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Thursday, 17 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: Linux, Docker and Guix Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 5:38am
Story Red Hat: OpenShift, RHEL, Dependency Analytics, vDPA and More Roy Schestowitz 1 18/10/2019 - 5:32am
Story Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” Released. Here's What's New arindam1989 10 18/10/2019 - 5:23am
Story In 2019, multiple open source companies changed course—is it the right move? Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 5:04am
Story Purism shows off more pictures of Librem 5 Phone and PureOS UI Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 4:46am
Story Graphics Stack: PTS, Libinput and NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 4:43am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 4:37am
Story Fedora: IBus, F31 Delays, Cockpit and Foliate Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 4:36am
Story Mozilla: Glean SDK, Localisation, Reps and Security Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 4:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2019 - 4:19am

Security: Linux, Docker and Guix

Filed under
Security
  • Unpatched Linux bug may open devices to serious attacks over Wi-Fi

    The flaw is located in the RTLWIFI driver, which is used to support Realtek Wi-Fi chips in Linux devices. The vulnerability triggers a buffer overflow in the Linux kernel when a machine with a Realtek Wi-Fi chip is within radio range of a malicious device. At a minimum, exploits would cause an operating-system crash and could possibly allow a hacker to gain complete control of the computer. The flaw dates back to version 3.10.1 of the Linux kernel released in 2013.

  • Docker Attack Worm Mines for Monero
  • Insecure permissions on profile directory (CVE-2019-18192)

    We have become aware of a security issue for Guix on multi-user systems that we have just fixed (CVE-2019-18192). Anyone running Guix on a multi-user system is encouraged to upgrade guix-daemon—see below for instructions.

    Context

    The default user profile, ~/.guix-profile, points to /var/guix/profiles/per-user/$USER. Until now, /var/guix/profiles/per-user was world-writable, allowing the guix command to create the $USER sub-directory.

    On a multi-user system, this allowed a malicious user to create and populate that $USER sub-directory for another user that had not yet logged in. Since /var/…/$USER is in $PATH, the target user could end up running attacker-provided code. See the bug report for more information.

    This issue was initially reported by Michael Orlitzky for Nix (CVE-2019-17365).

In 2019, multiple open source companies changed course—is it the right move?

Filed under
OSS

Free and open source software enables the world as we know it in 2019. From Web servers to kiosks to the big data algorithms mining your Facebook feed, nearly every computer system you interact with runs, at least in part, on free software. And in the larger tech industry, free software has given rise to a galaxy of startups and enabled the largest software acquisition in the history of the world.

Free software is a gift, a gift that made the world as we know it possible. And from the start, it seemed like an astounding gift to give. So astounding in fact that it initially made businesses unaccustomed to this kind of generosity uncomfortable. These companies weren't unwilling to use free software, it was simply too radical and by extension too political. It had to be renamed: "open source."

Once that happened, open source software took over the world.

Recently, though, there's been a disturbance in the open source force. Within the last year, companies like Redis Labs, MongoDB, and Confluent all changed their software licenses, moving away from open source licenses to more restrictive terms that limit what can be done with the software, making it no longer open source software.

Read more

Also: Network Time Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

Red Hat: OpenShift, RHEL, Dependency Analytics, vDPA and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Expands the Kubernetes Developer Experience with Newest Version of Red Hat OpenShift 4

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced Red Hat OpenShift 4.2, the latest version of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform designed to deliver a more powerful developer experience. Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extends Red Hat’s commitment to simplifying and automating enterprise-grade services across the hybrid cloud while empowering developers to innovate and enhance business value through cloud-native applications.

  • RHEL and Insights combo illuminates threats and spotlights performance for Red Hat systems

    When Red Hat Inc. officially rolled out its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, or RHEL 8, operating system in May, the open-source software company also included Red Hat Insights with every subscription for the new release. Based on data supplied by one of the company’s top executives, that has proven to be a wise decision.

    Insights is a software as a service product that works from a rules-based engine to offer continuous connected analysis of registered Red Hat-based systems.

    “We’ve seen an 87% increase since May in the number of systems that are linked in,” said Stefanie Chiras (pictured), vice president and general manager of the RHEL Business Unit at Red Hat. “We’re seeing a 33% increase in coverage of rules-based and a 152% increase in customers who are using it. That creates a community of people using and getting value from it, but also giving value back because the more data we have the better the rules get.”

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE.

    Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing.

    Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Breaking cloud native network performance barriers

    Up until now we have covered virtio-networking and its usage in VMs. We started with the original vhost-net/virtio-net architecture, moved on to the vhost-user/virito-pmd architecture and continued to vDPA (vHost Data Path Acceleration) where the virtio ring layout was pushed all the way into the NIC providing wiresspeed/wirelatency to VMs.

    We now turn our attention to using vDPA for providing wirespeed/wirelatency L2 interfaces to containers leveraging kubernetes to orchestrate the overall solution. We will demonstrate how Containerized Network Functions (CNFs) can be accelerated using a combination of vDPA interfaces and DPDK libraries. The vDPA interfaces are added as a secondary interface to containers using the Multus CNI plugin.

    This post is a high level solution overview describing the main building blocks and how they fit together. We assume that the reader has an overall understanding of Kubernetes, the Container Network Interface (CNI) and NFV terminology such as VNFs and CNFs.

  • Top 5 stress reliefs for sysadmins

Purism shows off more pictures of Librem 5 Phone and PureOS UI

Filed under
Gadgets

As the first batch of the Librem 5 phones starts reaching its respectful owners, we can now have a better look at the product from its pictures taken by the customers.

Before we check them out, let’s get to know a bit more about these phones. The Librem 5 smartphones are powered by PureOS, which is a Linux-based mobile operating system. The brains behind this product, namely Purism, have made it their top priority to offer such phones that provide security, privacy, and freedom to the customers. Accordingly, this product has been made for people who want to have complete control over their phones. You should check out this article if you want to know more about the Librem 5 smartphones.

Now coming back to the news, people who have ordered this phone are in for a treat as the Librem 5 comes with a black anodized aluminum case. Not only it’s stylish, but it also maintains high radio reception quality – thanks to its non-metal backing. It accompanies easier-to-slide, flush hardware kill switches.

Read more

Also: Nathan Wolf: New Life to Rock Candy Gamepad for PS3 | Another Repair

Graphics Stack: PTS, Libinput and NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 Milestone 1 Released With Updates For macOS Benchmarking

    The first development snapshot of Phoronix Test Suite 9.2-Hurdal is now available ahead of the stable release later this quarter.

    It's been just one month since the big Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 release with a new result viewer, graphing improvements, and other result viewing enhancements and lower-level improvements. With Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 as the Q4'2019 release will be more evolutionary improvements.

  • libinput and tablet pad keys

    Upcoming in libinput 1.15 is a small feature to support Wacom tablets a tiny bit better. If you look at the higher-end devices in Wacom's range, e.g. the Cintiq 27QHD you'll notice that at the top right of the device are three hardware-buttons with icons. Those buttons are intended to open the config panel, the on-screen display or the virtual keyboard. They've been around for a few years and supported in the kernel for a few releases. But in userspace, they events from those keys were ignored, casted out in the wild before eventually running out of electrons and succumbing to misery. Well, that's all changing now with a new interface being added to libinput to forward those events.

    Step back a second and let's look at the tablet interfaces. We have one for tablet tools (styli) and one for tablet pads. In the latter, we have events for rings, strips and buttons. The latter are simply numerically ordered, so button 1 is simply button 1 with no special meaning. Anything more specific needs to be handled by the compositor/client side which is responsible for assigning e.g. keyboard shortcuts to those buttons.

  • libinput and button scrolling locks

    For a few years now, libinput has provided button scrolling. Holding a designated button down and moving the device up/down or left/right creates the matching scroll events. We enable this behaviour by default on some devices (e.g. trackpoints) but it's available on mice and some other devices. Users can change the button that triggers it, e.g. assign it to the right button. There are of course a couple of special corner cases to make sure you can still click that button normally but as I said, all this has been available for quite some time now.

  • NVIDIA have released the big new Linux Beta driver 440.26 today

    Today NVIDIA released the 440.26 Beta driver for Linux with a number of new features, enhancements and a few interesting bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver Brings HDMI 2.1 VRR, VP9 VDPAU Decode + Much More

    NVIDIA today introduced their first beta driver in the 440 Linux branch and it's quite an exciting release!

    The NVIDIA 440.26 Linux beta driver is out this morning and it's bringing with it many new/improved features. There is now VP9 video decoding for VDPAU, HDMI 2.1 VRR for G-SYNC Compatible, and more.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Riddle me this

    Found this today while playing around, thought people might enjoy this riddle.

  • TOP 5 Software Failures of 2018–2019 (#5 is pretty alarming)

    In this modern day and age tech is something we can’t even imagine our life without. Technology is so cool and we love it! But not everything goes as planned and the thing that was supposed to make life easier and be useful can become quite scary. So, this week we’ve wanted to bring your attention to the “TOP 5 Software Failures of 2018–2019 (#5 is pretty alarming)”. We are very interested in your thoughts on the matter!

  • Using Matplotlib with Wing 7

    Wing supports interactive development and debugging of Python code designed for the Matplotlib numerical and scientific plotting library, so plots can be shown and updated from the command line.

  • An unexpected character replacement

    A few weeks ago I found a replacement in GBIF that I'd never seen before: M<fc>ller. It was a hexadecimal value for the character "ü" enclosed in angle brackets. That particular hex value for "ü" appears in Windows-1252 and other encodings, but what program did this replacement? And why?

    Suspecting the worst, I did a search for other angle-bracket-enclosed strings in the dataset. The search turned up a lot of data items which had originally contained a non-breaking space, and which now contained that character's Unicode representation in brackets, for example Laevicardium. Excluding these, the result is shown here:

  • 40 Simple Yet Effective Linux Shell Script Examples

    Historically, the shell has been the native command-line interpreter for Unix-like systems. It has proven to be one of Unix’s major features throughout the years and grew into a whole new topic itself. Linux offers a variety of powerful shells with robust functionality, including Bash, Zsh, Tcsh, and Ksh. One of the most amazing features of these shells is their programmability. Creating simple yet effective Linux shell scripts for tackling day to day jobs is quite easy. Moreover, a modest knowledge over this topic will make you a Linux power user in no time. Stay with us to for a detailed introduction to Unix shell scripting.

  • Creating A Super User In Django

    Django’s prominent feature is the admin interface, which makes it stand out from the competition. It is a built-in app that automatically generates a user interface to add and modify a site’s content.

  • Using PostgreSQL with Django

    Django is a high level full-stack open-source web framework written in Python, that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.

    Django, in its ‘out-of-the-box’ state, is set up to communicate with SQLite – a lightweight relational database included with the Python distribution. So by default, Django automatically creates an SQLite database for your project.

    In addition to SQLite, Django also has support for other popular databases that include PostgreSQL, MySQL, and Oracle.

  • Creating Comments System With Django

    In this tutorial, we will build a basic commenting system for a Django 2.X app, which lets readers add comments on posts.

    Here is a preview of what we are going to build by the end of this tutorial.

Fedora: IBus, F31 Delays, Cockpit and Foliate

Filed under
Red Hat
  • ibus-anthy 1.5.11 and anthy-unicode 1.0.0.20191015 are released

    ibus-anthy 1.5.11 is released and available in Fedora 30 or later.
    # dnf update ibus-anthy

    The default input mode is now Eisu (direct) mode but not Hiragana mode.

    Eisu mode now can load a user compose file of either $HOME/.config/ibus/Compose or $HOME/.XCompose although the system compose files has been already loaded.

  • IBus 1.5.21 is released

    IBus 1.5.21 is now released and available in Fedora 31.

    # dnf update ibus

    This release enhances the IBus compose features. The maximum number of the compose key sequences was 7. Also the output character was limited in 16 bit and only one character could be output so the latest emoji characters or custom long compose characters were not supported.
    The following is the demo.

  • Fedora 31 Release Held Up By Installer + DNF Bugs

    Fedora developers had been trying to ship Fedora 31 for their original release target of next Tuesday, 22 October, but that isn't going to happen due to remaining blocker bugs.

    At today's meeting they decided F31 is a "No-Go" due to open issues.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 205

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 205.

  • Foliate - A simple and modern ebook viewer for linux

    Foliate viewer support epub, .mobi, .azw, and .azw3 files. Have few mode for you such as light, dark, sepia and invert theme mode.

    How to install? Luckly, they also release distribution package for Fedora (sudo dnf install foliate , Arch and Void linux (xbps-install -S foliate). For DEB based such a Ubuntu or Debian can be download on latest release page. For others distribution, just download the source code and build yourself. Else, just download from Flatpak.

Mozilla: Glean SDK, Localisation, Reps and Security

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • This Week in Glean: Glean on Desktop (Project FOG)

    The Glean SDK is doing well on mobile. It’s shipping in Firefox Preview and Firefox for Fire TV on Android, and our iOS port for Lockwise is shaping up wonderfully well. Data is flowing in, letting us know how the products are being used.

    It’s time to set our sights on Desktop.

    It’s going to be tricky, but to realize one of the core benefits of the Glean SDK (the one about not having to maintain more than one data collection client library across Mozilla’s products) we have to do this. Also, we’re seeing more than a little interest from our coworkers to get going with it already : )

    One of the reasons it’s going to be tricky is that Desktop isn’t like Mobile. As an example, the Glean SDK “baseline” ping is sent whenever the product is sent to the background. This is predicated on the idea that the user isn’t using the application when it’s in the background. But on Desktop, there’s no similar application lifecycle paradigm we can use in that way. We could try sending a ping whenever focus leaves the browser (onblur), but that can happen very often and doesn’t have the same connotation of “user isn’t using it”. And what if the focus leaves one browser window to attach to another browser window? We need to have conversations with Data Science and Firefox Peers to figure out what lifecycle events most closely respect our desire to measure engagement.

    And that’s just one reason. One reason that needs investigation, exploration, discussion, design, proposal, approval, implementation, validation, and documentation.

    And this reason’s one that we actually know something about. Who knows what swarm of unknown quirks and possible failures lies in wait?

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: October Edition

    As explained in detail in the previous l10n report, cycles are starting to shorten towards the goal of 4 weeks. While Firefox 70 is going to be released in a few days, on October 22, the deadline to ship any update in Firefox 71 will be on November 19.

    Talking about Firefox 71, congratulations to Catalan (Valencian) (ca-valencia), Tagalog (tl), and Triqui (trs) for reaching an important milestone: with this version, they will move to Beta, and then will be officially released on December 3. Thanks to them, Firefox 71 will be shipping with 96 localizations.

    We have also added two new locales to Nightly in 71: Bodo (brx) and Tibetan (bo). If you speak one of these languages and want to help, head to Pontoon!

  • Mozilla Reps Community: Reps of the Month – September 2019

    Jyotsna is a Mozilla Rep and a Tech Speaker from Bangalore, India. The majority of her contributions goes to Add-ons, from building PrivateX to being an Add-ons Content Reviewer and a judge in the Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge. She was also highlighted as a Friend of Add-ons in the last quarter of 2018 on the Add-ons blog. Besides all this, she mentored new extension developers in her local community and joined the Featured Extensions Advisory Board.

  • Mozilla: Firefox 70 brings you these new security indicators

    Mozilla and Google Chrome developers discussed removing EV SSL indicators in the address bar in August because the indicators don't convey anything about the security and authenticity of a site.

    Google removed the EV indicators in Chrome 77, released in September, and Mozilla will do the same in Firefox 70, out later this month. This version removes the traditional green padlock icon plus the site owner's name from the address bar. The padlock for EV sites will now be the same as any normal HTTPS site.

Events: openSUSE Asia Summit, EmacsConf and LaKademy

Filed under
GNU
KDE
SUSE
  • openSUSE Asia Summit 2019: Summit Preparation

    Actually, this journey begins in 2015. I attending Indonesia Linux Conference, that’s the first time I meet people from openSUSE Indonesia. Mr. Edwin Zakaria. I remember, he gave me Alex the Gecko T-Shirt from Babacucu.com. My first openSUSE T-shirt.

    After attending the conference. I also invited to KPLI (Kelompok Pengguna Linux Indonesia: it’s like Indonesian Linux Users) meeting at Gucci, Tegal with my boss, Pak Vavai. It’s an honor for me. Because I remember, I was a kid who never knew about a community before.

  • November 2: Save the date! EmacsConf is coming to Boston

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is happy to announce our office in Boston as the next official EmacsConf satellite! Join us on Saturday, November 2 for an all-day event on everyone's favorite self-documenting, customizable, and extensible editor: GNU Emacs! The FSF will join ZĂźrich, Switzerland as the second physical satellite to EmacsConf, which will be held online this year.

  • Announcing LaKademy 2019

    The seventh edition of the KDE Latin-American Summit (LaKademy 2019) is ready to go! It will take place at Salvador-Bahia, northeastern Brazil, from 14th to 17th November. 24 participants, hopefully accompanied by some local guests, will meet at Information Technology Superintendence of Federal University of Bahia for four days of hacking sessions, promo meetings, and all sort of KDE-related things.

    Salvador (the city I live in) is well known for its beatiful beaches, the biggest carnival in the planet, and its unique cuisine. In November, attendees can already have a glimpse on our warm summer and hopefully that will bring a bunch of additional energy for having a fun and productive meeting.

Snaptastic – elementary OS snap manager

Filed under
Ubuntu

An interesting aspect in the life of any technology is how it propagates. Like organisms in nature, technology follows evolutionary patterns, and sometimes, it can be difficult predicting them. But their observation can be quite telling. Case in point, Snaptastic on elementary OS.

Snaptastic is a graphical snap manager utility, available in the elementary AppCenter, designed to aid the users of this distribution in getting the software that might not be available through standard repository channels.

Read more

Ubuntu and GNU/Linux Audiocasts/Shows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E28 – Super Sprint

    This week we’ve been doing ITIL Foundation training. Following the release of Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), we discuss our wish list items for Ubuntu Desktop 20.04 (Focal Fossa), bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 28 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Podcast Ubuntu Portugal: Ep 61 – Ubucon Europe 2019 Mashup show
  • Single Board Computers | Choose Linux 20

    We are joined by special guest Chz who is a long-time user of single board computers to talk about how we use boards like the Raspberry Pi, Orange Pi, and ROCKPro64.

  • 2019-10-17 | Linux Headlines

    OpenStack’s Train release pulls into the station amidst mixed news from supporters, Ubuntu 19.10 has arrived with plenty of tempting features, NGINX’s Unit application server receives a big update, IBM’s financials continue to disappoint, and some welcome security improvements for Chrome on Android.

Games: Tannenberg, Project Zomboid and Jackbox Party Pack 6

Filed under
Gaming
  • Tannenberg the WWI FPS adds the new Ukraine map, still on sale in a bundle

    M2H and Blackmill Games have just release another pretty big update to Tannenberg, their impressive WWI first-person shooter.

    Today's update adds in the Ukraine map which the developers say has plenty of open ground for HMGs to get you in their sights, with extensive trench networks to give some cover.

  • Project Zomboid just had the biggest Beta release ever overhauling loads of features

    Move over 7 Days to Die, you're not the only Zombie survival game in town with a recent overhaul. Project Zomboid is another that just released an absolutely massive Beta update to try out.

    Included in their "IWBUMS" (I Will Back Up My Save) Beta branch on Steam (not on GOG until stable) is the first step towards Project Zomboid version 41. The amount of changes included is quite ridiculous. The Indie Stone even said it's the "most fundamental and wide-ranging update that Project Zomboid has ever had" and they're not wrong.

    This latest Beta is work towards making Project Zomboid feel a little more alive and have a wider variety for everything. It's a foundation to bring even more big changes to PZ, with the new animation work in this build helping to bring wild animals in the next major build. This Beta is expected to last a while, as they have more to add back into it.

  • The Jackbox Party Pack 6 has officially released with Linux support

    In the mood to have a party? Well you're in luck as The Jackbox Party Pack 6 is now available with Linux support. Continuing their great support of Linux gaming, all six packs have Linux versions which is excellent!

    What makes the Jackbox Party Pack (any of them) great is how you connect to play them. No need to hook up 4 or 5 gamepads, stretch wires across the floor or anything annoying like that. You load the game, tell everyone to pull out their phone or tablet and connect up to their website with a room code and—pop, you're in the game.

GhostBSD Reaffirms To Being TrueOS+BSD Desktop OS With Official MATE Desktop

Filed under
BSD

With Project Trident moving away from a TrueOS/FreeBSD base to instead Void Linux, if you are looking for a good BSD-based desktop operating system it largely comes down to the likes of MidnightBSD and GhostBSD providing good out-of-the-box setups. As for GhostBSD, they are reaffirming their commitment to using TrueOS/FreeBSD and MATE as their official desktop.

The project reaffirmed on Wednesday that they are sticking to their TrueOS with FreeBSD 12-STABLE base while being a "slow-moving rolling release' that will eventually migrate to TrueOS with FreeBSD 13-STABLE after it is available.

Read more

Direct: Dealing with the misunderstandings of what is GhostBSD

Also: Codebase: Neck Deep | BSD Now 320

OpenBSD 6.6 Released

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD 6.6

    This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.6. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.6.

  • OpenBSD 6.6 Arrives: Disables GCC In Base For ARMv7/i386, SMP Improvements, AMDGPU Added

    Theo de Raadt released OpenBSD 6.6 today as the newest feature update to this popular BSD operating system known for its security focus.

    OpenBSD 6.6 has moved to disabling GCC in its base packages for i386 and ARMv7, LLVM Clang platform support has been expanded, various SMP improvements and more system calls being unlocked, improved Linux compatibility with ACPI interfaces, a number of new hardware drivers, wired and wireless networking stack improvements, various installation enhancements, and the never-ending work on improving the security. OpenBSD 6.6 ships with OpenSSH 8.1, LibreSSL 3.0.2, OpenSMTPD 6.6, and other updated packages.

antiX-19 isos available.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

antiX-19 is based on Debian Buster and systemd-free.

As usual we offer the following systemd-free flavours for both 32 and 64 bit architecture.

Read more

Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” Released. Here's What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” is released with latest features, iconic changes. Read on.

Ubuntu – the most popular and widely used Linux Operating system for desktop and servers, announced the release of fresh Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine”. This is a non-LTS release which means it is feature rich and supported till July 2020. Targeted for early adopters – Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” brings some important changes. These changes are the foundation for the next LTS release.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Purism shows off more pictures of Librem 5 Phone and PureOS UI

As the first batch of the Librem 5 phones starts reaching its respectful owners, we can now have a better look at the product from its pictures taken by the customers. Before we check them out, let’s get to know a bit more about these phones. The Librem 5 smartphones are powered by PureOS, which is a Linux-based mobile operating system. The brains behind this product, namely Purism, have made it their top priority to offer such phones that provide security, privacy, and freedom to the customers. Accordingly, this product has been made for people who want to have complete control over their phones. You should check out this article if you want to know more about the Librem 5 smartphones. Now coming back to the news, people who have ordered this phone are in for a treat as the Librem 5 comes with a black anodized aluminum case. Not only it’s stylish, but it also maintains high radio reception quality – thanks to its non-metal backing. It accompanies easier-to-slide, flush hardware kill switches. Read more Also: Nathan Wolf: New Life to Rock Candy Gamepad for PS3 | Another Repair

Graphics Stack: PTS, Libinput and NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver

  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 Milestone 1 Released With Updates For macOS Benchmarking

    The first development snapshot of Phoronix Test Suite 9.2-Hurdal is now available ahead of the stable release later this quarter. It's been just one month since the big Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 release with a new result viewer, graphing improvements, and other result viewing enhancements and lower-level improvements. With Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 as the Q4'2019 release will be more evolutionary improvements.

  • libinput and tablet pad keys

    Upcoming in libinput 1.15 is a small feature to support Wacom tablets a tiny bit better. If you look at the higher-end devices in Wacom's range, e.g. the Cintiq 27QHD you'll notice that at the top right of the device are three hardware-buttons with icons. Those buttons are intended to open the config panel, the on-screen display or the virtual keyboard. They've been around for a few years and supported in the kernel for a few releases. But in userspace, they events from those keys were ignored, casted out in the wild before eventually running out of electrons and succumbing to misery. Well, that's all changing now with a new interface being added to libinput to forward those events. Step back a second and let's look at the tablet interfaces. We have one for tablet tools (styli) and one for tablet pads. In the latter, we have events for rings, strips and buttons. The latter are simply numerically ordered, so button 1 is simply button 1 with no special meaning. Anything more specific needs to be handled by the compositor/client side which is responsible for assigning e.g. keyboard shortcuts to those buttons.

  • libinput and button scrolling locks

    For a few years now, libinput has provided button scrolling. Holding a designated button down and moving the device up/down or left/right creates the matching scroll events. We enable this behaviour by default on some devices (e.g. trackpoints) but it's available on mice and some other devices. Users can change the button that triggers it, e.g. assign it to the right button. There are of course a couple of special corner cases to make sure you can still click that button normally but as I said, all this has been available for quite some time now.

  • NVIDIA have released the big new Linux Beta driver 440.26 today

    Today NVIDIA released the 440.26 Beta driver for Linux with a number of new features, enhancements and a few interesting bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver Brings HDMI 2.1 VRR, VP9 VDPAU Decode + Much More

    NVIDIA today introduced their first beta driver in the 440 Linux branch and it's quite an exciting release! The NVIDIA 440.26 Linux beta driver is out this morning and it's bringing with it many new/improved features. There is now VP9 video decoding for VDPAU, HDMI 2.1 VRR for G-SYNC Compatible, and more.

Programming Leftovers

  • Riddle me this

    Found this today while playing around, thought people might enjoy this riddle.

  • TOP 5 Software Failures of 2018–2019 (#5 is pretty alarming)

    In this modern day and age tech is something we can’t even imagine our life without. Technology is so cool and we love it! But not everything goes as planned and the thing that was supposed to make life easier and be useful can become quite scary. So, this week we’ve wanted to bring your attention to the “TOP 5 Software Failures of 2018–2019 (#5 is pretty alarming)”. We are very interested in your thoughts on the matter!

  • Using Matplotlib with Wing 7

    Wing supports interactive development and debugging of Python code designed for the Matplotlib numerical and scientific plotting library, so plots can be shown and updated from the command line.

  • An unexpected character replacement

    A few weeks ago I found a replacement in GBIF that I'd never seen before: M<fc>ller. It was a hexadecimal value for the character "ü" enclosed in angle brackets. That particular hex value for "ü" appears in Windows-1252 and other encodings, but what program did this replacement? And why? Suspecting the worst, I did a search for other angle-bracket-enclosed strings in the dataset. The search turned up a lot of data items which had originally contained a non-breaking space, and which now contained that character's Unicode representation in brackets, for example Laevicardium. Excluding these, the result is shown here:

  • 40 Simple Yet Effective Linux Shell Script Examples

    Historically, the shell has been the native command-line interpreter for Unix-like systems. It has proven to be one of Unix’s major features throughout the years and grew into a whole new topic itself. Linux offers a variety of powerful shells with robust functionality, including Bash, Zsh, Tcsh, and Ksh. One of the most amazing features of these shells is their programmability. Creating simple yet effective Linux shell scripts for tackling day to day jobs is quite easy. Moreover, a modest knowledge over this topic will make you a Linux power user in no time. Stay with us to for a detailed introduction to Unix shell scripting.

  • Creating A Super User In Django

    Django’s prominent feature is the admin interface, which makes it stand out from the competition. It is a built-in app that automatically generates a user interface to add and modify a site’s content.

  • Using PostgreSQL with Django

    Django is a high level full-stack open-source web framework written in Python, that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. Django, in its ‘out-of-the-box’ state, is set up to communicate with SQLite – a lightweight relational database included with the Python distribution. So by default, Django automatically creates an SQLite database for your project. In addition to SQLite, Django also has support for other popular databases that include PostgreSQL, MySQL, and Oracle.

  • Creating Comments System With Django

    In this tutorial, we will build a basic commenting system for a Django 2.X app, which lets readers add comments on posts. Here is a preview of what we are going to build by the end of this tutorial.

Fedora: IBus, F31 Delays, Cockpit and Foliate

  • ibus-anthy 1.5.11 and anthy-unicode 1.0.0.20191015 are released

    ibus-anthy 1.5.11 is released and available in Fedora 30 or later. # dnf update ibus-anthy The default input mode is now Eisu (direct) mode but not Hiragana mode. Eisu mode now can load a user compose file of either $HOME/.config/ibus/Compose or $HOME/.XCompose although the system compose files has been already loaded.

  • IBus 1.5.21 is released

    IBus 1.5.21 is now released and available in Fedora 31. # dnf update ibus This release enhances the IBus compose features. The maximum number of the compose key sequences was 7. Also the output character was limited in 16 bit and only one character could be output so the latest emoji characters or custom long compose characters were not supported. The following is the demo.

  • Fedora 31 Release Held Up By Installer + DNF Bugs

    Fedora developers had been trying to ship Fedora 31 for their original release target of next Tuesday, 22 October, but that isn't going to happen due to remaining blocker bugs. At today's meeting they decided F31 is a "No-Go" due to open issues.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 205

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 205.

  • Foliate - A simple and modern ebook viewer for linux

    Foliate viewer support epub, .mobi, .azw, and .azw3 files. Have few mode for you such as light, dark, sepia and invert theme mode. How to install? Luckly, they also release distribution package for Fedora (sudo dnf install foliate , Arch and Void linux (xbps-install -S foliate). For DEB based such a Ubuntu or Debian can be download on latest release page. For others distribution, just download the source code and build yourself. Else, just download from Flatpak.