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Monday, 17 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more

8 tips to help non-techies move to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

ver the last 10 months, a handful of friends and acquaintances have pulled me back into that realm. How? With their desire to dump That Other Operating System™ and move to Linux.

This has been an interesting experience, in no small part because most of the people aren't at all technical. They know how to use a computer to do what they need to do. Beyond that, they're not interested in delving deeper. That said, they were (and are) attracted to Linux for a number of reasons—probably because I constantly prattle on about it.

While bringing them to the Linux side of the computing world, I learned a few things about helping non-techies move to Linux. If someone asks you to help them make the jump to Linux, these eight tips can help you.

1. Be honest about Linux.

Linux is great. It's not perfect, though. It can be perplexing and sometimes frustrating for new users. It's best to prepare the person you're helping with a short pep talk.

What should you talk about? Briefly explain what Linux is and how it differs from other operating systems. Explain what you can and can't do with it. Let them know some of the pain points they might encounter when using Linux daily.

If you take a bit of time to ease them into Linux and open source, the switch won't be as jarring.

Read more

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for December 2018

Filed under
Red Hat

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Read more

Linux Networking Improvements To Mitigate Retpoline Overhead Ready For 4.21 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

The recently talked about work to improve/restore Linux networking performance around Retpolines is queued now in net-next for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel cycle.

This patch series for the Linux kernel's networking subsystem is about mitigating the Retpoline overhead introduced at the start of the year in order to address the Meltdown CPU security issue.

Read more

Linux 4.20--rc76

Filed under
Linux

Well, that's more like it.

This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody
is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we
simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope
the trend continues.

The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of
bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio
completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and
spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem
fixes, core fixes, test updates..)

Read more

Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10.

This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590.

Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator.

It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root.

Read more

Leftovers: Linux in the Ham Shack and Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

Filed under
Misc
  • LHS Episode #264: The Weekender XXI

    Welcome to the 21st Weekender episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. This time around, we talk about the few contests and special event stations that are around for December. We also touch on Linux distros to try, things to do in the amateur radio and open source world and then we dive straight into hedonism, discussing good food, good music and good spirits. Thank you for listening and Happy Holidays.

  • The Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

    Apple’s premier gadget faces a less certain future than ever as the market shifts under its feet.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • The fourth industrial revolution is under way, and leaders must adopt open source thinking

    For the first time in history, knowledge is free and abundant, ordinary people are more empowered than ever before, and almost every boundary to communication has been lifted.

    [...]

    Welcome to the 21st Century where everyone and everything is connected 24/7, and where exciting progress opportunities and daunting challenges coexist. In this century, life and business have become “open source”. In order to succeed and thrive, our thoughts and actions must also become open source. It is time for business leaders to shed myths of the past, question conventional wisdom, and adopt “open source thinking” around the following fundamental questions/challenges:

  • Can real-world enterprises digest all this open-source, startup stuff?

    Why does the Cloud Native Computing Foundation now host more than 30 projects? Why are cloud-based startups coming out of the woodwork with narrow point solutions? Mostly just so users can have a better time with an application. But it’s all getting a bit weedy. How can enterprises pick out the right technologies from the aisles of them?

    “It’s really easy to forget that infrastructure is not a thing in its own right — it’s solely there to enable applications and to enable other things,” said Steve Herrod (pictured), managing director at General Catalyst Partners LLC.

  • CableLabs Open Source IoT Project Shoots for Scale

    Opening up another chapter in its open source story, CableLabs this week took another shot at the industrial Internet of Things market with its LPWAN Server project.

    The general concept is to create open source LPWAN Server software that can run on off-the-shelf hardware and support a wide range of low-power, IoT wireless technologies designed to transmit small bits of data over long distances. (See Blog: CableLabs Intros Open Source LPWAN Server.)

    "We don't see one clear winner in the LPWAN space," said Daryl Malas, principal architect at CableLabs' advanced technology group. "We don't see NB-IoT (Narrowband IoT) dominating all use cases. And we don't see LoRA dominating all use cases."

  • The 10 Coolest New Open-Source Technologies And Tools Of 2018
  • The fight to keep ideas open to all

     

    “The only way we can preserve and nurture other and more precious freedoms is by relinquishing the freedom to breed.” This ominous sentence comes not from China’s one-child policy but from one of the 20th century’s most influential—and misunderstood—essays in economics. “The tragedy of the commons”, by Garrett Hardin, marks its 50th anniversary on December 13th.
     

    The article, published in the journal Science, was a neo-Malthusian jeremiad about uncontrolled population growth. But it is remembered for the image that the title conjures up and for the anecdotes that Hardin used. The idea behind it is as simple as it is profound: a resource freely available to all will be used inefficiently. An actual common will inevitably be overgrazed. Who would restrict their cattle if other herders may not follow suit?  

  • Suriname community uses new open-source app to preserve storytelling traditions

    To prevent that from happening, the local community-based organization Stichting voor Dorpsontwikkeling Matawai has spent the last few years documenting their oral storytelling traditions using video recorders and interactive maps. With support from the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), the organization trained younger Matawai to record and interview their elders about the numerous named places and sites in their ancestral lands.

  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a Second Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors to Spur Open Innovation

    Flute is a configurable 5-stage application processor complementing the previously released 3-stage Piccolo microcontroller, both of which are suitable for IoT. The initial release provides synthesizable Verilog for a bare metal RV32IMA core and a supervisor level RV64IMA core. Future releases will add floating point and compressed instructions (RV32GC/RV64GC) and run Linux and FreeRTOS. The Flute download (here) provides working Verilator and Icarus simulations and the Verilog has been tested in Xilinx UltraScale/UltraScale+ boards.

Schedule a visit with the Emacs psychiatrist

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Welcome to another day of the 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

Some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

Today's selection is a hidden gem inside of Emacs: Eliza, the Rogerian psychotherapist, a terminal toy ready to listen to everything you have to say.

Read more

Download User Guide Books of All Ubuntu Flavors

Filed under
Ubuntu

This is a compilation of download information of user guide books of Ubuntu and the 5 Official Flavors (Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Studio). You can find either complete user guides (even for server edition), installation guide, or tutorials compilation; either in PDF or HTML format; plus where to purchase two official ebooks of Ubuntu MATE. On the end of this tutorial, I included how to download the HTML-only documentation so you can read it completely offline. I hope you will find all of books useful and you can print them out yourself. Get the books, print them, share with your friends, read and learn Ubuntu All Flavors.

Read more

Games: Desert Child, KKnD, Twice Circled

Filed under
Gaming
  • Desert Child Now Available on Linux, PC, and Mac OS

    Akupara Games is here with an all-new game that blends a mix of hoverbikes with shooting and racing alongside high-resolution pixel art. It's odd to see a game try so many different genres, but Desert Child does that and more. Adventure games are also covered, as you have to go from place to place and explore the world. Your overall goal is to leave Earth before it blows up, and winning the Grand Prix allows you to go to Mars and escape the planet.

  • The KKnD remake using the OpenRA engine has a first release out

    KKnD, the classic strategy game is being revived and the new open source project has the first release out.

    I was going to write this up last night, but it seems I jumped the gun a bit before they had all the bits in place. Nice to see such quick and polite communication from their team though.

    Unlike Red Alert and the other titles served by OpenRA, KKnD and KKnD 2 were not made freeware. You will still need the games for the full experience. However, this remake will download the demo files for you to get you going.

  • The lovely aquarium building game Megaquarium just had a big update

    Twice Circled are adding in plenty of new features to Megaquarium as promised, with a major update now available.

Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 release

Filed under
Debian

The Debian Installer team[1] is pleased to announce the fourth alpha release of the installer for Debian 10 "Buster".

Foreword
========

I'd like to start by thanking Christian Perrier, who spent many years working on Debian Installer, especially on internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) topics. One might remember graphs and blog posts on Planet Debian with statistics; keeping track of those numbers could look like a pure mathematical topic, but having uptodate translations is a key part of having a Debian Installer that is accessible for most users.

Thank you so much, Christian!

Read more

Also: Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 Released

VK9, the project that aims to support Direct3D 9 over Vulkan has hit another milestone

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Software

The developer of VK9, another rather interesting compatibility layer has advanced further with the announcement of another completed milestone.

Much like DXVK, it aims to push Direct3D over to Vulkan, while DXVK focuses on D3D11 and D3D10 the VK9 project is fixed on D3D9.

Read more

Also: A Look At The LLVMpipe OpenGL Performance On Mesa 19.0 With A 64C/128T Server

Server: Kubernetes, SUSE, WordPress and Moving to Jekyll

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes’ sprawling ecosystem offers lots of choice – and risk

    If your organization is ready to go all in on the Kubernetes orchestration manager and you’re looking for a way to package applications for easy deployment, you’ll probably gravitate to Helm, an open-source project incubating within the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

  • Unlocking the Skills Shortage Dilemma for IT Transformation
  • WordPress 5.0.1

    While I missed the WordPress 5.0 release, it was only a few more days before there was a security release out.

    So WordPress 5.0.1 will be available in Debian soon. This is both a security update from 5.0.1 and a huge feature update from the 4.9.x versions to the 5.0 versions.

  • Moved to Jekyll

    WordPress was actually quite good to me and quite easy to maintain and use. As uncomplicated as the Jekyll approach is, aided by its usage of convention to just do the smart thing, there’s still a fair bit of setup and playing around you need to do to get Jekyll sorted out.

Confluent 'Closing Down' in the Face of 'Cloud' Exploitation

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • After Amazon’s cloud encroaches on its turf, a startup is taking a stand: Open source can’t be ‘free and unsustainable R&D’ for tech giants

    In late November, Amazon Web Services announced it would sell a new service on its market-leading cloud called Amazon Managed Streaming for Kafka — a service that provides software that Amazon didn't create itself.

    This new service is based on Apache Kafka, an open source software project for handling large amounts of streaming data. AWS took Kafka and repackaged it as a paid cloud service — something completely legal, as open source software is free for anyone to use as they wish.

    Originally created at LinkedIn, the engineers who started Kafka made their own company around the software, called Confluent. At the time the service was revealed, Confluent CEO Jay Kreps told Business Insider that it wasn't worried about Amazon's move, saying "I don't think this announcement will impact our business."

  • Concerned about cloud providers, Confluent becomes latest open-source company to set new restrictions on usage

    Another open-source enterprise technology company is walling off parts of its software from cloud infrastructure providers.

    Confluent announced Friday morning that it is changing the terms of the licenses around several of the real-time data streaming open-source projects it has developed. Several components will no longer be available under the widely used and very permissible Apache 2.0 license: instead, they will be offered under a new license called Confluent Community License that is very similar to the Apache 2.0 license except for a clear restriction on providing KSQL and several other components as cloud services.

Databases: Cassandra/Instaclustr and MariaDB

Filed under
OSS
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Cassandra integrations from Instaclustr

    Open-source managed solutions-as-a-service company Instaclustr wants to address some gaps in a few key integrations for the Apache Cassandra database management solution with the announcement of three new open-source projects.

    The first piece of the problem was finding a way for Kubernetes to more fully integrate with Cassandra. This is where the company’s newly announced open-source Cassandra operator comes in, it explained. “While running Cassandra on Kubernetes can be relatively simple to begin with, Kubernetes provides only a limited understanding of database functionality: it’s blind to key details of the database being written to, and has incomplete capabilities for storing data in-state,” the company wrote in the release announcement.

  • What is a software ‘connector’?

    Open source news to end the week looks to the somewhat incongruous connection between Menlo Park California and Helsinki — it can only be MariaDB Corporation with that HQ combo.

    Updates to end 2018 see the new availability of the MariaDB Connector for Node.js, giving developers a method to build Node.js applications on top of MariaDB’s enterprise relational database.

    MariaDB uses pluggable, purpose-built storage engines to support workloads that previously required a variety of specialised databases. Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform JavaScript run-time environment that executes JavaScript code outside of a browser.

Openwashing: Bloomberg, Pimcore, Microsoft, Facebook and More

Filed under
OSS

Programming: Fuchsia SDK, Python, PGI, JFrog, Microsoft as 'Authority' and Fun Maze Generator

Filed under
Development
  • Fuchsia Friday: A first look at the Fuchsia SDK, which you can download here

    With the significant news this week that the Fuchsia SDK and a Fuchsia “device” are being added to the Android Open Source Project, now seems like a good time to learn more about the Fuchsia SDK. Today on Fuchsia Friday, we dive into the Fuchsia SDK and see what it has to offer developers who might want to get a head start on Fuchsia.

  • Python, signal handlers, and exceptions
  • Create a power bar for pygame project

    In this chapter, we are going to create the last piece of game feature which is the player’s power bar, after this, I will do all the touches up to this game project which certainly includes to tidy up the game code before uploading the game to the pygame portal. Alright, let’s get to work.

    The first file which we will need to edit is the score manager file where we will create a power bar object on the lower right corner of the game scene. What we will do here is to deduct the height of the original power bar whenever an enemy missile hits the player ship.

  • PGI 18.10 Community Edition Compiler Relased For High-Performance Multi-Core CPUs & GPUs

    The PGI 18.10 Community Edition compiler was recently released that is geared for HPC workloads and aims to deliver optimal performance on multi-core processors and GPUs.

  • JFrog to open freebie central repository for Go fans in the new year

    Self-proclaimed "Database of DevOps" JFrog is about to fling open the first central repository for Go modules in the form of GoCenter.

    Originally developed by Google, the open-source language Go, which celebrated its ninth anniversary last month, has seen impressive growth over the years. It hovers in fifth place in Stack Overflow's 2018 survey of most-loved languages (above the likes of JavaScript) and third in rankings of languages devs most want to learn. Python reigns supreme, of course.

  • GitHub and Kotlin: What is this Fastest Growing Language? [Ed: Another disturbing example of the corporate media treating a privatised site of Microsoft as though it's the complete set of all programming and Free software, licences etc.]

    What’s the fastest growing language on GitHub?

    The repository is seeing a “clear trend toward more statically typed languages focused on type safety and interoperability” the company said this week, including Kotlin, TypeScript and Rust – and it is the former that is surging fastest.

  • The world's most popular programming language is JavaScript, but why? [Ed: Microsoft as reference again?]

    Much of the work done using JavaScript still seems to be carried out by front-end web developers, despite the language finding new uses in areas such as back-end development in recent years.

    Now the code repository service GitHub has shed further light on what's fuelling the continued popularity of JavaScript, as part of a round-up of which technologies spawned the most new open-source projects on GitHub in 2018.

    [...]

    "In 2018 alone, we saw more new users than in our first six years combined, and we celebrated hosting over 100 million repositories. All of this growth is thanks to the open source community," writes Thomas Elliott, data scientist at GitHub

  • Maze Generator Keeps Plotter (and Kids) Busy

    The generator itself is written in Java, and should work on whatever operating system your box happens to be running thanks to the *nix and Windows wrapper scripts [Jon] provides. To create a basic maze, one simply needs to provide the script with the desired dimensions and the paper size. You can define the type of paper with either standard sizes (such as --paper a4) or in the case of a plotter with explicit dimensions (--paper 36x48in).

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more