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Saturday, 23 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Updating a group of packages on Gentoo
  • Men Of War Guide
  • Falkon 3.1.0 released

    New Falkon version is now out.

  • Xilinx Moving Ahead With Plans To Upstream Their Alveo PCIe Accelerator Driver

    A few weeks back I wrote about Xilinx looking at contributing their Alveo FPGA accelerator drivers to the mainline Linux kernel. They are continuing to work on that goal and pushed out their latest kernel driver patches this week for these Alveo PCIe accelerator cards. 

    The Xilinx Alveo PCIe accelerator driver for Linux is already used in production by customers albeit now the company is comfortable with the idea of upstreaming the work into the mainline kernel. These accelerators can ultimately run C/C++/OpenCL using their specialty compiler or programmed using RTL. Xilinx Alveo is marketed for machine learning, video transcoding/processing, genomics, financial computations, database searching, and related big data fields.

  • Fabian Affolter: Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019

    Once again, Robert and I went to Chemnitz. We don’t wanted to break with the tradition of having a Fedora Project booth at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage. Robert is representing the Fedora Project at CLT for over a decade now.

    To show the visitors a running Fedora installation Raphael decided to take a larger screen, mounted it on a stand and placed a Raspberry Pi behind it. Pretty straight-forward setup but there is always an issue with the VESA connection on the back of the screen.

  •  

(OSS) Web Project Management Software and OSI

Filed under
OSS
  • 10 Excellent Web Project Management Software

    Project management is the application of processes, methods, knowledge, skills and experience to achieve the project objectives. Project management tools encompass many different types of software such as scheduling, resource allocation, collaboration software, quality management, and cost control / budget management. This type of software is typically used by project managers looking to plan and control resources, costs and schedules to meet the objectives of a project.

    It can be very satisfying planning and delivering projects on time. One of the methods that has always helped me is PRINCE2, a de facto process-based method for effective project management. But project management software is equally as important to the success of a project.

    There are a number of different types of project management tools. One of the industry standards is the Gantt Chart, which provides a graphical displays of all the tasks that a project is composed of. Each bar on the chart is a graphical representation of the length of time the task is planned to take. Other popular tools include PERT charts (a method for analyzing the tasks involved in completing a project), Product Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of components that make up a project deliverable), and Work Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of deliverables and tasks that need to be performed to complete a project).

    To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 10 excellent web based project management software. Hopefully, there will be something of interest for anyone who wishes to organise their projects. Here’s our rating chart.

  • New Open Source Initiative Sponsors Emphasize Diverse/Broad Industry Adoption [Ed: In fact, so diverse that even companies that attack Open Source are in the Board and are sponsors, e.g. Microsoft]

    Today the Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the global non-profit formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, is pleased to announce the corporate sponsorship of Daily Fantasy Cafe and Lineups.com. The contributions from these diverse companies underscore the broad appeal and applicability of open source software across industries.

    Over 20 years of work, the OSI has constantly found adoption of, and contributions to, open source software growing, year over year, as companies realize the benefits and value of collaborative communities of practice. No longer limited to the data centers and development shops of tech-companies, open source software is now pervasive across diverse industries, all seeking to reduce costs, drive innovation, decrease time to market, increase quality, and avoid vendor lock-in.

    “The OSI is actively engaged with organizations across government, education, manufacturing, agriculture, entertainment—everywhere.  As new industries emerge, like fantasy sports, they’re choosing to be, ‘open source first,’” says Patrick Masson, General Manager of the Open Source Initiative. “Daily Fantasy Cafe and Lineups really show how broad the appeal is now, and most inspiring, how companies that benefit from open source choose to contribute back. Open source is a collaborative effort, projects need code, community, and cash.”

Security: Cryptocurrency Fears and New Browser Holes

Filed under
Security

Graphics: FreeSync, Primus-VK, NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • More AMD FreeSync Patches Likely Coming To Linux 5.2

    While the Linux 5.0 kernel brought initial support for the long-awaited open-source FreeSync implementation, the Linux 5.2 kernel coming out this summer will likely have additional improvements. 

    Open-source developer Mario Kleiner has been working on a set of patches this month for enabling proper vblank and page-flip time-stamping when in the FreeSync/VRR (Variable Rate Refresh) mode. This work makes the vblank timestamps as accurate as in the fixed refresh rate behavior. 

  • Primus-VK: PRIME-Style GPU Offloading For Vulkan

    For those with a PRIME style notebook or just making use of dual/multiple graphics processors in your system, Primus-VK allows for using a secondary/dedicated GPU for rendering while driving the display from the alternative (often integrated graphics) GPU. Primus-VK is implemented as a Vulkan layer as a clean approach for dealing with multiple GPUs in a Vulkan world. 

    Primus-VK pursues Vulkan GPU offloading by implementing this logic as a Vulkan layer for handling the rendering on one GPU and then when it comes to display-time it copies the image over to the integrated/primary GPU. This layer can be installed per-user or system-wide and has been tested on the likes of Debian. ENABLE_OPTIMUS_LAYER=1 is the environment variable used for activating the behavior. Primus-VK has also been tested with Windows games under Wine.

  • NVIDIA Releases Nsight Graphics 2019.2 With Vulkan Profiling Support

    Released for GDC/GTC week was Nsight Graphics 2019.2, the proprietary cross-platform, closed-source utility tool for debugging, profiling, and analyzing Direct3D, OpenGL, and other GPU-accelerated APIs. 

    With this week's Nsight Graphics 2019.2 release they finally have added Vulkan profiling support. This support allows inspecting GPU performance metrics under Vulkan workloads within the program's Range Profiler. Other new additions include improvements for running Steam games on Linux, a feedback button, and enhancements to the accelerated structure viewer and API inspector.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

21+ Linux Camera Software: IP, Webcam, CCTV & Security Camera Software

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is a strong open source platform where every type of necessary software tools are available for both the beginners and professionals. If you are in confusion about which camera software or IP camera software to use in your Linux system, then I can only say that there are lots of IP, security or surveillance camera software available for Linux system. For helping you to sort out, today I am going to provide a list of Linux camera software where various kinds of webcam software, IP camera software, security camera software, and video surveillance software are included with focusing on various important features.

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Security: Updates, VPN, BleachBit, TenFourFox and Steam

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Linux apps on Chrome OS will soon support Android-based VPN connections

    Google is finally fixing Chrome OS's inability to protect Linux apps with a VPN, like the ones downloadable from the Play Store.

  • BleachBit 2.2

    Designed for Linux and Windows systems, it wipes clean thousands of applications including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and more. Beyond simply deleting files, BleachBit includes advanced features such as shredding files to prevent recovery, wiping free disk space to hide traces of files deleted by other applications, and vacuuming Firefox to make it faster. Better than free, BleachBit is open source.

  • Stand by for urgent security update

    Pwn2Own came and went and Firefox fell with it. The __proto__ vulnerability seems exploitable in TenFourFox, though it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be fully weaponized, and I'm currently evaluating the other bug. Builds ("FPR13 SPR1") including fixes for either or both depending on my conclusions will be issued within the next couple days.

  • Steam vulnerability exposed users to account hijacking and malware [Ed: proprietary software cannot hide its holes for very long (or until it's too late to hide)]

Graphics: Vulkan in OpenArena and GDC 2019 Week

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • vkOpenArena: The ioquake3-Powered OpenArena Game Gets Ported To Vulkan

    OpenArena, one of the most well known open-source games built atop the ioquake3 engine of what started out as id Tech 3, has now seen an independent port to the Vulkan graphics API.

    The vkOpenArena game now marks the latest vintage game seeing a port to Vulkan. Independent developer Sui Jingfeng has been working on vkOpenArena as a port of the OpenArena engine over to using the Vulkan graphics API rather than Vulkan.

  • AMDVLK Has A Small Weekly Code Push For GDC 2019 Week

    With many AMD driver developers being over in San Francisco for the Game Developers Conference, this week AMDVLK saw rather small changes for this open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver.

Servers: Kubernetes, Docker, and Software Defined Infrastructure

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes End-to-end Testing for Everyone

    More and more components that used to be part of Kubernetes are now being developed outside of Kubernetes. For example, storage drivers used to be compiled into Kubernetes binaries, then were moved into stand-alone Flexvolume binaries on the host, and now are delivered as Container Storage Interface (CSI) drivers that get deployed in pods inside the Kubernetes cluster itself.

    This poses a challenge for developers who work on such components: how can end-to-end (E2E) testing on a Kubernetes cluster be done for such external components? The E2E framework that is used for testing Kubernetes itself has all the necessary functionality. However, trying to use it outside of Kubernetes was difficult and only possible by carefully selecting the right versions of a large number of dependencies. E2E testing has become a lot simpler in Kubernetes 1.13.

  • Why Docker Containers Matter, 6 Years After the Project First Started

    Docker, the eponymous name of the container technology and the company behind it, celebrated its six-year anniversary on March 20. From its earliest days, even as just a 1-year-old effort back in 2014, there was no shortage of optimism and excitement about Docker. With the Docker model, applications are more portable and run inside of containers, which are isolated instances that provide a more agile approach for development and deployment. Docker also introduced the "dockerfile" packaging format, which defines how a container image should be built.

    The container model that Docker first introduced has evolved over the past six years and is now the cornerstone of the broader cloud-native space, which includes the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at some of the key facts about Docker and the cloud-native revolution it has inspired.

  • Planning for a Software Defined Infrastructure

    Seems you can’t pick up an IT magazine these days without hearing the term software defined infrastructure. It’s easy to get caught up in the hype. You might be thinking ‘people are talking about so it must be something that we need.” Some of you are wincing from the pain felt in trying to adopt the latest technologies without properly looking at what will work for your environment and business.

    In a software defined world, the computing infrastructure is virtualized. That is, it is delivered as a service. Management and control of the networking, storage and/or data center infrastructure is automated by intelligent software rather than by the hardware components of the infrastructure.

Events: SREcon19 Americas, Scale, FudCon and Snapcraft Summit Montreal

Filed under
OSS
  • SREcon19 Americas Talk Resources

    At SREcon19 Americas, I gave a talk called "Operating within Normal Parameters: Monitoring Kubernetes". Here's some links and resources related to my talk, for your reference.

  • Participating at #Scale17x

    Everytime somebody asks me about Scale I can only think of the same: Scale is the most important community lead conference in North America and it only gets better by the years. This year it celebrated its seventeenth edition and it just struck me: with me being there this year, there have been more Scales I have attended than I have not. This is my nineth conference out of 17.

    The first time that I attended it was 2011, it was the edition followed by FudCon Tempe 2010 which happened to be my first Fedora conference and it was also the first time I got to meet some contributors that I had previously collaborated with, many of which I still consider my brothers.

    As for this time, I almost didn’t make it as my visa renewal was resolved on Friday’s noon, one day after the conference started. I recovered it that same day and book a flight in the night. I couldn’t find anything to LAX -as I regularly fly- so I had to fly to Tijuana and from there I borrowed a cart to Pasadena. Long story short: I arrived around 1:30 AM on Saturday.

  • Snapcraft Summit Montreal

    Snapcraft is the universal app store for Linux that reaches millions of users and devices and serves millions of app installs a month.

    The Snapcraft Summit is a forward-thinking software workshop attended by major software vendors, community contributors and Snapcraft engineers working at every level of the stack.

Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension

Filed under
GNOME

Ever wish you could draw on the Linux desktop or write on the screen?

Well, there’s a new GNOME Shell extension that lets you do exactly that: draw on the Linux desktop.

You may want to point out a bug, highlight a feature, or provide some guidance to someone else by sending them an annotated screenshot.

In this short post we’ll show you how to install the add-on and how to use it.

Read more

Fedora 31 Preparing To Start Removing Packages Depending Upon Python 2

Filed under
Red Hat

Python 2 support will formally reach end-of-life on 1 January 2020 and Fedora 31 is preparing for that by working to drop packages (or parts of packages) that depend upon Python 2.

Fedora has been pushing for a Python 2 to Python 3 migration for many cycles now -- as most Linux distributions have -- while with Fedora 31 they are planning a "mass Python 2 package removal" if necessary. They are planning to closely track the state of packages depending upon Python 2 to either drop the packages or allow packagers to easily abandon Python 2 parts of programs.

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A preliminary review of /e/

Filed under
OS
Android

I’ve been running LineageOS on my phone for a while now (and cyanogenmod before that) and been reasonably happy overall. Still even LineageOS is pretty intertwined with the google ecosystem and worries me, especially given that google is first and foremost an ad company.
I happened to run accross mention of /e/ somewhere and since LineageOS did a jump from being based on ASOP15 to ASOP16 which required a new install anyhow, I decided to check it out.
As you may have gathered from the above, /e/ is a phone OS and platform, forked off from LineageOS14.1. It’s located at https://e.foundation based in france (a non profit) headed by Gaël Duval, who Linux folks may know from his Mandrake/Mandriva days. The foundation has a lot of noble goals, starting with “/e/’s first mission is to provide everyone knowledge and good practices around personal data and privacy.” They also have a slogan “Your data is your data!”
I downloaded and installed a 0.5 version here. Since I already had my phone unlocked and TWRP recovery setup, I just backed up my existing LineageOS install (to my laptop), wiped the phone and installed /e/. The install was painless and since (of course) there’s no google connections wanted, I didn’t even have to download a gapps bundle. The install worked just fine and I was off and exploring:

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Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Leftovers

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Chrome 74 beta: reducing unwanted motion, private class fields, and feature policy API

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Android WebView, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 74 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 74 is beta as of March 22, 2019.

  • Chrome 74 Beta Released With CSS Media Query To Prefer Reduced Motion/Animations

    Google engineers are ending out their work week by issuing the beta of Chrome 74. 

    The Chrome 74 Beta features the CSS "prefers-reduced-motion" media query for honoring accessibility settings for those that may want to reduce/eliminate animations or other motions. Also on the developer side is ECMAScript private class fields, a JavaScript API for feature policy, CSS transition events, WebRTC additions, and other changes.

  • Mike Conley: Firefox Front-End Performance Update #15

    Firefox 66 has been released, Firefox 67 is out on the beta channel, and Firefox 68 is cooking for the folks on the Nightly channel! These trains don’t stop!

    With that, let’s take a quick peek at what the Firefox Front-end Performance team has been doing these past few weeks…

  • SUMO A/B Experiments

    This year the SUMO team is focused on learning what to improve on our site. As part of that, we spent January setting support.mozilla.org up for A/B testing and last week we ran our first test!

  • Get the tablet experience you deserve with Firefox for iPad

    We know that iPads aren’t just bigger versions of iPhones. You use them differently, you need them for different things. So rather than just make a bigger version of our browser for iOS, we made Firefox for iPad look and feel like it was custom made for a tablet. Mostly because it was.

Programming: Sublime Text Editor, RcppArmadillo, Django, Python and C

Filed under
Development
  • Sublime Text Editor For Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Programmers/Developers always love rich-feature text editor, they can be more productive using such application. Sublime Text Editor has been around since 2008 and widely used by many programmers. It is written using C++ and Python programming language, the best thing about this editor is that it's cross-platform and available for Linux, Mac and Windows.
    Sublime-Text editor natively support numerous amount of programming and markup languages, more functionality can be added using plugins, the plugins are mostly built by its community and maintained user free-software licenses.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.9.300.2.0

    A new RcppArmadillo release based on a new Armadillo upstream release arrived on CRAN and Debian today.

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 583 other packages on CRAN.

  • William Lachance: New ideas, old buildings

    Last week, Brendan Colloran announced Iodide, a new take on scientific collaboration and reporting that I’ve been really happy to contribute to over the past year-and-a-bit. I’ve been describing it to people I meet as kind of "glitch meets jupyter " but that doesn’t quite do it justice. I’d recommend reading Brendan’s blog post (and taking a look at our demonstration site) to get the full picture.

    One question that I’ve heard asked (including on Brendan’s post) is why we chose a rather conventional and old technology (Django) for the server backend. Certainly, Iodide has not been shy about building with relatively new or experimental technologies for other parts (e.g. Python on WebAssembly for the notebooks, React/Redux for the frontend). Why not complete the cycle by using a new-fangled JavaScript web server like, I don’t know, NestJS? And while we’re at it, what’s with iodide’s ridiculous REST API? Don’t you know GraphQL is the only legitimate way to expose your backend to the world in 2019?

    The great urban theorist of the twentieth century, Jane Jacobs has a quote I love:

  • Setup your Raspberry Pi Model B as Google Colab (Feb '19) to work with Tensorflow, Keras and OpenCV
  • Getting started with the updated VS Code Yeoman extension for Camel projects
  • Plot the Aroon Up and the Aroon Down lines with Python
  • Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 15 - 2's Complement and Negative numbers
  • Using multiprocessing - a simple introduction.

From Trusty to Bionic - my Ultrabook story

Filed under
Ubuntu

I am happy with how the upgrade went, given that I've actually bumped the system two major releases. Apart from small issues, there was nothing cardinal in the move. No data loss, no complications, no crashes. All my stuff remains intact, and so does Windows 8, living happily together and sharing the disk with Ubuntu. Mission accomplished.

But we ain't done. I need to make the system as usable as possible. Which means Unity testing - and Plasma testing, of course, duh! Indeed, this remains a productivity box, and as such, it must fulfill some very stringent requirements. It must be stable, fast and elegant. It must work with me every step of the way, and it must allow me to transparently and seamlessly use various programs that I need. On this particular machine, that would be video editing with Kdenlive, that would be image processing with GIMP, the use of encryption and VPN tools, tons of writing on the superbly ergonomic Asus keyboard. But all that and more - coming soon.

For now, thank you Trusty for five sweet, loyal years. May you ReST in ethernet peace.

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Software: Avidemux, Cockpit and NVMe VFIO in Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Avidemux 2.7.3 Released with Various Decoder Fixes (Ubuntu PPA)

    Avidemux video editor released a new bug-fix version just 11 days after the last, with decoder fixes and misc small improvements

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 190

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 190.

  • NVMe VFIO Mediated Device Support Being Hacked On For Lower Latency Storage In VMs

    Maxim Levitsky of Red Hat sent out a "request for comments" patch series this week introducing NVMe VFIO media storage device support for the Linux kernel.

    Levitsky is pursuing faster virtualization of storage while striving for low latency and that led to the creation of a VFIO-based mediated device driver to pass an NVMe partition or namespace to a guest. This NVMe VFIO mediated device support would allow virtualized guests to run their unmodified/standard NVMe device drivers, including the Windows drivers, while still allowing the NVMe device to be shared between the host and guest.

Fedora: Parental Controls, FPgM, Ambassadors/Translation Sprint, Modularity Test Day and Delays

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Allan Day: Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest

    This week I participated in the Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest, which was held at Red Hat’s London office.

    Parental controls and metered data already exist in Endless and/or elementary OS in some shape or form. The goal of the hackfest was to plan how to upstream the features to GNOME. It’s great to see this kind of activity from downstreams so I was very happy to contribute in my capacity as an upstream UX designer.

    There have been a fair few blog posts about the event already, so I’m going to try and avoid repeating what’s already been written…

  • FPgM report: 2019-12

    Fedora 30 Beta is No-Go. Another Go/No-Go meeting will be held on Thursday. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. The Fedora 30 Beta Go/No-Go and Release Readiness meetings are next week.

  • Not posting here means not there is nothing done

    I looking with fears to this strange ideas Mindshare has for the future of the Ambassadors. You can not write reports if you not have an event, so I telling here now how hard it is in this country to organize an event.

    Since October 2018 I search for a place which would host the next Translation Sprint. We have tons of co-working spaces or NGO’s which have space available. But is always the same I asked e.g. Open Institute, answer we can host you just on Saturday. And I had actually to write there several times and even make calls because I got no answer for the first contact. The same on The Desk, we can host you only on Saturday. This makes no sense in Cambodia, it is a regular working day, because they have 28 holidays. So most people have to work until 2pm. What sucked on this one, I was working on it since end of January. So first meeting was setup for 11th March, I went there but nobbody there to meet me. This is normal cambodian working style I dont tell I am busy and cant meet you and give you an alternative time. Well the promised mail with an alternative time never arrived, so I had to ask for it again. Second meeting was then this Monday, I spent an hour with them with the useless result of “just Saturday”. But there is light on the horizon OpenDevelopment might host us but here just on Sunday, which is for us better then just Saturday. So six months, hundreds of mails and several meetings and achieved nothing. How easy is it to setup a Fedora Womans Day in the Pune office, compared to this and then just travel around the world to visit other events and this is then called “active”

  • Fedora 30 Modularity Test Day 2019-03-26
  • Fedora 30 Beta Won't Be Released Next Week Due To Their Arm Images Lacking A Browser
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