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Wednesday, 13 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: mintCast, Linux Headlines, LINUX Unplugged, This Week in Linux, Full Circle Weekly News, OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Alpha 1 Run Through

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • mintCast 321.5 – Wololo

    In our Innards section, we decide when it’s the right time to suggest switching to Linux.

  • 2019-11-12 | Linux Headlines

    Python’s package manager looks forward to some much-needed love, PeerTube and Termshark both have major releases, and Mozilla joins forces to push WebAssembly outside the browser.

  • Distro Disco | LINUX Unplugged 327

    Get to know our Linux Users Group a little better and learn why they love their Linux distros of choice, and the one thing they’d change to make them perfect.

  • Episode 87 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, Pine64 announces the pre-orders for the PinePhone are coming this week! AMD Announces Latest Threadripper & Ryzen 9 CPUs. We’ve got the results from the openSUSE Name Change vote. In Distro News, Ubuntu pledges support for Raspberry Pis, elementary OS Adds Flatpak Support, and we got new releases from KaOS and Chrome OS. Microsoft confirms that their Edge browser is coming to Linux. Linus Torvalds was interviewed recently where he declared he is ‘Not a Programmer Anymore’, we’ll take a closer look at that. In Linux Gaming News, Steam releases beta support for Containers in Steam for Linux. Google Reveals Stadia Launch Games and further info on the service. We also got some really interesting news from Valve where they might launch their own Stadia competitor called “Steam Cloud Gaming”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #153
  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Alpha 1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Alpha 1. Enjoy!

Debian reconsiders init-system diversity

Filed under
Debian

The immediate motivation for a reconsideration would appear to be the proposed addition of elogind, a standalone fork of the systemd-logind daemon, to Debian. Elogind would provide support for systemd's D-Bus-based login mechanism — needed to support small projects like the GNOME desktop — without the need for systemd itself. The addition of elogind has been controversial; it is a difficult package to integrate for a number of reasons. Much of the discussion has evidently been carried out away from the mailing lists, but some context on the problem can be found in this bug report. In short: merging elogind appears to be complex enough that it would be hard to justify in the absence of a strong commitment to the support of non-systemd init systems. It seems possible that this commitment no longer exists across the distribution as a whole; the purpose of a general resolution would be to determine whether that is the case or not.

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What you need to know about burnout in open source communities

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OSS

Earlier this year, I was burned out. Coincidentally, at the time, I was also researching the subject of burnout. It's taken some time for me to take what I researched and experienced and put it into words.

Recently, the International Classification of Diseases classified burnout as an occupational phenomenon. It defines burnout as a "syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed."

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Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Web Browsing – Week 4

Filed under
Linux
Web

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers.

This week’s blog focuses on an absolutely essential desktop activity. Surfing the web. A web browser is the quintessential desktop application. Everyone needs one, and there is not a desktop Linux distribution around that does not make a web browser available.

For Linux, there’s a web browser for every need. There’s heavyweight browsers jammed with a large feature set with addons and extensions. Then there’s leaner web browsers which still offer an attractive graphical interface. And there’s lightweight browsers including console based web browsers too.

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Stable kernels 5.3.11, 4.19.84, 4.14.154, 4.9.201, and 4.4.201

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.3.11

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.3.11 kernel.

    All users of the 5.3 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.3.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.3.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.84
  • Linux 4.14.154
  • Linux 4.9.201
  • Linux 4.4.201

Latest Banana Pi showcases a new quad -A7 SoC with FPGA extensions

Filed under
Linux

The Banana Pi project and SunPlus have unveiled a “Banana Pi BPI-F2S” SBC with 40-pin RPi GPIO and an optional Artix-7 FPGA module. The SBC runs Linux on a new quad -A7 “SP7021” SoC from SunPlus and Tibbo with Arm9 and 8051 co-processors.

The Banana Pi project has teamed with Taiwanese automotive infotainment manufacturer SunPlus Technology to create an industrial development board that showcases a new SP7021 (Plus1) SoC developed by SunPlus and Tibbo Technology. The upcoming, yet-to-be-priced Banana Pi BPI-F2S board, which was announced on Hackster.io, runs a Yocto-based Linux distribution on the quad-core Cortex-A7 SP7021.

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WordPress 5.3 “Kirk”

Filed under
Server
OSS

5.3 expands and refines the block editor with more intuitive interactions and improved accessibility. New features in the editor increase design freedoms, provide additional layout options and style variations to allow designers more control over the look of a site.

This release also introduces the Twenty Twenty theme giving the user more design flexibility and integration with the block editor. Creating beautiful web pages and advanced layouts has never been easier.

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Proprietary Software From OnlyOffice and Microsoft

Filed under
Software
  • OnlyOffice, the Open Source Office Suite Apis Now Available on Flathub

    Big fan of productivity software? If so, you may be interested to know that the OnlyOffice Desktop Editors are now available on Flathub.

    Yes, Flathub, aka the de facto app store for Flatpak, the cross-distro containerised app distribution method.

  • ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors Now Available To Install On Linux From Flathub

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors, a free and open source office suite that offers text, spreadsheet and presentation editors for the Linux, Windows and macOS desktops, is now available on Flathub for easy installation (and update) on Linux distributions that support Flatpak.

    Flathub is an app store and build service for Linux that distributes applications as Flatpak packages, which allows them to run on almost any Linux distribution.

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors allows creating, viewing and editing text documents, spreadsheets and presentations with support for most popular formats like .docx, .odt, .xlsx., .ods, .pptx, .csv and .odp. Its website claims it has the "highest compatibility with Microsoft Office formats".

  • How to get Microsoft core fonts on Linux

    Linux is an open-source operating system. As a result, it is missing some critical components that users of proprietary operating systems enjoy. One big thing that all Linux operating systems miss out on is proprietary fonts.

    The most used proprietary fonts out there today are the Microsoft Core Fonts. They’re used in many apps, development, and even graphics design projects. In this guide, we’ll go over how to set them up on Linux.

    Note: not using Ubuntu, Debian, Arch Linux, Fedora, or OpenSUSE? Download the generic font package here and install the fonts by hand.

IEI's and Arbor Technology's Linux-Ready Devices

Filed under
Hardware
  • IEI ITG-100AI DIN-Rail Rugged mini PC Comes with a Myriad X AI Accelerator Module
  • Compact Kaby Lake signage player has dual 4K HDMI ports

    Arbor’s rugged, Linux-friendly “IEC-3900” signage player has a 7th Gen U-Series Core CPU, dual independent 4K HDMI ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, M.2 SATA storage, and a 130 x 124 x 35mm footprint.

    Arbor Technology, which recently introduced a rugged ELIT-1930 signage player based on Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake, has now launched an even more rugged signage system with a much more compact form factor that runs on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake processor. The 130 x 124 x 35mm, 0.73 kg IEC-3900 runs Linux or Win 10 on a dual-core, 2.8GHz/3.9GHz Core i7-7600U or 2.6GHz/3.5GHz Core i5-7300U.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Openwashing and Linux Foundation Openwash

Filed under
OSS
  • Huobi’s ‘Regulator-Friendly’ Blockchain Goes Open Source

    Huobi Chain, the regulator-facing public blockchain of exchange Huobi Group, is now open source and publicly available to all developers on GitHub, the firm said Tuesday.

    Nervos, a blockchain development startup, is providing part of the technical infrastructure for the project.

    The firms are developing pluggable components for the network that could enable regulators to supervise contract deployments, asset holdings and transfers, as well as the enforcement of anti money laundering regulations, Bo Wang, a Nervos researcher, told CoinDesk.

    The components will also allow financial institutions, such as banks and regulatory agencies, to freeze assets and accounts in case of emergencies via sidechains, according to Wang.

  • Is Open Source Broken?

    The movement to develop software applications and all manner of IT services through the open source model is fundamentally rooted in the notion of community contribution, but things have shifted.

  • Managing all your enterprise's APIs with new management gateways for review
  • See you at KubeCon!

    It’s that time of year again! We’re getting ready to head on out to San Diego for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon NA. For me, KubeCon always makes for an exciting and jam-packed week. 

  • Amazon Web Services, Genesys, Salesforce Form New Open Data Model

    To accelerate digital transformation, organizations in every industry are modernizing their on-premises technologies by adopting cloud-native applications. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), global spend on cloud computing will grow from $147 billion in 2019 to $418 billion by 2024. Almost half of that investment will be tied to technologies that help companies deliver personalized customer experiences.

    One major challenge of this shift to cloud computing is that applications are typically created with their own data models, forcing developers to build, test, and manage custom code that’s necessary to map and translate data across different systems. The process is inefficient, delays innovation, and ultimately can result in a broken customer experience.

  • The Linux Kernel Mentorship program was a life changing experience

    Operating systems, computer architectures and compilers have always fascinated me. I like to go in depth to understand the important software components we depend on! My life changed when engineers from IBM LTC (Linux Technology Center) came to my college to teach us the Linux Kernel internals. When I heard about the Linux Kernel Mentorship program, I immediately knew that I wanted to be a part of it to further fuel my passion for Linux.

    One of the project in the lists of projects available to work during the Linux Kernel Mentorship program was on “Predictive Memory Reclamation”. I really wanted the opportunity to work on the core kernel, and I began working with my mentor Khalid Aziz immediately during the application period where he gave me a task regarding the identification of anonymous memory regions for a process. I learned a lot in the application period by reading various blogs, textbooks and commit logs.

    During my mentorship period, I worked to develop a predictive memory reclamation algorithm in the Linux Kernel. The aim of the project was to reduce the amount of time the Linux kernel spends in reclaiming memory to satisfy processes requests for memory when there is memory pressure, i.e not enough to satisfy the memory allocation of a process. We implemented a predictive algorithm that can forecast memory pressure and proactively reclaim memory to ensure there is enough available for processes.

GNU Guix: Spreading the news

Filed under
OS
GNU

Developers keep adding crazy features, fixing bugs, and generally improving things. But how good is it if users aren’t aware of these new things? As an example, since June, our build farm has been offering lzip-compressed binaries, which results in better performance when installing software. But to take advantage of that, users need to be aware of its existence, and they need to upgrade their Guix daemon. Likewise, how do we get people to learn about the new guix deploy command that’s now available at their fingertips, about security issues that were fixed, about important infrastructure changes, new options added to existing commands, and so forth?

Our (frustrating!) experience has been that release notes, blog posts, and mailing list announcements aren’t quite enough to get the word out. There’s always people who’ll miss important info and realize when it’s already late, sometimes too late. Hence this simple idea: wouldn’t it be nice if important information would reach users right in their terminal?

[...]

Since it was applied a bit more than a month ago, we’ve already put the news mechanism to good use on quite a few occasions: giving users instructions on how to deal with locales after the last glibc upgrade, giving them upgrade info for CVE-2019-18192, telling them about new command-line options, and more.

In parallel, given that reading the mailing lists is akin to “drinking from a fire hose” as they say, Christopher Baines has been thinking about how to provide regular development updates to interested users and developers. Chris announced last week a prototype of a “Guix Weekly News” web site that would aggregate information about package updates automatically extracted from the Guix Data Service, along with manually written updates. It would seem that this service could readily grab info from channel news as well.

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Events: FSF, GStreamer, LibreOffice, Qt World Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • Hang out with the FSF staff in Seattle, November 15

    We are hosting this get-together to show our appreciation for your support of the FSF's work and to provide an opportunity to meet other FSF members and supporters in the area. We'll give updates on what the FSF is currently working on and we are curious to hear your thoughts, as well as answer any questions you may have.

  • GStreamer Conference 2019
  • GStreamer Conference 2019 Videos Now Available Online

    Taking place at the end of October during the Linux Foundation events in Lyon, France was the GStreamer Conference to align with the annual developer festivities.

    GStreamer Conference 2019 was once again livestreamed by the fantastic folks at Ubicast.tv with their great quality video/audio recordings of the conference now for many years.

  • Event report: Google Summer of Code presentation in Ankara, Turkey

    The Google Summer of Code – aka GSoC – is a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. In 2019, LibreOffice was once again a participating project, and we describe the results here.

  • Qt World Summit 2019

    We also had a dedicated table for our mobile effort where we showcased our KDE apps for Android and of course Plasma Mobile. The latter of which we had running on a good ol’ Nexus 5X and more importantly the Librem 5 Dev Kit by Purism. Unfortunately, the Pinephone developer kits we were hoping to show as well weren’t shipped in time for the event. Anyway, if you’re interested in learning more about what’s going on with Plasma Mobile go check out our new weekly blog series!

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Fedora: Updates, Upgrade and Fedora Women’s Day in Peru

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora status updates: October 2019

    The Fedora Silverblue team was not able to get the necessary changes into Fedora 31 to support having Flatpak pre-installed. They are looking at the possibility of re-spinning the Silverblue ISO to incorporate the changes. But they did update the Fedora 31 Flatpak runtime. The team updated the Flatpak’ed GNOME applications to GNOME 3.34 and built them against the Fedora 31 runtime.

  • Upgrade Fedora 30 to Fedora 31
  • Fedora Women’s Day (FWD) 2019

Security Patches and the Kernel (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (community-mysql, crun, java-latest-openjdk, and mupdf), openSUSE (libssh2_org), and SUSE (go1.12, libseccomp, and tar).

  • New ZombieLoad Side-Channel Attack Variant: TSX Asynchronous Abort

    In addition to the JCC erratum being made public today and that performance-shifting Intel microcode update affecting Skylake through Cascade Lake, researchers also announced a new ZombieLoad side-channel attack variant dubbed "TSX Asynchronous Abort" or TAA for short.

    ZombieLoad / MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) was announced back in May by researchers while today Cyberus Technology has announced a new variant focused on Intel processors with TSX (Transactional Synchronization Extensions). TSX Asynchronous Abort is a new ZombieLoad variant that was actually discovered back as part of Cyberus' originally discoveries but faced an extended embargo.

  • Linux Kernel Gets Mitigations For TSX Aync Abort Plus Another New Issue: iITLB Multihit

    The Linux kernel has just received its mitigation work for the newly-announced TSX Asynchronous Abort (TAA) variant of ZombieLoad plus revealing mitigations for another Intel CPU issue... So today in addition to the JCC Erratum and ZombieLoad TAA the latest is iITLB Multihit (NX) - No eXcuses.

    The mainline Linux kernel received mitigations for ZombieLoad TAA that work in conjunction with newly-published Intel microcode. The mitigations also now expose /sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/tsx_async_abort for reporting the mitigation status plus a new tsx_async_abort kernel parameter. With the TAA mitigation, the system will clear CPU buffers on ring transitions.

  • LinuxBoot Continues Maturing - Now Able To Boot Windows

    LinuxBoot is approaching two years of age as the effort led by Facebook and others for replacing some elements of the system firmware with the Linux kernel.

    Chris Koch of Google presented at last month's Platform Security Summit 2019 on the initiative. The Platform Security Summit 2019 took place at the start of October at Microsoft's facilities in Redmond. LinuxBoot in recent months has been able to begin booting Windows 10, which is related to the recent reports on kexec'ing Windows from Linux. But not only is Windows booting but VMware and Xen are also now working in a LinuxBoot environment.

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