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Monday, 22 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Excellent Utilities: Ulauncher – Sublime application launcher for Linux

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We are covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. Ulauncher is a fast application launcher for Linux. It has a minimal design, dependent on only a few resources, very fast, and works on virtually all Linux desktops. The software is written in Python, using GTK+. This review is carried out with the latest beta release of the software. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Problematic Privileges, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order

  • Linux Action News 115

    We're pleasantly surprised by a new Linux distro, EvilGnome malware spies on Gnome Shell users, and more good news for MacBook Linux users. Plus why RetroArch coming to Steam is a bit controversial, ubuntu-wsl is a cold drink for Windows users, and gpodder needs a new maintainer.

  • Problematic Privileges | TechSNAP 407b

    Wes takes a quick look at a container escape proof-of-concept and reviews Docker security best practices.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 155 - Stealing cars and ransomware

    Josh and Kurt talk about a new way to steal cars because a service didn't do proper background checks. We also discuss how this relates to working with criminals, such as ransomware, and what it means for the future of the ransomware industry.

  • gnu World Order 13x30

KDE: Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia and GSoC Work

  • Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia

    In June month we gathered in Slimbook’s offices to work on Plasma. Along with Plasma developers, we were also joined by KDE Usability and Productivity team. During the sprint I mostly worked to create up-to-date image for Plasma Mobile, as from last few weeks Plasma Mobile image was quite out-of-date and needed update.

  • Somewhat Usable

    Adding a feature by yourself is a lot satisfying than requesting someone to add that for you, cause now you are both the producer and the consumer. But to be honest, I never thought I would be the one implementing the Magnetic Lasso for Krita when I requested it 4 years back, leave the fact that I even getting paid for doing so. So here are the first tests being done on it.

  • View and Examples

    This week I began learning about QML to try to fix the View that show the graphs and tools for manipulating graphs.

  • Month 2 in making the Titler – GSoC ’19

    From my understanding so far (forgive me for any mistakes that I might make – it’s a different codebase and different concepts – I wholeheartedly welcome corrections and suggestions) the whole producer boils down to two parts – the actual producer code (which is in C and which is the thing which does the ‘producer stuff’) and the wrapper code (which ‘wraps’, supplements and does the actual rendering part of the QML frames). The wrapper files are responsible for mainly rendering the QML templates that are passed to it and make it available for the actual producer to use. And consequently, most of the work is to be done in the wrapper files, as the producer in itself doesn’t change much as it will still do the same things like the existing XML producer (producer_kdenlivetitle.c) – such as loading a file, generating a frame, calling rendering methods from the wrapper files.

System administrator responsibilities: 9 critical tasks

System administrators are critical to the reliable and successful operation of an organization and its network operations center and data center. A sysadmin must have expertise with the system's underlying platform (i.e., Windows, Linux) as well as be familiar with multiple areas including networking, backup, data restoration, IT security, database operations, middleware basics, load balancing, and more. Sysadmin tasks are not limited to server management, maintenance, and repair, but also any functions that support a smoothly running production environment with minimal (or no) complaints from customers and end users. Although sysadmins have a seemingly endless list of responsibilities, some are more critical than others. If you work in a sysadmin role (or hope to one day), make sure you are ready to follow these best practices. Read more

Programming, OSS and GNU

Filed under
Development
GNU
OSS
  • How to Split a String in Python
  • The 10 Best Software Engineering Books in 2019

    I’ll probably never forget my first day as a software engineer.

    Back in 2015, I got hired as a software engineer for a consulting company, in Luxembourg.

    I did not have much experience, but I was ready to tackle every single project I was assigned to.

  • GCC 10 Lands OpenRISC Support For Floating Point Instructions

    When it comes to open-source processor ISAs, RISC-V currently captures much of the spotlight but OpenRISC continues chugging along as another open-source CPU architecture. The OpenRISC GCC compiler back-end and other software tooling also continues to move along for this architecture that's been in the works since 2000.

    The OpenRISC back-end/target landed just at the end of 2018 for the current GCC 9 stable series. This OpenRISC "or1k" support continues maturing. It took so long for the OpenRISC support to land into GCC as the original developers of the compiler support wouldn't agree to their copyright assignment to the Free Software Foundation for getting the code merged. As a result, a clean-room rewrite of the GCC OpenRISC code was needed before it could be accepted into GCC.

  • Matthias Clasen: Westcoast hackfest; GTK updates

    old widget. It started out as a port of the tk text widget, and it has not seen a lot of architectural updates over the years. A few years ago, we added a pixel cache to it, to improve its scrolling, but on a high resolution display, its still a lot of pixels to shovel around.

    As we’ve moved widgets to GTK4’s rendering models, everybody avoided GtkTextView, so it was using the fallback cairo rendering path, even as we ported other text rendering in GTK to a new pango renderer which produces render nodes.

    Until yesterday. We decided to just have a look at how hard it would be to switch the text view over to the new pango renderer. This went much more smoothly than we expected, and the new code is in master today.

  • GTK4 Gets Smoother GPU-Accelerated Scrolling, Modern Cursor Blinking

    GNOME developers continue to be hard at work on GTK4 and trying to ensure this major tool-kit update will be a great success.

    Happening the past few days in Portland, Oregon was the "GTK West Coast Hackfest" where Matthias Clasen, Christian Hergert, and other GNOME developers took towards figuring out effectively last minute work for GTK 4.0.

  • GNU Hyperbole 7.0.3 is the latest release
    Hyperbole is an amazing hypertextual information management system 
    that installs quickly and easily as an Emacs package.  It is part of 
    GNU Elpa, the Emacs Lisp Package Archive. 
    Hyperbole interlinks all your working information within Emacs for 
    fast access and editing, not just within special modes.  An hour 
    invested exploring Hyperbole's built-in interactive DEMO file will 
    save you hundreds of hours in your future work. 
    
    
  • Sylvain Beucler: Planet clean-up

    Re-sync Debian base config, scripts and packaging, update documentation; the planet-venus package is still in bad shape though, it's not officially orphaned but the maintainer is unreachable AFAICS

    Fetch all Savannah feeds using https

  • Takeaways from PX4 Open-Source Drone Developer Conference

    Last month at ETH Zurich, Auterion sponsored the first-ever PX4 developer conference for those interested in the open-source-based operating system for enterprise drones. The event, held June 20-21, included 200 attendees from the open-source community, including developers, researchers, and technical thought leaders in the unmanned systems space.

    Here are three takeaway messages from the conference – for those interested in learning more about PX4 and ROS (the largest open-source drone and robotics communities), you can view all of the presentations on PX4’s YouTube channel.

  • Synchronize bookmarks: Syncmarx is now Open Source
  • SuperFreezZ is an open source alternative to Greenify that kills apps running in the background

    Task managers are widely viewed as unnecessary on Android smartphones. Most of us may agree with that view, but the reality is there are still a lot of misbehaving Android apps out there, most task “killers” don’t actually do anything useful besides clearing the recent apps view (which doesn’t really “kill” apps anyway), and a lot of users have yet to upgrade to newer Android versions that have implemented more restrictions on background apps. That’s why, to this very day, apps like Greenify and Brevent remain incredibly popular. Many users swear by both Greenify and Brevent, but since they’re closed source, some users are wary of them. If you’re looking for an open source alternative, check out SuperFreezZ by XDA Junior Member hcur.

Proprietary Spyware From Microsoft and Dropbox Targets GNU/Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
Software
  • Microsoft Teams client for Linux 0.4 Released with Stability Fixes

    Teams for Linux is an unofficial Microsoft Teams client for Linux using Electron. It uses the Web App and wraps it as a standalone application using Electron.

  • Dropbox Brings Back Support For ZFS, XFS, BTFS And eCryptFS On Linux [Ed: The NSA wants to slurp in all your files, irrespective of what file system you use]

    Dropbox stopped supporting folder syncing to drives with filesystems which it deemed "uncommon", which on Linux meant anything but Ext4, upsetting quite a few users. The reason cited for this was that "a supported file system is required as Dropbox relies on extended attributes (X-attrs) to identify files in the Dropbox folder and keep them in sync", which doesn't really make sense since there are many filesystems that support xattr (extended attributes) on Linux.

Excellent Utilities: Ulauncher – Sublime application launcher for Linux

Filed under
Software

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We are covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides.

Ulauncher is a fast application launcher for Linux. It has a minimal design, dependent on only a few resources, very fast, and works on virtually all Linux desktops. The software is written in Python, using GTK+.

This review is carried out with the latest beta release of the software.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Problematic Privileges, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order

Filed under
Interviews
  • Linux Action News 115

    We're pleasantly surprised by a new Linux distro, EvilGnome malware spies on Gnome Shell users, and more good news for MacBook Linux users.

    Plus why RetroArch coming to Steam is a bit controversial, ubuntu-wsl is a cold drink for Windows users, and gpodder needs a new maintainer.

  • Problematic Privileges | TechSNAP 407b

    Wes takes a quick look at a container escape proof-of-concept and reviews Docker security best practices.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 155 - Stealing cars and ransomware

    Josh and Kurt talk about a new way to steal cars because a service didn't do proper background checks. We also discuss how this relates to working with criminals, such as ransomware, and what it means for the future of the ransomware industry.

  • gnu World Order 13x30

KDE: Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia and GSoC Work

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia

    In June month we gathered in Slimbook’s offices to work on Plasma. Along with Plasma developers, we were also joined by KDE Usability and Productivity team.

    During the sprint I mostly worked to create up-to-date image for Plasma Mobile, as from last few weeks Plasma Mobile image was quite out-of-date and needed update.

  • Somewhat Usable

    Adding a feature by yourself is a lot satisfying than requesting someone to add that for you, cause now you are both the producer and the consumer. But to be honest, I never thought I would be the one implementing the Magnetic Lasso for Krita when I requested it 4 years back, leave the fact that I even getting paid for doing so. So here are the first tests being done on it.

  • View and Examples

    This week I began learning about QML to try to fix the View that show the graphs and tools for manipulating graphs.

  • Month 2 in making the Titler – GSoC ’19

    From my understanding so far (forgive me for any mistakes that I might make – it’s a different codebase and different concepts – I wholeheartedly welcome corrections and suggestions) the whole producer boils down to two parts – the actual producer code (which is in C and which is the thing which does the ‘producer stuff’) and the wrapper code (which ‘wraps’, supplements and does the actual rendering part of the QML frames). The wrapper files are responsible for mainly rendering the QML templates that are passed to it and make it available for the actual producer to use. And consequently, most of the work is to be done in the wrapper files, as the producer in itself doesn’t change much as it will still do the same things like the existing XML producer (producer_kdenlivetitle.c) – such as loading a file, generating a frame, calling rendering methods from the wrapper files.

System administrator responsibilities: 9 critical tasks

Filed under
Server

System administrators are critical to the reliable and successful operation of an organization and its network operations center and data center. A sysadmin must have expertise with the system's underlying platform (i.e., Windows, Linux) as well as be familiar with multiple areas including networking, backup, data restoration, IT security, database operations, middleware basics, load balancing, and more. Sysadmin tasks are not limited to server management, maintenance, and repair, but also any functions that support a smoothly running production environment with minimal (or no) complaints from customers and end users.

Although sysadmins have a seemingly endless list of responsibilities, some are more critical than others. If you work in a sysadmin role (or hope to one day), make sure you are ready to follow these best practices.

Read more

Fedora, CNCF and IBM-Paid Puff Pieces

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Changing how we work

    As those of you who read the https://communityblog.fedoraproject.org/state-of-the-community-platform-engineering-team/ blog know, we are looking at changing workflows and organization around in the Community Platform Engineering team (of which, I am a member). So, I thought I would share a few thoughts from my perspective and hopefully enlighten the community more on why we are changing things and what that might look like.

  • Kubernetes policy project takes enterprise IT by storm

    An open source compliance as code project has gained a groundswell of popularity over the last six months among enterprise IT pros, who say it simplifies and standardizes Kubernetes policy management.

    The Open Policy Agent (OPA), an open source compliance as code project founded by former VMware employees, was used at Netflix as early as 2017 and accepted into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a sandbox project in March 2018. Netflix gave an OPA demonstration at KubeCon in December 2017, and Intuit and Capital One followed at KubeCon in December 2018. After the project advanced to the CNCF's incubating stage in April 2019, and was demonstrated a third time at KubeCon EU in May 2019, it began to generate mainstream buzz.

    [...]

    As Kubernetes environments grow to encompass Istio service mesh and Knative event-based orchestration in what Google calls the open cloud stack, the fact that OPA lends itself to Kubernetes policy enforcement but can expand to include those adjacent utilities boosts its appeal.

  • The Who, What, Where, When, and Why for Mainframe Security [Ed: IBM pays Ponemon for puff pieces]

    For most people, security is a bit of a nuisance. No-one likes having to keep updating their password and then needing to remember the new one. And then there’s all the different passwords that need to be remembered for different things. It all just seems like an administrative nightmare. It just makes getting a day’s work done harder. That’s what most users think right up until the moment there’s a breach. And suddenly the mood has changed. Now everyone wants to know exactly what’s happened. They want to know who has done what, where they’ve done it, when it occurred, how they got in, and a million other questions. Your phone is ringing off the hook. Your e-mail is filling up faster than usual. What can you do? Where can you access the information you need? How do you respond to the incident?

Some Interesting Features In VLC and Typical FUD From Bogdan Popa

Filed under
Software
Movies
  • Some Interesting Features In VLC!

    VLC is one of the best video and audio player applications that are open source. We can install this application on various existing operating systems such as Linux, MAC, Windows, and also Android.

  • Critical Flaw in VLC Media Player Discovered by German Cybersecurity Agency [Ed: Will dedicated Microsoft propagandists like Bogdan Popa also write about NSA back doors in Windows or always just focus on smearing FOSS security? There are security bugs found every day, but back doors are an actual conspiracy; yet corporate media sponsored by the conspirators likes to deflect all blame to those who find/exploit these back doors.]

    A critical security flaw in VLC Media Player has recently been discovered by German cybersecurity watchdog CERT-Bund, who warns that a successful attack would allow for remote code execution.
    The vulnerability exists in VLC Media Player version 3.0.7.1, according to the official CVE-2019-13615, which is the latest stable release of the application.

Review: HexagonOS 1.0

Filed under
Reviews

On the whole, Hexagon worked well for me. Hardware support was solid, performance was above average, the included applications worked well, and the settings were easy to adjust. I had very few complaints - just two really: my keyboard layout had to be adjusted and Hexagon did not automatically work well with VirtualBox. However, both of these issues were easily addressed.

With that being said, Hexagon appears to bring relatively little, technologically, to the experience over its parent. While running this distribution I sometimes forgot that I was not simply running Xubuntu with a dock installed. The custom utilities Hexagon provides (the software centre and the backup tool) both function, but are quite limited in what they can do for the user and this makes me disinclined to use them over other solutions like Deja Dup and GNOME Software.

It's probably too soon to judge what HexagonOS will become. Right now it's just at its 1.0 release, and appears to be a first attempt to take Xubuntu and customize it with a few changes. Hopefully future versions will try more new things, polish the custom applications and distinguish the distribution from its parent.

Read more

10 resources every sysadmin should know about

Filed under
Server
Software

Everybody knows that sysadmins are impossibly busy people. Consequently, it sometimes seems they are superhuman. The sysadmin's dirty secret, the same one shared by many open source users, is that they don't actually do all of the work it looks like they've done. One of the greatest tools in the sysadmin's kit is their ability to reuse work someone else has already done for them.

A good sysadmin knows where to turn when there's a big job to be done but nobody available to do it. If you're looking to work smarter, not harder, this is for you: a list of the top 10 resources every sysadmin should know about.

Read more

8 Best Open Source CRM Software

Filed under
OSS

CRM stands for Customer Relationship Management. A CRM software enables the companies to interact with their potential and existing customers, understand and manage their requirement. This improved the relation of the organization with customer and you know that a happy customer brings profitability to the business.

No matter how big your team is (small business or a big firm), a CRM software always comes in handy when you want to keep things organized in your business.

You may avoid a CRM software for a couple of employees when you start a business. However, to streamline the process and make the work efficient and fast – you will eventually need a CRM software.

But, what about the level of control (or security) in a CRM software? Do you want a transparent CRM software which you can take control of?

Well, that is when an open source CRM software comes into play. You can host it yourself, and you can customize it as per your requirements. You may also opt for the hosted version where you don’t have to manage it yourself.

Read more

ArcoLinux 19.07.11

Filed under
Reviews

Today we are looking at the latest snapshot of ArcoLinux 19.07.11. We are looking at the main, edition, the XFCE release. It is based on Arch Linux, Linux Kernel 5.2, XFCE 4.12 and it uses about 600MB of ram when idling.

When I look at ArcoLinux, I can see just how much the developer loves this project and how much work he is putting into it. AcroLinux is clearly one of the best looking, and working great.

Read more

Direct/video: ArcoLinux 19.07.11 Run Through

What am I doing with Tracker?

Filed under
GNOME

Some years ago I was asked to come up with some support for sandboxed apps wrt indexed data. This drummed up into Tracker 2.0 and domain ontologies, allowing those sandboxed apps to keep their own private data and collection of Tracker services to populate it.

Fast forward to today and… this is still largely unused, Tracker-using flatpak applications still whitelist org.freedesktop.Tracker, and are thus allowed to read and change content there. Despite I’ve been told it’s been mostly lack of time… I cannot blame them, domain ontologies offer the perfect isolation at the cost of the perfect duplication. It may do the job, but is far from optimal.

So I got asked again “we have a credible story for sandboxed tracker?”. One way or another, seems we don’t, back to the drawing board.

Read more

KDE: SDDM, Kate and More

Filed under
KDE
  • [GSoC – 4] Achieving consistency between SDDM and Plasma

    This blog post marks the landing of the initial implementation of theme syncing between SDDM and Plasma, which you may already have read about in Nate’s post.

    Those of you running master can test the feature out by going to the Advanced tab in the Login Screen (SDDM) config module.

  • Kate LSP Status – July 21

    The new LSP client by Mark Nauwelaerts keeps making nice progress.

    It will not be shipped with the KDE Applications 19.08 release, but in master it is now compiled & installed per default. You only need to activate it on the plugin configuration page in Kate’s settings dialog to be able to use it.

    For details how to build Kate master with it’s plugins, please take a look at this guide.

    If you want to start to hack on the plugin, you find it in the kate.git, addons/lspclient.

    Feel welcome to show up on kwrite-devel@kde.org and help out! All development discussions regarding this plugin happen there.

    If you are already familiar with Phabricator, post some patch directly at KDE’s Phabricator instance.

  • Second month progress

    So yes, we are gradually moving our way forward towards completely removing our dependence over KAuth. But there are some things which are yet to complete. To name one, I need to finish up QDbus communication from helper to application which sends dbus (Inter Process Communication) messages. Currently I had tried this in QDbus patch, but it is not yet fully complete. All this stuff is done by KAuth currently in master.

First Release Candidate of Linux 5.3

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.3-rc1
    It's been two weeks, and the merge window is over, and Linux 5.3-rc1
    is tagged and pushed out.
    
    This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the
    biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was
    exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12,
    4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up
    there.
    
    The merge window also started out pretty painfully, with me hitting a
    couple of bugs in the first couple of days. That's never a good sign,
    since I don't tend to do anything particularly odd, and if I hit bugs
    it means code wasn't tested well enough. In one case it was due to me
    using a simplified configuration that hadn't been tested, and caused
    an odd issue to show up - it happens. But in the other case, it really
    was code that was too recent and too rough and hadn't baked enough.
    The first got fixed, the second just got reverted.
    
    Anyway, despite the rocky start, and the big size, things mostly
    smoothed out towards the end of the merge window. And there's a lot to
    like in 5.3. Too much to do the shortlog with individual commits, of
    course, so appended is the usual "mergelog" of people I merged from
    and a one-liner very high-level "what got merged". For more detail,
    you should go check the git tree.
    
    As always: the people credited below are just the people I pull from,
    there's about 1600 individual developers (for 12500+ non-merge
    commits) in this merge window.
    
    Go test,
    
                Linus
    
  • Linux 5.3-rc1 Debuts As "A Pretty Big Release"

    Just as expected, Linus Torvalds this afternoon issued the first release candidate of the forthcoming Linux 5.3 kernel.

    It's just not us that have been quite eager for Linux 5.3 and its changes. Torvalds acknowledged in the 5.3-rc1 announcement that this kernel is indeed a big one: "This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12, 4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up there."

  • The New Features & Improvements Of The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    The Linux 5.3 kernel merge window is expected to close today so here is our usual recap of all the changes that made it into the mainline tree over the past two weeks. There is a lot of changes to be excited about from Radeon RX 5700 Navi support to various CPU improvements and ongoing performance work to supporting newer Apple MacBook laptops and Intel Speed Select Technology enablement.

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment.

    But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users.

    Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once.

    This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task.

    Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong.

    Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

The Status of Fractional Scaling (HiDPI) Between Windows & Linux

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

There’s a special type of displays commonly called “HiDPI“, which means that the number of pixels in the screen is doubled (vertically and horizontally), making everything drawn on the screen look sharper and better. One of the most common examples of HiDPI are Apple’s Retina displays, which do come with their desktops and laptops.

However, one issue with HiDPI is that the default screen resolutions are too small to be displayed on them, so we need what’s called as “scaling”; Which is simply also doubling the drawn pixels from the OS side so that they can match that of the display. Otherwise, displaying a 400×400 program window on a 3840×2160 display will give a very horrible user experience, so the OS will need to scale that window (and everything) by a factor of 2x, to make it 800×800, which would make it better.

Fractional scaling is the process of doing the previous work, but by using fractional scaling numbers (E.g 1.25, 1.4, 1.75.. etc), so that they can be customized better according to the user’s setup and needs.

Now where’s the issue, you may ask? Windows operating system has been supporting such kind of displays natively for a very long time, but Linux distributions do lack a lot of things in this field. There are many drawbacks, issues and other things to consider. This article will take you in a tour about that.

Read more

Also: Vulkan 1.1.116 Published With Subgroup Size Control Extension

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