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Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.
  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot
    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.
  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes
    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.
  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek

Red Hat News

  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift
    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite
    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects
    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start. This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.
  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now

    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive.

    If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.

  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing

    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant.

    It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28

    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.

  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot

    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.

  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes

    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.

  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift

    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).

  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite

    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration

    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

    Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects

    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start.

    This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.

  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important.

So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal.

Read more

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.7 Brings More Mitigations Against Spectre Flaws

Filed under
Gentoo

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14.50 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.7.0 is the second release of the operating system in 2018 and comes five months after version 4.6 to introduce more mitigations against the Spectre security vulnerabilities, though the next-gen Spectre flaws require microcode firmware updates for Intel CPUs.

"Newly discovered "Spectre Next Generation" vulnerabilities require updated microcode from Intel which is not available yet. Please consider enabling automatic updates service for your kiosks to receive latest fixes and patches as soon as they become available," reads today's announcement.

Read more

Linspire 8 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Freespire 3.0.9 Is Out

Filed under
Ubuntu

Freespire 3.0.9 is a small incremental update of the free and open-source GNU/Linux distribution that includes all the latest security and software updates released upstream until June 11, 2018. It also introduces new light and dark modes, a full instance of the Calligra office suite, and replaces Mozilla Thunderbird with Kontact.

The developers recommend all users running the Freespire 3.0 operating system series on their personal computers to run a system-wide update if they want to upgrade to Freespire 3.0.9 and receive all the latest changes. On the other hand, new users are encouraged to download the Freespire 3.0.9 ISO image.

Read more

Also: Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released

How SUSE Is Bringing Open Source Projects and Communities Together

Filed under
Interviews
OSS
SUSE

The modern IT infrastructure is diverse by design. People are mixing different open source components that are coming from not only different vendors, but also from different ecosystems. In this article, we talk with Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO of SUSE, about the need for better collaboration between open source projects that are being used across industries as we are move toward a cloud native world.

Read more

Games: Insurgency: Sandstorm, Driftland: The Magic Revival and More

Filed under
Gaming

Canonical Shifts Its Fiscal Year Ahead Of Likely IPO

Filed under
Ubuntu

You have likely heard by now about Ubuntu maker Canonical planning to do an initial public offering (IPO) at some point in the not too distant future to become a publicly-traded company. The latest sign of that is Canonical has now shifted its corporate calendar.

Rather than ending its accounting period now on 31 March of each year, Canonical is shifting that to align with the end of each calendar year (31 December). 31 March tends to be the end of fiscal years for UK-based organizations. This change may indicate a desire of Canonical to more likely list on one of the US-based stock exchanges rather than London, but others may have differing hypothesis over the change.

Read more

KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Kube/Kolab, GSoC, and Atelier (3-D Printing)

Filed under
KDE
  • What a mesh!

    With all the advances being made in Qt 3D, we wanted to create some new examples showing some of what it can do. To get us started, we decided to use an existing learning framework, so we followed the open source Tower Defence course, which you can find at CGCookie. Being a game, it allows an interactive view of everything at work, which is very useful.

  • Last week in Kube

    Perhaps if Windows wasn’t such a PITA there would be more progress

  • GSoC 2018: Week 4 & 5

    The last 2 weeks were mainly dedicatd for reviews and testing and thanks to my mentors, I passed the first evaluation with good work till now. Some significant changes were made on discussion with my mentors during the last 2 weeks in the code and some new features.

  • Giving Atelier some Love

    I work for atelier together with Chris, Lays and Patrick for quite a while, but I was basically being the “guardian angel” of the project being invocked when anything happened or when they did not know how to proceed (are you a guardian angel of a project? we have many that need that)

    For instance I’v done the skeleton for the plugin system, the buildsystem and some of the modules in the interface, but nothing major as I really lacked the time and also lacked a printer.

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Winepak – Install Windows Apps and Games on Linux via Flatpak

    A reason for Linux not being more used as added in the comments section of a recent article is “Adobe and Games“. Well, there is a latest Linux bad guy in town and it is here to comfort us in a cooler way than Wine.

  • Mark Text Markdown Editor Adds Sidebar And Tabs Support

    Mark Text is a somewhat new free and open source Electron Markdown editor for Windows, Mac and Linux, which supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec.

    The app features a seamless live preview using Snabbdom as the render engine, multiple edit modes (Typewriter, Source Code and Focus), includes code fence support, light and drak themes, emoji auto-completion, and export to PDF, HTML or styled HTML.

  • Google’s VR180 Creator Makes It Easier to Edit VR Video on Linux

    It’s called “VR180 Creator” (catchy) and the tool aims to make it easier for people to edit video shot on 180-degree and 360-degree devices like the Lenovo Mirage camera (pictured opposite).

    And boy is just-such a tool needed!
    VR180 Creator: Easier VR Video Editing

    Editing VR video is, to be perfectly frank, a pain in the rump end. So by releasing this new, open-source tool for free Google is being rather smart.Anything that makes it easier for consumers and content creators to edit VR on something other than a high-end specialist rig is going to help the format flourish.

Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0.0 "ASCII"

Filed under
OS
Reviews

When I am trying out a desktop distribution, what really tends to divide the field of Linux distributions in my mind is not whether the system uses MATE or Plasma, or whether the underlying package manager uses RPM or Deb files. What tends to leave a lasting impression with me is whether the desktop environment, its applications and controls feel like a cooperative, cohesive experience or like a jumble of individual tools that happen to be part of the same operating system. In my opinion Ubuntu running the Unity desktop and Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop are good examples of the cohesive approach. The way openSUSE's administration tools work together provides another example. Like them or hate them, I think most people can see there is an overall design, a unifying vision, being explored with those distributions. I believe Devuan falls into the other category, presenting the user with a collection of utilities and features where some assembly is still required.

This comes across in little ways. For example, many distributions ship Mozilla's Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird e-mail client together as a set, and they generally complement each other. Devuan ships Firefox, but then its counterpart is the mutt console e-mail program which feels entirely out of place with the rest of the desktop software. The PulseAudio sound mixing utility is included, but its system tray companion is not present by default. Even the system installer, which switches back and forth between graphical windows and a text console, feels more like a collection of uncoordinated prompts rather than a unified program or script. Some people may like the mix-and-match approach, but I tend to prefer distributions where it feels like the parts are fitted together to create a unified experience.

What I found was that Devuan provided an experience where I had to stop and think about where items were or how I was going to use them rather than having the pieces seamlessly fit together. However, once I got the system set up in a way that was more to my liking, I appreciated the experience provided. Devuan offers a stable, flexible platform. Once I shaped the operating system a little, I found it to be fast, light and capable. Having a fairly large repository of software available along with Flatpak support provided a solid collection of applications on a conservative operating system foundation. It was a combination I liked.

In short, I think Devuan has some rough edges and setting it up was an unusually long and complex experience by Linux standards. I certainly wouldn't recommend Devuan to newcomers. However, a day or two into the experience, Devuan's stability and performance made it a worthwhile journey. I think Devuan may be a good alternative to people who like running Debian or other conservative distributions such as Slackware. I suspect I may soon be running Devuan's Raspberry Pi build on my home server where its lightweight nature will be welcome.

Read more

Also: deepin 15.6 Released With New Features: Get This Beautiful Linux Distro Here

5 open source alternatives to Dropbox

Filed under
OSS

Dropbox is the 800-pound gorilla of filesharing applications. Even it's a massively popular tool, you may choose to use an alternative.

Maybe that's because you're dedicated to the open source way for all the good reasons, including security and freedom, or possibly you've been spooked by data breaches. Or perhaps the pricing plan doesn't work out in your favor for the amount of storage you actually need.

Fortunately, there are a variety of open source filesharing applications out there that give you more storage, security, and control over your data at a far lower price than Dropbox charges. How much lower? Try free, if you're a bit tech savvy and have a Linux server to use.

Read more

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