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Wednesday, 17 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security and Spying With Listening Devices (Google, Amazon, Microsoft)

Filed under
Security
  • Was DNS intentionally designed to be insecure?

    but noone considered that now-controversial near-truism at all when the core internet protocols were first designed and implemented. the idea of abuse was considered novel in the 1990's when commercialization and privatization brought abuse into the internet world and burst the academic bubble. a lot of old timers blamed AOL and MSN and even Usenet for the problems, but in actuality, it's what humans _always_ do at scale. putting the full spectrum of human culture atop a technology platform designed for academic and professional culture should have been understood to be a recipe for disaster.

  • Smart meters in England are mysteriously switching to Welsh

    Bulb says that the problem has occurred in around 200 cases and that it takes five steps to fix it, though if you don't know Welsh, you'll need to get Bulb to talk you through it by way of numbers of button pushes.

    "While we think Welsh is a great language, we understand that in many cases people will want their display to be in English." it jibbered in a statement.

  • 'Defnydd heddiw': Smart meter displays in England turn Welsh in bizarre language glitch

    One customer, James Tombs, who lives well over 100 miles from the Welsh border, in West Sussex, told us: "I don't live in Wales and don't know Welsh. One day I saw my meter was in Welsh but ignored it as I was busy. I then came back to it later and realised that the screen was locked, the buttons didn't do anything and the unit wasn't updating. The clock was stuck at 15.47.

  • iOS 13 beta exposes iCloud Keychain passwords and usernames

    This allows for access to iCloud Keychain passwords, which pretty much means access to a whole suite of usernames and passwords stored by Apple's cloud service. We can envision the potential for another iCloud hack, only with leaked nudes of early adopter Apple fanatics rather than celebs indulging their promiscuous sides.

  • Windows 10 will soon allow third-party voice assistants to take precedence over Cortana

    Watch out for the change is 19H2 - which will be the first bi-annual update to the operating system to be a patch rollup, similar to the old Service Packs, instead of a full new build.

  • Google Home integrations are borking left, right and centre

    So what's the problem? Well, from the sound of the workaround, it appears that Google has been mucking about with the API under the hood again.

  • Google Assistant currently can’t connect to Philips Hue lights, fix is in the works

    For the past several months, Google Home owners have been encountering spotty issues between Assitant and Philips Hue products. In recent weeks especially, this problem has only gotten worse, and currently, the two products can’t talk to each other whatsoever. For most users, this results in attempting to unlink and relink a Hue account to Assistant, but that only results in an error when trying to relink the two accounts.

Krita 4.2.3 Released

Filed under
KDE

Today we’re releasing Krita 4.2.3. This is mostly a bug fix release, but has one new feature: it is now possible to rotate the canvas with a two-finger touch gesture. This feature was implemented by Sharaf Zaman for his 2019 Google Summer of Code work of porting Krita to Android. The feature also works on other platforms, of course.

The most important bug fix is a workaround for Windows installations with broken, outdated or insufficient graphics drivers. The core of the issue is that our development platform, Qt, in its current version needs a working OpenGL or Direct3D installation as soon as there is a single component in the application that uses QML, a technology for creating user interfaces. We have managed to work around this issue and especially users of Windows 7 systems that have become a bit messy should be able to run Krita again.

Read more

Games: Eagle Island, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS, Robo Instructus, Ion Fury, TRI: Of Friendship and Madness

Filed under
Gaming
  • The lovely rogue-lite platformer "Eagle Island" can now be picked up on GOG, Linux build soon

    Heads up GOG fans, Eagle Island from Pixelnicks is now available to pick up from GOG with the Linux build expected soon.

  • Total War: THREE KINGDOMS new "Eight Princes" DLC is set 100 years after the main game

    Releasing soon, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS is to get an "Eight Princes" DLC set 100 years after the Three Kingdoms period began.

    Announced yesterday, Creative Assembly are moving quickly to add in a whole lot more content to THREE KINGDOMS and it does sound pretty sweet.

    It will feature: an entirely new campaign; eight new playable princes with "substantially different" play-styles with unique buildings, assignments and court options; along with new elite units like cataphracts; four new alignments Wealth, Spirit, Might, and Mind and more.

  • Guide a robot with simple programming in "Robo Instructus", out now

    Robo Instructus from Big AB Games, which is mainly a solo-operation, is a puzzle game where you need to guide a robot using a simple programming language.

    Is it odd to think programming can be relaxing? If so, I guess I'm pretty strange in that way. Even if you don't know any programming, Robo Instructus walks you through things quite easily and getting started with it is pretty quick.

  • Grab Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) before the price shoots up tomorrow

    Interested in slick retro first-person shooters? You may want to act fast as the price of Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) goes up tomorrow.

    Currently in Early Access, Ion Fury offers a very good preview campaign to play through while you wait for the full release on August 15th. The price is currently around $19.99 but from tomorrow they will bump it up to $24.99.

  • TRI: Of Friendship and Madness returns to GOG with Linux support

    After being previously removed from the DRM-free store GOG, TRI: Of Friendship and Madness has now made a return with full Linux support included.

8 Top Ubuntu server Web GUI Management Panels

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Server with command-line interface might sound little bit wired to newbies because of no previous familiarization. Thus, if you are new to Ubuntu Linux server running on your local hardware or some Cloud hosting and planning to install some Linux Desktop Graphical environment (GUI) over it; I would like to recommend don’t, until and unless you don’t have supported hardware. Instead, think about free and open-source Ubuntu server Web GUI Management panels.

Moreover, for a moment, you can think about Desktop Graphical environment for your local server but if you have some Linux cloud hosting server, never do it. I am saying this because Ubuntu or any other Linux server operating systems are built to run on low hardware resources, thus even old computer/server hardware can easily handle it. GUI means more RAM and hard disk storage space.

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Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish reaches end of life on Thursday, upgrade now

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Ubuntu

Canonical, earlier this month, announced that Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish will be reaching end-of-life status this Thursday, making now the ideal time to upgrade to a later version. As with all non-Long Term Support (LTS) releases, 18.10 had nine months of support following its release last October.

When distributions reach their end-of-life stage, they no longer receive security updates. While you may be relatively safe at first, the longer you keep running an unpatched system, the more likely it is that your system will become compromised putting your data at risk. If you’d like to move on from Ubuntu 18.10, you’ve got two options; you can either perform a clean install of a more up-to-date version of Ubuntu or you can do an in-place upgrade.

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today's leftovers: kernel, games, mozilla...

Filed under
Misc
  • Call for submissions — linux.conf.au 2020

    The linux.conf.au 2020 organising team has issued an invitation to IT professionals for proposals for talks and miniconfs at the next conference, which will take place on the Gold Coast, 13–17 January 2020.

    Held regularly since 1999, linux.conf.au is the largest Linux and open source conference in the Asia–Pacific region. The conference provides deeply technical presentations from industry leaders and experts on a wide array of subjects relating to open source projects, data and open government and community engagement.

  • Intel Is Still Working On Upstreaming SGX Enclave Support To Linux - Now At 21 Revisions

    Intel Software Guard Extensions "SGX" have been around since Skylake for allowing hardware-protected (via encryption) memory regions known as "enclaves" that prevent processes outside of the enclave from accessing these memory regions. While supported CPUs have been out for years, the Intel SGX support has yet to make it into the mainline kernel and this week marks the twenty-first revision to these patches. 

    The twenty-eight patches implementing the Intel SGX foundations support for the Linux kernel and Intel Memory Encryption Engine support were revised with various fixes. Even if the review of this twenty-first revision to these patches go spectacular, due to the timing this SGX support won't land until at least the Linux 5.4 kernel with being too late for Linux 5.3. 

  • Ciel Fledge, an Anime-styled sim about raising an adopted daughter

    Quite a peculiar game this one, Ciel Fledge from Studio Namaapa and PQube Games has you adopt a strange child found on the surface of a ruined planet and raise her.

  • Bendy and the Ink Machine & Prison Architect going cheap in the new Humble Very Positive Bundle 3

    Humble just released a new bundle full of highly rated games, with 2 great picks in there for Linux gamers.

    The Humble Very Positive Bundle 3 is now live, with 7 total games. Sadly, only 2 of those have Linux releases but even so it's a chance for you to get them a lot cheaper than normal and together.

  • backlogs, lag, and waiting
  • MDN’s First Annual Web Developer & Designer Survey

    Today we are launching the first edition of the MDN Developer & Designer Needs Survey. Web developers and designers, we need to hear from you! This is your opportunity to tell us about your needs and frustrations with the web.

  • GSOC19 Ahmed ElShreif: Week 7 Report

    Then I spend more time reading some UI tests written with Python framework and try to figure out what missing of the UI elements and I disccuss adding logs for new events with my mentors.

Video/Audio: LINUX Unplugged, Coder Radio, and Debian 10 "Buster" Video Overview

Devices With Linux: Ibase, AOpen, Purism and ASUS

Filed under
Linux
  • Ryzen Embedded V1000 module supports four USB 3.1 ports

    Ibase’s “ET976” COM Express Type 6 module builds on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC with USB 3.1, SATA III, GbE, PCIe x8, PEG, and more.

    Ibase announced a COM Express Type 6 module equipped with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 system-on-chip. The announcement refers to the ET876 as a Compact module (95 x 95mm) like Ibase’s earlier, Intel 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” ET975, but the spec sheet and the photo indicate it’s a larger 125 x 95mm Basic module like Ibase’s 7th Gen ET970.

  • AOpen’s new kiosk/signage systems span Kaby Lake and Whiskey Lake

    AOpen’s compact, Linux-friendly “Digital Engine DE5500” embedded PC for kiosk and signage has a 7th Gen CPU, 2x HDMI 2.0, 2x GbE, 3x M.2, and SATA. AOpen is also prepping a Whiskey Lake based smart kiosk with OpenVINO and RealSense.

    Taiwanese signage vendor AOpen, which offers products such as its Android-driven, i.MX6-based MEP320 signage player, has launched an Intel 7th Gen Kaby Lake based signage and kiosk computer called the Digital Engine DE5500. The product supports Linux or Windows 10 and offers an optional AOpen Intelligent Control Unit (AiCU) smart kiosk control software package with “self-perception, self-determination, and self-execution” features.

  • Mr. Librem Kyle Rankin: Consent Matters: When Tech Shares Your Secrets Without Your Permission

    There is a saying that goes around modern privacy circles that “Privacy is about Consent.” This means that the one big factor that determines whether your privacy is violated comes down to whether you consented to share the information. For instance, let’s say Alice tells Bob a secret: if Bob then tells the secret to someone else, Bob will be violating Alice’s privacy, unless he had asked Alice for permission first. If you think about it, you can come up with many examples where the same action, leading to the same result, takes on a completely different tone–depending on whether or not the actor got consent.

    We have a major privacy problem in society today, largely because tech companies collect customer information and share it with others without getting real consent from their customers. Real consent means customers understand all of the ways their information will be used and shared, all the implications that come from that sharing–now, and in the future. Instead, customers get a lengthy, click-through privacy policy document that no one is really expected to read or understand. Even if someone does read and understand the click-through agreement, it still doesn’t fully explain all of the implications behind sharing your location and contact list with a messaging app or using voice commands on your phone.

    Big Tech has been funded, over the past two decades, by exploiting the huge influx of young adults who were connected to the Internet and shared their data without restriction. While it’s a generalization that young adults often make decisions based on short-term needs, without considering the long-term impacts, there’s also some truth behind it–whether we are discussing a tattoo that seemed like a good idea at the time, posting pictures or statements on social media that come back to bite you or giving an app full access to your phone. Individuals didn’t understand the value of this data or the risks in sharing it; but tech companies knew it all along and were more than happy to collect, store, share and profit off of it, and Big Tech is now a multi-billion-dollar industry.

  • ASUS Chromebook C523

    Today we are looking at the ASUS Chromebook C523 (C523NA-DH02). It is a strong, modern smart-looking Chromebook for a great price with a big screen.

    It comes with a fanless Dual-Core Intel Celeron N3350 CPU, a 15.6 inch, 1366x768, HD NanoEdge display, and non-touch screen. It has 4gb of RAM and a 32GB eMMC SSD.

    It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until November 2023.

    It weighs 3.1 lbs and its dimensions are 14.1 x 9.9 x 0.6 in inches. The battery has 2 cells, 38Whr Lithium-ion battery, and 10 hours of battery life.

Ubuntu Copying Fedora and Ubucon Raising Funds

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 19.10 Will Offer a Flicker Free Boot (For Some Users, Anyway)

    A short, but welcome, update: Ubuntu 19.10 will offer a flicker free boot experience for some users!

    Red Hat’s crop of competent engineers are (as always) to credit for effort that Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’ takes full advantage of.

    Now, Ubuntu’s boot experience as-is isn’t exactly terrible, but there’s a visible bit of blinking during the process.

    As an AMD user I’m used to my laptop display “flickering” off and back on a few times during boot, signalling the transition from boot loader to loading screen to login screen — alas, something this effort can’t address.

    But users of Ubuntu 19.10 with modern Intel graphics cards and an UEFI setup should benefit from a truly seamless flickr-free boot experience, thanks to a new Plymouth snapshot added to the Eoan archives.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Ship With Flicker-Free Boot Support

    Thanks to the upstream work achieved by Red Hat engineers working on Fedora the past few cycles, Ubuntu 19.10 should have a flicker-free boot experience.

    Ubuntu 19.10 is in the process of picking up packages for the flicker-free boot experience that was led by Red Hat engineers like Hans de Goede for delivering a very polished boot experience particularly when booting in UEFI mode and also with supported graphics driver configurations, which for now is best with the Intel DRM code.

  • Our Diamond Sponsor – Ubuntu!

    Our Diamond Sponsor of this event is Ubuntu, an open source software operating system that runs from the desktop, to the cloud, to all your internet connected things.

    Linux was already established in 2004, but it was fragmented into proprietary and unsupported community editions, and free software was not a part of everyday life for most computer users. That’s when Mark Shuttleworth gathered a small team of Debian developers who together founded Canonical and set out to create an easy-to-use Linux desktop called Ubuntu.

  • Ubucon Europe 2019: Call for Sponsors

    This event can only be possible thanks to our sponsors. Your investment helps us create a greater experience for the open source community, while you still benefit from a considerable amount of exposure.

IBM, Red Hat and Servers

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Using KubeFed to Deploy Applications to OCP3 and OCP4 Clusters
  • IBM Announces Three New Open Source Projects for Developing Apps for Kubernetes and the Data Asset eXchange (DAX), the Linux Foundation Is Having a Sysadmin Day Sale, London Launches Open-Source Homebuilding App and Clonezilla Live 2.6.2-15 Released

    IBM this morning announces three new open-source projects that "make it faster and easier for you to develop and deploy applications for Kubernetes". Kabanero "integrates the runtimes and frameworks that you already know and use (Node.js, Java, Swift) with a Kubernetes-native DevOps toolchain". Appsody "gives you pre-configured stacks and templates for a growing set of popular open source runtimes and frameworks, providing a foundation on which to build applications for Kubernetes and Knative deployments". And Codewind "provides extensions to popular integrated development environments (IDEs) like VS Code, Eclipse, and Eclipse Che (with more planned), so you can use the workflow and IDE you already know to build applications in containers."

    IBM also today announces the Data Asset eXchange (DAX), which is "an online hub for developers and data scientists to find carefully curated free and open datasets under open data licenses". The press release notes that whenever possible, "datasets posted on DAX will use the Linux Foundation's Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) open data licensing framework to enable data sharing and collaboration. Furthermore, DAX provides unique access to various IBM and IBM Research datasets. IBM plans to publish new datasets on the Data Asset eXchange regularly. The datasets on DAX will integrate with IBM Cloud and AI services as appropriate."

  • Data as the new oil: The danger behind the mantra

    Not a week goes by that I don’t hear a tech pundit, analyst, or CIO say “data is the new oil.” This overused mantra suggests that data is a commodity that can become extremely valuable once refined. Many technologists have used that phrase with little knowledge of where it originated – I know I wasn’t aware of its origin. 

    It turns out the phrase is attributed to Clive Humby, a British mathematician who helped create British retailer Tesco’s Clubcard loyalty program. Humby quipped, “Data is the new oil. It’s valuable, but if unrefined it cannot really be used. It has to be changed into gas, plastic, chemicals, etc., to create a valuable entity that drives profitable activity; so must data be broken down, analyzed for it to have value.”

  • How to explain deep learning in plain English

    Understanding artificial intelligence sometimes isn’t a matter of technology so much as terminology. There’s plenty of it under the big AI umbrella – such as machine learning, natural language processing, computer vision, and more.

    Compounding this issue, some AI terms overlap. Being able to define key concepts clearly – and subsequently understand the relationships and differences between them – is foundational to your crafting a solid AI strategy. Plus, if the IT leaders in your organization can’t articulate terms like deep learning, how can they be expected to explain it (and other concepts) to the rest of the company?

  • How to make the case for service mesh: 5 benefits

    Service mesh is a trending technology, but that alone does not mean every organization needs it. As always, adopting a technology should be driven by the goals it helps you attain or, put another way, the problems it helps you solve.

    It’s certainly worth understanding what a service mesh does – in part so you can explain it to other people. Whether or not you actually need one really depends upon your applications and environments.

Programming/Development: Python and C++

Filed under
Development
  • Return the number which is larger than the sum of the remaining numbers in a list with Python

    Given a list of numbers, return a new list consists of the number which is larger than the sum of the remaining numbers in a list or larger than absolute zero. For example, this list [2, 5, 2, 1] will convert to [5, 2, 1] because 5 is greater than 2+1, 2 is greater than 1 and 1 is greater than absolute zero. Another example. [2, 3, -3] will convert to [2, 3] because 2 is greater than 3+(-3) and 3 is greater than -3 but -3 is lesser than 0 which means -3 will not get included into the new list.

  • Jussi Pakkanen: A personal story about 10× development

    During the last few days there has been an ongoing Twitter storm about 10× developers. And like all the ones before it (and all the future ones that will inevitably happen) the debate immediately devolved into name calling and all the other things you'd except from Twitter fights. This blog post is not about that. Instead it is about a personal experience about productivity that I had to experience closer than I would have liked.

    Some years ago I was working for company X on product Y. All in all it was quite a nice experience. We had a small team working on a code base that was pretty good. It had nice tests, not too many bugs, and when issues did arise they were usually easy to fix. Eventually the project was deemed good enough and we were transferred to work on different projects.

    I have no idea what our "industry standard performance multiplier" was when we worked on that project, but for the sake of argument let's call it 1×.

    The project I got transferred to was the thing of nightmares. It was a C++ project and all the bad things that have ever been said about C++ were true about that code base. There was not much code but it was utterly incomprehensible. There were massively deep inheritance hierarchies, , compilation speed was measured in minutes for even the most trivial changes, and so on. It was managed by an architecture astronaut that, as one is wont to do, rewrote existing mature libraries as header only template libraries that were buggy and untested (one could even say untestable).

  • 101 Machine Learning Algorithms for Data Science with Cheat Sheets

    Think of this as the one-stop-shop/dictionary/directory for your machine learning algorithms. The algorithms have been sorted into 9 groups: Anomaly Detection, Association Rule Learning, Classification, Clustering, Dimensional Reduction, Ensemble, Neural Networks, Regression, Regularization. In this post, you'll find 101 machine learning algorithms, including useful infographics to help you know when to use each one (if available).

  • Python for NLP: Developing an Automatic Text Filler using N-Grams

    This is the 15th article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In my previous article, I explained how to implement TF-IDF approach from scratch in Python. Before that we studied, how to implement bag of words approach from scratch in Python.

    Today, we will study the N-Grams approach and will see how the N-Grams approach can be used to create a simple automatic text filler or suggestion engine. Automatic text filler is a very useful application and is widely used by Google and different smartphones where a user enters some text and the remaining text is automatically populated or suggested by the application.

  • How to Write Pythonic Loops

    One of the easiest ways to spot a developer who has a background in C-style languages and only recently picked up Python is to look at how they loop through a list. In this course, you’ll learn how to take a C-style (Java, PHP, C, C++) loop and turn it into the sort of loop a Python developer would write.

    You can use these techniques to refactor your existing Python for loops and while loops in order to make them easier to read and more maintainable. You’ll learn how to use Python’s range(), xrange(), and enumerate() built-ins to refactor your loops and how to avoid having to keep track of loop indexes manually.

  • Tutorial: Advanced For Loops in Python

    In a previous tutorial, we covered the basics of Python for loops, looking at how to iterate through lists and lists of lists. But there’s a lot more to for loops than looping through lists, and in real-world data science work, you may want to use for loops with other data structures, including numpy arrays and pandas DataFrames.

    This tutorial begins with how to use for loops to iterate through common Python data structures other than lists (like tuples and dictionaries). Then we’ll dig into using for loops in tandem with common Python data science libraries like numpy, pandas, and matplotlib. We’ll also take a closer look at the range() function and how it’s useful when writing for loops.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #377 (July 16, 2019)

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (expat and radare2), Oracle (thunderbird), Red Hat (389-ds-base, keepalived, libssh2, perl, and vim), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), SUSE (bzip2, kernel, podofo, systemd, webkit2gtk3, and xrdp), and Ubuntu (bash, nss, redis, squid, squid3, and Zipios).

  • Explainer: What is post-quantum cryptography?

    Few of us give much thought to the tiny padlock symbol that appears in our web browsers every time we use an e-commerce site, send and receive emails, or check our bank or credit card accounts. But it’s a signal that the online services are using HTTPS, a web protocol that encrypts the data we send across the internet and the responses we receive. This and other forms of encryption protect all kinds of electronic communications, as well as things like passwords, digital signatures, and health records.

  • Monitoring Linux Logs with Kibana and Rsyslog

    f you are a system administrator, or even a curious application developer, there is a high chance that you are regularly digging into your logs to find precious information in them.

    Sometimes you may want to monitor SSH intrusions on your VMs.

    Sometimes, you might want to see what errors were raised by your application server on a certain day, on a very specific hour. Or you may want to have some insights about who stopped your systemd service on one of your VMs.

    If you pictured yourself in one of those points, you are probably on the right tutorial.

    In this tutorial, we are to build a complete log monitoring pipeline using the ELK stack (ElasticSearch, Logstash and Kibana) and Rsyslog as a powerful syslog server.

    Before going any further, and jumping into technical considerations right away, let’s have a talk about why do we want to monitor Linux logs with Kibana.

  • Critical Vulnerability Found In Ad Inserter WordPress Plugin [Ed: Well, ads are malicious, many are literally malware, so people who put this crap in their site ask for if not deserve the worst.]

    On July 12, Wordfence team(Another popular security plugin for WordPress), discovered a vulnerability called RCE — Remote Code Execution in Ad inserter. This vulnerability can allow an attacker to run any arbitrary PHP code on the site.

    The vulnerability was found in Ad preview module of the plugin where you can preview the ads position, size, etc. before publishing it. This action can only be executed by the WordPress administrators and to ensure this, the plugin writer used WordPress function ‘check_admin_referer()‘ which ensures that the action is being performed by the administrator.

    Wordfence threat intelligence team who discovered this vulnerability said the ‘check_admin_referer()‘ function is not enough protection. check_admin_referer() is designed to protect against CSRF (Cross-site request forgery) and the way it ensures this is by checking if nonce (a one-time token) exists in the request.

  • Wanna work on Debian LTS (and get funded)?

    If you are in Curitiba and are interested to work on Debian LTS (and get paid for that work), please come and talk to me, Debian LTS is still looking for more contributors!

Kali NetHunter App Store – Public Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Kali NetHunter has been undergoing a ton of changes of late. Now supporting over 50 devices and running on Android devices from KitKat (v4.4) to Pie (v9.0), its amazing the extra capabilities that have been introduced.

But, we don’t want to stop there. After a ton of work, we are really excited to introduce the Kali NetHunter App Store!

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VirtualBox 6.0.10 Released

Filed under
Software

Top 15 Best Forum Software For Linux in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

The online forum has been a popular and helpful platform for different kinds of professionals and bloggers. Based on the posted topic, people do discuss and provide their opinions. It works as a great place to get a clear idea of any item you prefer in the specific community. Like the other platforms, Linux also has many useful forum applications. Today, we are going to show you a comprehensive list of the best forum software for Linux users.

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Seven Concerns Open Source Should Worry About - Part 1

Filed under
OSS

Not long ago, the Linux community celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of Linus Torvalds’ famous Internet post, and thus its birth. While Linux was not the first open source project (Richard Stallman announced his GNU Project eight years before), it soon became the poster child of a new way of collaborative development that changed not only how technology is created, but many other aspects of the world as well. Today, most critical software platforms and architectures are open source, and virtually all proprietary software is riddled with free and open source software (FOSS) as well.

So, what could go wrong? Well, a lot, actually, unless we pause to think about where the potholes may emerge in the future, and how we can successfully navigate our way around them. That’s what I plan to do in a series of articles to which this is the introduction.

Happily, all the potential concerns I will address can be addressed. That’s the good news. The bad news is that neither the commercial world nor the community of developers has a very good history of thinking about some types of risks that might be expensive, inconvenient, or just plain boring to manage or fix.

Take security. That’s hardly a risk that’s unique to FOSS. But it is a concern that’s been around for a very long time. So long that we have a pretty compelling record of how both human and commercial nature act in response to security risks. Or, more to the point, don’t act. It would be impossible to find a single new wave of technology – and there have been very many – where security was not addressed as an after thought rather than designed in from the start. Almost always after multiple disasters had already occurred.

The latest example is the Internet of Things. The IoT has been building out for going on a decade now, and none of the initial devices had any security features at all. Most of the latest devices still don’t. Some even have designed-in vulnerabilities, like factory programmed, unchangeable passwords.

Other risks arise from a different type of complacency – assuming that because FOSS is “good” that it’s not possible to do anything “bad” when it’s created. That’s a dangerous attitude to have when you consider that there are increasing numbers of projects that are heavily funded by multiple head to head competitors. FOSS projects need concise antitrust policies - and then they need to follow them. Codes of Conduct, too.

Other aspects of complacency relate to how effective FOSS licenses (as compared to what might be referred to as social pressures) are in a legal sense. Another is unquestioned assumption that the world will always be better with a single, dominant code base. Sometimes, competition between multiple architectures and platforms is a good thing. And while everybody wants to contribute to a rapidly expanding project that’s taking over the world, not everyone wants to do the boring maintenance work after its finished and becomes stable. If too many developers lose interest and drift away, still-crucial elements of the technology ecosystem can become dangerously vulnerable, stagnant and weak.

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Network Security Toolkit 30-11210

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Security

We are pleased to announce the latest NST release: "NST 30 SVN:11210". This release is based on Fedora 30 using Linux Kernel: "kernel-5.1.17-300.fc30.x86_64". This release brings the NST distribution on par with Fedora 30.

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8 Top Ubuntu server Web GUI Management Panels

Ubuntu Server with command-line interface might sound little bit wired to newbies because of no previous familiarization. Thus, if you are new to Ubuntu Linux server running on your local hardware or some Cloud hosting and planning to install some Linux Desktop Graphical environment (GUI) over it; I would like to recommend don’t, until and unless you don’t have supported hardware. Instead, think about free and open-source Ubuntu server Web GUI Management panels. Moreover, for a moment, you can think about Desktop Graphical environment for your local server but if you have some Linux cloud hosting server, never do it. I am saying this because Ubuntu or any other Linux server operating systems are built to run on low hardware resources, thus even old computer/server hardware can easily handle it. GUI means more RAM and hard disk storage space. Read more

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish reaches end of life on Thursday, upgrade now

Canonical, earlier this month, announced that Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish will be reaching end-of-life status this Thursday, making now the ideal time to upgrade to a later version. As with all non-Long Term Support (LTS) releases, 18.10 had nine months of support following its release last October. When distributions reach their end-of-life stage, they no longer receive security updates. While you may be relatively safe at first, the longer you keep running an unpatched system, the more likely it is that your system will become compromised putting your data at risk. If you’d like to move on from Ubuntu 18.10, you’ve got two options; you can either perform a clean install of a more up-to-date version of Ubuntu or you can do an in-place upgrade. Read more