Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 19 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

To space and beyond with open source

Filed under
OSS

The Cambridge Dictionary defines curiosity as "an eager wish to know or learn about something." It's curiosity that fuels our drive to acquire knowledge about outer space, but what drives our curiosity, our "eager wish," in the first place?

I believe that our curiosity is driven by the desire to escape the unpleasant feeling of uncertainty that is triggered by acknowledging our lack of knowledge. The intrinsic reward that comes from escaping uncertainty pushes us to find a correct (or at least a less wrong) answer to whatever question is at hand.

If we want space discovery to advance at a faster pace, we need more people to become aware of the rewards that are waiting for them when they make the effort and discover answers for their questions about the universe. Space discovery is admittedly not an easy task, because finding correct answers requires following rigorous methods on a long-term scale.

Luckily, open source initiatives are emerging that make it easier for people to get started exploring and enjoying the beauty of outer space.

Read more

Announcing the release of LTTng 2.11

Filed under
Linux

We're happy to announce the release of LTTng 2.11 "Lafontaine".
This is a combined release announcement for the 2.11.0 - "Lafontaine" release of the LTTng Tools, LTTng UST, and LTTng modules projects.
This release is named after a modern Saison beer from Montréal's Oshlag microbrewery. It is a refreshing, zesty, rice beer with hints of fruit and spices. Some even say it makes for a great Somaek when mixed with Chamisul Soju, not that we've tried!
Lafontaine is also a tongue-in-cheek reference to a water leak that affected EfficiOS's offices during the development of this release.

Read more

Also: LTTng 2.11.0 "Lafontaine" released

Top 20 Best Openbox Themes for Linux System in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Have you ever heard about the stacking window manager, Openbox? It is broadly used in Unix-like systems. Most probably, it’s among the most customizable parts out there. You can easily modify and beautify this with a little bit of effort. The question may arise- with what and how can you do this? Well! We are going to disclose it now. It’s by Openbox themes, which lets you have a minimalist and fantastic visual interface for your desktop manager.

Read more

Fedora IoT Review

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

With the rise in IoT use, we are witnessing a demand for ready-made operating systems to support smart device development. Currently, the race is between proprietary versions such as IoT Plug and Play by Microsoft and open source operating systems.

One such emerging open source player is Fedora which has a workstation that supports virtualization and containers. Fedora is also slated to release an Internet of Things edition called “Fedora IoT” in future.

Here is a review of the open source product’s support capabilities for IoT and relevant installation details.

Read more

5 Practical Examples of the Read Command in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

With read command, you can make your bash script interactive by accepting user inputs. Learn to use the read command in Linux with these practical examples.
Read more

Programming: C++, C and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Extend C++ capabilities with LLVM STLExtras.h

    The LLVM compiler project provides a header file called STLExtras.h that extends the capabilities of C++ without any dependency on the rest of LLVM. In this article, we take a quick look at its basic functionality.

  • Rewriting Old Solaris C Code In Python Yielded A 17x Performance Improvement

    While we normally hear of rewriting code from Python and other scripting languages into C/C++ when its a matter of performance, in the case of Oracle Solaris it was taking old C code and modernizing it in Python 3 to yield a ~17x performance improvement.

    Shared today on Oracle's official Solaris blog was an interesting anecdote about their listusers command being rewritten in Python 3 from C. Oracle's Darren Moffat noted the C code was largely untouched since around 1988 and given its design at a time when systems were less dense than today with hundreds or even thousands of users per system.

  • Python Projects for Beginners: The Best Way to Learn

    Learning Python can be difficult. You can spend time reading a textbook or watching videos, but then struggle to actually put what you've learned into practice. Or you might spend a ton of time learning syntax and get bored or lose motivation.

    How can you increase your chances of success? By building Python projects. That way you're learning by actually doing what you want to do!

    When I was learning Python, building projects helped me bring together everything I was learning. Once I started building projects, I immediately felt like I was making more progress.

  • PyCon 2019: The People of PyCon

    I can’t tell you how amazing it was to meet the individuals I read, listen to, or who make the tools I use.

    I was so happy to meet the authors that helped me to grow over the last few years, especially Dan Bader, Peter Baumgartner, Matt Harrison, Reuven Lerner, Harry Percival , and Lacey Williams Henschel.

    I love podcasts, so it was wonderful to meet Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken in person.

    And I was happy to meet Paul Ganssle, Russell Keith-Magee, Barry Warsaw, and other maintainers and contributors.

    It was a delight to meet Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira from PyBites.

  • Find the first non-consecutive number with Python

    Your task is to find the first element of an array that is not consecutive.

    E.g. If we have an array [1,2,3,4,6,7,8] then 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 are all consecutive but 6 is not, so that’s the first non-consecutive number.

    If the whole array is consecutive then return None.

  • Perceiving Python programming paradigms

    Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.

OSI Announces Appointment of New Board Directors

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is pleased to announce the appointments of Deb Bryant and Tracy Hinds to fill the two vacant seats on the OSI Board of Directors. Their terms will begin immediately and run through October 2021. We hope you will join us in welcoming both to the OSI.

Deb Bryant is returning to the OSI Board after spending several years away. After spending her days as the Senior Director of the Open Source Programs Office at Red Hat, Deb volunteers for open source organizations and supports the open source community. Bryant is passionate about open and transparent governments, bringing open source technology and ideas into the public sector.

Tracy Hinds has an impressive history of managing development, operations, and growth for non-profit and for-profit organizations. Previous Education and Community Manager as well as Board Director of the OpenJS(formerly Node.js) Foundation, Hinds now works as Head of Platform at Samsung NEXT and is the president of GatherScript, where she works to support startup engagement and community, inspired by her prior work as a web engineer, community builder, OSS advocate, and strategist.

Read more

A Trustworthy Free/Libre Linux Capable 64bit RISC-V Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

My goal is to build a Free/OpenSource computer from the ground up, so I may completely trust that the entire hardware+software system's behavior is 100% attributable to its fully available HDL (Hardware Description Language) and Software sources.
More importantly, I need all the compilers and associated toolchains involved in building the overall system (from HDL and Software sources) to be Free/OpenSource, and to be themselves buildable and runnable on the computer system being described. In other words, I need a self-hosting Free/OpenSource hardware+software stack!

Read more

Also: COM offers 9th or 8th Gen Coffee Lake with 10Gbps USB 3.2 and up to 96GB RAM

Dragora 3.0-beta1 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am pleased to announce the release of Dragora 3.0 Beta 1.

Dragora is a complete and reliable distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system that is entirely free software. Dragora is founded on the concepts of simplicity and elegance, it can be run for almost any purpose (desktop,
workstation, server, development, etc.). The intended audience is people
interested in learning more about the technical aspects of a friendly
GNU/Linux distribution.  Also people looking to use the purest ethical
software for daily use.

The beginning of the development of the series 3.0 represents the
migration towards a new C library, Musl.  The continuation of
supervision capabilities (introduced for the services in 2012).
The restructuring of the hierarchy of directories, the improvement of
the tools provided by the distribution, a new automatic method to build
the distribution, the prebuilt cross-compiler set, and much more!

The homepage is at www.dragora.org

Current development pages are located at
https://git.savannah.nongnu.org/cgit/dragora.git/ and
https://notabug.org/dragora/

Changes in this version:

  * A new installer for this series has been introduced, it can be
    invoked from the command line as `dragora-installer'.

  * A new tool (based on dialog(1)) has been introduced to
    configure the keyboard mapping in the console, it is called
    `dragora-keymap'.

  * Our simple and friendly package manager has reached version 1.3,
    which contains minor changes and fixes.  It is worth mentioning
    that Qi now uses `tarlz' to produce, list packages in parallel.
    Tarlz uses a simplified and safer variant of the POSIX pax format
    compressed with our favorite compressor "lzip".

  * To complement the security in general, for binaries with PIE and
SSP (both are default features in Dragora), they are now complemented
    with RELRO by default.

  * The main toolchain has been upgraded.  This -beta1 have Binutils
    2.33.1, The GNU C Compiler 9, GNU Linux libre 4.19.78, and
    Musl 1.1.24.

  * LibreSSL has been upgraded to the version 3.0.1

  * Ruby (programming language) version 2.6.5 has been introduced.

  * Support for FUSE (in the kernel) and user space, is now available
    in Dragora.

  * Xfce 4.14 has been introduced in this version.

  * dragora-ice, a customized version of IceWM has been added.

  * All the official X.Org components has been updated (drivers, server,
    applications, etc.).  Included new drivers: xf86-input-elographics,
    xf86-video-amdgpu, xf86-video-vboxvideo.  The configuration for the
    xf86-video-intel driver has been fixed this time.

  * Work to complete DocBook support in Dragora is underway.

  * Build recipes for new packages have been built:

    Please, traverse the /usr/pkg hierarchy for a full view of
    installed packages.

  * Many general fixes, improvements, and clean ups have been performed.

The ISO images may be fetched at:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/dragora/files/beta/

See http://dragora.org/en/mirrors.html for a list of available mirrors.

The sha256sums are:

59a1c1693d62c2d61a0d5b4b826313ce8b736768b1a42097f1478a20a37f7a80 dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-live.iso 3127ea5b619b8e049b45a17e1e4d9c538b35ac067a7cd63d2262a30782e7cc2d dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-packages.iso 1c0f63a69cd4b674b742550562605f240e98cdbc63ab670c9f8cdd5d2d134efc dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-live.iso 2dd58b1e6429876aa1883b4682914184bce6cac2adfe53ea7c2e0c46d7987385 dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-packages.iso

Dragora is available in "live" or hybrid ISO image form. You need the .iso
for the packages if you want to perform a hard disk installation.

Notes:

* The password for the root user in the Live CD is: dragora

This beta version can be considered as stable, it is catalogued just as
beta because it lacks many things that we will try to complement in future
versions.

We welcome feedback at our Freenode IRC channel, #dragora, and on our
mailing list.  We are looking for help with documentation, testing,
bug reports, patches, etc.

Thank you to all of you who support this humble project made with great
sacrifice.  And thank you especially for supporting the philosophy and
spirit of software freedom that Dragora aims to promote.

Best regards,
Matias Fonzo, Dragora author and maintainer.

--
``Someone told me I would never be free
The way you are is way you'll always be
But it's all wrong!
There's Time To Burn'' - Ronnie James Dio

Read more

PCLinuxOS 2019.10 updated installation media release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS project has announced the release of updated installation media for PCLinuxOS. The new media carries the version number 2019.10 and contains a fully updated system as of October 15 2019. Please note it is not required to do a clean installation each month since PCLinuxOS is a rolling release. These ISOs are being provided so new users don’t have a large update to perform after installation from a dated ISO.

Read more

Firefox Reality Top Picks - Bringing You New Virtual Reality Experiences Weekly

Filed under
Moz/FF

So you bought yourself a fancy VR headset, you’ve played all the zombie-dragon-laser-kitten-battle games (we have too!) and now you’re wondering… what else is there? Where can I find other cool stuff to explore while I have this headset strapped to my face? We felt the same way, so we built Firefox Reality to help you in your quest for the most interesting, groundbreaking and entertaining virtual reality content on the Web.

The real promise of VR is the ability to immerse yourself into countless other places and perspectives - both real and imaginary - and to experience things you’ve never done before. Our Top Picks page is a great place to start exploring, with fresh recommendations coming weekly so you always have new content to check out. Of course, if you want to explore on your own, you can use Firefox Reality for that too.

Firefox Reality Top Picks is the start of what we hope will evolve into a thriving and sustainable ecosystem connecting creators, VR content, and audience.

Read more

Also: Faster Layouts with CSS Grid (and Subgrid!)

Wine 4.18 Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine 4.18 Released

    The Wine development release 4.18 is now available.

  • Please look at this Wine graph showing a 4.18 increase

    I decant believe that title! The latest and greatest code from the Wine hackers has been sweetened to perfection with the Wine 4.18 development release now available.

  • Wine 4.18 Released With Many Bug Fixes, Some Feature Work

    While three weeks have passed since the previous Wine development release compared to the usual two week cadence, Wine 4.18 is out today and isn't too busy on the feature front but there are more than three dozen bug fixes.

    The delay and Wine 4.18 not being particularly big appear to be due to WineConf taking place last week in Toronto keeping many of the developers busy. New Wine 4.18 feature work includes implementing more VBScript functions, cleanups/improvements to the Apple macOS Quartz code, and fixes for test case failures.

DXVK 1.4.3

Filed under
Software
  • DXVK 1.4.3 Works On State Cache Improvements, Lowering CPU Overhead

    As another release in time for weekend gamers, DXVK 1.4.3 was released today as the newest update for this library mapping Direct3D 10/11 to Vulkan for accelerating the Wine/Proton-based Linux gaming experience.

    The biggest change with DXVK 1.4.3 is the introduction of a new state cache file format, which should lead to smaller file sizes for the caches. DXVK 1.4.3 still supports reading old state caches for automatically converting to the new format.

  • DXVK 1.4.3 released helping games with a large number of different shaders

    No doubt some of our readers will be in for a busy weekend testing, with another release of DXVK now officially available.

    Developer Philip Rebohle put out DXVK 1.4.3 this evening which adds in a new file format for the state cache, which should give smaller files. The state cache from previous versions of DXVK should be converted automatically, so no manual effort is required.

Solus Brightens Computing Across the Linux User Spectrum

Filed under
OS
Linux
Reviews

Regardless of how you spend your time at the keyboard, Solus can be an ideal solution for all your computing needs. It comes with a collection of specially designed tools to make using and maintaining the operating system a uniquely easy experience.

For technically minded users, Solus supports a wide variety of editors, programming languages, compilers and version-control systems. It has tools for containerization/virtualization technology, such as Docker and Vagrant. Whether you're writing drivers in C or writing backend Web services in Go, there is software that will fit your needs.

Home or office users will be pleased with the latest LibreOffice suite version 6.2.1.2. The Solus Software Center has options for accounting, Personal Information Management and more. Content Creators can animate in Synfig Studio, produce music with Musescore or Mixxx, do graphic designing with GIMP or Inkscape, and edit videos with Avidemux, Kdenlive or Shotcut.

Gamers can enjoy open source games natively configured for Solus with support for many gamepads and controllers. With little or no setup required, gamers can play Steam titles for Linux with a modern, optimized gaming runtime. There is also built-in support for the Itch.io and Lutris gaming platforms.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Molly de Blanc: Autonomy and consent

    When I was an undergraduate, I took a course on medical ethics. The core takeaways from the class were that autonomy is necessary for consent, and consent is necessary for ethical action.

    There is a reciprocal relationship between autonomy and consent. We are autonomous creatures, we are self-governing. In being self-governing, we have the ability to consent, to give permission to others to interact with us in the ways we agree on. We can only really consent when we are self-governing, otherwise, it’s not proper consent. Consent also allows us to continue to be self-governing. By giving others permission, we are giving up some control, but doing so on our own terms.

    In order to actually consent, we have to grasp the situation we’re in, and as much about it as possible. Decision making needs to come from a place of understanding.

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: User Mode Linux 5.2

    User Mode Linux version 5.2 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and will soon be available on the supported architectures. This upload took more time than usual as I ran into a build time failure caused by newer PCAP library.

    Thanks to active upstream developers, this got sorted out quick. In the longer run, we may have a much better fix for it.

  • PCLinuxOS MATE Review

    Published for Patreons on Oct 8th 2019. Available to the public Oct. 17th, 2019 – Become a Patreon today to get this plus exclusive Linux tips not found anywhere else!

  • Worn Out EMMC Chips Are Crippling Older Teslas

    Much like the rockets and spacecraft of sister company SpaceX, Tesla’s vehicles are powered by Linux running on what’s essentially off-the-shelf computing hardware. Until 2018 the Model S and X were running the open source operating system on a NVIDIA Tegra 3, at which point they switched the Media Control Unit (MCU) over to an Intel Atom solution. In either event, the Linux system is stored on an embedded Multi-Media Controller (eMMC) flash chip instead of a removable storage device as you might expect.

    Now under normal circumstances, this wouldn’t be an issue. There are literally billions of devices running Linux from an eMMC chip. But any competent embedded Linux developer would take the steps necessary to make sure the operating system’s various log files are not being written to a non-replaceable storage device soldered onto the board

    Unfortunately, for reasons that still remain somewhat unclear, the build of Linux running on the MCU is doing exactly that. What’s worse, Tesla’s graphical interface appears to be generating its own additional log messages. Despite the likelihood that nobody will ever actually read them, for every second a Tesla is driving down the road, more lines are being added to the log files.

    Now, it appears that the near continuous writing of data to the eMMC chips on the older Tegra-based MCUs has finally started to take its toll. Owners on Tesla forums are reporting that their MCUs are crashing and leaving the expensive vehicles in “Limp Home Mode”, which allows the car to remain drivable but unable to charge. The prescribed fix for this issue by Tesla is a complete MCU replacement at the cost of several thousand dollars. As this failure will almost certainly happen after the factory warranty has lapsed, the owner will have to foot the bill themselves.

  • Seven more videos from the auditorium at LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Yes, here’s anther bunch of videos from our recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain.

  • Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6

    My new book, Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6, is now available in paperback or PDF.

  • Montreal Subway Foot Traffic Data

    STM kindly sent me daily values for each subway stations from 2001 to 2018. Armed with all this data, I decided to play a little with R and came up with some interesting graphs.

    Behold this semi-interactive map of Montreal's subway! By clicking on a subway station, you'll be redirected to a graph of the station's foot traffic.

  • Is your Internet up-to-date?

    Modern Internet Standards provide for more reliability and further growth of the Internet. Are you using them?

  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare ditches loot boxes for a battle pass

    Popularized by Fortnite, the battle pass system allows for players to buy the pass at the beginning of the season, and unlock a variety of items as they progress. Modern Warfare’s system sounds like it’ll be extremely similar to the Fortnite model (which has since been adopted by other major titles, like Destiny 2 and PUBG). Players will be able to buy a pass at the beginning of a season, with full transparency as to what the items included are, and how and when they’ll be unlocked.

  • Innr Smart White A19 bulb review: This inexpensive smart bulb seamlessly connects with a Philips Hue Bridge

    If you’re shopping for your first smart bulb and you’re not ready to invest in a hub, an Innr bulb isn’t the cheapest way to go. Instead, you’d be better off with a Bluetooth- or Wi-Fi-enabled bulb that can operate with just a smartphone app. The latest Philips Hue White bulb, for example, which can be controlled via Bluetooth as well as Zigbee), or a Wi-Fi-connected bulb like the $8 Wyze Bulb, which offers the bonus of being color-temperature-tunable.

  • The Untold Story of the 2018 Olympics Cyberattack, the Most Deceptive [Computer Attack] in History [iophk: Windows TCO]

    All nine of the Olympic staff's domain controllers, the powerful machines that governed which employee could access which computers in the network, had somehow been paralyzed, crippling the entire system. The staff decided on a temporary workaround: They set all the surviving servers that powered some basic services, such as Wi-Fi and the internet-linked TVs, to bypass the dead gatekeeper machines. By doing so, they managed to bring those bare-minimum systems back online just minutes before the end of the ceremony.

  • [Old] Olympic Destroyer Takes Aim At Winter Olympics

    The purpose is to copy the initial stage to the remote system in %ProgramData%\%COMPUTERNAME%.exe and to execute it via a VBScript.

Apache Rya matures open source triple store database

Filed under
OSS

The open source Apache Rya database effort is continuing to move forward as it reaches a new level of project maturity and acceptance.

Rya (pronounced "ree-uh") is an RDF (resource description framework) triple store database. The project started at the U.S. government's Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences with an initial research paper published in 2012.

The project joined the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in 2015 as an incubated project, and in September 2019 achieved what is known as Top-Level Project status. The Top-Level status is an indication and validation of the project's maturity, code quality and community. The ASF is home to Hadoop, Spark and other widely used database and data management programs.

Read more

Also: Yahoo Groups is being prepared for shutdown, with all stored archives to be deleted on Dec 14

The Spectre Mitigation Impact For Intel Ice Lake With Core i7-1065G7

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering if -- or how much -- of a performance impact mitigations still make regarding Spectre for Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Ice Lake processors, here is the rundown on the mitigation state and the performance impact.

One of the areas that Phoronix readers have requested testing on with the recent purchase of the Dell XPS 7390 with Core i7 1065G7 is regarding the mitigation state and performance. Ice Lake with its Sunny Cove microarchitecture -- similar to Cascade Lake -- is no longer affected by Meltdown, MDS, or L1TF / Foreshadow.

Read more

Syndicate content