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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 6:42pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:52pm
Story Point Linux 3.2 Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:26pm
Story Future of Mozilla Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:25pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:24pm
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:23pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:22pm
Story The saga continues with Slackware 14.2 Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:11pm
Story Korora 23 - is it an alternative to Linux Mint? Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:08pm
Story Slack 14.2 & Korora 23 Reviewed, Distros for Average Joe Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2016 - 4:05pm

Elive 2.7.1 beta released

Filed under
Debian

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.7.1
This new version includes:

Audacity (audio wave editor) included by default
Timezone detection improved
Detector of systems improved and updated to detect last windows installed systems
Linux Kernel updated with a lot of new patches for new hardware, bugfixes and improvements
Google Voice search on internet using your microphone

Read more

How To Setup Linux Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Computer [Part - 2]

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Welcome, everyone. It is the second part of how we can setup Linux Web Server and host website on our own Computer. There are some prerequisites to hosting Linux Web Server that we talked about in part 1. If you've not installed Apache web server or any other prerequisite then you must visit Part 1 before reading any further. In this article, we will show you how you can easily make your local website available for the rest of World! So let's get started.

Read<br />
more

15 top Android smartphones we reviewed recently

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Android

The second half of 2016 took off with some exciting launches from notable manufacturers like Motorola, HTC, Xiaomi and others. With so many smartphones being launched on a near-daily basis by brands both big and small, it gets quite difficult to keep track of them.

To help our readers in making their purchase decisions, here is a list of the 15 top Android smartphones we reviewed recently. Take a look.

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Ubuntu tablet and smartphone: a personal "mini" review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

So when Ubuntu and Canonical revealed they were partnering with actual, big manufacturers for Ubuntu mobile devices, a spark of hope was rekindled in my heart. Let it be clear, I am by no means an Ubuntu user, not even a fan. I left the fold nearly a decade ago, after having spent quite some time using and contributing to Kubuntu (to the point of becoming a certified “member” even, though I never ascended to the Council). In terms of loyalties and usage, I am a KDE user (and “helper”) foremost. I use Fedora because it just works for me, for now. So, yes, an Ubuntu Touch device would be another compromise for me, but it would be the smallest one. Or so I hoped.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Emulation or WINE

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • New "remi-php71" repository
  • PHP on the road to the 7.1.0 release
  • First round of Fedora 24 Updated Lives now available. (torrents expected later this week)

    As noted by my colleague on his blog the first round of F24 Updated Lives are now available and carry the date 20160720, Also as mentioned last week on his blog F23 Respins are not going to be actively made, however we and the rest of the volunteer team will field off-off requests as time and resources permit. We are considering a new/second tracker for the Updated Spins but as of today there are only .ISO files available at https://alt.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/live-respins [shortlink] F24 Live-Respins . The F24 respins carry the 4.6.4-200 Kernel and roughly ~500M of updates since the Gold ISOs were released just 5 weeks ago. (some ISOs have more updates, some less)

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Snappy Packaging Happenings In The Fedora, Arch Space

    This week Canonical hosted a Snappy Sprint in Heidelberg, Germany where they worked to further their new package management solution originally spearheaded for Ubuntu Touch. This wasn't an Ubuntu-only event, but Canonical did invite other distribution stakeholders.

    Coming out of this week's event were at least positive moments to share for both Arch and Fedora developers. The Arch snaps package guy made progress on snap confinement on Arch. Currently when using Snaps on Arch, there isn't any confinement support, which defeats some of the purpose. There isn't any confinement support since it relies upon some functionality in the Ubuntu-patched AppArmor with that code not yet being mainlined. Arch's Timothy Redaelli has got those AppArmor patches now running via some AUR packages. Thus it's possible to get snap confinement working on Arch, but it's not yet too pleasant of an experience.

  • PhantomJS 2.1.1 in Ubuntu different from upstream

    At the moment of this writing Vitaly's qtwebkit fork is 28 commits ahead and 39 commits behind qt:dev. I'm surprised Ubuntu's PhantomJS even works.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS released

    Ubuntu 16.04 is a LTS version of Ubuntu.Now Ubuntu team has announced the release of it's first point release,Ubuntu 16.04.1.This first point release includes many updates containing bug fixes and fixing security issues as well and as always what most of users want from a distribution and most of distributions tries to perform,Stability.This release is also well focoused on stabilty as Ubuntu 16.04.

OSS Leftovers

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Android Wear: Should Manufacturers be Given More Freedom?

    In the world of Android, we’ve become accustomed to the myriad of different brands and manufacturers putting their own twist on Android. While this has caused some friction in some circles, it has given certain devices a unique sense of identity and now that most of these skins have been toned down somewhat, they often add a little more value, too. The case is no more clear than it is with Android tablets, stock Android might be just fine and dandy for a lot of users on smartphones, but on tablets it can feel stark and limited. The added features from the likes of Samsung and Sony often make an Android tablet a hell of a lot more useful out of the box, but in the world of Android smartwatches, there’s none of this. The only thing that device manufacturers can realistically change with their Android Wear watches is the different watch faces they include and include some different apps. Is it about time that this changed?

  • $99 Superdock turns Android phones into laptops — but why?

    Stop me if you've heard this idea before: Imagine turning your smartphone into a laptop just by plugging it into a laptop "shell."

    Yeah... it's not a new idea and yet Superbook, a product that promises to turn your Android phone into a laptop, has already smashed its Kickstarter campaign goal of $50,000 with more than $398,000 pledged as of this writing and 28 days left to go.

  • BlackBerry Hamburg Android phone release date soon, FCC now

    This week the folks at BlackBerry have had their latest Android device revealed by the FCC. Re-revealed, we might say, as the device was first leaked several weeks ago with its partner, both BlackBerry smartphones running Android. This device is being shown by the FCC this week with model name STH100-2 (RJD211LW) with GSM quad-band, UMTS penta-band, and LTE deca-band connectivity technology inside. We will very likely see this device released inside the United States very soon.

  • This smart shell can turn your Android smartphone into a complete laptop

    A US-based startup has launched a smart laptop shell that turns your Android smartphone into a complete laptop -- making it more convenient and affordable for people in developing countries like India and South Africa to carry their office in their pocket, literally.

    The shell, called Superbook by Andromium, makes an Android smartphone output look very much like a desktop environment. It is essentially a "dumb terminal"-- a notebook without a processor but with a keyboard, battery, trackpad and display, TreeHugger reported on Saturday.

  • SamsungOne is the new font for all things Samsung
  • Nokia set to make a comeback with two Android devices by the end of year

    Finnish telecommunications giant Nokia is all set to make a smartphone comeback with two new Android 7.0 Nougat devices by the end of this year, a media report said on Saturday.

    The two unnamed devices will have premium metal designs complete with IP68 certification, which means they will be as water resistant as Samsung's Galaxy S7, The Inquirer reported.

    The smartphones may come up with 5.2-inch and 5.5-inch QHD screens, along with fingerprint scanner and "innovations" in the camera, the report noted.

  • Cyanogen Inc. reportedly fires OS development arm, switches to apps

    Cyanogen Inc. seems to be in trouble. A report from Android Police cites "several sources" that say the three-year-old Android software house will be laying off 20 percent of its workforce. One source said the company would "pivot" to "apps" and away from OS development.

  • Cyanogen is chopping its staff after its alternative Android has failed to catch on with phone makers [Ed: Microsoft deal didn't work out, eh?]
  • When Will Android Users Get Prisma App?
  • This week’s top stories: New Android phones, Nougat details, best Android apps for July, & more
  • Android Nougat Update Schedule & Release Date: When's It Coming To Your Android Phone?

Android, Chromebook Make a Sweet Couple

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Running Android apps on a Chromebook gives the Chrome OS added functionality. It has the potential to morph the Chromebook into a portable computing device that offers the best of two Linux worlds.

Still, Google engineers have some tinkering to do before Android apps and the Chrome OS are fully implemented and functional. This transition will not be complete until the Google Play Store works out of the box on new Chromebooks without users having to "upgrade" through Developer's Mode.

Read more

A Grand Experiment

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
BSD

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data?

I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio.

But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.)

Read more

Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Karbonn confirms Android One smartphone(s) launching in Q1 next year

Filed under
Android

In an interview with TOI Tech, Karbonn Mobiles has confirmed it will be introducing new Android One-based smartphone(s) early next year. Karbonn's Managing Director Pradeep Jain said the company is in talks with Google for Android One, and we might see some Android One smartphone launch(es) in Q1 of next year.

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COM and Pico-ITX dev kit run Linux on dual-core Cortex-A7

Filed under
Linux

iWave has launched a rugged, SODIMM-style COM and Pico-ITX form factor carrier board that run Linux on the Renesas dual-core, Cortex-A7 RZ/G1E SoC.

In January, iWave launched the iW-RainboW-G20M-Qseven computer-on-module, built around the dual-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A15 based Renesas RZ/G1M and RZ/G1N SoCs. Now the company has followed up with a 67.6 x 37mm, SODIMM form factor “iW-RainboW-G22M-SM” COM that runs Linux 3.10.31 on the dual-core Cortex-A7 based RZ/G1E SoC from the same RZ/G series SoCs.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion

    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."

  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it

    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.

  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux

    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.

  • GammaRay 2.5 release

    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.

  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection

    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.

  • The new Keyboard panel

    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.

  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS

    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port.

    Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

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More in Tux Machines

Why open source programming languages are crushing proprietary peers

It's no secret that open source now dominates big data infrastructure. From Kubernetes to Hadoop to MongoDB, "No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last ten years in closed-source, proprietary form," as Cloudera chief strategy officer Mike Olson reminded us. Read more

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more