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Quick Roundup

LibreOffice at FOSDEM and Special Characters' Final Touch

Filed under
LibO
  • Open Document Editors DevRoom at FOSDEM 2019: Call for Papers

    FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and takes place each year in Brussels (Belgium) at the ULB Campus Solbosch. In 2019, it will be held on Saturday February 2, and Sunday February 3.

    The Open Document Editors DevRoom is scheduled for Saturday, February 2 (from 10:30AM to 7:00PM, room UB2.147).

    We are inviting proposals for talks about Open Document Editors or the ODF standard document format, on topics such as code, localization, QA, UX, tools, extensions and adoption-related cases. Please keep in mind that product pitches are not allowed at FOSDEM.

  • Special Characters: The Final Touch

    Last year we revised the workflow to insert special characters. Based on a design proposal the dialog was reimplemented in a Google Summer of Code project by Akshay Deep. The new dialog allows to easily browse through the list and to search for glyphs contained in the selected font. It also introduced Favorites (a user collection of glyphs that are used frequently) and a list of Recently Used glyphs. But some pieces got more or less intentionally lost and some parts of the redesign might have room for improvements. So here is an idea for the final touch.

10 Best Native Linux Games

Filed under
Gaming

Whether you want something free to play or you're looking for invest in a long term favorite, there are plenty of amazing options on Linux. Many of Linux's best titles are actually the best in their genre. This is especially true with some eSports games. Plenty of big names from other platforms have been ported over to Linux recently too, allowing for a ton of choice. That said, these games stand out above the rest.

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Fixing Broken Dropbox Sync Support

Filed under
Software

Dropbox have reduced the number of file systems they support. We knew this was coming for a while, but it's a pain if you don't use one of the supported filesystems.

Recently I re-installed my Ubuntu 18.04 laptop and chose XFS rather than the default ext4 partition type when installing. That's the reason the error is appearing for me.

I do also use NextCloud and Syncthing for syncing files, but some of the people I work with only use Dropbox, and forcing them to change is tricky.

Read more

Proprietary Browsers That Run on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Web
  • Opera launches a cryptocurrency wallet in its Android browser [Ed: Would you trust a proprietary Chinese browser with your cryptocurrency wallet? On a platform with (intentional) back doors?]

    Web browser Opera has launched a built-in cryptocurrency wallet on its Android app, the company announced today at a blockchain event in London. The wallet will first support ethereum, with support for other coins likely to come later. Ether investors using Opera would potentially be able to more easily access their tokens using the feature.

  • Latest Vivaldi Update Adds Pop Out Video, Tab Sessions + More

    A new version of the Vivaldi web browser has been released — and it’s even more customisable than before!

    The Vivaldi 2.2 update adds a “pop out” video player feature (just like the picture-in-picture feature available in Chrome), introduces new ways to manage tabs, and — at long last! — gives you control over which buttons appear in the main browser toolbar.

  • Vivaldi 2.2: Focus on details
  • Vivaldi Browser 2.2 Released with More Configurable Toolbars

    Vivaldi web browser released version 2.2 yesterday with more tabs management functionality, more configurable toolbars, and other new features.

  • Chrome 73 Reportedly Introducing Tab Grouping Feature

    Google is gearing up to make some notable changes to its popular web browser, Chrome, with the latest Chrome 73 update. Last week, Google released the Chrome 71 Update which added dark mode feature, but macOS users missed out on the feature. Recently, it was revealed that Google is reportedly working on Chrome 73, which would bring the dark mode feature for macOS users as well.

    Today, a new feature was leaked in a code change request. “A recent code change suggests that users will be able to organize Chrome tabs into different groups, possibly to improve productivity by grouping tabs belonging to one task or a project in one set.”, as Wccftech reports. Although there is little clarity about the feature’s exact description, this likely seems like the upcoming feature in Windows, ie, ability to group together different applications in one window to improve accessibility as well as productivity.

Nvidia unveils cheaper 4GB version of its Jetson TX2 and begins shipping its next-gen Xavier module

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Nvidia announced a lower-cost 4GB version of its Linux-driven Jetson TX2 module with half the RAM and eMMC and has begun shipping its next-gen Jetson AGX Xavier.

Nvidia will soon have three variants of its hexa-core Arm Jetson TX2 module: the original Jetson TX2, the more embedded, industrial temperature Jetson TX2i , and now a new Jetson TX2 4GB model. The chip designer also announced availability of its next-gen, robotics focused Jetson AGX Xavier module (see farther below).

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Server: Arista, Red Hat, Istio and More (Mostly KubeCon + CloudNativeCon)

Filed under
Server
  • Arista Extends Its Reach Into Containers

    Networking in containerized environments is really hard to do with a traditional network stack. Virtual machines seem complex, according to many engineers I know, but as the Canadian rock band Bachman-Turner Overdrive used to sing "B-b-b-baby, you ain't seen n-n-nothin yet," as containers take complexity to the next level.

    Containers are unlike anything network professionals have dealt with before. They are highly dynamic, are spun up and down very quickly and often run for just a few seconds. Traditional networking can be used for VMs and physical workloads, which aren't very agile and take a long time to boot. But the dynamic nature of containers makes visibility, connectivity and security much more difficult, as services need to be invoked as soon as the container is spun up and then turned off when the container is shut down. If a live container loses connectivity, bad things happen, so ensuring the network is there and rock solid is critical.

  • Arista Networks Showcases Any Cloud Networking at KubeCon NA 2018
  • KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Videos Now Online

    This week's KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 in Seattle was the biggest ever! This sold-out event featured four days of information on Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, OpenTracing, Fluentd, gRPC, containerd, and rkt, along with many other exciting projects and topics.

  • How Epic Games Uses Kubernetes to Power Fortnite Application Servers

    "This is my first time in the gaming industry, I didn't know what to expect when I joined, but it turns out that scaling a video game is just like scaling any other successful product," Sharpe said. "Modern game development is actually a whole lot of microservices and other types of technology that are used outside of the gaming industry."

    Sharpe said that Epic Games is already heavily invested in AWS (Amazon Web Services) and has been using Docker containers. He added that moving to Kubernetes is a natural evolution of Epic Games' work, which is all about trying to improve developers lives.

  • DevOps lessons: 4 aspects of healthy experiments

    Fast iteration is all the rage. And it’s not just DevOps and software.

    It’s even made its way into distilling bourbon. When Bryan Davis of Lost Spirits distillery talked about accelerated bourbon aging in a recent Gastropod podcast, I expected the win would be about reducing costs; it’s expensive to keep bourbon aging for a decade or more! But no. It’s more about tweaking variables over the course of days, rather than years. “I would never have been able to build up the business to the point where I could take all the failed batches and throw them away. And so what the technology really did for me was make it possible for me to compete,” Davis says.

  • 6 best practices for highly available Kubernetes clusters

    Everyone running a Kubernetes cluster in production wants it to be reliable. Many administrators implement a multi-master setup, but often this isn't enough to consider a cluster highly available.

    A highly available microservice requires that the system gracefully handle the failures of its components. If one part of the system fails in any way, the system can recover without significant downtime.

    So how exactly can you achieve a highly available, highly reliable, and multi-master Kubernetes cluster? One way is to run a regional Kubernetes cluster on the Google Kubernetes Engine, a managed version of Kubernetes hosted on the Google Cloud Platform.

  • Tigera Looks To Improve Cloud-Native Kubernetes Networking

    The new funding was led by Insight Venture Partners, with participation from existing investors Madrona, NEA, and Wing. Total funding to date for Tigera stands at $53 million. The new fund raise is the second such event for the company in 2018, with a $10 million raise announced back in January. EnterpriseNetworkingPlanethas been following Tigera since the company was first announced in May 2016 at the CoreOS Fest event in Berlin, Germany.

    "Kubernetes is gaining momentum within every progressive enterprise," Ratan Tipirneni president and CEO of Tigera, stated in a media advisory. "These businesses cannot get their applications to production without strong security controls and the ability to prove compliance."

    "As a result, we are being pulled into several hundred projects and will use this funding to meet that demand," Tipirneni added.

  • Changes to OpenShift Online Starter Tier

    For some time now, we have offered our OpenShift Online service in a few service tiers. This hosted service has been available since 2011, and to date, well over 4 million applications have been launched on OpenShift Online. One of the key features of this hosted form of Red Hat OpenShift has been our Starter tier, where we have provided free access to our award-winning platform for learning and experimenting.

    This service has helped many users kick the tires on OpenShift, and to build their own proof of concepts, or to port a single application to measure the experience. We’re happy that we have been able to enable so many newcomers to our platform with this free service.

    We have listened to our users, and we’re happy to announce that we will be increasing the resources of this free service by double. Due to the popularity of our platform, we will be introducing time limits on the Starter platform to allow more users to take advantage of this useful resource.

  • VMware Paid $550M for Heptio to Boost Its Kubernetes Portfolio

    VMware paid $550 million for its recently closed acquisition of 2-year-old Kubernetes-focused startup Heptio. That amount was a substantial premium over what Heptio had raised from investors and other similar deals in the Kubernetes space.

  • KubeCon 2018 Bits

    This week KubeCon took place in Seattle, offering over 8,000 attendees (2,000 on the waiting list didn’t make it) an updated vision on Kubernetes as well as the projects under development and consideration. Thus far three projects have graduated (Kubernetes, Prometheus and Envoy) a dozen or so are incubating and many more are hopeful within the Sandbox. Over 125 event sponsors wanted to be sure the attendees understood their view and involvement in these projects, most of them going way beyond simply offering Kubernetes distributions. Security was a hot topic as well as management and deployment of these projects.

  • The co-founder of $725 million cloud startup Mesosphere is stepping aside as CEO to make way for a Symantec veteran

    Earlier this year, cloud startup Mesosphere raised $125 million, bringing its total funding to just shy of $250 million. That deal valued Mesosphere at $725 million, according to Bloomberg, up from $600 million in 2016.

    Now, Mesosphere co-founder Florian Leibert is following through on his previously-announced intention to step aside as CEO, to take a new role focused on strategy and working with customers. Replacing him will be Mike Fey, most recently president and COO of Symantec, in a move that the company says will help it achieve the next stage of growth by going after larger customers.

  • Kubernetes vendors target container security, operations and management

    If you were kicking the tires on Kubernetes and other cloud/container services, you found may have found nirvana at this week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 where all manner of new operational software and support from VMware, Arista and others were on display.

    To access the growing popularity of cloud, Kubernetes and containers, the Cloud Foundry Foundation released the results of a new survey that found among other things that 45 percent of companies are doing at least some cloud-native app development, and 40 percent are doing some re-architecting/refactoring of their legacy apps.

  • Istio service mesh tradeoffs prompt caution among IT pros

    Some Kubernetes proponents said they believe Istio service mesh is as important to cloud-native infrastructure as container orchestration, but most enterprise IT shops aren't ready to dive in just yet.

    Service mesh, a term coined by the makers of Linkerd in 2016, refers to a microservices networking architecture that consists of a centralized control plane and a pool of sidecar containers deployed in each container cluster pod. The sidecars' proximity to microservices workloads creates detailed visibility into application performance and intricate segmentation of networks for container security. Istio is also backed by IBM and Google, and therefore has the attention of the Kubernetes community, especially since the project reached version 1.0 in July 2018.

    Google and IBM subsidiary Red Hat promoted Istio management products and services at KubeCon here this week, while the project generated buzz in the halls among conference attendees. In the right hands, service mesh can be a vital tool for microservices management, but it comes with daunting complexity for IT pros already challenged to learn container orchestration.

  • ​What is the Kubernetes hybrid cloud and why it matters

    Over 8,000 people are at KubeCon in Seattle. Every major tech company and businesses I've never even heard of are here and trumpeting their Kubenetes distros -- about 80 of them. IBM recently bought Red Hat for a cool $34-billion. I, and others, think they did it to get Red Hat's Kubernetes expertise. Why? To answer this question we need to look into the hybrid-cloud model.

Uber brings Horovod project for distributed deep learning to Linux Foundation

Filed under
OSS

Uber today brought Horovod, a framework for distributed training across multiple machines, to open source initiative LF Deep Learning Foundation. Uber has used Horovod to support self-driving vehicles, fraud detection, and trip forecasting. Contributors to the project include Amazon, IBM, Intel, and Nvidia.

In addition to Uber, Alibaba, Amazon, and Nvidia also use Horovod.

The Horovod project can be used with popular frameworks like TensorFlow, Keras, and PyTorch.

Read more

Also: LF Deep Learning Welcomes Horovod Distributed Training Framework as Newest Project

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Programming: Wayland in Qt 5.12, Red Hat, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • What’s new with the Wayland platform plugin in Qt 5.12?

    Wayland is a display server protocol used on modern Linux systems, the Qt Wayland platform plugin lets Qt applications run on Wayland display servers (compositors).

    Continuing the trend from the Qt 5.11 release, the Qt 5.12 release contains a substantial amount of improvements.

  • Building Red Hat Mobile Applications on your own hardware

    Before getting started, it’s important to be aware of the versions of the tools, frameworks, and SDKs that the Build Farm uses to build mobile applications. This information can be found on the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform Supported Configurations page. This guide will call out the specific versions in each section and also note where you need to confirm versions for your specific project and/or requirements.

  • Tips for using Flood Element for performance testing

    In case you missed it, there’s a new performance test tool on the block: Flood Element. It’s a scalable, browser-based tool that allows you to write scripts in JavaScript that interact with web pages like a real user would.

    Browser Level Users is a newer approach to load testing that overcomes many of the common challenges we hear about traditional methods of testing.

  • Integration of external application details (Part 3)

    In Part 2 of this series, we took a high-level view of the common architectural elements that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

    I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

    This article takes you deeper to cover details pertaining to the specific elements (mobile and web application deployments) of the generic architectural overview.

  • How To Do Just About Anything With Python Lists
  • The tools of libfprint

    libfprint, the fingerprint reader driver library, is nearing a 1.0 release.

    Since the last time I reported on the status of the library, we've made some headway modernising the library, using a variety of different tools. Let's go through them and how they were used.

  • libchirp or Software is infinite
  • Introduction to Web Scraping with Python
  • Python Data Visualization 2018: Where Do We Go From Here?
  • Django Tutorial Adventure Part 2

We need Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities

Filed under
OSS

The short version: we should stop focusing on how to protect the revenue models of open source companies, and instead focus on how to create sustainable communities. Both because it leads to better software, but also because it’s better for business.

Today I’m launching the Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities (SFOSC) project. It’s a place to discuss what the principles are that lead to sustainable communities, to develop clear social contracts communities can use, and educate Open Source companies on which business models can create true communities. I also wrote a short book on why I think this is important, and the research that went in to the development of the principles themselves.

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Managing Servers: Appaserver and Cockpit

Filed under
Server
Software
  • FOSS Project Spotlight: Appaserver

    Assume you are tasked to write a browser-based, MySQL user interface for the table called CITY. CITY has two columns. The column names are city_name and state_code—each combined are the primary key.

  • Cockpit 184

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 184.

  • Video: Using Cockpit for KVM Virtual Machine Management

    Cockpit has been in development for a few years now and it appears it is going to be default in the upcoming RHEL8 release. I've recently started using it for managing and accessing KVM virtual machines via the cockpit-machines package. I made a short screencast showing the basics.

Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Ubuntu Podcast, Full Circle Weekly News and Python

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #263: Better Than Brexit

    Welcome to Episode 263 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts touch on a wide range of amateur radio and computing topics including net neutrality, satellite launches, CWops Awards, AI6TK, alternatives to Adobe Creative Cloud in the open-source world and much more. Thank you for being a listener of our show!

  • Ubuntu Podcast S11E40 – North Dallas Forty

    This week we’ve been playing on the Nintendo Switch. We review our tech highlights from 2018 and go over our 2018 predictions, just to see how wrong we really were. We also have some Webby love and go over your feedback.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #116
  • Full Circle Weekly News #117
  • Testing REST APIs with Docker containers and pytest

    Let's say you've got a web application you need to test.
    It has a REST API that you want to use for testing.

    Can you use Python for this testing even if the application is written in some other language? Of course.
    Can you use pytest? duh. yes. what else?
    What if you want to spin up docker instances, get your app running in that, and run your tests against that environment?
    How would you use pytest to do that?
    Well, there, I'm not exactly sure. But I know someone who does.

GNOME Development Leftovers

Filed under
GNOME
  • Nightly GNOME Apps and New Adwaita GTK Theme Run Through

    In this video, we are quickly looking at Nightly GNOME Apps and a sneak peek at New Adwaita GTK Theme.

  • Emmanuele Bassi: And I’m home

    Of course I couldn’t stay home playing video games, recording podcasts, and building gunplas forever, and so I had to figure out where to go to work next, as I do enjoy being able to have a roof above my head, as well as buying food and stuff. By a crazy random happenstance, the GNOME Foundation announced that, thanks to a generous anonymous donation, it would start hiring staff, and that one of the open positions was for a GTK developer. I decided to apply, as, let’s be honest, it’s basically the dream job for me. I’ve been contributing to GNOME components for about 15 years, and to GTK for 12; and while I’ve been paid to contribute to some GNOME-related projects over the years, it was always as part of non-GNOME related work.

    The hiring process was really thorough, but in the end I managed to land the most amazing job I could possibly hope for.

  • Opera Launches Built-in Cryptocurrency Wallet for Android, ManagedKube Partners with Google Cloud to Provide a Monitoring App for Kubernetes Cluster Costs, QEMU 3.1 Released, IoT DevCon Call for Presentations and GNOME 3.31.3 Is Out

    GNOME 3.31.3 is out, and this will be the last snapshot of 2018. Note that this is development code meant for testing and hacking purposes. For a list of changes, go here, and the source packages are here.

  • Firmware Attestation

    When fwupd writes firmware to devices, it often writes it, then does a verify pass. This is to read back the firmware to check that it was written correctly. For some devices we can do one better, and read the firmware hash and compare it against a previously cached value, or match it against the version published by the LVFS. This means we can detect some unintentional corruption or malicious firmware running on devices, on the assumption that the bad firmware isn’t just faking the requested checksum. Still, better than nothing.

    Any processor better than the most basic PIC or Arduino (e.g. even a tiny $5 ARM core) is capable of doing public/private key firmware signing. This would use standard crypto using X.509 keys or GPG to ensure the device only runs signed firmware. This protects against both accidental bitflips and also naughty behaviour, and is unofficial industry recommended practice for firmware updates. Older generations of the Logitech Unifying hardware were unsigned, and this made the MouseJack hack almost trivial to deploy on an unmodified dongle. Newer Unifying hardware requires a firmware image signed by Logitech, which makes deploying unofficial or modified firmware almost impossible.

  • Robert Ancell: Interesting things about the GIF image format
  • GIFs in GNOME
  • About ncurses Colors

    These colors go back to CGA, IBM's Color/Graphics Adapter from the earlier PC-compatible computers. This was a step up from the plain monochrome displays; as the name implies, monochrome could display only black or white. CGA could display a limited range of colors.

    CGA supports mixing red (R), green (G) and blue (Cool colors. In its simplest form, RGB is either "on" or "off". In this case, you can mix the RGB colors in 2x2x2=8 ways. Table 1 shows the binary and decimal representations of RGB.

Mozilla: Rust and WebAssembly, WebRender, MDN Changelog for November 2018, Things Gateway and Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Rust and WebAssembly in 2019

    Compiling Rust to WebAssembly should be the best choice for fast, reliable code for the Web. Additionally, the same way that Rust integrates with C calling conventions and libraries on native targets, Rust should also integrate with JavaScript and HTML5 on the Web. These are the Rust and WebAssembly domain working group’s core values.

    In 2018, we made it possible to surgically replace performance-sensitive JavaScript with Rust-generated WebAssembly.

  • rust for cortex-m7 baremetal
  • WebRender newsletter #33

    Yes indeed. In order for picture caching to work across displaylists we must be able to detect what did not change after a new displaylist arrives. The interning mechanism introduced by Glenn in #3075 gives us this ability in addition to other goodies such as de-duplication of interned resources and less CPU-GPU data transfer.

  • MDN Changelog for November 2018

    Potato London started work on this shortly after one-time payments launched. We kicked it off with a design meeting where we determined the features that could be delivered in 4 weeks. Potato and MDN worked closely to remove blockers, review code (in over 25 pull requests), and get it into the staging environment for testing. Thanks to everyone’s hard work, we launched a high-quality feature on schedule.

    We’ve learned a lot from these payment experiments, and we’ll continue to find ways to maintain MDN’s growth in 2019.

  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station

    Today, I'm going to talk about creating a Virtual Weather Station using the Things Gateway from Mozilla and a developer account from Weather Underground. The two combined enable home automation control from weather events like temperature, wind, and precipitation.

  • Taskgraph Like a Pro

    Have you ever needed to inspect the taskgraph locally? Did you have a bad time? Learn how to inspect the taskgraph like a PRO. For the impatient skip to the installation instructions below.

  • Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday, December 21th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, December 21th, we are organizing Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: and changes and UpdateDirectory.

    Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

Fedora Developers Are Trying To Figure Out The Best Linux I/O Scheduler, Fedora 29 Review and Fedora Program Management

Filed under
Red Hat

ARM's Work in Linux (Kernel)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Energy Model Management Framework Queued For Linux 4.21

    A new framework queued for introduction with the Linux 4.21 kernel is the ARM-developed Energy Model Management Framework.

    With different hardware and drivers exposing the processor/system energy consumption in different manners, the Energy Model Management Framework tries to provide a standardized way of accessing the power values for each performance domain in a system. This can help kernel drivers/schedulers and other code that could make smarter decisions based upon current energy use be able to do so via this standardized framework for acquiring the power information on capable systems.

  • ARM's AArch64 Adding Pointer Authentication Support To The Linux 4.21 Kernel

    The 64-bit ARM architecture code (a.k.a ARM64 / AArch64) with the Linux 4.21 kernel is seeing pointer authentication added as a new security feature.

    Pointer authentication can be supported by ARMv8.3 hardware and newer to allow for signing and authenticating of pointers against secret keys. The purpose of this pointer authentication is to mitigate ROP attacks and other potential buffer-overrun-style attacks. This ARM64_PTR_AUTH functionality will enable pointer authentication for all user-space processes and the presence of supported hardware is determined at run-time. ARM developers have been working on the plumbing for this Linux kernel support for it the past year.

The OSD and user freedom

Filed under
GNU
OSS

The relationship between open source and free software is fraught with people arguing about meanings and value. In spite of all the things we’ve built up around open source and free software, they reduce down to both being about software freedom.

Open source is about software freedom. It has been the case since “open source” was created.

In 1986 the Four Freedoms of Free Software (4Fs) were written. In 1998 Netscape set its source code free. Later that year a group of people got together and Christine Peterson suggested that, to avoid ambiguity, there was a “need for a better name” than free software. She suggested open source after open source intelligence. The name stuck and 20 years later we argue about whether software freedom matters to open source, because too many global users of the term have forgotten (or never knew) that some people just wanted another way to say software that ensures the 4Fs.

Once there was a term, the term needed a formal definition: how to we describe what open source is? That’s where the Open Source Definition (OSD) comes in.

The OSD is a set of ten points that describe what an open source license looks like. The OSD came from the Debian Free Software Guidelines. The DFSG themselves were created to “determine if a work is free” and ought to be considered a way of describing the 4Fs.

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SUSE: South Africa, SAP and SUSE YES Certification

Filed under
SUSE
  • First year of SUSE Graduate Program saw their students graduate in South Africa

    Yesterday at an event held at Bryanston Country Club the SUSE graduate programme saw their 2018 students graduate. I am very proud and happy that the first year of the programme has seen tremendous success with a 90% pass rate, with 50% of graduates already being employed and commitment to place the remaining graduates by early 2019.

  • SAP HANA Cost-optimized – An alternative Route is available

    Sometimes the direct way could end up in dead end. In such cases an alternative route is needed to come to the desired destination. What does that mean for my SAP HANA cost optimized scenario? Where is the possible dead end? In some installations we have seen that the SAPDatabase resource agent using the SAPHOSTAGENT framework could be lead into configuration problems according to database users, database permissions and user secure store keys. But we have an alternative to control SAP HANA much more easy and independent from such database related objects. It’s the well known SAPInstance resource agent. It could be used for SAP HANA Scale-Up systems, which could completely be started and stopped with HDB start and HDB stop. Internally HDB uses sapcontrol to start and stop the database and that is exactly what SAPInstance is doing for application servers.

  • SUSE YES Certification for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP4 now available

    With the official release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP4, the SUSE Partner Engineering team also announces the availability of the YES Certification Kit version 8.2 for system certification. This new System Certification Kit (SCK) adds support for SLE 12 SP4 including XEN and KVM Virtualization.

FreeBSD ZFS vs. Linux EXT4/Btrfs RAID With Twenty SSDs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With FreeBSD 12.0 running great on the Dell PowerEdge R7425 server with dual AMD EPYC 7601 processors, I couldn't resist using the twenty Samsung SSDs in that 2U server for running some fresh FreeBSD ZFS RAID benchmarks as well as some reference figures from Ubuntu Linux with the native Btrfs RAID capabilities and then using EXT4 atop MD-RAID.

Read more

Discord announce a 90/10 revenue split, Discord Store will support Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Discord announce a 90/10 revenue split, Discord Store will support Linux

    You will be forgiven for not paying much attention to the Discord Store, since it doesn't currently support Linux. It seems that is going to change and they've announce a pretty small cut compared to the competition.

    Firstly, today the Discord team announced in a new blog post that starting in 2019 they will only take a 10% cut from developers. Considering Valve still take 30% unless you earn a lot of money and even the Epic Store will take 12% that might help quite a bit. Not only that, Discord do have a pretty large pull considering they're already the go-to application for a lot of people to chat, even game developers and publishers have moved over in large numbers to have their community on Discord. I wouldn't underestimate them if they keep pushing it.

  • Discord Steps Up to Epic and Steam Game Stores with a 90/10 Developer Split

    Recently Fortnite publisher Epic made a splash in the world of PC gaming by introducing its own game store, with a competitive 88% share of profits going to developers. Now Discord is going one better with an even more generous split.

    Discord is best known as a game-focused chat and VOIP app, but the company has been selling indie games on its own digital storefront for a few months as well. The company announced today on its blog that, beginning next year, the store will give a full 90% of the price of games directly to developers. That beats Steam’s 70/30 split by a huge margin and steals the thunder from Epic, which has been wooing independent and mid-sized developers to its newer store at a steady pace.

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