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Wednesday, 21 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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2004 Members Choice Award Winners Announced

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Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

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A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

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Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

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Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

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Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

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Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

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Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

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Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

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Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux With Radeon / GeForce GPUs On The Latest 2018 Drivers

Given how fiercely the latest open-source AMD Linux driver code is running now up against NVIDIA's long-standing flagship Linux GPU driver, you might be curious how well that driver stacks up against the Radeon Software driver on Windows? Well, you are in luck as here are some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 as well as the GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 Ti while being tested both under Microsoft Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS while using the latest AMD/NVIDIA drivers on each platform. Read more

Android Leftovers

Debian-driven DragonBoard expands to 96Boards Extended spec

Arrow has launched its $199 DragonBoard 820c, an open-spec, Snapdragon 820E based 96Boards CE Extended SBC with an audio header and a second 60-pin connector in addition to the usual 40- and 60-pin headers. Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed DragonBoard 820c was teased over a year ago and then announced by Qualcomm last month in conjunction with the release of the Snapdragon 820E SoC. We briefly covered the SBC earlier this week as part of Linaro’s multi-board roll-out — Linaro said that it would soon qualify the 820c as compliant with its new AI-focused spec. There was no shopping link at the time, but now you can purchase this successor to the DragonBoard 410C for $199. The open-spec SBC runs Debian Linux, with planned support for OpenEmbedded. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Google Patches All Intel Chromebooks Against Spectre Variant 2 with Chrome OS 65
    Google released a new stable version of its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, build 65.0.3325.167 (Platform version: 10323.58.0/1) bringing the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations to more devices and a bunch of other improvements.
  • VIDEO: Cooking With Linux: Lots and Lots of Word Processors! The Tuesday Linux Journal Show
  • How to use netstat in GNU/Linux
  • Cutelyst 2 released with HTTP/2 support
    Cutelyst the Qt/C++ web framework just got a major release update, around one and half year ago Cutelyst v1 got the first release with a stable API/ABI, many improvements where made during this period but now it was time to clean up the mistakes and give room for new features.
  • Fedora 28 and GNOME 3.28: New Features for Eastern Europe
    This time this is not fake, edited, patched, nor a custom build from COPR but the real screenshots of the unmodified downstream Fedora 28 planned to be released on May 1 this year. Here is how the default calendar widget in GNOME Shell looks in Greek, Polish, and Ukrainian:
  • Stephen Smoogen: /usr/bin/whoami
  • Debian CEF packages
    I've created some Debian CEF packages—CEF isn't the easiest thing to package (and it takes an hour to build even on my 20-core server, since it needs to build basically all of Chromium), but it's fairly rewarding to see everything fall into place. It should benefit not only Nageru, but also OBS and potentially CasparCG if anyone wants to package that.
  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #151
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 1)
    For quite some time, I have been interested in alternative operating system technologies, particularly kernels beyond the likes of Linux. Things like the Hurd and technologies associated with it, such as Mach, seem like worthy initiatives, and contrary to largely ignorant and conveniently propagated myths, they are available and usable today for anyone bothered to take a look. Indeed, Mach has had quite an active life despite being denigrated for being an older-generation microkernel with questionable performance credentials. But one technological branch that has intrigued me for a while has been the L4 family of microkernels. Starting out with the motivation to improve microkernel performance, particularly with regard to interprocess communication, different “flavours” of L4 have seen widespread use and, like Mach, have been ported to different hardware architectures. One of these L4 implementations, Fiasco.OC, appeared particularly interesting in this latter regard, in addition to various other features it offers over earlier L4 implementations. Meanwhile, I have had some success with software and hardware experiments with the Ben NanoNote. As you may know or remember, the Ben NanoNote is a “palmtop” computer based on an existing design (apparently for a pocket dictionary product) that was intended to offer a portable computing experience supported entirely by Free Software, not needing any proprietary drivers or firmware whatsoever. Had the Free Software Foundation been certifying devices at the time of its introduction, I imagine that it would have received the “Respects Your Freedom” certification. So, it seems to me that it is a worthy candidate for a Free Software porting exercise.
  • Samsung Announces Galaxy Tab Active2, a Rugged Android Tablet for Mobile Workers
    Samsung announced today the Galaxy Tab Active2 rugged Android tablet designed for mobile workers conducting business outdoors in industrial locations, under harsh weather, and other difficult conditions.