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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 4:19pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 4:16pm
Story Development News/Tools Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:26pm
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:22pm
Story GNOME News: GNOME 3.24, Vala, and GNOME Shell Extensions Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:19pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:16pm
Story New/Imminent Releases: Black Lab Linux, Exton|Defender, Mageia Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:15pm
Story 5 Signs That Show You’re a Linux Geek Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 2:47pm
Story Top 5 best rising Linux distros in 2017 Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 1:08pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 12:37pm

Desktop: Munich’s Fake News On GNU/Linux, More Misleading Headlines, and "You've come a long way baby!"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Munich’s Fake News On GNU/Linux

    Truth doesn’t seem to matter much in politics these days. Just repeat a lie. If enough believe it, you get what you want… Despite proof that GNU/Linux works for Munich, the mayor and friends are going to migrate back to Wintel at all costs.

  • Munich's vote to return to Windows annoys Linux and LibreOffice community [Ed: This headline is misleading and needs correcting]

    THE GERMAN CITY of Munich has voted to investigate the viability of creating a Windows 10 client, thus ending its multi-million euro, nine-year experiment in running the municipality on Linux.

    A final decision will be taken later, but the announcement marks the first step on the road back to Microsoft, just three years after completing the transition.

  • Linux desktops: You've come a long way baby!

    Anyone who has used Linux for the last 15 years or so knows that things have gotten better and better when it comes to desktop environments. There are plenty to choose from and, as the years have gone by, Linux desktops have made big advances in terms of features and quality.

    One redditor recently noted how much better Linux desktops are today in a thread on the Linux subreddit.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Alternative Global Menu For MATE And Xfce: Vala Panel AppMenu [PPA]

    A while back I wrote about TopMenu, a panel plugin that provides global menu (AppMenu) support for MATE, then also included support for Xfce and LXDE.

    The problem with TopMenu is that it only partially supports GTK3, it doesn't support LibreOffice, and with Ubuntu 16.04, it doesn't support Qt (4 or 5) applications.

  • Gimp Photo Editor A Free Photoshop Alternative

    So Photoshop is the industry standard for photo editing but it is going to cost you as high as $600 a year. If you are looking for something arguably as good but cheaper as free, then you’ve got to go with GIMP. GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) is a cross-platform image editor available for GNU/Linux, OS X, Windows and more operating systems. So how good is GIMP? Can it effectively replace Photoshop? How far Let’s take a look.

  • ANNOUNCE: libosinfo 1.0.0 release

    I am happy to announce a new release of libosinfo, version 1.0.0 is now available, signed with key DAF3 A6FD B26B 6291 2D0E 8E3F BE86 EBB4 1510 4FDF (4096R). All historical releases are available from the project download page.

  • 3 Good Command-Line Audio and Graphics Apps for Linux

    It is often faster to use command-line apps to play audio files and preview images than to futz around launching and using a graphical application, and you can use them in scripts. Come along to learn about MOC and SoX for playing audio files, and feh for viewing image files from the Linux command line.

  • Franz – One application for 14 messenger services (WhatsApp, Telegram, Google Hangouts & more)

    Franz is a free desktop messaging app which combines chat & messaging services into one application. It currently supports 14 messenger services such as Slack, WhatsApp, WeChat, HipChat, Facebook Messenger, Telegram, Google Hangouts, GroupMe, Skype and many more. You can download Franz for Mac, Windows & Linux. Still its in beta, hope they will add more apps before its going stable release.

  • PTS 7.0 M4 Released With SVG Graph Optimizations, More CLI Interface Tweaks
  • GRUB 2.02 Is Still Coming Along With Many Features, Even Morse Code Output

    The first release candidate to GRUB 2.02 was quietly released at the beginning of the month. GRUB 2.02 is going to be a sizable feature update with it already having been five years since the current stable version, GRUB 2.00.

  • A quick introduction to tmux

    For many people, the Linux terminal represents a substantial portion of where their most important work happens. Whether a system administrator managing multiple remote machines, a programmer trying to run a new snippet of code as they walk through the source, or simply an ordinary user who is trying to read a man page for documentation as they step through pecking out a lengthy command, it's not uncommon to need to run and see the output of multiple terminal applications at a time.

    Why should keeping track of multiple applications be a difficult proposition that requires a fancy modern GUI? Sure, you can launch multiple terminal instances, or use a terminal emulator that tiles terminals for you. But there's an easier, and arguably better way, by using a native terminal application to manage your multiple applications just like you would in a traditional windowed environment. Enter tmux, the terminal multiplexer.

More on HITMAN for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • RadeonSI Works Surprisingly Well With HITMAN On Linux

    With today's release of HITMAN for Linux it's exciting not only because there are signs of possible Vulkan support but also because Feral Interactive backed this game with launch-day RadeonSI support.

  • HITMAN ‘The Complete First Season’ Out Now for Linux

    HITMAN, the latest entry the popular Hitman franchise, is available to buy and play on Linux from today. Surprised? You should be! This HITMAN Linux release is the first game in this popular 16 year-old series to be released on the platform. “Become the Master Assassin in this intense spy-thriller story.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Transit Route Planning Is Coming to GNOME Maps
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Up To 3.24 Beta State

    GNOME Shell 3.23.90 and Mutter 3.23.90 are now available for testing, which represents the component's release for the GNOME 3.24 beta.

    With tonight's GNOME Shell 3.23.90 release is handling Ctrl+Q and Ctrl+W in portal windows, reloading of apps when the .desktop file contents change, fixing for sub-surfaces not showing up in previews, kill-switch has been added for user extensions, and a nightlight indicator has been added to the status area. There have also been a number of bug fixes to the GNOME Shell as it gets ready for the GNOME 3.24.0 release in March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Beta Released

    GNOME 3.23.90, a.k.a. the GNOME 3.24 beta, is now available for testing ahead of this big desktop update due out in late March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Is Coming March 22

    With a one-day delay, the Beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is finally here, available for public testers who want to get an early taste of its new features.

    Of course, GNOME 3.24 Beta can't be called a feature-full release, as some things are yet to be implemented, such as the return routes and transit routing planning functionalities of the Maps app that we've discussed earlier, but it comes with enough changes to please the eye.

  • Outreachy Applications Now Open For Their 2017 Summer Internships

    For those eligible, Outreachy is accepting applications for their summer 2017 internship period if you wish to get paid while getting involved with open-source software.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • GPD Pocket, the 7-Inch Ubuntu Laptop, Has Rasied $700k in 24 Hours

    The GPD Pocket crowdfunder has only been live on IndieGoGo for just over 24 hours but it’s has already amassed a staggering $700,000 — $500,000 more than it was seeking! With 2 months left to run the question now is can the diminutive computing device can go on to hit the $1 million mark?

  • MirAL 1.2 Released: Mir's Abstraction Layer

    Alan Griffiths of Canonical has announced the release of MirAL 1.2 for Ubuntu 17.04 and the Ubuntu Stable Phone Overlay.

  • MirAL 1.2

    There’s a new MirAL release (1.2.0) available in ‘Zesty Zapus’ (Ubuntu 17.04) and the so-called “stable phone overlay” ppa for ‘Xenial Xerus’ (Ubuntu 16.04LTS). MirAL is a project aimed at simplifying the development of Mir servers and particularly providing a stable ABI and sensible default behaviors.

  • Snap URL Support Is Coming to Ubuntu Software

    The little screenshot nestled to the left of this text contains something that makes us very happy.

    It’s a change-log for GNOME Software that mentions handler support for opening Snappy URLs is on the way.

    Why do we find that exciting? Allow me to explain.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • ReactOS 0.4.4 Released

    Today marks the fifth release of the ReactOS 0.4.x series, as well as the fifth following the 4 month release cycle started by 0.4.0 itself. Progress has continued steadily, with a great deal of work going on in the background to improve ReactOS' general usability and stability. Many of these improvements were on display at the FOSDEM convention in Brussels that took place on the 4th and 5th of this month. Certainly one of the more notable albeit less visible additions was the incorporation of basic printing support by Colin Finck. At present ReactOS is only capable of sending print commands to a parallel port printer, but this is the first step towards universal support and Colin should be applauded for his effort. A video demonstration of it can be viewed here.

  • ReactOS 0.4.4 Released with Initial Printing Support, Rendering Improvements

    A new stable maintenance update of the ReactOS 0.4 series of operating system that tries to recreate the design principles of Windows NT and offer binary compatibility is now available for download, versioned 0.4.4.

    Coming exactly three months after the release of ReactOS 0.4.3, a point release that ReactOS 0.4.4 implemented the Winsock library and fixed over 340 bugs, ReactOS 0.4.4 is here to add initial printing support, as well as various general stability and usability improvements, most of which were planned during the FOSDEM 2017 meeting.

  • Ivy League astronomers take exoplanet hunting open-source

    If you’ve ever wanted to join the ranks of career scientists and academics who hunt for exoplanets using the world’s most powerful telescopes, your day has come. This week, an international team of astronomers including a delegation from MIT, Carnegie Mellon, and Yale released to the public a huge set of exoplanet-detecting observations taken with the radial velocity method. To demonstrate the utility of the data set, they used it to find more than 100 exoplanets, all within 100 parsecs of us. There’s even one orbiting a near neighboring star to our own Solar System, GJ 411, which lies about 8.1 light years from Earth.

  • Why I’m Not a Full-Throttle FOSS Advocate

    I’m not this kind of hypocrite. I’m a pragmatic computer user. I use free software wherever I can, and open source as my #2 preference. But the main thing is that the software I use must be able to do the job.

  • 5 Tips on Enterprise Open Source Success From Capital One, Google, and Walmart

    Some of the world’s largest and most successful companies gathered this week at Open Source Leadership Summit in Lake Tahoe to share best practices around open source use and participation. Companies from diverse industries -- from healthcare and finance, to telecom and high tech -- discussed the strategies and processes they have adopted to create business success with open source software.

  • New ‘Open Source Days’ Program Launches as Part of OpenStack Summit in Boston

    The OpenStack Summit—the must-attend open infrastructure event—will feature a new program called “Open Source Days,” happening May 8-11 in Boston at the Hynes Convention Center. Open Source Days bring together adjacent open source communities with the goals to improve collaboration and technical integration throughout the diverse ecosystem of open source projects that OpenStack users rely upon.

  • OpenSSL Hit By New High Severity Security Issue

    OpenSSL has been hit by another "high" severity security vulnerability.

Go 1.8 Release Notes

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Go 1.8 Release Notes

    The latest Go release, version 1.8, arrives six months after Go 1.7. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. There are two minor changes to the language specification. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before.

  • Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Google today announced the release of the Go 1.8 programming language implementation that is coming with six months worth of features and changes.

    Go 1.8 has a few new 64-bit x86 instructions supported, Go 1.8 now uses its new compiler back-end on all architectures (with Go 1.7 their new compiler back-end was just used on 64-bit x86) and that should yield a 20~30% performance improvement for 32-bit ARM systems. But even x86 64-bit systems should see 0~10% performance improvements with Go 1.8.

Games for GNU/Linux: HITMAN and Serious Sam

Filed under
Gaming

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Thursday's security updates
  • Capsule8 comes out of stealth to help protect Linux from attacks

    Capsule8 has emerged from stealth mode to unveil its plans for the industry’s first container-aware, real-time threat protection platform designed to protect legacy and next-generation Linux infrastructures from both known and unknown attacks. Founded by experienced hackers John Viega, Dino Dai Zovi and Brandon Edwards, Capsule8 is being built on the real-world experience of its founders in building and bringing to market defensive systems to protect against exploitation of previously unknown vulnerabilities. The company raised seed funding of $2.5 million from Bessemer Venture Partners, as well as individual investors Shardul Shah of Index Ventures and Jay Leek of ClearSky. The funding will help fuel the launch of the Capsule8 platform spring 2017.

  • Bruce Schneier Says Government Involvement in Coding Is Coming

    Security expert Bruce Schneier is painting a grim future for the tech community as the government will start to stick its nose into people’s codes.

    Schneier, present at the RSA Conference, said that until now everyone had this “special right” to code the world as they saw fit. “My guess is we’re going to lose that right because it’s too dangerous to give it to a bunch of techies,” he added, according to The Register.

  • How To Shrink Attack Surfaces with a Hypervisor

    A software environment’s attack surface is defined as the sum of points in which an unauthorized user or malicious adversary can enter or extract data. The smaller the attack surface, the better. We recently sat down with Doug Goldstein (https://github.com/cardoe or @doug_goldstein) to discuss how companies can use hypervisors to reduce attack surfaces and why the Xen Project hypervisor is a perfect choice for security-first environments. Doug is a principal software engineer at Star Lab, a company focused on providing software protection and integrity solutions for embedded systems.

  • Xen Project asks to limit security vulnerability advisories
  • Xen Project wants permission to reveal fewer vulnerabilities
  • Xen Project proposes issuing fewer advisories
  • Verified Boot: From ROM to Userspace

    Amid growing attacks on Linux devices, the 2016 Embedded Linux Conference demonstrated a renewed focus on security. One well-attended presentation at ELC Europe covered the topic of verified boot schemes. In this talk, Marc Kleine-Budde of Pengutronix revealed the architecture and strategies of a recently developed verified boot scheme for a single-core, Cortex-A9 NXP i.MX6 running on the RIoTboard SBC.

  • Yahoo's Security Incompetence Just Took $250 Million Off Verizon's Asking Price

    So last year we noted how Verizon proposed paying $4.8 billion to acquire Yahoo as part of its plan to magically transform from stodgy old telco to sexy new Millennial advertising juggernaut, which, for a variety of reasons, isn't going so well. One of those reasons is the fact that Yahoo failed to disclose the two, massive hacks (both by the same party) that exposed the credentials of millions of Yahoo customers during deal negotiations. The exposure included millions of names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates, hashed passwords (using MD5) and "encrypted or unencrypted" security questions and answers.

    As noted previously, Verizon had been using the scandal to drive down the $4.8 billion asking price, reports stating that Verizon was demanding not only a $1 billion reduction in the price, but another $1 billion to cover the inevitable lawsuits by Yahoo customers.

  • Updates on CyberSecurity, WordPress and what we're cooking in the lab today.

    One of the most effective ways the Wordfence team keeps the WordPress community and customers secure is through something we call the ‘Threat Defense Feed’. This is a combination of people, software, business processes and data. It’s an incredibly effective way to keep hackers out and provide our customers with early detection.

  • The 7 security threats to technology that scare experts the most

    What happens if a bad actor turns off your heat in the middle of winter, then demands $1,000 to turn it back on? Or even holds a small city’s power for ransom? Those kinds of attacks to personal, corporate, and infrastructure technology were among the top concerns for security experts from the SANS Institute, who spoke Wednesday during the RSA conference in San Francisco.

    Some of these threats target consumers directly, but even the ones that target corporations could eventually “filter down” to consumers, though the effects might not be felt for some time.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • Google under Investigation for obstructing Samsung’s development of Tizen

    Google, the maker of the Android Operating System (OS), has had an anti-competitive Investigation launched against it by The South Korean Fair Trade Commission (FTC), to see whether it has obstructed Samsung’s development of the Tizen platform to replace the Android OS on its mobiles.

  • Smartphone Game: Ninja Assassin’s comes to the Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3
  • GameAnalytics releases SDK for use with Tizen apps

    Of late we have been reporting on SDKs being released by some of the popular software service providers for the Tizen OS. Today’s new addition to this list comes from GameAnalytics. GameAnalytics until now has been available for iOS, Android, Windows, Unity, Unreal, etc and provides game developers with an easy to use service for getting valuable analytical data of their players. The most important part of the service is that it is completely free of cost. Tizen game developers can now make use of GameAnalytics’ SDK for Tizen and implement it into their games.

  • Smartphone App: HDR Camera take HD photos on your Tizen Devices

    Lots of new apps were added to the Tizen Store this month like games, funny apps, music and video apps, photo editing, camera apps, entertainment apps etc. Lately, we have also had many good camera apps added like InstaTags, Monograph. Sweet camera, angleCam etc.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports today, February 16, about the latest software updates and technologies that landed in the stable repositories during last week and the beginning of this one via a total of six snapshots.

Read more

A Few Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux OpenGL Benchmarks With A Core i7 7700K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This week I've published Windows 10 vs. Linux NVIDIA gaming benchmarks and a Radeon Software Windows 10 vs. RadeonSI/RADV Linux comparison with a variety of interesting games. For this third article on the topic of Windows 10 vs. Linux performance are a few Intel HD Graphics 630 benchmark results.

Read more

Top 10 FOSS legal stories in 2016

Filed under
OSS
Legal

The year 2016 resulted in several important developments that affect the FOSS ecosystem. While they are not strictly "legal developments" they are important for the community.

For one, Eben Moglen, the general counsel of the Free Software Foundation, stepped down. Eben has been a leader on FOSS legal issues since the late 1990s and has been critical to the success of the FOSS movement. The FOSS community owes him a huge debt of gratitude, and I expect that he will continue to be active in the FOSS community. The success of FOSS adoption was dramatically illustrated when Microsoft joined the Linux Foundation and summarized in the article, Open Source Won. So, Now What? in Wired magazine.

Read more

Linux/FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • DebConf18 Will Be Hosted in Hsinchu, Taiwan, as First Debian Conference in Asia

    Debian developer Daniel Lange announced today that the host city of the next Debian conference, DebConf18, will be Hsinchu, a city in northern Taiwan located southwest of Taipei.

    While the developers and engineers behind the very popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system are currently preparing for DebConf17, which will take place in Montréal, Canada, between August 6-12, 2017, it looks like they've already decided which will be the next host city, but no official dates were set for the upcoming event.

  • NorNet: An Open Source Inter-Continental Internet Testbed

    With new devices and applications creating interesting use cases for IoT, smart cities, vehicle networks, mobile broadband and more, we are creating new ways to use networked technologies, and we need to be able to test these in realistic settings across locations. In his LinuxCon Europe talk, Thomas Dreibholz, Senior Research Engineer at Simula Research Laboratory talked about how they are building NorNet using open source software as an inter-continental Internet testbed for a variety of networked applications.

  • NorNet -- Building an Inter-Continental Internet Testbed Based on Open Source Software

    Thomas Dreibholz, Senior Research Engineer at Simula Research Laboratory, describes how his team is using open source software to build NorNet -- an inter-continental Internet testbed for a variety of networked applications.

  • DevConf.cz 2017

    Friday was the first day of the conference. We got up bright and early (well, maybe not bright…) and headed over to the venue. I spent a fair amount of time on Friday attending talks.

    I started with the keynote, presented by a variety of speakers representing a wide range of Red Hat's products. The keynote told a narrative of going from unboxed, racked servers to deploying code live from Eclipse to production on those servers (and all the steps in between).

    Next I attended "Generational Core - The Future of Fedora?" by Petr Sabata. Petr presented about Fedora's modular future and how Factory 2.0 fits into the picture.

  • Facebook throws an open source hackathon

    Facebook’s Boston-area outpost is in Cambridge, close to MIT – they’ve just expanded from a smaller site and annexed a whole floor of a well-kept office building near Kendall Square Station. The first thing you see when you get off the elevator is a floor-to-ceiling pattern of blue lines that are meant to spell out the words “Ship Love” (Facebook’s unofficial motto) in binary.

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today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more