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Monday, 19 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Best Linux Desktop Environments: Strong and Stable

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A desktop environment is a collection of disparate components that integrate together. They bundle these components to provide a common graphical user interface with elements such as icons, toolbars, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. Additionally, most desktop environments include a set of integrated applications and utilities.

Desktop environments (now abbreviated as DE) provide their own window manager, system software that controls the placement and appearance of windows within a windowing system. They also provide a file manager which organizes, lists, and locates files and directories. Other aspects include a background provider, a panel to provide a menu and display information, as well as a setting/configuration manager to customize the environment.

Ultimately, a DE is a piece of software. While they are more complicated than most other types of software, they are installed in the same way.

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KDE neon upgrade - From 16.04 to 18.04

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KDE

I am quite happy with the KDE neon upgrade, going from the 16.04 to the 18.04 base. I think it's good on several levels, including improved hardware support and even slightly better performance. Plus there were no crashes or regressions of any kind, always a bonus. This means that neon users now have a fresh span of time to enjoy their non-distro distro, even though it's not really committing to any hard dates, so the LTS is also only sort of LTS in that sense. It's quite metaphysical.

On a slightly more serious note, this upgrade was a good, positive experience. I semi-accidentally tried to ruin it, but the system recovered remarkably, the post-upgrade results are all sweet, and you have a beautiful, fast Plasma desktop, replete with applications and dope looks and whatnot. I'm happy, and we shall bottle that emotion for when the need arises, and in the Linux world it does happen often, I shall have an elixir of rejuvenation to sip upon. KDE neon, a surprisingly refined non-distro distro.

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Games: Starsector, Squally, Where The Water Tastes Like Wine: Fireside Chats, 103

Filed under
Gaming
  • Open-world single-player space-combat RPG 'Starsector' has a major new release out and it's awesome

    Starsector (formerly "Starfarer") is a game that I've followed for quite a few years now, one I personally purchased many years ago and the latest release is a big one.

    I've tested it at various points over the years, always coming away impressed by the visual design just as much as the gameplay. The spaceship design really is quite incredible.

    Thankfully, the issues that plagued the Linux version (for me) in the past are gone. Multi-monitor support has vastly improved, with it not messing with my secondary monitor and going fullscreen correctly on my primary monitor. That alone, is a big deal for me and it's so much nicer.

  • Squally now has the Early Access release on Linux with the Hexus card mini-game available

    Squally is what they're calling a 2D puzzle RPG, which is supposed to teach you "video game hacking" without needing prior experience and no "boring lessons".

  • Where The Water Tastes Like Wine: Fireside Chats, a free standalone adventure is out

    Where The Water Tastes Like Wine: Fireside Chats acts as a free standalone companion to Where The Water Tastes Like Wine and it's out with Linux support.

  • First-person mystery adventure '103' will have Linux support at release

    103 is a rather stylish and intriguing first-person mystery adventure that's releasing next month and it will have Linux support at release.

    A game we covered previously as it was on Kickstarter, they managed to hit over their funding goal in in September by other seven thousand Australian dollars so they did quite well.

    In reply to a user question on Steam earlier this month, the developer noted that the Linux version will in fact be available at release so that's some rather nice news to see them so positive about it.

Linus Torvalds Comments On STIBP & He's Not Happy - STIBP Default Will End Up Changing

Filed under
Linux

It turns out that Linus Torvalds himself was even taken by surprise with the performance hit we've outlined on Linux 4.20 as a result of STIBP "Single Thread Indirect Branch Predictors" introduction as well as back-porting already to stable series for cross-hyperthread Spectre V2 protection. He doesn't want this enabled in full by default.

All of the benchmarking I've been doing the past few days to shine the light on the Linux kernel's STIBP addition appears to be paying off. My tests have found Linux 4.20 to incur significant performance penalties in many workloads -- in fact, more so than some of the earlier Spectre and Meltdown mitigations -- and STIBP is already being back-ported to stable series like Linux 4.19.2. PHP, Pythom, Java, and many other workloads are measurably affected and even the gaming performance to some extent.

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Submissions now open for the Fedora 30 supplemental wallpapers

Filed under
Red Hat

Each release, the Fedora Design team works with the community on a set of 16 additional wallpapers. Users can install and use these to supplement the standard wallpaper. Submissions are now open for the Fedora 30 Supplemental Wallpapers, and will remain open until January 31, 2019

Have you always wanted to start contributing to Fedora but don’t know how? Submitting a supplemental wallpaper is one of the easiest ways to start as a Fedora contributor. Keep reading to learn how.

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Void Linux, Solus, Manjaro, Antergos, Sabayon & Clear Linux Put To A Performance Battle

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given last week's new images release of the rolling-release, systemd-free, original-creation Void Linux I decided to take it for a spin with some fresh benchmarking as it had been two years or so since last trying out that Linux distribution with its XBPS packaging system. For seeing how the performance compares, I benchmarked it against some of the other primarily enthusiast/rolling-release/performant Linux distributions including Antergos, Clear Linux, Debian Buster Testing, Fedora Workstation 29, Manjaro 18.0, Sabayon Linux, Solus, and Ubuntu 18.10.

These nine Linux distributions were tested on the new Intel Core i9 9900K eight-core / sixteen-thread processor. The i9-9900K was running at its stock speeds with the ASUS PRIME Z390-A motherboard, 2 x 8GB DDR4-3000 memory, Samsung 970 EVO 256GB NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics.

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Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Available for Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Precise Pangolin) on 32-bit, 64-bit, Raspbbery Pi 2, AWS (Amazon Web Services), GCP (Google Cloud Platform), and cloud environments, the new Linux kernel security updates fix multiple issues that might put your computer and data at risk.

Affecting both Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) releases, the kernel security patch address just one issue, namely a vulnerablity (CVE-2018-15471) discovered by Felix Wilhelm in Linux kernel’s Xen netback driver, which improperly performed input validation under certain circumstances, thus allowing an attacker to crash the vulnerable system via a denial of service (DoS attack) or possible execute arbitrary code.

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Practical Networking for Linux Admins: TCP/IP

Filed under
Linux

I have a peeve. OK, more than one. But for this article just one, and that is using "IP" as a shortcut for "IP address". They are not the same. IP = Internet Protocol. You're not managing Internet Protocols, you're managing Internet Protocol addresses. If you're creating, managing, and deleting Internet Protocols, then you are an uber guru doing something entirely different.

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Hands-on with the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ and new Raspbian Linux release

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation made two significant announcements last week. First, the availability of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+, which has been eagerly awaited; then, the next day, a new release of the Raspbian Linux operating system. That means I have a lot to talk about today, so let's get busy!

First, the new Pi 3 Model A+. This is a scaled-down and lower cost version of the Pi 3 Model B+. In the most important functional areas it is identical to the Pi3 B+: it has a 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, and dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2/BLE. That means the performance is very similar to the Model B+.

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Tiny, single-GbE Arm networking SBC runs Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

Gateworks has spun a 100 x 35mm, single-GbE “Newport GW6100” networking SBC, which follows a recent dual-GbE “GW6200” model. Both run Linux on a dual-core Cavium Octeon TX SoC and offer mini-PCIe expansion and -40 to 85°C support.

In Nov. 2017, when Gateworks unveiled its Newport family of Linux-driven, Octeon TX based SBCs with the 105 x 100mm, dual GbE port Newport GW6300, it promised several more models in 2018. The 140 x 100mm, 5-GbE port Newport GW6400 was announced in May along with a GW6404 sibling that swaps two of the GbE ports to SFP ports. Now, the company has launched the single-GbE port GW6100 model, which had been scheduled for a 2018 Q2 arrival. There was no announcement of the GW6100, which was discovered by CNXSoft, nor of the dual-port, 100 x 75mm GW6200, which now has a product page (see farther below).

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Linux Shutdown Command: 5 Practical Examples

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HowTos

The shutdown command in Linux allows you to shut down, reboot or schedule a shutdown of your system. This article explains the most common and useful examples of the Linux shutdown command.
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Linux Shutdown Command: 5 Practical Examples

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HowTos

The shutdown command in Linux allows you to shut down, reboot or schedule a shutdown of your system. This article explains the most common and useful examples of the Linux shutdown command.
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Games: Vendetta Online, Bad North, Fighting Games

Filed under
Gaming

Server: Silicon Sky, IBM and Red Hat

Filed under
Server

today's howtos

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos
  • Free Ebook Kubernetes Essentials - A Tutorial for Beginners
  • Twitter Alerts: A Trick for the Twitter-averse
  • Tuning your Intel Graphics Card in Ubuntu 18.04

    In the computing world things move at a brisk pace. To appeal to business users and conservative types like me Ubuntu releases the Long Term Support (LTS) versions of Ubuntu the latest of which is Ubuntu 18.04 which came out early this year. Ubuntu 16.04 for which I wrote the guide, is the LTS version prior to 18.04.

    It’s a little bit late to say this now but Ubuntu 18.04 came with a lot of changes including the infamous switchback to GNOME and the subsequent death of Unity. Another not so famous change was the fact that Intel drivers now ship with the kernel. This is not an Ubuntu specific change per se which explains why it was more of a footnote and not a headline in the Ubuntu world.

  • 4 Best open source & free YouTube Downloader for Ubuntu Linux

    Downloading YouTube Videos on Ubuntu Linux is not that much difficult as it appears. Lots of newbies think that Windows is the only platform to download online Youtube videos due to the availability of tons of free YouTube downloader software for it. However, after going through this article their opinion would be changed forever because not only normal videos but 4K videos can be downloaded on the Linux platforms as easy as on Windows.

  • Beginner's Guide: How To Install Ubuntu Linux 18.10

Interview With Mark Shuttleworth

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth delivered an unashamed plug for Ubuntu while cheerfully throwing a little shade on the competition at the OpenStack Berlin 2018 summit last week.

If Nick Barcet of Red Hat had elicited gasps by suggesting the OpenStack Foundation (OSF) might consider releasing updates a bit more frequently, Shuttleworth sent eyebrows skywards by announcing that the latest Long Term Support (LTS) edition of Ubuntu, 18.04, would get 10 years of support.

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Security: Facebook/Instagram Breach and More FUD From Microsoft's Friends at WhiteSource

Filed under
Security
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