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Monday, 21 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 22/05/2020 - 6:08am
    Marius Nestor
  • 20/01/2020 - 5:37am
    johnwalsh
  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
  • 04/07/2019 - 7:09pm
    ksanaj
  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt

RPI4 & Ubuntu MATE - second attempt, new results

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

This time around, I have to say, the effort went much more quickly and smoothly, and I didn't have to fight the system to get the desired results. I am rather pleased with the outcome, and I can say, in its current guise, Ubuntu MATE does offer a decent, rounded desktop experience on Raspberry Pi 4. It's the most complete Pi operating system I've tried, when you take into account the functional, ergonomic and aesthetics elements.

At this point, I might be cautiously inclined to say: yes, here's your viable mini PC, right there. Of course, there's room for even more improvement - better 3D support, better performance, less heating. I think we will get there eventually. For now, if you'd like to try your luck with a card deck sized pack of punchy electronics, Ubuntu MATE is a sensible, pleasant choice for your Pi 4 adventures. And we're done.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Unix Philosophy Is More Than Just A Simple Slogan
  • KDE’s Akademy 2020 – A Quick Summary

    Akademy is the yearly conference for the KDE community, which is a community devoted to creating free software for desktop and mobile. Typically, Akademy takes place in a different city each year. However, due to the pandemic, the conference was online this time around. September 4-11 marked the dates of Akademy 2020.

  • openmediavault 5.5.11
  • Brackets

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: Brackets

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – SeongSoo Cho at NHN / OpenStack Korea User Group

    Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

    Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

  • Developing a WordPress Website Without Programming Knowledge

    WordPress is the solution to those who want to create websites but have minimal programming and coding experience. If you’ve heard that expression multiple times, why not check it out at least once? You don’t need to worry about your programming skills, since this powerful Content Management System (CMS) can be easily used by a layman to create stunning websites. However, you will need to understand the way WordPress functions as there are two WordPress versions that you can work with, and all that can be a bit confusing. In this article, we shall look at WordPress from a beginner or a novice’s perspective and determine whether it’s truly easy to learn. Let’s get started.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (inspircd and modsecurity), Fedora (chromium, cryptsetup, gnutls, mingw-libxml2, and seamonkey), openSUSE (ark, chromium, claws-mail, docker-distribution, fossil, hylafax+, inn, knot, libetpan, libjpeg-turbo, libqt4, librepo, libvirt, libxml2, lilypond, mumble, openldap2, otrs, pdns-recursor, perl-DBI, python-Flask-Cors, singularity, slurm_18_08, and virtualbox), SUSE (jasper, less, ovmf, and rubygem-actionview-4_2), and Ubuntu (sa-exim).

  • Seungha Yang: Continuing to make GStreamer more Windows-friendly [Ed: step forward?]

    GStreamer 1.18 includes various exciting features especially new Windows plugins: Direct3D11, Media Foundation, UWP support, DXGI desktop capture and rewrite of the WASAPI audio plugin using Windows 10 APIs.

  • A recipe for presenting at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women – Ideas, dedication and a dash of energy

    One professional milestone for developers as they get more experience is to present at a major technical conference. To evolve from passionate conference attendee to conference session presenter is a huge step that not only requires technical chops, but also important soft skills like public presentation, writing, and communications. We sat down with two mid-career developers, Megan Kostick and Cindy Lu as they were preparing for the upcoming, Grace Hopper Celebration in the fall of 2020. Here’s a quick peek into the whats, whys, hows and lessons learned in presenting at a major technical conference!

    [...]

    Megan: IBM recently launched Developer Advocacy as its own career path and being part of the Developer Advocacy organization here at IBM, Cindy and I thought we could bring some light to this emerging role and give individuals of all technical levels a chance to learn about another career option that may not have been on their radar screen. GHC is traditionally a very big networking and hiring event for college students and just maybe our talk will get some future new hires interested in pursuing developer advocacy as a potential career. Or influence mid-level to senior-level developers that would like a change of pace. It’s always fun to share insider tips as well to help others be successful and grow.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Top 10 Natural Language Processing Tools For Today's Demand
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Call for 2021 Roadmap Blogs Ending Soon

    We will be closing the collection of blog posts on October 5th. As a reminder, we plan to close the survey on September 24th, later this week.

  • Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview

    Are you a Python developer brushing up on your skills before an interview? If so, then this tutorial will usher you through a series of Python practice problems meant to simulate common coding test scenarios. After you develop your own solutions, you’ll walk through the Real Python team’s answers so you can optimize your code, impress your interviewer, and land your dream job!

  • Learn to Code Free — Our Interactive Courses Are ALL Free This Week!

    Exciting news: for the next week, all courses are free. Yup, every single course in every learning path is free from Sept 21-28.

    This free week includes all of our courses in R, Python, SQL, machine learning, Git, the command line, and much more!

    Even more exciting: complete at least one mission during this week and you'll unlock an additional prize: a downloadable data science career resources pack sent to your email!

    Now, it’s easier than ever to go from total beginner to job-qualified using Dataquest. The paywall is down!

  • Molfile "S SKP"

    In the last couple of essays I described some of the parts of a SDF record then pointed out some of the ways to break simple SDF record tokenizers. In this essay I'll point out an documentation curiosity which makes it even harder to parse a molfile with simple tools, though until I wrote this essay I had never seen it in actual use.

Games: Unity, Super Slap Sisters, Ayo the Clown and Steam News Hub

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unity 2020.2 Bringing Some Hefty Performance Optimizations [Ed: Microsoft Mono unfortunately]

    Not only did Unity Software experience a successful IPO last week but they also rolled out the Unity 2020.2 engine into public beta and with that comes some "major speed-ups" for performance.

  • Super Slap Sisters [Ed: Requires WINE]

    These are some great additions that allow for an even wider variety of playstyles, keeping your opponent guessing as to when the best time to strike is. For example, not only can the clutch be used during an attack to throw your opponent off, it can also be a lifesaver just as you’re about to reach the blastzone (knockout boundaries) after getting hit. The clutch will reverse your momentum, meaning that the sooner you perform the clutch after flying, the closer you’ll get to the stage and therefore have a more successful recovery.

    Players who are new to this type of fighting will not be left in the dark here, as there is a great tutorial mode. The tutorial is very interactive with the player, giving them everything they need to get a basic grasp on how the game works. You can also read about the various mechanics that are available in-game, what they do, and how to do it, as well as get a bio on each character and what their moves entail.

  • Go on an epic quest as a not-so-average clown trying to find their dog in Ayo the Clown

    Ayo the Clown is an upcoming adventure platformer from developer Cloud M1, it should be releasing this year and it looks so full of charm it could pop like a balloon at any moment.

    Funded on Kickstarter back in September 2019 with 475 backers pledging $20,397 we totally missed this, it even had a Linux demo back then too. Cloud M1 said their take on the busy platformer genre is one that's supposed to "reintroduce you to the incredibly fun platformer games of the ‘90s where platforming is accompanied by an inspiring and memorable story". It has a pretty amazing style, one you can easily say is quite Nintendo-like.

  • Valve rolls out News Channels onto Steam to follow your favourite curators - like us!

    Over time Steam continues to grow as much more than just a games store, and Valve are showing how today with their next Steam Labs experiment to let you get your news.

    Steam Labs Experiment 009 announced here is an addition to the News Hub, which is now hooked up with the Steam Curator system. Valve said it's now nearing completion and it's a big stop towards the full launch. This will presumably replace the old Steam news feed.

Vulkan Graphics: Vulkan Portability Extension and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Portability Extension 1.0 Now Shipping For Expanding Vulkan's Reach

    The Vulkan Portability Extension (VK_KHR_portability_subset) has been released as part of the effort by The Khronos Group in getting Vulkan running on as many platforms as possible, including the likes of Apple macOS/iOS.

    The VK_KHR_portability_subset extension is about getting Vulkan up and running on non-Vulkan APIs, as opposed to the success we have already seen in areas like getting OpenGL or Direct3D atop Vulkan. The VK_KHR_portability_subset extension makes it easier for the likes of GFX-RS and MoltenVK for getting Vulkan running on platforms like Apple's operating systems where Vulkan is not supported and thus having to reside on top of say the Apple Metal API.

  •  

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Dynamism

    In Vulkan, a pipeline object is bound to the graphics pipeline for a given command buffer when a draw is about to take place. This pipeline object contains information about the draw state, and any time that state changes, a different pipeline object must be created/bound.

    This is expensive.

    Some time ago, Antonio Caggiano did some work to cache pipeline objects, which lets zink reuse them once they’re created. This was great, because creating Vulkan objects is very costly, and we want to always be reusing objects whenever possible.

    Unfortunately, the core Vulkan spec has the number of viewports and scissor regions as both being part of the pipeline state, which means any time either one changes the number of regions (though both viewport and scissor region counts are the same for our purposes), we need a new pipeline.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

IBM/Red Hat: State of PHP 8.0, OpenShift and IBM POWER CPUs

Filed under
Red Hat
  • PHP extensions status with upcoming PHP 8.0

    With PHP 8.0 entering stabilization phase, time to check the status of most commonly used PHP extensions (at least, the ones available in my repository).

  • Red Hat Training delivers new courses for OpenShift developers and administrators

    Red Hat OpenShift includes what you need to meet your team’s objectives by enabling a high velocity DevOps pipeline, leading to faster, dynamic application deployments. It includes an enterprise-grade Linux operating system, container runtime, networking, monitoring, container registry, authentication, and authorization solutions. These components are tested together for unified operations on a complete Kubernetes platform spanning major public clouds.

    While the promise of container-based architecture is compelling, the road to container adoption can be complex. To gain the full benefit of containers, administrators and developers alike need a flexible program that delivers a modern, container-based infrastructure—with the necessary organizational process changes. With our new courses Red Hat is able to better facilitate your organization’s container adoption journey at both the administrative and developer level.

  • POWER Coregroup Support Coming With Linux 5.10

    There is some new feature code in the IBM POWER CPU architecture's "-next" Git tree for the Linux 5.10 kernel.

    Queued up this past week is coregroup support for POWER processors on Linux. This includes a cleanup of the PowerPC topologies code and adding the Coregroup support, which in this context is about a group/subset of cores on a die that share a resource.

Kernel: Mainline Linux on the MikroTik RB3011, FS With Cloning, Intel Spying and Oracle Linux KVM

Filed under
Linux
  • Jonathan McDowell: Mainline Linux on the MikroTik RB3011

    I upgraded my home internet connection to fibre (FTTP) last October. I’m still on an 80M/20M service, so it’s no faster than my old VDSL FTTC connection was, and as a result for a long time I continued to use my HomeHub 5A running OpenWRT. However the FTTP ONT meant I was using up an additional ethernet port on the router, and I was already short, so I ended up with a GigE switch in use as well. Also my wifi is handled by a UniFi, which takes its power via Power-over-Ethernet. That mean I had a router, a switch and a PoE injector all in close proximity. I wanted to reduce the number of devices, and ideally upgrade to something that could scale once I decide to upgrade my FTTP service speed.

  • Which file systems support file cloning

    OpenZFS isn’t part of the Linux kernel because of licensing issues, and that is unlikely to change. OpenZFS doesn’t support any of the relevant Linux syscalls for cloning files or blocks. It doesn’t offer a replacement for these syscalls on FreeBSD or Linux. (This is why there are no out-of-band deduplication tools for OpenZFS.)

    Bcachefs isn’t in the kernel yet either, but it’s developed under a Linux-kernel compatible license with the ultimate goal of being merged into the kernel. It supports all the relevant Linux-specific syscalls for file cloning.

    Over the last three years, Apple has switched all of its products to its new CoW-based Apple File System (APFS). Microsoft has decided to go in the opposite direction, and removed its copy-on-write file system, ReFS, from Windows 10 Professional in 2017. ReFS is now only available on Workstation and Server editions. ReFS was not suitable for use on Windows desktops anyway. This does leave Windows as the only computer operating system without a CoW file system.

    I find file cloning fascinating, and I’ll explore several potential use cases for it in the coming weeks. Next up will be how you can identify a cloned file. Something that is surprisingly difficult because the file system doesn’t keep track of it.

  • Intel Platform Monitoring Telemetry Appears Destined For Linux 5.10

    As first outlined earlier this year, Intel has been working on the Linux support for Platform Monitoring Technology as a new hardware telemetry feature first introduced with new Tigerlake hardware. It's looking like the initial Intel PMT support will come with Linux 5.10 while further work is being prepared that builds off its foundation.

  • Announcing updated Oracle Linux Templates for Oracle Linux KVM

    Oracle is pleased to announce updated Oracle Linux Templates for Oracle Linux KVM and Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

    Oracle Linux Templates for Oracle Linux KVM provide an innovative approach to deploying a fully configured software stack by offering pre-installed and pre-configured software images. Use of Oracle Linux Templates eliminates the installation and configuration costs, and reduces the ongoing maintenance costs helping organizations achieve faster time to market and lower cost of operations.

    [...]

    New Oracle Linux Templates for Oracle Linux KVM and Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager supply powerful automation. These templates are built on cloud-init, the same technology used today on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and includes improvements and regression fixes.

Android 11—The Ars Technica Review

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Android 11 has finally arrived after a lengthy beta process that started approximately three years ago in February 2020. This is the 30th release of Android, if we're counting by API levels, and in a year when it seems nearly everything has been delayed or canceled, Google has managed to turn in one of the smaller Android releases.

Last year, Android 10 was a massive release, adding gesture navigation, a dark mode, Project Mainline, a dual-boot system, scoped storage, foldable smartphone support, and a million other things. In comparison, Android 11 is more limited. This being the annual Ars Technica review, however, there are of course still plenty of things to talk about—like yet another notification panel revamp, a new media player, chat bubbles, smart home controls, and more.

Read more

Oracle Solaris and Java Update

Filed under
OS
Development
  • Oracle Solaris: Update to the Continuous Delivery Model

    The Oracle Solaris 11 Operating System (OS) is synonymous with three words: consistent, reliable and secure. With Oracle Solaris OS being designed to deliver a consistent platform to run your enterprise applications, Oracle Solaris has become the most trusted solution for running both modern and legacy applications on the newest system hardware while providing the latest innovations. Oracle Solaris combines the power of industry standard security features, unique security and anti-malware capabilities, and compliance management tools for low risk application deployments and cloud infrastructure. In its most recent avatar, Oracle Solaris 11.4 has already provided our customers with the latest features and observability tools and the list of new features in build grows with every SRU release.

  • Oracle To Stick With Solaris "11.4" For Continuous Delivery SRU Releases

    With no new indications of Solaris 12 or Solaris 11.next and given the past layoffs and previous announcements from Oracle, today's statement that Solaris 11.4 will remain as their continuous delivery model with monthly SRU releases come as little surprise.

    Tanmay Dhuri who has been at Oracle since April as the Solaris product manager wrote today on the Oracle Solaris blog about their continuous delivery model. Basically it's reiterating that Solaris 11.4 will be sticking to a continuous delivery model moving forward. This comes after Solaris 11.4 turning two years old and seeing monthly SRU releases during that time. These monthly releases are designed to offer up timely security fixes and other mostly small updates to Oracle Solaris.

  • Java 15 Goes GA as the Language Turns 25

    Oracle today announced the general availability release of Java 15 during the opening keynote of its Developer Live conference, the online version of the company's annual CodeOne and OpenWorld events, underway this week.

    The latest Java Development Kit (JDK) delivers new functionality, preview features now finalized, incubating features in preview, the continued modernization of the existing code, and a host of bug fixes and the deprecation of outdated functionality.

    This release comes as Java turns 25, noted Georges Saab, vice president of development for Oracle's Java Platform Group, in a statement.

  • Solve a real-world problem using Java

    As I wrote in the first two articles in this series, I enjoy solving small problems by writing small programs in different languages, so I can compare the different ways they approach the solution. The example I'm using in this series is dividing bulk supplies into hampers of similar value to distribute to struggling neighbors in your community, which you can read about in the first article in this series.

    In the first article, I solved this problem using the Groovy programming language, which is like Python in many ways, but syntactically it's more like C and Java. In the second article, I solved it in Python with a very similar design and effort, which demonstrates the resemblance between the languages.

    Now I'll try it in Java.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: Deepin 20 Review, FuryBSD 20200907 Overview, GNU World Order and Linux in the Ham Shack.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Pi-like SBC offers Rockchip RK3128 for $25

Filed under
Android
Linux

Geniatech has launched a $25 “XPI-3128” SBC that runs Linux or Android on a quad -A7 Rockchip RK3128 with 512MB RAM, 8GB eMMC, optional 802.11ac/BT 4.2, and Pi-like ports, layout, and 40-pin GPIO.

Last year, Geniatech introduced a series of Developer Board (DB) SBCs based on Rockchip SoCs led by the RK3399Pro-based DB3399 Pro. Now the company has launched an XPI-3128 SBC built around the lowlier, quad-core, Cortex-A7 Rockchip RK3128, which is also found on Firefly’s Firefly-RK3128 and Commell’s Pico-ITX form-factor LP-150 SBCs.

Read more

Open-Source Vivante Driver In Some Cases Outperforming Proprietary Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

One of the less talked about open-source graphics drivers talked about is Etnaviv as the reverse-engineered, community-based driver providing OpenGL/GLES support for Vivante graphics IP. While it's still working towards OpenGL ES 3.0 compliance, its performance is currently in some cases competitive -- and even outperforming -- the Vivante proprietary driver.

Christian Gmeiner who has been involved with the Etnaviv driver effort for years presented at last week's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC2020). There he talked about the progress on the driver, the support spanning from the GC600 through GC7000L series at present with i.MX8M, and its OpenGL ES 2 capabilities along with desktop OpenGL 1.3/2.0 support. OpenGL ES 3.0 support remains a work-in-progress.

Read more

Also: New OpenBenchmarking.org Features Enhance Discovering Popular + Reliable Tests

Devices and Open Hardware Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware

  • Compact in-vehicle gateway offers flexible power switching

    Axiomtek’s rugged, Linux-ready“ UST200-83H-FL” is a compact, DIN-rail IoT gateway with an Apollo Lake SoC plus dual isolated GbE, mSATA, CAN, DIO, dual mini-PCIe, and in-vehicle friendly power management.

    In-vehicle computers are becoming increasingly diverse, with different systems targeting everything from infotainment to telematics to ADAS and camera integration. Axiomtek’s fanless UST200-83H-FL is billed as an in-vehicle IoT gateway for shuttle buses, police cars, ambulances, cold chain trucks, forklifts, and heavy-duty vehicles. The DIN-rail and wall-mountable system measures only 125 x 100 x 31mm and weighs 0.3 Kg.

  • WPQ873 Wireless Embedded SBC is Powered by Qualcomm IPQ8072A WiFi 6 SoC, Supports 5G Modules

    The company provides support for the older OpenWrt Barrier Breaker which appears to be the same for all Qualcomm Networking Pro series, as well as Qualcomm SDKs with QCA binary drivers. Optional accessories include a JTAG programmer, a serial converter, and a power supply.

  • These geodesic RGB LED spheres are absolutely stunning

    While this project took him over 100 hours to complete, creator Whity claims that his glowing geodesic domes were worth the effort. As seen below, each dome is able to light up its triangular faces, using via WS2812B programmable LEDs embedded inside. The effect is mesmerizing on video, and has to be even more so in person.

    Each device is controlled by an Arduino Nano, along with a MPU-6050 inertial measurement unit. A series of 18650 rechargeable batteries provide power for the numerous lights involved. Magnets hold the two halves of the spheres together for easy access, and the triangles were 3D-printed with hinges to make assembly easier.

Plasma Beta Review Day

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.20 is now in beta, which gives us one month of intense testing, bugfixing and polishing.

During this time we need as many hands on deck as possible to help with finding regressions, triaging incoming reports and generally being on top of as much as possible.

In order to make this process more accessible, more systematic and hopefully more fun we are going to run an official "Plasma Beta Review Day"

Read more

11 Best Free and Open Source Linux Video Editors

Filed under
Software

Video editing is the process of editing motion video footage. In the new age of personal video, video editing is becoming a central function of the desktop, with the popularity of video editing software ever increasing.

Any self-respecting operating system that has ambitions on becoming the dominant force on the desktop therefore needs to have a good selection of video editing software. Video sharing websites such as YouTube are now enormously popular with hundreds of thousands of new videos uploaded every day.

Read more

New Geniatech SBC

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Pi-like SBC offers Rockchip RK3128 for $25

    Geniatech has launched a $25 “XPI-3128” SBC that runs Linux or Android on a quad -A7 Rockchip RK3128 with 512MB RAM, 8GB eMMC, optional 802.11ac/BT 4.2, and Pi-like ports, layout, and 40-pin GPIO.

    Last year, Geniatech introduced a series of Developer Board (DB) SBCs based on Rockchip SoCs led by the RK3399Pro-based DB3399 Pro. Now the company has launched an XPI-3128 SBC built around the lowlier, quad-core, Cortex-A7 Rockchip RK3128, which is also found on Firefly’s Firefly-RK3128 and Commell’s Pico-ITX form-factor LP-150 SBCs.

  •  

  • Geniatech XPI 3128 RK3128 SBC is Equipped with an NXP WIFi 5 Module

    Geniatech XPI family of single board computers was first introduced in 2018 with the launch of the XPI-S905X development board following many of Raspberry Pi 3 Model B features and form factor. The company has now added another board to the family with XPI 3128 single board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3128 quad-core Cortex-A7 processor coupled with up to  2 GB RAM and 64 GB flash, as well as an NXP WiFi 5 and Bluetooth 4.2 module. 

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Programming Leftovers

  • Top 10 Natural Language Processing Tools For Today's Demand
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Call for 2021 Roadmap Blogs Ending Soon

    We will be closing the collection of blog posts on October 5th. As a reminder, we plan to close the survey on September 24th, later this week.

  • Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview

    Are you a Python developer brushing up on your skills before an interview? If so, then this tutorial will usher you through a series of Python practice problems meant to simulate common coding test scenarios. After you develop your own solutions, you’ll walk through the Real Python team’s answers so you can optimize your code, impress your interviewer, and land your dream job!

  • Learn to Code Free — Our Interactive Courses Are ALL Free This Week!

    Exciting news: for the next week, all courses are free. Yup, every single course in every learning path is free from Sept 21-28. This free week includes all of our courses in R, Python, SQL, machine learning, Git, the command line, and much more! Even more exciting: complete at least one mission during this week and you'll unlock an additional prize: a downloadable data science career resources pack sent to your email! Now, it’s easier than ever to go from total beginner to job-qualified using Dataquest. The paywall is down!

  • Molfile "S SKP"

    In the last couple of essays I described some of the parts of a SDF record then pointed out some of the ways to break simple SDF record tokenizers. In this essay I'll point out an documentation curiosity which makes it even harder to parse a molfile with simple tools, though until I wrote this essay I had never seen it in actual use.

Games: Unity, Super Slap Sisters, Ayo the Clown and Steam News Hub

  • Unity 2020.2 Bringing Some Hefty Performance Optimizations [Ed: Microsoft Mono unfortunately]

    Not only did Unity Software experience a successful IPO last week but they also rolled out the Unity 2020.2 engine into public beta and with that comes some "major speed-ups" for performance.

  • Super Slap Sisters [Ed: Requires WINE]

    These are some great additions that allow for an even wider variety of playstyles, keeping your opponent guessing as to when the best time to strike is. For example, not only can the clutch be used during an attack to throw your opponent off, it can also be a lifesaver just as you’re about to reach the blastzone (knockout boundaries) after getting hit. The clutch will reverse your momentum, meaning that the sooner you perform the clutch after flying, the closer you’ll get to the stage and therefore have a more successful recovery. Players who are new to this type of fighting will not be left in the dark here, as there is a great tutorial mode. The tutorial is very interactive with the player, giving them everything they need to get a basic grasp on how the game works. You can also read about the various mechanics that are available in-game, what they do, and how to do it, as well as get a bio on each character and what their moves entail.

  • Go on an epic quest as a not-so-average clown trying to find their dog in Ayo the Clown

    Ayo the Clown is an upcoming adventure platformer from developer Cloud M1, it should be releasing this year and it looks so full of charm it could pop like a balloon at any moment. Funded on Kickstarter back in September 2019 with 475 backers pledging $20,397 we totally missed this, it even had a Linux demo back then too. Cloud M1 said their take on the busy platformer genre is one that's supposed to "reintroduce you to the incredibly fun platformer games of the ‘90s where platforming is accompanied by an inspiring and memorable story". It has a pretty amazing style, one you can easily say is quite Nintendo-like.

  • Valve rolls out News Channels onto Steam to follow your favourite curators - like us!

    Over time Steam continues to grow as much more than just a games store, and Valve are showing how today with their next Steam Labs experiment to let you get your news. Steam Labs Experiment 009 announced here is an addition to the News Hub, which is now hooked up with the Steam Curator system. Valve said it's now nearing completion and it's a big stop towards the full launch. This will presumably replace the old Steam news feed.

Vulkan Graphics: Vulkan Portability Extension and More

  • Vulkan Portability Extension 1.0 Now Shipping For Expanding Vulkan's Reach

    The Vulkan Portability Extension (VK_KHR_portability_subset) has been released as part of the effort by The Khronos Group in getting Vulkan running on as many platforms as possible, including the likes of Apple macOS/iOS. The VK_KHR_portability_subset extension is about getting Vulkan up and running on non-Vulkan APIs, as opposed to the success we have already seen in areas like getting OpenGL or Direct3D atop Vulkan. The VK_KHR_portability_subset extension makes it easier for the likes of GFX-RS and MoltenVK for getting Vulkan running on platforms like Apple's operating systems where Vulkan is not supported and thus having to reside on top of say the Apple Metal API.

  •  
  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Dynamism

    In Vulkan, a pipeline object is bound to the graphics pipeline for a given command buffer when a draw is about to take place. This pipeline object contains information about the draw state, and any time that state changes, a different pipeline object must be created/bound. This is expensive. Some time ago, Antonio Caggiano did some work to cache pipeline objects, which lets zink reuse them once they’re created. This was great, because creating Vulkan objects is very costly, and we want to always be reusing objects whenever possible. Unfortunately, the core Vulkan spec has the number of viewports and scissor regions as both being part of the pipeline state, which means any time either one changes the number of regions (though both viewport and scissor region counts are the same for our purposes), we need a new pipeline.