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Saturday, 25 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Announcing Rockstor 3.9.0 Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 7:53pm
Story Toughened up PC/104 SBC runs Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 7:46pm
Story Blender - Your FOSS 3D Software Mohd Sohail 22/03/2017 - 7:41pm
Story Wine-Staging 2.4 Released Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 7:37pm
Story GNOME 3.24 is Ready! Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 7:30pm
Story Entroware Launches Ubuntu-Powered Kratos Laptop with Nvidia GTX 1050, Kaby Lake Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 1:41pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 1:40pm
Story Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 review: Android's best foe to the iPad Pro Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 1:37pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:56pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:56pm

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • IBM unveils Blockchain as a Service based on open source Hyperledger Fabric technology

    IBM unveiled its “Blockchain as a Service” today, which is based on the open source Hyperledger Fabric, version 1.0 from The Linux Foundation.

    IBM Blockchain is a public cloud service that customers can use to build secure blockchain networks. The company introduced the idea last year, but this is the first ready-for-primetime implementation built using that technology.

  • Software And Choice

    Some projects, whether intentionally (e.g., LLVM) or by accident (e.g., Linux) will grow beyond this scope (in those cases, vastly so). The question then becomes murkier. The two projects I've chosen for example here are both, I would say, "fork-proof" - LLVM has a very lenient code acceptance policy (see: all of the ghc-specific portions of the backend), while Linux has an extremely powerful module interface against which things can be built that do not merit inclusion into mainline. A user could fork LLVM, or Linux, but their version is extremely unlikely to become authoritative. Even if one does become authoritative, or close to it, that decision may also revert if the new fork does not live up to the quality standards of the old (I'm thinking about ffmpeg/libav here).

  • Hello FOSSASIA: Revisiting the event *and* the first program we write in C

    I was at FOSSAsia this weekend to deliver a workshop on the very basics of programming. It ended a pretty rough couple of weeks for me, with travel to Budapest (for Linaro Connect) followed immediately by the travel to Singapore. It seems like I don’t travel east in the timezone very well and the effects were visible with me napping at odd hours and generally looking groggy through the weekend at Singapore. It was however all worth it because despite a number of glitches, I had some real positives to take back from the conference.

  • Community leadership charts course for OpenStack

    Last week, about 40 people from the OpenStack Technical Committee, User Committee, Board of Directors and Foundation Staff convened in Boston to talk about the future of OpenStack. We candidly discussed the challenges we face as a community, but also why our mission to deliver open infrastructure is more important than ever.

    To kick things off, Mark Collier opened with a state of the union address, talking about the strength of our community, the number of users running OpenStack at scale across various industries and the progress we’ve made working across adjacent open source projects. OpenStack is one of the largest, global open source communities. In 2016 alone, we had 3,479 unique developers from dozens of countries and hundreds of organizations contribute to OpenStack, and the number of merged changes increased 26 percent year-over-year. The size and diversity of the OpenStack community is a huge strength, but like any large organization, scale presents its own set of challenges.

  • OpenStack® Board Elects Huawei as Platinum Member and H3C as Gold Member of the Foundation
  • Community leadership planning, new board members, and more OpenStack news
  • Open project collaboration from elementary to university classrooms

    In this article, we share our experiences: two examples of fostering creative collaboration among students from elementary school to higher education. Aria F. Chernik, an open educator and director of OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation) at Duke University, introduces an open-by-design, learning innovation project at Duke. Anna Engelke, a tinkering and technology educator, speaks about using open pedagogy to design a Scratch-based maker club at a local elementary school.

  • Rcpp 0.12.10: Some small fixes

    The tenth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp just made it to the main CRAN repository providing GNU R with by now over 10,000 packages. Windows binaries for Rcpp, as well as updated Debian packages will follow in due course. This 0.12.10 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, and the 0.12.9 release in January --- making it the fourteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Audacity 2.1.3 Released with Minor New Features
  • Kodi Is Getting A Proper Netflix Plugin

    The Kodi HTPC software will soon have a "real" Netflix plugin/add-on for making a better show/movie watching experience.

  • See Lyrics for Any Song on Spotify with This Ubuntu App

    It’s been several months since Spotify removed the lyrics function from it’s apps, and it shows no signs of returning soon. If you liked being able to tap a button to instantly see lyrics for the currently playing song, we’ve found a nifty little indicator applet that can help.

  • WordGrinder: Distraction-Free Writing From the Command Line

    A few months back while perusing the latest news from the open source media, I came across an article listing five favorite command line tools, or some such nonsense. It turned out that one of the items on the list was a command line “word processor,” WordGrinder, which the article’s writer claimed to be an uber-easy way to write from the command line.

    As it happened, I’d been looking for that very thing, so I immediately looked in the Mint/Ubuntu repositories, found it, installed it and took a look. Unfortunately, at the time I was busy, facing a couple of deadlines, so when I couldn’t figure the first thing out about it in five seconds or less, I closed the terminal and went to Bluefish to finish an article I was writing, while vowing to return to look further into WordGrinder as soon as I finished.

  • Calibre 2.82 Open-Source Ebook Manager Launches with Various Improvements

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced a new maintenance update of his open-source, free, cross-platform and powerful ebook library management software, versioned 2.82.

    Calibre 2.82 comes just one week after the previous point release, namely Calibre 2.81, which means that it's mostly a bugfix update that addresses various of the issues reported by users lately, and updates the supported news sources.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Some thoughts on 'Codex of Victory', the mix of turn-based and real time strategy

    It's a mix of turn-based battles with some real-time base building. The base building aspect is a little like XCOM 2 with a side-on view as you dig out rooms. The whole game feels like it was inspired by XCOM 1 & 2, as you send over units to different regions to perform missions. You even speed up time at will when outside of missions, so it's all very familiar.

  • Overload, the shiny new six-degree-of-freedom shooter has entered Early Access

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where the developers nabbed $306,537 from helpful people wanting to see it become a reality. It's also nice that another Kickstarter team actually managed day-1 Linux support.

    The team behind Overload actually has some of the originally Descent team and the co-founder of the studio even worked on Freespace 1 & 2, which are my two all time favourite space shooters. I'm really not surprised the game has already turned out so well!

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hire a DDoS service to take down your enemies

    According to Neustar, almost three quarters of all global brands, organizations and companies have been victims of a DDoS attack. And more than 3,700 DDoS attacks occur each day.

  • Apollo Lake 3.5-incher doubles down on security

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly, Intel Apollo Lake based “3.5″-SBC-APL” SBC features triple display support, a TPM 2.0 chip, and optional security services.

  • Leading Linux distros dawdle as kernel flaw persists

    A local privilege esclation flaw has been fixed in the Linux kernel, but several upstream distributions have yet to release updates. Administrators should plan on mitigating the vulnerability on Linux servers and workstations themselves and monitor the distributions for their update plans.

First Hint at Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Revealed?

Filed under
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus' bringing us to the end of the alphabet, many in the Ubuntu community have wondered what the Ubuntu 17.10 name will be.

Read more

Also: Orange Pi can draw on Ubuntu snaps

EC study recommends that policies emphasise open source

Filed under
OSS

Europe’s public administrations should support the use of open source in all sectors of the economy and in public administration, a study for the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology recommends. The report by German and French ICT researchers, concludes that “open source is important for the future of the European software industry.”

Read more

Yap Wen Jiun - the Android scientist

Filed under
Android
Interviews

WE live in a world where technology surrounds us.

The biggest piece of technology we use is possibly the smartphone. It’s like a computer in your hand and it’s handy for communication. The smartphone engine, which most people take for granted, is the operating system (OS). A local Android OS developer, Yap Wen Jiun, shares his thoughts on his field of choice.

Read more

Open source seen as door to digital innovation by decision-makers in Malaysia, survey finds

Filed under
OSS

According to a new Forrester Consulting survey in the Asia Pacific region, 76 percent of survey respondents in Malaysia view open source as computing as a door to business innovation, cost-saving and the forming of deeper customer experience.

Damien Wong (pic below), vice president and general manager, ASEAN, Red Hat, said, "It is encouraging to see IT decision makers in Malaysia thinking beyond the traditional approaches and taking a cue from the companies championing digital innovation through open source."

Read more

Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Cutting to the heart of it, it doesn't actually matter if Microsoft releases Windows Server for ARM. Windows isn't the future and even Microsoft knows it. The upcoming availability of SQL server on Linux is all the proof we need that the game is over and, in the data centre at least, Microsoft didn't win.

Quite frankly, there's nothing wrong with that. Legacy x86 Windows applications have been a millstone around the neck of the entire industry for ages now and its long past time they were relegated to a niche and left to quietly slip away into the night. What's interesting here isn't that Microsoft managed to take its existing code base, strip out some of the cruft and compile it on ARM. What's interesting is what Microsoft's experiment unlocks outside the Windows ecosystem.

Read more

10 BEST OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE IN 2017

Filed under
OSS

When we talk about open source software, we are talking about software program which has been created with the idea of being shared. Open source software is developed, tested, and improved through public collaboration. The main objective is that in future the collaboration is maintained i.e. the user is able to make changes to the program and tailor it to suit their own needs.

In the past years, the world of open source software has changed tremendously. No longer are the old programs used and each year, you will find a new innovation in the field. On year, you will find a particular program leading the market, while the other year, you will find the same program in the pits of obsolescence. That’s how innovations move through this field.

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Solus Users Get MATE 1.18 and Linux Kernel 4.9.16, Budgie 10.3 Coming Very Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Solus maintainer Joshua Strobl is informing users of the independently-developed GNU/Linux distribution about the availability of some of the latest updated packages, as well as upcoming features.

According to the developer, it would appear that the feature-rich MATE 1.18 desktop environment released last week is now available for installation from the official stable Solus repositories for users of the Solus MATE edition, along with the long-term supported Linux 4.9.16 kernel and numerous other up-to-date components.

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How to secure your Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security

The Raspberry Pi and many other inexpensive computer boards like it have become part of the "Internet of Things" or IoT revolution. Internet-connected computing devices have emerged beyond traditional servers, desktops, laptops, and mobile devices. Now your TV, DVR (digital video recorder), thermostat, refrigerator, Internet radio, Raspberry Pi, and other devices are on the network too.

IoT has been huge for experimentation and innovation. But as projects get rushed to completion, there have been severe consequences for ignoring security. And this applies both to commercial products and hobby projects. I'll talk about the Raspberry Pi specifically in this article, so this post is oriented more toward do-it-yourself projects.

Read more

Linux 4.11 RC3 and 4.4.55 LTS

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11-rc3

    Another week, another rc.

    As is our usual pattern after the merge window, rc3 is larger than
    rc2, but this is hopefully the point where things start to shrink and
    calm down. We had a late typo in rc2 that affected arm and powerpc
    (the prep code for the 5-level page tables), and hopefully there are
    no similar brown-paper-bugs now in rc3.

    On the whole rc3 looks pretty normal, with two thirds being driver
    updates (late qla2xxx scsi driver updates stand out, but ethernet
    drivers for broadcom and cavium aren't that far behind, and there are
    updates for gpu, md, cpufreq, x86 platform drivers etc).

    Outside of drivers, the rest is a mix of arch updates (parisc,
    powerpc, x86), filesystems (afs, nfs, xfs) and "misc" (mainly core
    kernel and general networking updates).

    Shortlog appended for those who want to see some overview of the
    details, but what we really want is testing. Please.

    Linus

  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Third Release Candidate of the Linux 4.11 Kernel

    It's still Sunday in the US, and that means Linus Torvalds has prepared yet another Release Candidate (RC) milestone for the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel for GNU/Linux distros.

    That's right, Linux kernel 4.11 Release Candidate 3 is now ready for public testing, and, according to Linus Torvalds, it appears to be a fairly normal patch that's just a bit larger than last week's Release Candidate because of a typo that affected the PowerPC (PPC) and ARM architectures.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.55 LTS Arrives with Various MIPS Changes, Updated USB Drivers

Raspberry Pi Surges To 3rd Best Selling Computer Of All Time Surpassing The Commodore 64

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

In many regards, the Raspberry Pi family of computers is quite modest, which is of course by design. For a relatively small price, you can pick up a fully-functional RPi single board computer that can be used for many purposes, whether it is for learning, creating homemade bots, or cobbling together your own purpose-built media player or server solution. Given RPi's flexibility, it should come as no surprise that the open source Linux-power min PC has proven to be such a popular computing platform for scores of consumers, businesses and educational institutions.

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Arch Linux-Based ArchEX Distro Is Powered by LXQt Desktop, Linux Kernel 4.10.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is known for all sort of distributions most of which are derivatives of some of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and he informs us this weekend about the availability of a new build of his ArchEX distro.

ArchEX is an Arch Linux-based distribution built around the lightweight LXQt desktop environment. The new things implemented in ArchEX Build 170318 is the recently released Linux 4.10.3 kernel, as well as all the latest package versions that have been released on the official Arch Linux repositories.

Read more

Releases already covered here: 4MLinux 22.0 Launches July 2017 Based on GCC 6.2.0 and the Linux 4.9 LTS Kernel

Zorin OS 12.1 Education Promises to Make Learning Better and More Impactful

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Standards for ARM computers and Linaro

    It looks like someone else figured it out, ergo Linaro. Unfortunately, they do not seem to be eager to create a real platform, but rather slap a veneer of something OpenFirmware-like on top of exising systems. Also, they are buddying with Ubuntu. So, a half-hearted effort and a top-down deal. But it's a step in the right direction.

  • Linux Kernel 4.10.4 Released with MIPS Improvements, Updated USB Drivers

    The fourth maintenance update to the Linux 4.10 kernel series arrived this weekend with various improvements to some of the supported filesystems and architectures, as well as updated drivers.

  • Linux Kernel 4.9.16 LTS Has Various MIPS and PowerPC Changes, Updated Drivers

    Immediately after announcing the release of the Linux 4.10.4 kernel, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of the sixteenth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel series.

Vulkan, Mir, and Wayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Flowblade Video Editor 1.12 Released, Adds 2 New Tools
    A shiny new version of open-source video editor Flowblade is available for download. Flowblade 1.12 introduces a pair of new tools. Progress has also been made towards creating a distribution agnostic .AppImage, though, alas, there are still kinks to be ironed out so you won’t find an app image of the current release.
  • Vivaldi 1.8 Web Browser Launch Imminent As First Release Candidate Is Out
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard announced today, March 24, 2017, the release and immediate availability of the first Release Candidate of the forthcoming Vivaldi 1.8 web browser for all supported platforms. Dubbed as Vivaldi Snapshot 1.8.770.44, the Release Candidate of Vivaldi 1.8 is here to fix some last-minute bugs for the new History feature, which is the star of the new upcoming web browser release based on the latest Chromium 57 open-source project, as well as to improve the user interface zoom functionality.
  • Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser Has New Bookmarks UI, Improves Tracking Protection
    GNOME 3.24 arrived a couple of days ago, and it's the biggest release of the popular desktop environment so far, shipping with lots of new features and improvements across all of its applications and components. During its 6-month development cycle, we managed to cover all the major features implemented in the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, but also the various improvements included in many of the apps that are usually distributed under the GNOME Stack umbrella.
  • Firefox Sync Support Is Coming to GNOME Web
    GNOME Web (aka the browser formerly known as Epiphany) is working to add Firefox Sync support, letting users keep bookmarks, history and open-tabs in sync across devices.

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers