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Sunday, 11 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Foundation: Blockchain and Automotive Grade Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation’s Blockchain Collective Hyperledger Hits 100 Members

    Hyperledger aims to enable organizations to build robust, industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support their individual business transactions by creating an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and code base.

  • The Blockchain Milestone You May Have Missed
  • Sasken becomes member of Automotive Grade Linux

    Sasken Communication Technologies Ltd has announced its membership with Automotive Grade Linux as its bronze member.

    This will enable Sasken to provide solutions to customers on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). Sasken will provide product development and system integration services for automotive customers spanning in-vehicle infotainment (IVI), instrument cluster, heads-up display and telematics.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016

    This was my ninth month as a paid contributor and I have been paid to work 11 hours on Debian LTS, a project started by Raphaël Hertzog.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20161130-1

    As we are moving closer to the Debian release freeze, I am shipping out a new set of packages. Nothing spectacular here, just the regular updates and a security fix that was only reported internally. Add sugar and a few minor bug fixes.

  • Canonical yells at European cloud provider

    Open saucy outfit Canonical is in the middle of a legal dispute with an unnamed “a European cloud provider” over the use of its own homespun version of Ubuntu on their cloud servers.

    Canonical is worried that the implementation disables even the most basic of security features and Canonical fears that when something bad happens, the great unwashed will not blame the cloud provider but will instead blame Ubuntu.

    Writing in the company bog, Canonical said that it has spent months trying to get the unnamed provider to use the standard Ubuntu as delivered to other commercial operations to no avail. It said that Red Hat and Microsoft wouldn’t be treated like this.

  • Should Linux Mint be discontinued?

    Linux Mint has been quite popular with many users for a very long time. But changes to Linux Mint in recent years have one redditor wondering exactly what the point of using it is these days. Distributions like Fedora, Ubuntu and others have also stolen some of Linux Mint's thunder with notable improvements and popular spins.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • AWS hires new open source expert

    Last month, AWS also hired Adrian Cockcroft, who previously shepherded open source efforts at Netflix. At Amazon’s conference last week, Cockcroft said AWS planned to increase its efforts in open source, with Bhorat leading the charge.

  • Google Launches Open Source Security Tool in Beta

    Google wants to make "fuzz testing" -- providing random data inputs to programs -- a standard part of open source development.

    To that end, it just launched a beta program for OSS-Fuzz, a project on GitHub. It seeks to help standardize modern fuzzing techniques and combine them with a distributed execution model that can scale as needed.

  • Flash Facing Death as Google Launches Chrome 55

    To support HTML5, the internet giant finally launched an update for Chrome 55 which makes Flash obsolete in many websites except to those that only support Adobe's multimedia software platform. These exempted websites include Facebook, Youtube, VK, Yahoo, Yandex, OK.ru, Twitch.tv, Amazon, and Mail.ru.

  • Powering NFV, Kubernetes integration, and more OpenStack news
  • Support open-source projects this giving season
  • OpenMake Software Announces Open Source Strategy for Application Release Automation

    OpenMake Release Engineer to be offered as Open Source under the FreeBSD License

  • French National Assembly organises its first data camp

    The National Assembly, the lower house of the French parliament, in collaboration with Etalab, organised an open data camp on 26 November for the first time in its history.

    During the event, developers, data scientists and citizens were invited to “imagine new usages”, based on data provided by the French Assembly. One of the objectives was to help analyse citizens’ participation and the design of laws based on public consultations, Etalab, the French government agency in charge of Open Data in France, said on its website.

  • Open source planning tool for the energy turnaround: platform for electric power grids

    Hundreds of volunteers are already underway, and their numbers are growing every day. Armed with the OpenGridMap app on their smart phones, they meander through Munich, Berlin, Tokyo and even Teheran. Just another cell phone game? "No, we aren't chasing Pokémons," reassures Jose Rivera, director of the OpenGridMap project. "What we are interested in is the electrical infrastructure: High-voltage and low-voltage power lines, transformer sub-stations, wind turbines and solar power plants."

  • Microsemi goes open source with FPGA for RISC-V

    Us-based Microsemi has laid claim to being the first field programmable gate array (FPGA) provider to offer a comprehensive software tool chain and intellectual property (IP) core for RISC-V designs.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Android Leftovers

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Android

Fedora 25 review

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Even when dealing with the various Wayland oddities and issues, Fedora 25 is a great distribution. Everything is reasonably polished and the default software provides a functional desktop for those looking for a basic web browsing, e-mail, and word processing environment. The additional packages available can easily turn Fedora into an excellent development workstation customized for a developer's specific needs. If you are programming in most of the current major programming languages, Fedora provides you the tools to easily do so. Overall, I am very pleased using Fedora 25, but I am even more excited for future releases of Fedora as the various minor Wayland issues get cleaned up.

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Must have Ubuntu Packages

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Ubuntu

For most people, any default Ubuntu installation will meet their needs. Ubuntu provides users with Web browsing, email, along with various communication tools right out of the box. Heck, even basic backups are provided...although you must take the time to configure it.

Putting all of that aside for a moment, let's consider which "must have Ubuntu packages" aren't included by default. In this article, I'll share my top list of must have Ubuntu packages and explain why I rely on each of them.

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform

Filed under
Red Hat

The adoption of OpenStack in production environments has burgeoned, necessitating increased requirements for enhanced management and seamlessly integrated enterprise capabilities.

Numerous enterprises worldwide rely on Red Hat's offerings in the OpenStack space—that is, Red Hat OpenStack Platform, a highly scalable, open Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) platform designed to deploy, scale and manage private cloud, public cloud and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) environments.

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PayPal Reduces Costs 10x With Open Source CI

Filed under
OSS

The bigger you are, the more small efficiencies add up. Manivannan Selvaraj's talk from LinuxCon North America gives us a detailed inside view of how PayPal cut operating costs by a factor of ten, while greatly increasing performance and user convenience.

Everything has to be fast now. We can't have downtimes. No going offline for maintenance, no requesting resources with a days-long ticketing process. Once upon a time virtual machines were the new miracle technology that enabled more efficient resource use. But that was then. Selvaraj describes how PayPal's VMs were operating at low efficiency. They started with a single giant customized Jenkins instance running over 40,000 jobs. It was a single point of failure, not scalable, and inflexible.

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Turn Raspberry Pi 3 Into a Powerful Media Player With RasPlex

Filed under
HowTos

I have hundreds of movies, TV shows and music that I have bought over the years. They all reside on my Plex Media Server. Just like books, I tend to buy these works and watch them once in awhile, instead of relying on "streaming" services like Netflix where content isn’t always available forever.

If you already have Plex Media Server running, then you can build an inexpensive Plex Media Player using Raspberry Pi 3 and RasPlex. Plex Media Server is based on open source Kodi (formerly XBMC), but is not fully open source. Plex Media Center has a friendly interface and it’s very easy to set up a media center (See our previous tutorial on how to install it on a Raspberry Pi 3 or on another dedicated Linux machine).

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7 Linux predictions for 2017

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Linux

Last year I made a set of predictions of events that I thought would happen in the tech world (focused primarily on Linux and free software). I was mostly right. This has emboldened me to make another set of predictions for 2017. I have no inside knowledge on any of these—I am basing this entirely on the twin scientific principles of star maths and wishy thinking.

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GTK Graphics

Filed under
GNOME
  • GTK Lands A Big Refactoring Of OpenGL Code

    In addition to Red Hat's Benjamin Otte working on a Vulkan renderer for GTK4's GSK, he's also been working on a big refactoring of the OpenGL code that's now been merged to master.

    OpenGL is very important for GTK4 as it will play a big role in rendering with GSK. With this "large GL refactoring", a big clean-up was done of the OpenGL GDK code, affecting the X11, Win32, Wayland, and Mir code too. Some of the specific work includes no longer using buffer-age information, passing the actual OpenGL context, and simplifying the code. More details via this Git commit.

  • A Vulkan Renderer For GNOME's GTK+ GSK Is In Development

    A Vulkan back-end is in development for GNOME's GTK's tool-kit new GTK Scene Kit (GSK) code.

    Benjamin Otte has begun experimenting with a Vulkan back-end for GTK's GSK code with GTK Scene Kit being one of the big additions in development for the major GTK+ 4.0 milestone. GSK implements a scene graph to allow for more complex graphical control of widgets and other improvements to its graphics pipeline. GSK was merged back in October and currently uses OpenGL for rendering while there is now a branched Vulkan renderer.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Early Benchmarks Of GCC 7 On Linux x86_64 With An Intel Core i7 6800K

Filed under
Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the GCC 7 compiler having entered its stage three, feature development is basically over so it's a great time to begin running more benchmarks of this big compiler update that will be officially released as GCC 7.1.0 in early 2017. Up today are benchmarks of the latest GCC 7.0 development snapshot compared to GCC 6.2 and GCC 5.4 on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system running Ubuntu 16.10.

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Also: LLVM's LLD Linker Gets Faster Performance (Parallelized ICF)

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • 7 Things to do After Installing KDE Plasma

    Even for other Linux users, KDE Plasma can seem like a different operating system. Except for a few standards like LibreOffice, the apps are different, and so is the design philosophy, which tends to cram in every possible feature. As a result, once they install, users are likely to wonder what to do next.

  • KDE Framworks 5 Content Snap Techno

    In the previous post on Snapping KDE Applications we looked at the high-level implication and use of the KDE Frameworks 5 content snap to snapcraft snap bundles for binary distribution. Today I want to get a bit more technical and look at the actual building and inner workings of the content snap itself.

    The KDE Frameworks 5 snap is a content snap. Content snaps are really just ordinary snaps that define a content interface. Namely, they expose part or all of their file tree for use by another snap but otherwise can be regular snaps and have their own applications etc.

    KDE Frameworks 5’s snap is special in terms of size and scope. The whole set of KDE Frameworks 5, combined with Qt 5, combined with a large chunk of the graphic stack that is not part of the ubuntu-core snap. All in all just for the Qt5 and KF5 parts we are talking about close to 100 distinct source tarballs that need building to compose the full frameworks stack. KDE is in the fortunate position of already having builds of all these available through KDE neon. This allows us to simply repack existing work into the content snap. This is for the most part just as good as doing everything from scratch, but has the advantage of saving both maintenance effort and build resources.

  • Calligra 3.0 Is Ready As A Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 Office Suite

    It's been quite a while since last having anything to report on the KDE Calligra open-source graphics/office suite while surprisingly this morning it was pleasant to see Calligra 3.0 tagged for release.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 Up to Release Candidate State, Final Arrives December 15

    The KDE development team was proud to announce the availability of the Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

    Work on KDE Applications 16.12 started about a month ago, on November 10, when the third and last maintenance update of the current stable KDE Applications 16.08 release was announced, marking the end of life of the series. Until today, KDE Applications 16.12 received a Beta development version, tagged as build 16.11.80, and now we're seeing the Release Candidate, tagged as build 16.11.90.

64-bit Raspberry Image and OpenStack at SUSE

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 gets 64-bit Raspberry Image

    The latest release from openSUSE has new images available for the Raspberry Pi and joins SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi in becoming the initial distributions with 64-bit for the Raspberry Pi 3.

    The 64-bit image of openSUSE Leap 42.2 for the Raspberry Pi 3 has been out for a couple weeks.

    “The ARM and AArch64 Images for openSUSE Leap 42.2 are not a once-only release,” said Dirk Mueller. “They get continuously updated and include fixes as the Leap 42.2 port matures over time. These are the first usable images, and more variants with more fixes will come over time.”

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Does A 64-bit Spin For The Raspberry Pi 3

    Following SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as being available in a 64-bit edition catered to the Raspberry Pi 3, openSUSE developers have now released a 64-bit image of Leap 42.2 for the RPi3.

  • http://ostatic.com/blog/suse-buys-hpes-openstack-and-cloud-foundry-assets-talent

    Back in November, the Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of an industry-standard platform for cloud applications, announced that SUSE had increased its engagement and support of Cloud Foundry by becoming a Platinum member.

    Now, SUSE has entered into an agreement with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to acquire technology and talent that will expand SUSE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. In addition, the company announced that it will accelerate its entry into the growing Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) market, and said that the acquired OpenStack assets will be integrated into SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

Pico-ITX SBC runs Ubuntu on Braswell

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

DFI announced an Intel Braswell based “BW051” Pico-ITX SBC with up to 8GB DDR3L, mini-PCIe, SATA 3.0, mSATA, and Linux support.

DFI, which earlier this year tapped Intel’s “Braswell” generation of SoCs for its BW968 COM Express Compact Type 6 module, has now chosen Braswell for a Pico-ITX SBC. The 100 x 72mm BW051 ships with 4-6W Braswell processors including dual or quad-core Celeron models, the quad-core 1.6GHz Pentium N3710, and quad-core, 1.04GHz Atom x5-E8000.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenShift and Google

  • Red Hat launches 'OpenShift' dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    World's leading provider of open source solutions Red Hat has announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform.
  • Red Hat and Google join forces on containers
    Red Hat and Google are set to offer enterprise customers a managed OpenShift service hosted on Google's cloud to make the build, launch and management of applications a less time-consuming process. OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform will speed up the adoption of containers, according to Red Hat, giving developers the guidance they need to create applications and deploy them faster.
  • Red Hat’s Container Platform Lands on Google Cloud
    Red Hat’s OpenShift Dedicated container platform will now be available on Google Cloud Platform, the companies announced yesterday. OpenShift Dedicated is a managed version of Red Hat’s OpenShift container platform, targeting enterprises. Launched in December, the Dedicated version puts Red Hat in the role of a service provider, taking care of infrastructure and operations.

Security News

  • A 'mystery device' is letting thieves break into cars and drive off with them, insurance group says
    Insurance crime investigators are raising alarms over a device that not only lets thieves break into cars that use keyless entry systems but also helps start and steal them. Investigators from the National Insurance Crime Bureau, a not-for-profit organization, said in an interview they obtained what they called the “mystery device” from a third-party security expert at an overseas company. So far, the threat here may be mostly theoretical. The crime bureau said it heard of the device being used in Europe and had reports that it had entered the U.S., but said there are no law enforcement reports of a car being stolen using it in the United States.
  • Turkish hacking group offers tiered points rewards program for DoS attacks
    A TURKISH HACKING GANG is taking an unusual approach to funding denial of service attacks, and is soliciting for, and offering hackers rewards for taking down chosen pages. This is unusual, as far as we know, and it has led to the creation of comment from the security industry. Often these things do.
  • German judges explain why Adblock Plus is legal
    Last month, Adblock Plus maker Eyeo GmbH won its sixth legal victory in German courts, with a panel of district court judges deciding that ad-blocking software is legal despite German newsmagazine Der Spiegel's arguments to the contrary. Now, the reasoning of the Hamburg-based panel of judges has been made public. According to an unofficial English-translated copy (PDF) of the judgment, Spiegel Online argued it was making a "unified offer" to online consumers. Essentially, that offer is: read the news content for free and view some ads. While Internet users have the freedom "not to access this unified offer," neither they nor Adblock Plus have the right to "dismantle" it. Eyeo's behavior thus amounted to unfair competition, and it could even wipe the offer out, Spiegel claimed. "The Claimant [Spiegel] argues that the Defendant’s [Eyeo's] business model endangers the Claimant’s existence," reads the judgment, which isn't final because it can be appealed by Spiegel. Because users aren't willing to pay for editorial content on the Web, "it is not economically viable for the Claimant to switch to this business model." Spiegel asked for an accounting of all the blocked views on its website and a fine to be paid—or even for managers Wladimir Palant and Till Faida to be placed in "coercive detention" of up to two years.
  • Op-ed: I’m throwing in the towel on PGP, and I work in security [Ed: Onlya tool would drop PGP for Facebook-controlled Whatsapp. The company back-doors everything under gag orders.]
    In the coming weeks I'll import all signatures I received, make all the signatures I promised, and then publish revocations to the keyservers. I'll rotate my Keybase key. Eventually, I'll destroy the private keys.
  • 90 per cent of NHS Trusts are still running Windows XP machines
    90 PER CENT of the NHS continues to run Windows XP machines, two and a half years after Microsoft ditched support for the ageing OS. It's Citrix who is ringing the alarm bells, having learnt that 90 per cent of NHS Trusts are still running Windows XP PCs. The firm sent Freedom of Information (FoI) requests to 63 NHS Trusts, 42 of which responded. The data also revealed that 24 Trusts are still not sure when they'll migrate from Windows XP to a newer version of Microsoft's OS. 14 per cent said they would be transitioning to a new operating system by the end of this year, while 29 per cent pledged to make the move sometime next year.
  • Ransomware blamed for attack that caused Lincolnshire NHS Trust shutdown
    RANSOMWARE is to blame for an attack which saw an NHS Trust in Lincolnshire that forced to cancel operations for four days in October. In a statement, Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust said that a ransomware variant called Globe2 was to blame for the incident.
  • Researchers Find Fresh Fodder for IoT Attack Cannons
    New research published this week could provide plenty of fresh fodder for Mirai, a malware strain that enslaves poorly-secured Internet of Things (IoT) devices for use in powerful online attacks. Researchers in Austria have unearthed a pair of backdoor accounts in more than 80 different IP camera models made by Sony Corp. Separately, Israeli security experts have discovered trivially exploitable weaknesses in nearly a half-million white-labeled IP camera models that are not currently sought out by Mirai.
  • Your data is not safe. Here's how to lock it down
    But some people worry that government surveillance will expand under a Donald Trump presidency, especially because he tapped Mike Pompeo, who supports mass surveillance, for CIA chief.
  • Tor at the Heart: Library Freedom Project
    Library Freedom Project is an initiative that aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and responsibilities, and privacy-enhancing technologies to help safeguard digital freedoms.
  • PowerShell security threats greater than ever, researchers warn
    Administrators should upgrade to the latest version of Microsoft PowerShell and enable extended logging and monitoring capabilities in the light of a surge in related security threats, warn researchers [...] Now more than 95% of PowerShell scripts analysed by Symantec researchers have been found to be malicious, with 111 threat families using PowerShell.
  • Five-Year-Old Bait-and-Switch Linux Security Flaw Patched
    Maintainers of the Linux Kernel project have fixed three security flaws this week, among which there was a serious bug that lingered in the kernel for the past five years and allowed attackers to bypass some OS security systems and open a root shell.
  • The Internet of Dangerous Auction Sites
    Ok, I know this is kind of old news now, but Bruce Schneier gave testimony to the House of Representatives’ Energy & Commerce Committee about computer security after the Dyn attack. I’m including this quote because I feel it sets the scene nicely for what follows here. Last week, I was browsing the popular online auction site eBay and I noticed that there was no TLS. For a moment, I considered that maybe my traffic was being intercepted deliberately, there’s no way that eBay as a global company would be deliberately risking users in this way. I was wrong. There is not and has never been TLS for large swathes of the eBay site. In fact, the only point at which I’ve found TLS is in their help pages and when it comes to entering card details (although it’ll give you back the last 4 digits of your card over a plaintext channel).

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.8.14

Turns out I'm going to be on a very long flight early tomorrow morning, so I figured it would be good to get this kernel out now, instead of delaying it by an extra day. So, I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.14 kernel. All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.38 Linux Kernel 4.8.14 Hits the Streets with Numerous Networking Improvements, More