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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Software: Selenium, Password Managers, MAAS Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 4:45am
Story A 'Bridge' for GNU/Linux Games Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:38am
Story Security: Updates, IPSec, Elections, AWS and Surveillance Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:24am
Story Mozilla: WebTorrent, Bitslicing, Firefox Security Add-on and Time Dilation Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:17am
Story Programming: Go, Agile, and Literature Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:12am
Story Railway computer runs Linux on Kaby Lake Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:07am
Story GNOME Linux Desktop With Only Keyboard and a New Anniversary Release Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:04am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:02am
Story Upcoming Linux Foundation Events Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2018 - 3:00am
Blog entry Watson claimed And Seantrel Henderson Bills jersey 2018 naghiyever 16/08/2018 - 2:43am

GIMP Photo Editor: Fine-Tune Your Images Like Never Before

Filed under
GNU
Software

Who doesn’t like to fine-tuning their images and the perfect way for a lot of users is to opt for popular image editing tools. While the count of these offerings is continuing excessively, we are here to talk specifically about GIMP or (the GNU Image Manipulation Program). The free alternative to Adobe Photoshop is no less than its counterparts owing to the set of features it offers to the users.

The professional is there for the users for adding the perfect shades of color, texture, and highlights in the image. It is a tool that you can use for developing your photos from the scratch. Use the tool for professional quality effect and you will have a whole new set of images to flaunt before others.

Read more

Software: libredwg, MPV Player, Colibri, BitTorrent, Vocal, Curl

Filed under
Software
  • libredwg-0.6 released [alpha]
  • MPV Player: A Minimalist Video Player for Linux

    VLC is probably the best video player for Linux or any other operating system. I have been using VLC for years and it is still my favorite.

    However, lately, I am more inclined towards minimalist applications with a clean UI. This is how came across MPV. I loved it so much that I added it in the list of best Ubuntu applications.

  • Colibri – A Unique Minimalist Browser Without Tabs

    Today, we’ve got a somewhat non-conventional app for you and depending on how ready you are to jump on a new idea, you might just fall in love with it. This new idea is bundled in the form of Colibri, a browser that was not available for Linux until recently.

    Colibri is a free, proprietary, secure, speed-efficient, and uncluttered browser designed to be unique and compact. Its major selling point is its tabless browsing interface which works with 3 main tabbed sections instead – Links, Lists, and Feeds.

  • The Best Free BitTorrent Clients

    BitTorrent, the company that created the BitTorrent protocol, designed it with the aim of making it easy to distribute large amounts of data effectively. The peer-to-peer (P2P) technology enables each person downloading the data also to serve that data to others (a process called “seeding”). This drastically reduces the load on a single server and has many uses aside from downloading pirated material.

    So really, BitTorrent is merely a protocol—a tool that, in and of itself, is not at all illegal. It’s what you do with it that matters, just like owning a hammer isn’t illegal, but hitting someone over the head with it is. If you’re considering downloading copyrighted content, that’s illegal.

  • Vocal – a modern Vala podcast player

    Vocal is a powerful, fast, and intuitive application that helps users find new podcasts, manage their libraries, and enjoy the best that independent audio and video publishing has to offer.

  • A hundred million cars run curl

    One of my hobbies is to collect information about where curl is used. The following car brands feature devices, infotainment and/or navigation systems that use curl - in one or more of their models.

    These are all brands about which I've found information online (for example curl license information), received photos of or otherwise been handed information by what I consider reliable sources (like involved engineers).

    Do you have curl in a device installed in another car brand?

Games: Bad Pad, Stage 9, Gladiabots, City of the Shroud, Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy

Filed under
Gaming
  • Hard rock musical comedy metroidvania platformer 'Bad Pad' officially released

    Sometimes games get practically no attention which is such a shame, Bad Pad [Official Site] is one such game that deserves a little more as it's actually pretty good. It just left Early Access last week too, so if you're in the mood for a musical platformer that has a sprinkle of comedy and gore then it's one for you to take a good look at.

    What's interesting about it isn't just that it pulls in elements from games like Super Meat Boy with both the difficulty, movement style and the gory deaths but also the metroidvania-style gameplay and the (pretty good) music that goes along with it to tell the story.

  • Set Phasers to fun! Stage 9 lets you explore the Enterprise-D from Star Trek The Next Generation on Linux

    Are you as excited as I am about the news of Sir Patrick Stewart returning as Jean-Luc Picard in a new Star Trek series? Well, now you can nerd out in style with Stage 9 which let's you explore the Enterprise-D from Star Trek The Next Generation.

    Sent in by a reader, who also happens to be one of the people working on it, Stage 9 aims to recreate the entirety (inside and out) of the Enterprise-D using Unreal Engine 4. They also gave me a little fun fact, that the Linux version seems to be more popular than the Mac version.

  • Real-time tactical RPG 'City of the Shroud' has a Linux demo build available for testing

    City of the Shroud, a real-time tactical RPG just recently launched on Steam and it turns out it's had a Linux demo build for testing for a long time, with hardly anyone stepping up to check it out.

    This post on Steam, open since October 2016 seemed to have no one reply to it until June this year. Now it's actually getting some attention, the developer has actually put up a new build (make sure to use the newer build in that later post). To be clear, you don't need to own it to test it, as it's an external demo download.

  • Gladiabots, the AI combat arena now has a test release for Linux on Steam

    Fancy having a team of robots you program with drag and drop AI fight in an arena? As that's exactly what you will be doing in Gladiabots.

    It's been available on itch.io for a while, with it just now entering Early Access on Steam. Today, the developer put up a Linux version in an opt-in beta on Steam named "new-platforms". If you do try it, you can let them know how it runs in this post on Steam. The itch version has worked pretty well for me, but as usual your experience may vary.

  • Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy now has a Linux build for testing

    Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy is a rather popular punishing climbing game, made as a tribute to Jazzuo's 2002 B-Game classic 'Sexy Hiking' and it now has a Linux build.

    Originally, you needed to opt into a Beta to access it. Going by the posts in the announcement thread on Steam, it seems you might not need to opt into anything now.

Phoronix on Threadripper 2900 Series

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • Threadripper 2900 Series Temperature Monitoring Sent In For Linux 4.19 Then Backported

    As expected, the CPU temperature monitoring support within the "k10temp" hwmon driver has seen the patches sent in today to be updated for the AMD Threadripper 2900 series CPU support. These patches are going into the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window but slated to be back-ported to the currently supported stable kernel series.

  • AMD Threadripper 2950X Offers Great Linux Performance At $900 USD

    The embargo has expired now for talking about Threadripper 2 performance figures... First up are our initial Threadripper 2950X Linux benchmarks. In this article are the most interesting metrics for this 16-core / 32-thread processor while in the just-published AMD Threadripper 2990WX Linux Benchmarks are a lot more figures complemented by the 2950X and other CPUs plus power consumption numbers, etc. This article is most useful if specifically focused on the performance of the Threadripper 2950X that comes in at $899 USD.

  • AMD Threadripper 2990WX Cooling Performance - Testing Five Heatsinks & Two Water Coolers

    The 32-core / 64-thread AMD Threadripper 2990WX carries a 250 Watt TDP rating, thus the cooling performance is quite important especially if you don't want to hit any thermal throttling with this $1799 USD processor. Fortunately, the 2990WX doesn't require water cooling but actually can work quite well with high-end air heatsinks too. For adding some perspective on the cooling requirements of the Threadripper 2990WX, here are benchmarks of five heatsinks and two all-in-one water cooling systems.

  • AMD Threadripper 2990WX Linux Benchmarks: The 32-Core / 64-Thread Beast

    Whether you are compiling a lot of code, rendering models with Blender, or running various scientific workloads with OpenMP or MPI, the AMD Threadripper 2990WX is capable of delivering immersive Linux performance with its 32-cores and 64 total threads. While coming in at $1800 USD, the AMD Threadripper 2990WX can deliver better performance than the more expensive Intel Core i9 7980XE. Beyond being mesmerized about the performance today with this high-end desktop/workstation processor with the many thread-happy Linux workloads we encounter daily, this 32-core Zen+ processor has us even more eager to see AMD's next-generation Zen2-based EPYC CPUs next year.

GNU Linux-libre 4.18

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • GNU Linux-libre 4.18-gnu

    Two new drivers had blob requests and were cleaned up (psp-dev crypto
    and icn8505 touchscreen), one was removed (atom isp), plenty needed
    adjustments.

    There are some new firmware loading interfaces starting with
    firmware_request (rather than request_firmware). The deblob-check
    script was adjusted to look for uses thereof. firwmare_request_nowarn
    is one of the new interfaces, and it almost looks like we could use it,
    since it doesn't log any errors if the firmware is not there, but it
    still looks for and asks for non-Free Software, so I decided to disable
    it just like request_firmware.

  • GNU Linux-libre 4.18-gnu Released As The Latest Deblobbed Kernel

    Hot off the release of the upstream Linux 4.18 kernel, the GNU folks have released GNU Linux-libre 4.18-gnu that is their deblobbed version that strips out any "non-free" device driver support, removes the ability to load binary-only kernel modules and not being able to load firmware blobs either.

    With the Linux-libre 4.18 release they had to clean-up some new drivers to fit their strict standards on code freedom, removed one more driver (Atom ISP), and make adjustments to other existing code.

Graphics: SIGGRAPH and XDC2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Pro WX 8200 Launches As "Best Workstation Graphics Performance Under $1,000"

    It's SIGGRAPH week and AMD has used this annual graphics conference to announce the Radeon Pro WX 8200, which they are saying is able to offer the best workstation graphics card performance in the sub-$1,000 USD category.

    The Radeon Pro WX 8200 is intended to be used for visualizations, VR, photo-realistic rendering, and other professional graphics workloads. The Pro WX 8200 features a High Bandwidth Cache Controller (HBCC), enhanced pixel engine on, ECC memory, and is built on their Vega GPU architecture. The WX 8200 features 8GB of HBM2 memory and the graphics card is rated for a 230 Watt TDP.

  • XDC2018 Will Have Many Interesting Talks On Vulkan, AR/VR, Wayland & More

    Just over one month away is XDC2018 as the annual X.Org Developers' Conference where a variety of X.Org, Wayland, Mesa, Vulkan, and OpenGL talks will take place. This year's schedule is particularly packed and full of interesting information.

    XDC2018 is being hosted in Spain and running from 26 to 28 September at the University of A Coruña. The proposal for talks at XDC2018 are now over and the proposed sessions can be found on this Wiki page. Below is a look at some of the interesting talks slated for this open-source graphics/driver conference next month.

KDE and GNOME: CMake, CPU Usage and Student Work on Pitivi

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Qt1 CMake port and more Akademy crazyness

    So, my plans was always finish the full KDE1 port, and now on Akademy i have some time to get back to this pet project. Starting on Qt1 porting entirely to CMake because the experience on Qt2 was so good that i decided going back to that and do some of the same love on Qt1.

    KDE 1 for that new port next. For now, i’m working on github, so https://github.com/heliocastro/qt1

  • KDE Plasma 5.14's Lock Screen Will No Longer Eat Your CPU Resources On Old Hardware

    With KDE Plasma 5 right now it turns out that if you have relied upon CPU-based software rendering, when hitting Plasma's lock-screen it would actually go CPU-wild -- as far as maxing out the CPU to 100% utilization, thereby consuming a lot of power and generating excess heat. That will be fixed for KDE Plasma 5.14.0.

    Since May has been a bug report about the KScreenLocker greeter process going to 100% CPU usage and needing to wait 5~10 seconds after entering the user password before the screen would actually unlock. Several others also reported similar issues of this lock-screen managing to consume a lot of the CPU resources, including on ARM boards and older hardware.

  • [GSoC’18] Pitivi’s UI Polishing – Final Report

    As part of Google Summer of Code 2018, I worked on the project Pitivi: UI Polishing. This is my final report to showcase the work that I have done during the program.

  • Pitivi's User Interface Is Getting Better Thanks To GSoC, Plus Other GNOME Improvements

    If you have been less than satisfied with the user-interface of the Pitivi non-linear open-source video editor for Linux, you may want to try out their next release.

    Student developer Harish Fulara spent his summer working on polishing the open-source video editor's interface as part of Google Summer of Code 2018.

Security: Defcon 2018, Cortana and Windows Updates That Break Windows

Filed under
Security

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Review: NomadBSD 1.1

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

One of the most recent additions to the DistroWatch database is NomadBSD. According to the NomadBSD website: "NomadBSD is a 64-bit live system for USB flash drives, based on FreeBSD. Together with automatic hardware detection and setup, it is configured to be used as a desktop system that works out of the box, but can also be used for data recovery."

The latest release of NomadBSD (or simply "Nomad", as I will refer to the project in this review) is version 1.1. It is based on FreeBSD 11.2 and is offered in two builds, one for generic personal computers and one for Macbooks. The release announcement mentions version 1.1 offers improved video driver support for Intel and AMD cards. The operating system ships with Octopkg for graphical package management and the system should automatically detect, and work with, VirtualBox environments.

Nomad 1.1 is available as a 2GB download, which we then decompress to produce a 4GB file which can be written to a USB thumb drive. There is no optical media build of Nomad as it is designed to be run entirely from the USB drive, and write data persistently to the drive, rather than simply being installed from the USB media.

Read more

Also: Happy Bob's Libtls tutorial

Tesla Software Code

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • Tesla Will Open-Source Its Vehicle Security Software In Push For Safer Vehicles

    Tesla has also directly communicated with hackers to improve its vehicles’ software. Back in 2016, Keen Security Lab, a white hat hacker group based in China, was able to remotely hack a Model S through a compromised WiFi hotspot, conducting one of the first known instances of a Tesla being hacked. Keen Security Lab contacted Tesla after they successfully compromised the electric car, and Tesla promptly pushed an update to address the vulnerability.

  • Tesla Plans to Open-Source Its Vehicle Security Software for Free to Other Automakers

    Believing he has the best solution, Elon Musk plans to make Tesla’s vehicle security software open source so other automakers can adopt the technology for "a safe self-driving future for all." On top of "specialized encryption" for "multiple sub-systems," future Tesla vehicles will ensure drivers always have "override authority" in the event their cars become "wacky."

  • Elon Musk Plans To Open Source Tesla Software Code

    One of the biggest advantages of open sourcing your software is allowing the independent security researchers to access the code and spot the vulnerabilities that might go unnoticed during the internal auditing.

  • Tesla plans to open source its car security software to other automakers for free

    According to the Electrek, with the rise of autonomous driving and car networking technology, the risk of malicious attacks on cars increased. Tesla CEO Elon Musk believes that the company’s car safety software is the best solution, and he plans to open source car safety software to other automakers for a safer autopilot future.

    Musk has publicly expressed concern about hackers attacking car systems. He said that fully blocking ” hacking” is Tesla’s primary security task.

Build Your Own Linux Single Board Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

We are fortunate enough to have a huge choice of single-board computers before us, not just those with a bare-metal microcontroller, but also those capable of running fully-fledged general purpose operating systems such as GNU/Linux. The Raspberry Pi is probably the best known of this latter crop of boards, and it has spawned a host of competitors with similarly fruity names. With an entire cornucopia to choose from, it takes a bit more than evoking a berry to catch our attention. The form factors are becoming established and the usual SoCs are pretty well covered already, show us something we haven’t seen before!

[Marcel Thürmer] may have managed that feat, with his Blueberry Pi. On the face of it this is just Yet Another SBC With A Fruity Pi Name, but what caught our attention is that unlike all the others, this is one you can build yourself if you want. It’s entirely open-source, but it differs from other boards that release their files to the world in that it manages to keep construction within the realm of what is possible on the bench rather than the pick-and-place. He’s done this by choosing an Alwinner V3, an SoC originally produced for the action camera market that is available in a readily-solderable TQFP package. It’s a choice that has allowed him to pull off another constructor-friendly feat: the board is only two layers, so it won’t break the bank to have it made.

Read more

The House of Elive Linux Revamped!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

I visited the www.elivecd.org, the page that houses Elive. This is one Linux distro that caught my eye in 2009 and that I have been following ever since.

The site is being redecorated and renovated, which is a great change to reflect the polished nature of the distro that Thanatermesis (Samuel Flores Baggen) crafts there.

Read more

Also: DebConf in Taiwan!

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • #DEFCON DHS Says Collaboration Needed for Secure Infrastructure and Elections

    Speaking at DEFCON 26 in Las Vegas on the subject of “Securing our Nation's Election Infrastructure”, Jeanette Manfra, assistant secretary, Office of Cybersecurity and Communications from the Department of Homeland Security stressed the need for public and private sector collaboration.

    She said that “instead of thinking of individual risk and your own part, try to think about enterprise and government as a whole.”

    In terms of critical infrastructure, Manfra said that this is “purely voluntary in the private sector” and includes “everyone working for yourself or your company, and this includes academic institutions and the broader private and public partnership to work together to figure our critical infrastructure.”

    She went on to talk about the concept of collective defense, saying that government is “one player in the community,” and with companies and citizens on the front line with government sectors “we have to share information and be transparent and build trust with individuals and entities that we have not done before.”

  • The Enigma of AI & Cybersecurity

    We've only seen the beginning of what artificial intelligence can do for information security.

    Alan Turing is famous for several reasons, one of which is that he cracked the Nazis' seemingly unbreakable Enigma machine code during World War II. Later in life, Turing also devised what would become known as the Turing test for determining whether a computer was "intelligent" — what we would now call artificial intelligence (AI). Turing believed that if a person couldn't tell the difference between a computer and a human in a conversation, then that computer was displaying AI.

    AI and information security have been intertwined practically since the birth of the modern computer in the mid-20th century. For today's enterprises, the relationship can generally be broken down into three categories: incident detection, incident response, and situational awareness — i.e., helping a business understand its vulnerabilities before an incident occurs. IT infrastructure has grown so complex since Turing's era that it can be months before personnel notice an intrusion.

  • Open-source snafu leaves patient data exposed [Ed: They never generalise like this about proprietary software]

    Researchers at cyber security outfit Project Insecurity discovered dozens of security bugs in the OpenEMR system, which is described as the “most popular open source electronic health records and medical practice management solution”.

    Many of the flaws were classified as being of high severity, leaving patient records and other sensitive information within easy reach of would-be hackers.

    One critical flaw meant that an unauthenticated user was able to bypass the patient portal login simply by navigating to the registration page and modifying the URL, Project Insecurity reported in its findings.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 109 - OSCon and actionable advice

Let’s share

Filed under
OSS

“Information wants to be free” goes the slogan of the social movement encouraging open-source software, file sharing and a permissive legal environment for modifying and distributing the creative works in the form of open content or free content by using the internet and other forms of media. The free software and open access movements are among the most important developments after the rise of the world wide web. Swartz was not the only internet activist who believed in the concept of an open and free internet. There were people like Richard Stallman, who gave birth to the term “free software”, free as in freedom, not free as in no cost.

The aura of the information age is not just about new ideas but about a shift in the paradigms of communication and control. In this age of digital feudalism, we do not actually own the products we buy, but we are merely granted limited use of them as long as we continue to pay the rent. The radical expansion of intellectual property (IP) rights threatens to reach the point where they suppress any and all other rights of the individual and society. The current copyright laws have hindered creativity and resulted in a read-only internet culture in which we only consume information/content, despite technology advances that make it easy to create and contribute to culture. Copyright law doesn’t extend neatly to the digital world and the digital rights management tools the industry is endeavouring to develop to maintain copyright control are dampening the growth of a rich read-or-write culture.

We need to bring that open-source mentality to the content layer. Two-thirds of all websites run on open-source software, but most of the premium academic resources remain closed behind digital gates. The Directory of Open Access Journals reports that nearly 4,000 publications are available to the masses via the internet, a number that grows rapidly each year. It is essential to liberate data, liberate knowledge — especially data that taxpayers have already paid for.

Thanks to the Free Culture movement, vast knowledge repositories like Wikipedia and Stack Exchange and open access efforts like the science article sharing site arXiv.org have flourished as they permit content to be re-used for free and built upon, and many major websites offer Creative Commons (CC) licensing as part of their user interfaces (UI). In 2012, Google launched a worldwide campaign named Take Action for building a free and open world wide web. Here is the kernel of Google’s argument: “A free and open world depends on a free and open internet. Governments alone, working behind closed doors, should not direct its future. The billions of people around the globe who use the internet should have a voice”.

Read more

DXVK 0.65

Filed under
Gaming

Linux 4.19 and More

Filed under
Linux
  • New ARM SoCs & Boards To Be Supported By The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    Hardware support improvements coming for Linux 4.19 aren't limited to the x86 space but a lot of new ARM hardware support is also being introduced in this imminent kernel cycle.

    While the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window isn't quite open yet -- it should open tonight, following the release of Linux 4.18 -- the new feature work is already staged. There is the for-next arm-soc.git branch.

  • F2FS In Linux 4.19 Will Fix Big Performance Issue For Multi-Threaded Reads

    The Linux 4.19 kernel updates for the Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) should bring much faster performance for multi-threaded sequential reads -- as much as multiple times faster.

    Two years ago F2FS dropped its write-pages lock on the basis it could improve multi-threading performance... 4KB writes across 32 threads went up from 25 to 28MB/s on some tests done on the developer's hardware. While it was a minor win for multi-threaded writes, it turns out dropping the write-pages lock took a major toll on the multi-threaded read performance. Now with Linux 4.19, that write-pages lock is being restored.

  • SoundWire For Linux Preps Support For Multiple Masters

    Back in Linux 4.16 the SoundWire subsystem was added to the staging area as the MIPI standard for a low-power, two-wire sound bus that can support multiple audio streams and primarily utilized by small audio peripherals like IoT and mobile devices. With the next Linux kernel cycle, the SoundWire support is being improved upon.

Sparky 5.5 RC

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are new iso images of SparkyLinux 5.5 Release Candidate available to download.
Sparky 5 follows rolling release model and is based on Debian testing “Buster”.

ISO images of Sparky 5.5 RC provides bug fixing found in the 5.5 dev20180725 release.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Canonical/Ubuntu: Quirky Xerus 8.6, Snapcraft and More

  • Quirky Xerus 8.6 features latest DEBs from Ubuntu 16.04.x
    The independent Linux-based operating system, Quirky 8.6, a side project of Puppy Linux made with Woof, has just hit the market. According to an announcement by its creator, Barry Kauler, who retired from the Puppy Linux project to work on the Quirky Distro, the woofQ operating system is live for users to download and enjoy. The latest release mainly features bug fixes and minor improvements from previous Quirky OS 8.x versions. The release notes of Quirky’s Xerus version 8.6 explain that the update comes with a package upgrade to version 2.49.4 SeaMonkey and Kernel 4.14.63 with aufs patch. The new release is built with the latest DEBs from the Ubuntu 16.04.x range and features improvements for its EasyShare with specific improvements for Android connections. A Gxlat language translator has been introduced in this update and there are 10 architectural improvements and fixes as well. Several minor security bugs have also been patched since its predecessor.
  • Snapcraft at Europython 2018
    In July, several members of our advocacy and design teams went to Europython 2018 in Edinburgh. It was a really well-organised event, mixing great speakers from a vibrant community at a great location. The main reason for us to get closer to the Python developer community was to promote Snapcraft as the best way to publish on Linux, for app developers in general, and for Python developers in particular. As well as increasing awareness of Snapcraft, we gained a deeper understanding of the needs of Python developers and made contact with interesting products and engineers.
  • Cloud Native, Docker, K8s Summit
  • Ubuntu 18.04.1 Bionic Beaver Has Been Released (Download Links)

Graphics: Wayland/Weston, Mesa and AMD

  • Wayland 1.16 / Weston 5.0 RC2 Released To Fix Vulnerabilities
    Two release candidates of Wayland 1.16 / Weston 5.0 were not originally scheduled, but it's been necessitated due to some pressing issues both with Wayland and its reference compositor. Samsung's Derek Foreman issued these "RC2" releases on Friday rather than going straight to the official Wayland 1.16 and Weston 5.0 releases. On the Wayland front, Michael Srb found and fixed issues that could cause pointer overflows within Wayland's connection code. These overflow fixes are the only changes in this Wayland 1.15.94 (RC2) version.
  • RAGE & Doom Get Radeon Workarounds In Mesa 18.3-dev
    If you are looking to enjoy id Software's RAGE or Doom VFR games this weekend on Linux via Wine, they should be playing nicer with the latest open-source Mesa graphics driver code. Timothy Arceri at Valve has added a workaround to get RAGE working under Wine with RadeonSI. The workaround is a DRIRC configuration addition for allowing GLSL built-in variable redeclarations. This is enough to get RAGE working with RadeonSI on Mesa Git. Though only RadeonSI is working out currently since the game relies upon the OpenGL compatibility profile mode that is only supported currently by RadeonSI when it comes to the Mesa drivers. Thanks to Valve's developers and others, the OpenGL compatibility profile mode for RadeonSI has matured into great shape these past few months.
  • Adreno 600 Series Support Lands In Mesa 18.3 Gallium3D
    With the Adreno 600 series support going into Linux 4.19 for the kernel bits, the user-space OpenGL driver support for the latest-generation Qualcomm graphics has now been merged into Mesa. Kristian Høgsberg Kristensen of Google's Chrome OS graphics team (yes, Kristian of Wayland and DRI2 fame) has been working on the Gallium3D support for the Adreno 600 series hardware along with Freedreno founder Rob Clark. This A6xx support is being tacked onto the existing Freedreno Gallium3D driver and amounts to just over six thousand lines of new code. Keep in mind this A6xx Freedreno back-end must also be used with the supported MSM DRM driver in the Linux 4.19+ kernel.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 Radeon Linux Driver Released with Support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    Featuring official support for the AMD Radeon PRO WX 8200 graphics cards and initial Wattman-like functionality, the Radeon Software for Linux 18.30 finally adds support for some of the most recent Ubuntu, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and CentOS Linux distributions. These include Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10, CentOS 7.5, and CentOS 6.10. SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and Server (SLED/SLES) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 is supported as well, but not the latest SUSE Linux Enterprise 15.
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Update Fixes Witcher 3 Issue, Bug Fixes
    In addition to AMD releasing AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 on Friday, they also did their usual weekly source push of their newest "AMDVLK" open-source Radeon Vulkan driver code.

Kernel: Linux 4.19 Staging and Greg Kroah-Hartman's Very Many Stable Releases

  • Linux 4.19 Staging Brings EROFS File-System & Gasket Driver Framework
    Following the USB subsystem updates, Greg Kroah-Hartman sent in the kernel's staging area work for the Linux 4.19 merge window. This experimental/testing area of the Linux kernel is adding a new file-system with 4.19: EROFS. EROFS is developed by Huawei for possible Android device use-cases. EROFS stands for the Extendable Read-Only File-System and is developed to address shortcomings in other Linux read-only file-systems. EROFS features compression support and other features, but the on-disk layout format isn't 100% firm yet -- hence going into the staging area.
  • USB Patches Posted For Linux 4.19 Kernel, Including The New USB-C DisplayPort Driver
    Having wrapped up his latest stable kernel wrangling and the fallout from L1TF/Foreshadow, Greg Kroah-Hartman got around today to sending out the feature pull requests for the kernel subsystems he oversees. His first new batch of changes for Linux 4.19 today is the USB subsystem work.
  • One Week Past Linux 4.18.0, The Linux 4.18.3 Kernel Is Already Out
    Greg Kroah-Hartman had a fun Friday night issuing new point releases to the Linux 3.18 / 4.4 / 4.9 / 4.14 / 4.17 / 4.18 kernels only to have to issue new point releases minutes later. It was just on Thursday that Linux 4.18.1 was released along with updates to older stable branches for bringing L1TF / Foreshadow mitigation. Friday night then brought Linux 4.18.2, Linux 4.17.16, Linux 4.14.64, Linux 4.9.121, Linux 4.4.149, and Linux 3.18.119 with more patches. Those kernels brought various fixes, including in the x86 PTI code for clearing the global bit more aggressively, crypto fixes, and other maintenance work.