Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 23 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Still not dead: The mainframe hangs on, sustained by Linux and hybrid cloud

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The mainframe has been declared “dead”, “morphed” and “transformed” so many times over the years sometimes it’s sometimes hard to believe the Big Iron still has an identity in the enterprise world.

But clearly it does and in a major way, too.

Take recent news as an example: According to IBM, 75% of the top 20 global banks are running the newest z15 mainframe, and the IBM Systems Group reported a 68% gain in Q2 IBM Z revenue year-over-year.

At the heart of its current vitality is Linux—primarily in the form of Big Iron-based Red Hat OpenShift—and a variety of software such as IBM Cloud Paks and open source applications. The Linux-mainframe marriage is celebrating 20 years this month, and while the incongruous mashup—certainly at the beginning anyway—has been a boon for the mainframe, by most accounts it still has plenty of good years ahead of it.

Read more

What To Do After Installing deepin 20 GNU/Linux 20

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Everything is fun with Deepin Twenty. If you are new to deepin, this article helps you to do things with your new computer in deepin ways. Check it out!

Tuxmath and Friends: do you know that deepin brings complete set of educational applications? Starting for kids and kindergarten ages, we see Tuxmath - Tuxpaint - TuxTyping available. For middle school upwards, we see KAlgebra - KAlzium - Marble available. For universities and researchers, we see Scilab - GNU R - LaTeX available. get them all from App Store.

Ethercalc and Friends: if you're teacher here is Ethercalc you can use as simple online students presence form. It is a spreadsheet just like LibreOffice Calc or Microsoft Excel but accessible online. You can make one freely at Disroot. Similarly, you can also use Etherpad the word processor you can access freely at Disroot as well. If you need free and reliable video calls, I shared my experiences in I Teach With Jitsi last month you can learn from. Quickly access Jitsi for free at the official site.

Read more

6 Best Free and Open Source Linux Anti-Spam Tools

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Email is one of the primary communication channels among users. The Radicati Group is an organization which publishes quantitative and qualitative research on business and consumer usage for email, instant messaging, social networking, wireless email, and unified communications. Their research estimates that the total worldwide emails in 2020 is 306 billion.

The cost of spam is frightening, estimated to be approximately $50 billion each year. The tide of the daily spam is a continual thorn in the side for both providers and users. Spam is a waste of valuable network bandwidth, disk space and takes up users’ valuable time to declutter their mailboxes. Many spam messages contain URLs to a dubious website or websites, peddling fake pharmaceutical products, replicas, enhancers, or gambling. Alternatively, the URLs may be phishing attacks, for example taking an unwitting victim to a site which seeks to steal private information such as bank account login data.

Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.8.11, 5.4.67, 4.19.147, 4.14.199, 4.9.237, and 4.4.237

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.8.11 kernel.

All users of the 5.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.8.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

Read more

Also: Linux 5.4.67

Linux 4.19.147

Linux 4.14.199

Linux 4.9.237

Linux 4.4.237

KaOS 2020.09

Filed under
KDE

KaOS is pleased to announce the availability of the September release of a new stable ISO.

With almost 60 % percent of the packages updated since the last ISO and the last release being over two months old, a new ISO is more than due. News for KDE Applications 20.08 included Dolphin adding thumbnails for 3D Manufacturing Format (3MF) files, you can also see previews of files and folders on encrypted file systems such as Plasma Vaults now remembers and restores the location you were viewing, as well as the open tabs, and split views you had open when you last closed it.Yakuake now lets you configure all the keyboard shortcuts that come from Konsole and there is a new system tray item that shows you when Yakuake is running. Elisa now lets you display all genres, artists, or albums in the sidebar, below other items.

As always with this rolling distribution, you will find the very latest packages for the Plasma Desktop, this includes Frameworks 5.74.0, Plasma 5.19.5 and KDE Applications 20.08.1. All built on Qt 5.15.1.

Read more

Plasma adventures - 5.19.4 tried and tested

Filed under
KDE

I like the momentum in the Plasma space. The last three years have been phenomenal, and there does not seem to be any fatigue, which typically affects most software projects after a while. Given that Plasma has been chugging on for a looong time now, this is rather impressive. What worries me, though, is that each new version brings in more fragility, more bugs. And this brings me back to the fundamental issue with the Linux desktop. It's simply not robust enough to be a day-to-day system for most people.

My mind simply cannot reconcile with breakages and compatibility issues. They feel like the easy way out of difficult situations with legacy models and usage patterns. Instead of creating a smooth transition to whatever the new thing is, what most projects seem to be doing is - break stuff. Why should plasma 5.19 be any less stable than say 5.18 or 5.15 or whatever. All in all, there's decent progress in Plasma, most notably the visuals and the responsiveness of the desktop, but these seem to come at the cost of good ole stability. Hopefully, future versions of Plasma will be able to give us both. That said, despite my grumbling, if you're after a solid desktop, Plasma is still the indubitable winner. Version 5.20 test coming soon!

Read more

Games: art of rally, Navi, Proton

Filed under
Gaming
  • art of rally strips down the furious sport into a serene top-down experience

    From the creator of Absolute Drift comes art of rally, a top-down racing game that heavy on style and it has great gameplay to back it up too.

    Here's the thing: i don't drive. Not in real life and any attempt at doing so seriously in games always comes with massive amount of hilarious failure. I'm terrible at DiRT Rally, I'm equally as crap at the F1 series, back when GRID Autosport came to Linux a lot of my time was spent on my roof and…you get the idea. They're all actually a little brutal for people like me - which is why I've come to appreciate the calmer side of it all thanks to the magnificent art of rally.

  • A Linux update may have let slip AMD Big Navi's mammoth core specs

    The summer of leaks continues, this time with the attention turning to AMD's next-gen GPUs based on the RDNA 2 architecture, which we'll find out more about on October 28. An enterprising redditor (via Tom's Hardware) was digging around the Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) code and discovered what appears to be a specification list for two of AMD's next generation GPUs.

  • Proton: More Games to Play

    Proton is amazing, and it’s easy to lose sight of all that it can do. Here’s a few videos I picked up recently to showcase some of the latest tested games running on Linux via Proton/Steamplay, as captured in video.

Mozilla: Fake News and AI Fund

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • How to spot (and do something) about real fake news

    Think you can spot fake news when you see it? You might be surprised even the most digitally savvy folks can (at times) be fooled into believing a headline or resharing a photo that looks real, but is actually not.

  • Launching the European AI Fund

    Right now, we’re in the early stages of the next phase of computing: AI. First we had the desktop. Then the internet. And smartphones. Increasingly, we’re living in a world where computing is built around vast troves of data and the algorithms that parse them. They power everything from the social platforms and smart speakers we use everyday, to the digital machinery of our governments and economies.

    In parallel, we’re entering a new phase of how we think about, deploy, and regulate technology. Will the AI era be defined by individual privacy and transparency into how these systems work? Or, will the worst parts of our current internet ecosystem — invasive data collection, monopoly, opaque systems — continue to be the norm?

    A year ago, a group of funders came together at Mozilla’s Berlin office to talk about just this: how we, as a collective, could help shape the direction of AI in Europe. We agreed on the importance of a landscape where European public interest and civil society organisations — and not just big tech companies — have a real say in shaping policy and technology. The next phase of computing needs input from a diversity of actors that represent society as a whole.

Is Open Source a Religion?

Filed under
OSS

Is open source a religion? There is a persistent myth that free/open source software (F/OSS) supporters think of F/OSS as a religion. SUSE is the largest open source software company, so that would make us, what, a church with the cutest mascot?
Of course this is wrong and F/OSS is not a religion, though the idea of working in a hushed cathedral-like atmosphere with pretty stained glass and organ music is appealing. (Visit St. John’s Cathedral in Spokane, Washington, USA to see a real genuine full-sized pipe organ. When it hits the low notes it rattles your bones from the inside.) If I really want stained glass and my own cathedral I can have those for just because, so let us move on to what F/OSS is really about, and what the value is for everyone who touches it, like customers, vendors, learners, hobbyists, governments– you might be surprised at the reach of F/OSS and its affect on the lives of pretty much everyone.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Computer Science University of Cuba, 18 years creating the future

    Among the many programs conceived there are the Nova system, a Cuban distribution of GNU / Linux that promotes the values ​​of sovereignty and technological independence, and are national leaders in the country's migration to Free Software and Open Source technologies.

  • New Ensemble Graphics Toolkit Optimized for 32-bit MPUs Running Linux Operating System

    Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and interactive touchscreen displays provide intuitive user experiences in applications from robotic and machine controls to medical user interfaces, automotive instrumentation and home and building automation systems. A well-designed GUI enables users to process information more quickly and interact more effectively with a product. Microchip Technology Inc. (Nasdaq: MCHP) today announced a new GUI development toolkit for its portfolio of 32-bit microprocessors (MPUs) running Linux, helping designers of industrial, medical, consumer and automotive graphical displays to reduce development cost and time-to-market.

  • AMDGPU For Linux 5.10 Brings PCIe DPC Recovery, More RDNA2 Updates

    Another batch of AMDGPU kernel driver updates have landed in DRM-Next ahead of the upcoming Linux 5.10 kernel cycle.

    Queued already on the AMD Radeon side for Linux 5.10 has been more RDNA2 code for Navy Flounder and Sienna Cichlid, Southern Islands DC display code support, and other low-level updates.

    With this latest pull that was sent out on Friday and merged to DRM-Next on Monday there was more work, albeit mostly lower-level. There were yet more Sienna Cichlid and Navy Flounder updates but not Dimgrey Catfish or VanGogh that just appeared in RadeonSI as other RDNA2 devices.

  • What’s an Open Source Program Office?

    Open Source Program Offices help companies create and manage an open source strategy in terms of the adoption, use, support, participation, and development of open source software. OSPOs help companies understand both the benefits and potential drawbacks of open source software and how to balance those considerations to meet the company’s unique business goals.

    As Brian Proffitt explains on the Red Hat blog, “it’s not about implementing open source for the sake of open source. It's also about aligning open source tools and techniques with the needs of the organization.”

    The role of an OSPO is “to align the efforts of all relevant parts of an organization—engineering, sales, marketing, content creation—toward making open source methodologies and outputs successful,” Proffitt says.

  • Red Hat partners with Skillsbuild.org to offer retraining solution

    The impact of COVID-19 on the jobs market has been substantial, but we know that enterprises are still looking for qualified IT professionals. Red Hat is working to help those affected by COVID-19 gain the skills and knowledge that can help them find their next opportunity.

  • "A place for public code" +++ FSFE support +++ Job vacancy
  • Raspberry Pi powered e-paper display takes months to show a movie
  • Intel Announces Atom x6000E Series "Elkhart Lake", 11th Gen Core Tigerlake-UP3

    Given that they are IoT/embedded products where Linux dominates and all of the Elkhart Lake and Tigerlake open-source/Linux patches we have been noting over the past number of months, the Linux support should be quite ready to go for these new Intel offerings as soon as they begin appearing in actual devices. Those are the highlights from today's announcement and once we can get our hands on such hardware we'll certainly be putting them through much benchmarking to test the claims.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • How my students taught me to code

    "Hello, I'm Miss Jess, and my students taught me how to code."

    When I say this to new students, they often think I misspoke. But it's true. Coding always interested me, but it seemed inaccessible. Then my students taught me to code a video game during a few lunch breaks.

    Their encouraging advice and suggestions helped me create my first video game using Scratch. The game was simple. It was about a monkey catching bananas as they fell from the sky. If you caught a ripe banana, you earned points.

  • ssh-copy-id: call for testing

    After a prolonged period of neglect, I've finally got round to putting the various patches I had laying around into some sort of order, and pushing them somewhere public, so it would be great if people could test them.

    There are two branches that I'd like people to try:

    https://gitlab.com/phil_hands/ssh-copy-id/-/tree/main

    and

    https://gitlab.com/phil_hands/ssh-copy-id/-/tree/bug/3201

  • How to rename columns in Pandas Dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover various methods to rename columns in pandas dataframe in Python. Renaming or changing the names of columns is one of the most common data wrangling task. If you are not from programming background and worked only in Excel Spreadsheets in the past you might feel it not so easy doing this in Python as you can easily rename columns in MS Excel by just typing in the cell what you want to have. If you are from database background it is similar to ALIAS in SQL. In Python there is a popular data manipulation package called pandas which simplifies doing these kind of data operations.

  • How to use Ansible to update your Django web app

    Now, as you have overcome or evaded the reefs, shoals and swirls of initial development and deployment and your appetite grows, you ask “How do I automate the update and restart of my web app when I change the code?” There is already one simple and elegant method on our blog, that uses one of the possible push to publish methods, but this time we will dip our toes into vast waters of Ansible automation.

    You may think that using Ansible for a simple task like this is overkill, and it’s a valid thought, but our example is a good practice case that introduces multiple elements that can be used later for much bigger projects. That’s why, instead of writing a simple bash or python script, we will build a full Ansible playbook with accompanying configuration.

  • Popular Python Libraries for Data Science, Machine Learning and More
  • Using bash’s shopt builtin to manage Linux shell behavior

    If you haven’t tried it yet, you might be surprised by the many features of shopt. While it works like a Linux command, it’s actually a bash shell builtin that allows you to change many things about that shell’s behavior.

    One option, for example, allows the shell to fix minor typos when you type directory names. To demonstrate, in the first cd command shown below, the directory name, bin, is typed with an extra letter and the shell complains and gives up:

Security and Tor

Filed under
Security
  • Find security issues in Go code using gosec

    It's extremely common now to encounter code written in the Go programming language, especially if you are working with containers, Kubernetes, or a cloud ecosystem. Docker was one of the first projects to adopt Golang, Kubernetes followed, and many new projects select Go over other programming languages.

    Like any other language, Go has its share of strengths and weaknesses, which include security flaws. These can arise due to issues in the programming language itself coupled with insecure coding practices, such as memory safety issues in C code, for example.

    Regardless of why they occur, security issues need to be fixed early in development to prevent them from creeping into shipped software. Fortunately, static analysis tools are available to help you tackle these issues in a more repeatable manner. Static analysis tools work by parsing source code written in a programming language and looking for issues.

  • NXLog Enterprise Edition 5.1: Providing capabilities to further harden enterprises’ security

    NXLog announces the first minor release in the new major version of NXLog Enterprise Edition, NXLog Enterprise Edition version 5.1 (EE 5.1).

    Even though it is a minor release, it is very significant, because along with EE 5.0, NXLog is now filling its new passive network monitoring module with additional protocol parsers focused on Industrial Control Systems.

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10

    The new shiny Tor Browser 10 for Desktop is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory!

    Android Tor Browser 10 is under active development and we are supporting the current 9.5 series for Android until the new one is ready. We are informed by Mozilla of any issues they learn about affecting the 9.5 series. We expect to release the new Tor Browser for Android based on Fenix in the following weeks.

  • New Release: Tails 4.10

Feature Requests, Submit Requests for openSUSE Jump Take Shape

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Project is progressing with the state of openSUSE Jump, which is the interim name given to the experimental distribution in the Open Build Service.

openSUSE Leap Release Manager Lubos Kocman sent an email to the project titled “Update on Jump and Leap 15.3 and proposed roadmap for the next steps” that explains the progress that has been made with Jump 15.2.1.

“We have some exciting news to share about the openSUSE Jump effort!” Kocman wrote. “We will have a Jira partner setup (coming) for openSUSE this week!”

Access to Jira will allow openSUSE Leap contributors to see updates on community feature requests and be able to comment on requested information or allow them to request information. The process will be tested initially by one of the community members to see if it works properly.

Read more

Gateworks Venice SBC runs Ubuntu on i.MX8M Mini

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Gateworks unveiled a “Venice” family of SBCs that run Ubuntu on an i.MX8M Mini, starting with a “GW7300” model with 2x GbE with PoE, USB host and OTG, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, and 3x mini-PCIe with SIM.

Our readers seem like Gateworks SBCs despite the fact the San Luis, Obispo, Calif. based company often equips its boards with aging processors such as the NXP i.MX6, found on SBCs like the Ventana GW5913 and Ventana GW5910. Now there is even more to like as Gateworks has moved to an up-to-date i.MX8M Mini with its new Venice family of SBCs.

Read more

Fix IceCat Suddenly Failed To Run on Trisquel

Filed under
GNU

Suddenly I cannot run my web browser on my computer. It is GNU IceCat on Trisquel operating system. More precisely, other applications seem to be worked normally but only this one failed to function and got some strange error. This issue can happen on other distros as well. Here is my report on this experience along with the solution and some references. I hope this report will be useful for GNU/Linux users everywhere.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines