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Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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4MParted 20 Disk Partitioning Live CD Enters Beta Stage, Based on GParted 0.26.1

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Today, October 16, 2016, 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the release and immediate availability of the Beta pre-release version of the upcoming 4MParted 20.0 Live CD.

Based on the 4MLinux 20.0 operating system, which is also in the Beta stages of development, the 4MParted 20.0 disk partitioning Live CD is built around the popular and open-source GParted 0.26.1 graphical partition editor utility, which right now is the best tool for formatting, resizing, splitting, and joining disk partitions of any type.

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Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Review

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Overall, I want to congratulate the Ubuntu MATE development team on really working hard to nail the user experience. This is one of the better distributions out there and a great example for others with regards to the Welcome app and the initial introduction to the system. If you are looking for a solid desktop environment to explore, be sure to give Ubuntu MATE a try, it's an excellent distribution.

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Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.10 Officially Released, Available for Download Now

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Softpedia was informed today, October 16, 2016, by budgie-remix project leader David Mohammed about the official and final release of the Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.10 computer operating system.

Based on the recently released Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) distro, Ubuntu Budgie Remix (budgie-remix) 16.10 ships with a kernel from the Linux 4.8 series and it's built around the Budgie 10.2.7 desktop environment developed by the Solus Project. There are a lot of great new features implemented in this major version, such as full disk encryption support, Home folder encryption, and support for more languages during installation.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.04 — What Do You Think The Codename Will Be?

Linux 4.8.2

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I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.2 kernel.

All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at:
git:// linux-4.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal git web browser:

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Also: Linux 4.7.8

Linux 4.4.25

Dota 2 Radeon OpenGL vs. Vulkan Performance With Mesa Git, Linux 4.9-rc1

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Now that the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver has landed in Mesa Git and Linux 4.9-rc1 is out, I figured it was time for some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon Vulkan driver against the RadeonSI Gallium3D OpenGL driver. Here is the first of that new data.

For some Sunday benchmarking fun was testing RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL for Dota 2, the best Vulkan benchmark on Linux to date. In addition to looking at the latest performance results, the Phoronix Test Suite was looking at the CPU utilization in both scenarios too (by setting the MONITOR=cpu.usage environment variable). The OpenGL vs. Vulkan tests were done at a variety of resolutions.

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Also: Mesa Benchmarks Post-ReZ RadeonSI Change, Another Game Jumps Up By ~20%

10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak'

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Ubuntu 16.10 was recently released with some improvements. According to the poll 53% conducted on LinuxAndUbuntu, 53% users will upgrade to Ubuntu 16.10. But what to do next after you've upgraded to Yakkety Yak. In this article, I'll walk you through the 10 Things to do after installing Ubuntu 16.10.

Read<br />

Top 5 Penetration Testing Linux Distributions

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There are a seemingly endless amount of Linux distros for just about every area of use. This includes pen testing, sometimes called hacking, distros. Some of you are undoubtedly familiar with, at least if you have spent any time looking around at all the distributions out there. ​

Read<br />

today's leftovers

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Leftovers: Software

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  • Atom 1.11

    Atom 1.11 features performance and stability improvements and, in particular, we’re excited that Atom now asks for permission before sending any telemetry data.

  • Is Open Source Design a Thing?

    The prowess and power of Open Source is undeniable. From servers, to the desktop, mobile, to the underpinnings of the so-called “Internet of Things”, Open Source spans sectors and continents, public and private. One profession, however, that has traditionally been dominated by closed, proprietary software solutions – and usually very expensive ones at that! – is the field of design. In this article, we’ll take a look at some free and open source options to pad, if not replace your existing design arsenal. Maybe you’re a designer just starting out and you are understandably on a budget. Maybe you’re more seasoned and simply want to adopt more of an “open” workflow. Read on and let’s see what the free and open source software world has to offer!

  • Audacious 3.8, Terminix 1.3.0, Atom 1.11.1, MATE Dock Applet 0.75 [PPA Updates Part 1]
  • Multiload-ng 1.4.0, GNOME Twitch 0.3.0, Sublime Text 3 Build 3126 [PPA Updates Part 2]
  • tint 0.0.3: Tint Is Not Tufte

    The tint package, whose name stands for Tint Is Not Tufte , on CRAN offers a fresh take on the excellent Tufte-style for html and pdf presentations.

  • New free software projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Calibre 2.70 Ebook Manager Adds Tool to Download External Resources for Books

    Today, October 14, 2016, Calibre developer Kovid Goyal proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Calibre 2.70 ebook library management software for all supported platforms.

    Calibre 2.70 comes two weeks after the release of Calibre 2.69, and it promises two new features. First, there is a new tool implemented in the Edit Book component and designed to let users download external resources, such as stylesheets or images, that aren't included in a book.

    The second feature added in the Calibre 2.70 release is support for custom columns in the Manage Categories sub menu of the Alter Tag Browser function. Also new is the implementation of the Various Danish news source, which has been submitted by Allan Simonsen.

  • Vectr’s Roadmap: How Free Cross-Platform Graphics Editor Is Going To Evolve Over The Next Year

    Vectr is a free collaborative vector graphics editor, for both web & desktop. Our mission is to help everyone create vector graphic designs easily and intuitively, using its simple yet powerful web and desktop cross-platform tool. For three years now we’ve been working hard building Vectr from scratch. Last month we launched Vectr 1.0 out of beta and got covered by top media creating lots of positive buzz in design and tech communities. This is however only the beginning of journey for Vectr.

  • Get your Linux on

    One of the top requests from the community after we launched end-to-end encryption was to also provide a Linux client. We’ve just released an experimental version, available from

    Our Linux app has comparable functionality with Wire for Windows and macOS, and calls, video calls, etc. work cross-platform. However, it is an experimental build and we expect to see some issues arise from day-to-day usage. One known shortcoming is that there is no auto-update. We recommend to follow Wire News to find out about updates.

  • Getting started with music production on Linux: Three ways to get set up with pro-audio free software

    There are plenty of reasons to choose Linux over other platforms for audio production: For me, I was willing to learn some new software, and was sick of being burned by vendor lock-in, not even to mention the crazy high cost of DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software. I wanted to have a free software audio set-up that I could "set up and forget", so I could stop wasting time tinkering with different options, and instead jump head-first into producing soundtracks for the video games I'm developing on Linux.

    So, I investigated 3 different routes, and recorded my results here.

    The conclusion? KXStudio is super freaking cool. Seriously: Install once and get a crazy number of instruments and effects, dozens of DAWs and sequencers, on top of a low-latency kernel, all set up and ready to go, all for free. At least in terms of quantity, it's the simplest way to go from 0 to 60 for audio production on any platform. Pro-audio in Linux is totally here.

  • PlayOnLinux second review - The magic man?

    Roughly five years ago, I tested PlayOnLinux. My first reaction was, blimey, was it five years ago? Damn. It feels like only a few months back. Anyhow, this program is a very nice wrapper for WINE, allowing you to install Windows software with more ease and a higher chance of success than just manually. In Linux. Need I say that?

    Back in 2011, PlayOnLinux did an okay job, but as I aptly titled the article, there are no miracles. Some of the stuff simply did not work. Fast forward a lot, WINE seems to have stagnated, at least in my experience. Winetricks looks outdated. Which leaves us with PlayOnLinux, and recently it did an excellent job of getting Sketchup 3D to run on Ubuntu. So, we are giving it a second chance. Five years is a long time in the binary world. Let us see if and how PlayOnLinux has changed. Perhaps there will be a miracle this time. To wit.

today's howtos

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Kernel Space/Linux

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  • Linux 4.9-rc1 Kernel Released Early
  • xfs: shared data extents support for 4.9-rc1
  • Linux can be really stable under the right circumstances

    We don't think about our iSCSI backends all that often. Really, we don't think about them at all. They're just kind of there, sitting quietly in racks and quietly working away. They haven't even sent in any SMART complaints about their data disks yet (although I'm sure that'll start happening in another year or two, unless we got really lucky or unlucky with these HDs).

    Recently, though, we got email from the IPMI monitoring on one and as a result I wound up logging in to it. This caused me to notice just how long the production iSCSI backends have been up: from 557 days for the hot spare backend to 726 days for a pair used by one fileserver. As it turns out, this uptime is not arbitrary; it dates back to our forced switch from 10G to 1G networking, when we put 1G cards into everything in our fileserver infrastructure. They've been running untouched (and trouble-free) since then, faithfully handling what has undoubtedly been tens or hundreds of terabytes of IO by now.

  • Cgroups v2: resource management done even worse the second time around

    The second version of the Cgroups interface is also described in kernel documentation; the most interesting part from the perspective of the issues that will be discussed here are in an appendix, titled “R. Issues with v1 and Rationales for v2”.

  • Additional P-State Change For Linux 4.9 May Boost Intel Atom Performance

    Rafael Wysocki sent in a secondary pull request today of more power management updates for the Linux 4.9 kernel.

    There's a second batch of power management changes on top of the main feature material that came last week. Power management changes for this secondary pull include some CPUFreq regressions, improve the safety around MSRs for hardware-managed P-States, and various fixes.

  • Linux and high dynamic range displays

    Andy Ritger began his talk at the 2016 X.Org Developers Conference (XDC) with a disclaimer of sorts: "I am very much not a color expert" and welcomed corrections from attendees. But his talk delved into chromaticity and other highly technical color characteristics in order to talk about the advent of high dynamic range (HDR) displays—and what is needed for Linux to support them.

    Ritger works for NVIDIA, which has been getting requests for HDR display support from its customers. The company has implemented that support in its Windows and Android drivers, but has not yet done so for its discrete GPU Linux drivers. Ritger has been studying the subject to try to understand what is needed to support these displays for Linux; the talk was meant to largely be a report on what he has learned.

GNU/Linux Leftovers

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  • What to expect from Linux in 2017: IPv6, High Scalability and is anyone using CephFS?

    2016 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux - the Linux operating system kernel is 25 years old this month. It was August 25, 1991, when Linus Torvalds posted his famous message announcing the project, claiming that Linux was “just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu.”

    But now, Linux is far bigger and it powers a huge part of the Internet’s infrastructure, data centers, websites, smartphone operating systems, and nearly all of the world’s fastest supercomputers.

  • Linux Update Coming For Tesla Model S, X This December

    We constantly hear about the enormous touchscreen displays in Tesla’s line of vehicles. Compared to most other cars on the market, the screen size is more than double. However, what we don’t hear about often enough is that the internet browser is way behind. This is not expected of such a tech company, with all of the other bells and whistles Tesla includes in its vehicles.

    Well … the time is coming and it has been made Twitter official by Elon Musk. Many people assumed that the huge, recent 8.0 update would address the issue. Unfortunately, that was not the case, and Tesla owners will have to wait until December for the Linux OS to update to 4.4. At least now we know … and Elon and Tesla have been pretty efficient as of late, living up to all of the bold promises.

  • Chris Were Interviews Linux Musician Emily Fox

    Last year I wrote an article for FOSS Force about Emily Fox, the very talented musician who uses only open source tools to create her YouTube videos. I’m a musician myself and I’m in awe of her musical talents. Today, I was thrilled to come across a feature length interview with her on YouTube by Welsh open source enthusiast Chris Were. In this video learn her back story, including her dad who loves Gentoo Linux.

  • Three Women Creating Awesome Stuff with Linux

    Today is Ada Lovelace Day, a 19th-century woman widely regarded as the first computer programmer. Ada wrote various notes describing what we now would recognize as computer programs, envisioning these running on Charles Babbage’s “Analytical Engine” (an early take on what we would call a computer today). To celebrate the contributions that Ada provided to early computing we are taking the time today to recognize three women creating awesome stuff with Linux (and System76 computers).

    We sent three questions to our friends Helena, Na’Tosha, and our very own Emma (from here at System76). Below you will find our questions and their fantastic answers!

  • Behind the Scenes: Engineering with David

    Product Engineer David Jordan shares what he's working on in this behind the scenes video from the System76 office.

  • POWER8 Workstation Launches On Crowdfunding: $4k For Motherboard, $18k For System

    The Talos Secure Workstation that we previously have covered on Phoronix has now launched on crowd-funding where they hope to raise close to four million dollars to make this POWER8 system that's free down to the firmware a reality.

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Linux Devices: ESLOV, EOMA68, Android and Tizen

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  • ESLOV IoT Invention Kit
  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices: Update from Shenzhen

    This update is about being in Shenzhen for the past few days, during their October National Holiday. In summary, I know now why it’s been so damn difficult to get anything done from outside of China: it’s the incredibly poor internet access.

  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices: Post-Shenzhen Reflections

    Much of what I write is off-the-cuff, I don’t know what’s going to be on the page until it’s written. So it’s often interesting, even for me, to re-read things my writing. As I was going back over my previous update on my visit to Shenzhen, it suddenly hit me: everything I’ve done over the past five years - the entire EOMA68 design ethos - is vindicated by this one visit to Huaqiang Road. The process of developing electronics products is not greatly improved by coming over here: it’s something that you have to be very, very careful about in advance. You cannot just pick random parts off of Digi-Key and expect them to be available everywhere. Products are successful, in large part, if they are designed around the most commonly-made components.

  • Installing Ubuntu Linux on a Nexus 7 Tablet

    Online I found a lot of resources that helped me out but it still took a little tweaking. I thought I’d share the steps I used in case any other sad people out there want to try out the same. I’m not sure how universal these steps are or in what ways they might change depending on your particular device or version of tools you use. But let’s get to it, shall we?

  • Android-x86 6.0 review - not there yet
  • Samsung Moves on from Exploding Galaxy Note 7
  • Xiaomi has backdoors in their phones
  • Xiaomi trackers and backdoors (Update)
  • Two IoT Solutions Giants Merge to Accelerate the Internet of Things (IoT)

    The Internet of Things is set to get a big boost with the recent announcement of a merger between Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) which sponsors the IoTivity open source project, and AllSeen Alliance provider of the AllJoyn open source IoT framework. Both bigwigs would now exist under the sole OCF name and bye-laws in working towards creating solutions that would enable devices, phones, computers and sensors communicate with one another regardless of manufacturer, operating system, chipset or physical transport.

  • Game: Mad O Ball 3D for Tizen Smartphones

    A new addition to the Tizen Store is the Mad O Ball 3D game which is available to download for FREE only for the next 2 months. This is an exciting arcade action game in which you race ball against time. Awesome 3D graphics, excellent music and sound effects and superb physics are the winning combination for this title.

Leftovers: OSS

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  • Hello fans and followers of open source voting in San Francisco!

    The Open Source Initiative works with a variety of organizations to promote the adoption of open source software throughout government. San Francisco Elections Commissioner Chris Jerdonek provides the OSI with a breakdown of the latest happening with San Francisco's efforts to develop and certify the country's first open source voting system!

  • Announcing Google Code-in 2016 and Google Summer of Code 2017

    One of the goals of the Open Source Programs Office is to encourage more people to contribute to open source software. One way we achieve that goal is through our student programs, Google Summer of Code (for university students) and Google Code-in (for pre-university students).

    Over 15,000 students from more than 100 countries have worked with 23,000 mentors and contributed to 560+ open source projects, so we're excited to announce the next round of these programs.

  • MySQL 8.0: The end of MyISAM

    This blog discusses the gradual end of MyISAM in MySQL.

    The story that started 20 years ago is coming to its end. I’m talking about the old MyISAM storage engine that was the only storage provided by MySQL in 1995, and was available in MySQL for 20+ years. Actually, part of my job as a MySQL consultant for 10+ years was to discover MyISAM tables and advise customers how to convert those to InnoDB.

  • Devs Await Open Source Word After Commercial RethinkDB Effort Fails

    With the company behind the RethinkDB project having failed and its engineering team scooped up by Stripe, Big Data developers are awaiting further word on plans to continue it as fully open source.

    Although failing to achieve commercial success, the RethinkDB database was lauded by many developers for its different approach and solid technology on developer-oriented social sites such as Hacker News and Reddit.

  • First LibreOffice 5.3 BugHunting Session

    LibreOffice is approaching the 5.3 release season with the first bug hunting session, on Friday, October 21, 2016. Tests will be performed on the Alpha version of LibreOffice 5.3, which will be available on the pre-releases server ( a few days before the event. Builds will be available for Linux (DEB and RPM), MacOS and Windows, and will run in parallel with the actual installation.

  • When it Comes to Open CMS Solutions, Take a Test Drive First

    Datamation is out with an extensive evaluation of which open source content management systems (CMS) really stand out, which is a topic near and dear to us here at OStatic. Our site runs on Drupal, which powers many sites around the web, but there are key differences between CMS offerings, and if you're looking for the right solution, we have some good resources for you.

    The Datamation story provides a nice overview of the open CMS space, but here are some of out favorite ways to go about evaluating which is the right CMS for you.

    Marking a true renaissance for tools that can help anyone run a top-notch website or manage content in the cloud, open source content management systems (CMS) have come of age. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla. As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue.

FOSS/Sharing in Government

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  • Senate supports open-source initiatives

    The ASWSU Senate passed a resolution to support the Office of the Provost’s open education initiatives at its meeting on Wednesday. The resolution supports the use of the OpenStax program to provide textbooks created with open-source material.

    This does not force professors to use a book that does not perfectly line up with their curriculum because they can freely edit and update the source material, said Sen. Matthew Morrow, author of the resolution.

    Researchers and professors collaborate to create open-source textbooks for students at other universities to use. Morrow said they are targeting UCORE courses because open-source textbooks are currently less suitable for upper-level classes.

  • Obama’s Facebook Messenger Bot Is Now “Open Source” And Available On GitHub
  • Why the White House is open-sourcing its chatbot code
  • White House open-sources chatbot
  • White House encourages local governments to embrace chatbots
  • Governments favor open source, Google releases 3 new projects, and more news: Russia and the Netherlands propose moves to open source

    For years now, governments throughout Europe have been enthusiastically adopting open source software. Their main reasons for doing so have been to lower costs and to be able to modify the software to suit their needs. Governments in Russia and the Netherlands are following that trend, but for divergent reasons.

    The Russian Duma announced earlier this month that it's drafting a law to give preference to open source over proprietary software. Specifically, "the law will require local agencies to give preference to open source software and justify any purchases of proprietary software." In an interview with Bloomberg News, Duma official Andrey Chernogorov cites security as a major driver behind this shift. Much of the government's IT infrastructure is based on proprietary, foreign-made platforms, and Chernogorov said that the Russian government is "seeking to close this loophole for state purchases, as it causes security risks."

Development News

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Security Leftovers

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  • Alpine edge has switched to libressl

    We decided to replace openssl with libressl because we believe it is a better library. While OpenSSL is trying to fix the broken code, libressl has simply removed it.

  • German nuclear plant infected with computer viruses, operator says

    A nuclear power plant in Germany has been found to be infected with computer viruses, but they appear not to have posed a threat to the facility’s operations because it is isolated from the internet, the station’s operator said on Monday.

    The Gundremmingen plant, located about 120 km northwest of Munich, is run by the German utility RWE.

    The viruses, which include “W32.Ramnit” and “Conficker”, were discovered at Gundremmingen’s B unit in a computer system retrofitted in 2008 with data visualisation software associated with equipment for moving nuclear fuel rods, RWE said.

  • The Slashdot Interview With Security Expert Mikko Hypponen: 'Backupception'

    Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer at security firm F-Secure, has answered a range of your questions. Read on to find his insight on the kind of security awareness training we need, whether anti-virus products are relevant anymore, and whether we have already lost the battle to bad guys. Bonus: his take on whether or not you should take backups of your data.

  • SourceClear Brings Secure Continuous Delivery to the Developer Workflow [Ed: I don't trust them; they're Microsoft connected with a negative track record]
  • Serious security: Three changes that could turn the tide on hackers

    The state of tech security is currently so dire that it feels like anything you have ever stored on a computer, or a company or government has ever stored about you, has already been hacked into by somebody.

  • Crypto needs more transparency, researchers warn

    Researchers with at the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA) and the University of Pennsylvania have called for security standards-setters to publish the seeds for the prime numbers on which their standards rely.

    The boffins also demonstrated again that 1,024-bit primes can no longer be considered secure, by publishing an attack using “special number field sieve” (SNFS) mathematics to show that an attacker could create a prime that looks secure, but isn't.

    Since the research is bound to get conspiracists over-excited, it's worth noting: their paper doesn't claim that any of the cryptographic primes it mentions have been back-doored, only that they can no longer be considered secure.

    “There are opaque, standardised 1024-bit and 2048-bit primes in wide use today that cannot be properly verified”, the paper states.

    Joshua Fried and Nadia Heninger (University of Pennsylvania) worked with Pierrick Gaudry and Emmanuel Thomé (INRIA at the University of Lorraine on the paper, here.

    They call for 2,048-bit keys to be based on “standardised primes” using published seeds, because too many crypto schemes don't provide any way to verify that the seeds aren't somehow back-doored.

  • Is Let’s Encrypt the Largest Certificate Authority on the Web?

    By the time you read this, Let’s Encrypt will have issued its 12 millionth certificate, of which 6 million are active and unexpired. With these milestones, Let’s Encrypt now appears to us to be the the Internet’s largest certificate authority—but a recent analysis by W3Techs said we were only the third largest. So in this post we investigate: how big is Let’s Encrypt, really?

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Easy, Automated Benchmarking On Linux With PTS
    It's easy to run benchmarks on Linux as well as Solaris, BSD, and other operating systems, using our own Phoronix Test Suite open-source benchmarking software. For those that haven't had the opportunity to play with the Phoronix Test Suite for Linux benchmarking, it's really easy to get started. Aside from the official documentation, which is admittedly limited due to time/resource constraints, there are a few independent guides, Wiki pages, and other resources out there to get started.
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Alpha Tagged, New Features Inbound
    The first alpha release of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite was tagged a short time ago in Git. LibreOffice 5.3 is a major update to this distant fork of LibreOffice 5.3.0 is planned to be officially released in late January or early February while this week's alpha one is just the first step of the process. The hard feature freeze on 5.3 is at the end of November followed by a series of betas and release candidates. Those interested in more details on the release schedule can see this Wiki page.
  • MPV 0.21 Player Adds CUDA, Better Raspberry Pi Support
    MPV Player 0.21 is now available as the latest version of this popular fork of MPlayer/MPlayer2. MPV 0.21 adds support for CUDA and NVDEC (NVIDIA Decode) as an alternative to VDPAU. The NVIDIA decode support using CUDA was added to make up for VDPAU's current lack of HEVC Main 10 profile support. Those unfamiliar with NVDEC can see NVIDIA's documentation.
  • MPV 0.21.0 Media Player Adds Nvidia CUDA Support, Raspberry Pi Hardware Decoding
    Today, October 20, 2016, MPV developer Martin Herkt proudly announced the release of another maintenance update of the very popular MPV open-source and cross-platform media player software based on MPlayer. Looking at the release notes, which we've also attached at the end of the story for your reading pleasure, MPV 0.21.0 is a major update that adds a large amount of new features, options and commands, but also addresses dozens of bugs reported by users since the MPV 0.20.0 release, and introduces other minor enhancements. Among the most important new features, we can mention the ability to allow profile forward-references in the default profile, as well as support for Nvidia CUDA and cuvid/NvDecode, which appears to be a welcome addition to GNU/Linux distributions where HEVC Main 10 support is missing.
  • anytime 0.0.4: New features and fixes
    A brand-new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the three earlier releases since mid-September. anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.

KDE Leftovers

  • Choose Your Own Experience in Plasma 5.8 and beyond
    One of the key points of Plasma is while giving a simple default desktop experience, not limiting the user to that single, pre-packed one size fits all UI.
  • KDevelop 5.0.2 released for Windows and Linux
    Four weeks after the release of KDevelop 5.0.1, we are happy to announce the availability of KDevelop 5.0.2, a second stabilization release in the 5.0 series. We highly recommend to update to version 5.0.2 if you are currently using version 5.0.1 or 5.0.0.
  • Wayland improvements since Plasma 5.8 release
    Two weeks have passed since the Plasma 5.8 release and our Wayland efforts have seen quite some improvements. Some changes went into Plasma 5.8 as bug fixes, some changes are only available in master for the next release. With this blog post I want to highlight what we have improved since Plasma 5.8.
  • Wayland For KDE Plasma 5.9 Should Shape Up Quite Nicely
    Plasma 5.8 was only released at the beginning of October but already there has been a number of Wayland improvements queuing up for the next milestone, Plasma 5.9. KWin maintainer Martin Gräßlin wrote a blog post yesterday about some of the early Wayland changes coming for Plasma 5.9. Some of this early work for the next KDE Plasma 5 release includes resize-only borders, global shortcut handling, support for keyboard LEDs via libinput, relative pointer support, the color scheme syncing to the window decoration, window icon improvements, multi-screen improvements, panel imporvements, and more.
  • Autumn Sale in the Krita Shop
  • .

Linux/FOSS Events

  • FOSDEM Desktops DevRoom 2016 all for Participation
    FOSDEM is one of the largest (5,000+ hackers!) gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium, Europe). Once again, one of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks. We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.
  • LatinoWare
    Yesterday, Wednesday 19 oct, was the first day of LatinoWare thirteen edition hosted in the city of Foz do Iguaçu in Parana state with presence of 5155 participants and temperature of 36ºC. Currently this is the biggest event of free software in Brazil.
  • Attending a FUDcon LATAM 2016
    From my experience I will share my days at FUDcon 2016 held on Puno last week. There were 3 core days, and 2 more days to visit around.

Linux Graphics