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Sunday, 17 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The SheevaPlug NAS mini-PC is back with dual -A53 Sheeva64 Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 12:57am
Story SUSE and Red Hat Server Software Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 8:47pm
Story KDE on Chakra and on Phones Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 8:46pm
Story Governments Are Spending Billions on Software They Can Get with Freedom Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 8:30pm
Story Security: Updates, Thread Safety and Crypto Policies in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 8:25pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 8:22pm
Story Android Things is now only for smart speakers and displays Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 6:49pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 6:21pm
Story Audiocasts: BSD Strategy, FLOSS Weekly, Linux in the Ham Shack Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 6:04pm
Story MakuluLinux 2019.01.25, Netrunner 19.01 and Virtual Desktops Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2019 - 5:40pm

Stable kernels 4.20.8, 4.19.21, 4.14.99 and 4.9.156

  • Linux 4.20.8

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.20.8 kernel.

    All users of the 4.20 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 4.20.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.20.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

  • Linux 4.19.21
  • Linux 4.14.99
  • Linux 4.9.156

Programming: PyCon, Kafka, wxPython and More

Filed under
Development
  • PyCon: Hatchery programs at PyCon 2019!

    The PyCon Hatchery program was introduced last year to allow for the addition to PyCon of new tracks, summits, demos, or any other imaginable events which share and fulfill the mission of the Python Software Foundation.

    The Hatchery program was first run as a trial in 2018, welcoming the PyCon Charlas as it’s inaugural program. This year we are happy to have built upon that trial and are delighted to have received so many proposals and to have accepted many more events!

  • The day you start to use rc builds in production - Kafka 2.1.1 edition

    tl;dr If you want to run Kafka 2.x use 2.1.1rc1 or later.

    So someone started to update from Kafka 1.1.1 to 2.1.0 yesterday and it kept crashing every other hour. It pretty much looks like https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/KAFKA-7697, so we're now trying out 2.1.1rc1 because we missed the rc2 at http://home.apache.org/~cmccabe/kafka-2.1.1-rc2/. So ideally you go with rc2 which has a few more fixes for unrelated issues.

  • Mike Driscoll: Creating a Calculator with wxPython

    A lot of beginner tutorials start with “Hello World” examples. There are plenty of websites that use a calculator application as a kind of “Hello World” for GUI beginners. Calculators are a good way to learn because they have a set of widgets that you need to lay out in an orderly fashion. They also require a certain amount of logic to make them work correctly.

  • Downloading Files using Python (Simple Examples)

    Also, you will learn how to overcome many challenges that you may counter such as downloading files that redirects, downloading large files, multithreaded download, and other tactics.

  • Hypha Spike: Persistence 1

    2019/02/12: This is a Work In Progress (WIP). I will be live-updating this post as I work on the spike. If you want to get streaming updates without having to refresh your browser, open the DAT version in Beaker Browser and toggle the live reloading feature. Please feel free to talk to me about this on the fediverse as I work on it, perhaps via Mastodon.

Mozilla: Ubisoft, Physics Engines, Security and VR

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Making the Building of Firefox Faster for You with Clever-Commit from Ubisoft

    Firefox fights for people online: for control and choice, for privacy, for safety. We do this because it is our mission to keep the web open and accessible to all. No other tech company has people’s back like we do.

    Part of keeping you covered is ensuring that our Firefox browser and the other tools and services we offer are running at top performance. When we make an update, or add a new feature the experience should be as seamless and smooth as possible for the user. That’s why Mozilla just partnered with Ubisoft to start using Clever-Commit, an Artificial Intelligence coding assistant developed by Ubisoft La Forge that will make the Firefox code-writing process faster and more efficient. Thanks to Clever-Commit, Firefox users will get to use even more stable versions of Firefox and have even better browsing experiences.

  • Jingle Smash: Choosing a Physics Engine

    The key to a physics based game like Jingle Smash is of course the physics engine. In the Javascript world there are many to choose from. My requirements were for fully 3D collision simulation, working with ThreeJS, and being fairly easy to use. This narrowed it down to CannonJS, AmmoJS, and Oimo.js: I chose to use the CannonJS engine because AmmoJS was a compiled port of a C lib and I worried would be harder to debug, and Oimo appeared to be abandoned (though there was a recent commit so maybe not?).

  • Retailers: All We Want for Valentine’s Day is Basic Security

    This has been the case with smart dolls, webcams, doorbells, and countless other devices. And the consequences can be life threatening: “Internet-connected locks, speakers, thermostats, lights and cameras that have been marketed as the newest conveniences are now also being used as a means for harassment, monitoring, revenge and control,” the New York Times reported last year. Compounding this: It is estimated that by 2020, 10 billion IoT products will be active.

    Last year, in an effort to make connected devices on the market safer for consumers, Mozilla, the Internet Society, and Consumers International published our Minimum Security Guidelines: the five basic features we believe all connected devices should have. They include encrypted communications; automatic updates; strong password requirements; vulnerability management; and an accessible privacy policy.

  • Anyone can create a virtual reality experience with this new WebVR starter kit from Mozilla and Glitch

    Here at Mozilla, we are big fans of Glitch. In early 2017 we made the decision to host our A-Frame content on their platform. The decision was easy. Glitch makes it easy to explore, and remix live code examples for WebVR.

    We also love the people behind Glitch. They have created a culture and a community that is kind, encouraging, and champions creativity. We share their vision for a web that is creative, personal, and human. The ability to deliver immersive experiences through the browser opens a whole new avenue for creativity. It allows us to move beyond screens, and keyboards. It is exciting, and new, and sometimes a bit weird (but in a good way).

    Building a virtual reality experience may seem daunting, but it really isn’t. WebVR and frameworks like A-Frame make it really easy to get started. This is why we worked with Glitch to create a WebVR starter kit. It is a free, 5-part video course with interactive code examples that will teach you the fundamentals of WebVR using A-Frame. Our hope is that this starter kit will encourage anyone who has been on the fence about creating virtual reality experiences to dive in and get started.

Ubuntu Developers Seem To Be Really Pursuing ZFS Root Partition Support On The Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Earlier this month I reported on how Ubuntu developers indicated they were looking at ZFS support on the desktop as part of their work developing the new Ubuntu desktop installer GUI. It's quite clear now that they are indeed pursuing the work to allow Ubuntu desktop installs via their work-in-progress installer to support ZFS root installations.

As outlined in the aforelinked article, the developers indicated they were looking at "zfs on the desktop" after they had already been supporting ZFS as a standard offering for Ubuntu servers for a while and making the ZFS On Linux packages readily available. But their current Ubuntu desktop "Ubiquity" installer doesn't allow easily setting up a ZFS root partition with this out-of-tree file-system support.

Read more

Also:

2018 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Desktop Distribution of the Year - Linux Mint (14.93%)
Server Distribution of the Year - Slackware (25.69%)
Live Distribution of the Year - antiX (24.70%)
Database of the Year - MariaDB (44.59%)
Browser of the Year - Firefox (57.63%)
Desktop Environment of the Year - Plasma Desktop (KDE) (29.43%)
Window Manager of the Year - Openbox (24.64%)
Audio Media Player Application of the Year - VLC (24.10%)
Digital Audio Workstation of the Year - Ardour (33.33%)
Video Media Player of the Year - VLC (65.00%)
Video Authoring Application of the Year - KDEnlive (41.67%)
Network Security Application of the Year - Wireshark (20.25%)
Host Security Application of the Year - AppArmor (31.25%)
Network Monitoring Application of the Year - Nagios XI (30.51%)
IDE of the Year - Visual Studio Code (19.08%)
Text Editor of the Year - vim (24.92%)
File Manager of the Year - Dolphin (25.68%)
Open Source Game of the Year - SuperTuxKart / 0 A.D. tie (16.51%)
Programming Language of the Year - Python (32.51%)
Backup Application of the Year - rsync (43.36%)
Log Management Tool of the Year - Logwatch (43.75)
X Terminal Emulator of the Year - Konsole (20.94%)
Browser Privacy Solution of the Year - uBlock Origin (31.21%)
Privacy Solution of the Year - GnuPG (27.88%)
Open Source File Sync Application of the Year - Nextcloud / Syncthing tie (25.93%)
IRC Client of the Year - HexChat (47.67%)
Universal Packaging Format of the Year - Appimage (38.89%)
Single Board Computer of the Year - Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ (58.43%)
Virtualization Application of the Year - VirtualBox (56.79%)
Container of the Year - Docker (57.63%)
Orchestrator of the Year - Kubernetes (74.19%)
Linux/Open Source Podcast of the Year - GNU World Order (20.00%)
Secure Messaging Application of the Year - Signal (40.00%)
Video Messaging Application of the Year - Skype (44.90%)
Raster Graphics Editor of the Year - GIMP (79.49%)
Linux Desktop Vendor of the Year - System76 (55.17%)
Linux Server Vendor of the Year - Dell (32.69%)
Email Client of the Year - Thunderbird (61.54%)

Read more

Games: Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus, Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 now available

    Unreal Engine 4.22 will be releasing soon with a number of fixes and updates. In the meantime, the first Preview is now available for download from the Epic Games launcher.

    Preview 1 includes support for real-time ray tracing, Editor Utility Widgets, Blueprint indexing optimizations, virtual production updates, Oculus Quest support and the Unreal Audio Engine is now on by default for new projects.

    A full list of the upcoming changes to this build are available on the Unreal Engine forums. We invite you to provide feedback on Preview 1, and all subsequent releases. Please keep in mind that Preview releases are intended only to provide a sample of what is going to be released in the update and are not production-ready.

  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Released With Real-Time Ray-Tracing

    Unreal Engine 4.21 back in November was a big update for Linux gamers in that this game engine now defaults to the Vulkan renderer and also had various other fixes. With today's Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 release, there are no Linux/Vulkan-specific changes mentioned, but some other interesting changes in general.

    The release notes as of Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 don't indicate any Vulkan or Linux focused changes, but aside from that there is some interesting changes. Arguably most interesting is having experimental support for real-time ray-tracing and path tracing though sadly that's limited for now to Direct3D 12 with DXR and not yet any Vulkan ray-tracing support.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus officially released for Linux, more content on the way

    Bulwark Studios and Kasedo Games have officially released Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus for Linux after having a 'soft launch' in December last year.

  • The Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle is out with some sweet Linux games

    It's almost midweek, time to refresh that gaming collection of yours with The Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle that has some Linux games available.

Security: Apple, 'Cloud', Containers and More FUD

Filed under
Security

Chrome OS 72

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS 72 brings improved support for Android, Linux apps and more

    Chrome OS 72 is starting to roll out to users with a wealth of changes, including a tablet mode, improvements for Android apps and plenty more.

    For one, Chrome OS 72 brings native Google Assistant and Android Pie to more Chromebooks. Those features initially came with Chrome OS 71 but were limited to the Pixel Slate.

    Speaking of the Slate, it and Chromebooks like it now have access to a tablet mode that should improve usability.

  • Google Outs Chrome OS 72 with Android Improvements, Picture in Picture Support

    Google promoted the Chrome OS 72 operating system to the stable channel, a release that introduces several improvements to make your Chromebook experience better, more secure, and enjoyable.
    The Chrome OS 72 release introduces numerous improvements, especially for dealing with Android files. Among these, we can mention external storage access support for Android apps via /storage dir and MediaStore APIs, and the ability to search app shortcuts for Android apps in the Launcher.

    To find an app shortcut, you need to right-click or long-press on an Android app. Chrome OS 72 also introduces Picture in Picture (PiP) support and touchscreen support in tablet mode for the Chrome web browser, and the ability to view saved Google Drive through from Backup and Sync in the Files app under My Drive/Computers.

Software: Top 10 Best Linux Media Server Software, Skrooge 2.18.0 and the Money Questions

Filed under
Software
  • Top 10 Best Linux Media Server Software

    Did someone tell you that Linux is just for programmers? That is so wrong! You have got a lot of great tools for digital artists, writers and musicians.

    We have covered such tools in the past. Today it’s going to be slightly different. Instead of creating new digital content, let’s talk about consuming it.

    You have probably heard of media servers? Basically these software (and sometimes gadgets) allow you to view your local or cloud media (music, videos etc) in an intuitive interface. You can even use it to stream the content to other devices on your network. Sort of your personal Netflix.

  • Skrooge 2.18.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.18.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • Paying money for things

    Sometimes it’s hard to make money from software. How do you make money from something that can be copied infinitely?

    Right now there are 3 software tools that I pay for. Each one is supplied by a small company, and each one charges a monthly or annual fee. I prefer software with this business model because it creates an incentive for careful, ongoing maintenance and improvement. The alternative (pay a large fee, once) encourages a model that is more like “add many new features, sell the new version and then move onto something else”.

  • Here's why investors are throwing money at startups that give away their software for free

    OSS Capital founder Joseph Jacks, whose venture capital firm focuses on open source startups, reckons that there was roughly $70 billion in mergers and acquisitions, private equity and IPOs involving open source last year. And he estimates that there's been another $2 billion in funding for commercial open source startups in the past year, as startups like Confluent, Neo4j, HashiCorp and GitLab raised money.

Latest Kernel Changes/Additions

Filed under
Linux
  • Radeon VII (Vega 20) Firmware Support Lands In Linux-Firmware.Git

    In addition to needing a recent version of the Linux kernel and Mesa (ideally, Linux 5.0 and Mesa 19.0 if enjoying the very best performance and features) for using a Radeon VII graphics card on Linux, you also need to have the necessary firmware binaries manually installed if not using the Radeon Software for Linux driver package. Those firmware bits are now in the linux-firmware.git repository.

  • Queued Linux Patches To Better Track AVX-512, Allowing For More Optimal Task Placement

    After going through several rounds of patch review in recent months, a patch series providing for tracking AVX-512 usage of tasks and exporting it to user-space is poised to be part of the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel.

    As using complex AVX-512 operations can lead to lower turbo frequencies for those cores, the Linux kernel will be providing better tracking of AVX-512 usage of tasks that is readable by user-space for programs doing their own task placement. If keeping AVX-512 usage to particular core(s) and not intermixing them with non-AVX tasks, better performance can be achievable due to the differing turbo frequencies of CPUs when running Advanced Vector Extensions.

  • Qualcomm FastRPC Driver Going Mainline For Offloading Tasks To The DSP

    The latest Qualcomm driver working its way to the mainline Linux kernel is the FastRPC driver and should arrive with Linux 5.1.

    FastRPC is an in-kernel IPC mechanism for clients to make remote method invocations across DSP/APPS boundaries. The intent of Qualcomm FastRPC is allowing tasks to be easily offloading to the DSP hardware, such as easily punting work from the Snapdragon processor to the Qualcomm Hexagon on capable SoCs.

  • PulseAudio Plugin Allows For Better Bluetooth Audio Quality On Linux

    Right now on most Linux distributions when using higher-end Bluetooth headphones, the low-end SBC audio codec ends up being utilized by default which is subpar for the potential audio quality of the more expensive headphones. Fortunately, there are PulseAudio modules that allow for the higher-end codecs to be used. 

    The low-complexity sub-band codec "SBC" is what ends up being used by default as it's native to Bluetooth and not proprietary or encumbered by patents. But newer headphones on the premium end of the spectrum also support LDAC, AptX-HD, and others with higher bit-rates yielding better audio quality.

Red Hat's OpenShift 4.0 and CloudForms 4.7

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The Modern Software Platform

    This is the first post in an ongoing series which will explore the changes, improvements, and additions we’re planning for the next big release of Red Hat OpenShift, version 4.0. Check in each week for more information that will prepare you for the shift to 4.0.

    From the time the fledgling Kubernetes community met at the Google office in Seattle for our first face-to-face meeting in the fall of 2014, I’ve believed that Kubernetes was a project that would transform how we build and run software. Over the last few years, we’ve seen countless others come around to that point of view (most enthusiastically, some grudgingly). At the same time, the public cloud providers have continued the massive investments in infrastructure and services that make IT and software easier, simpler, and available at a scale that few people anticipated when the decade began.

  • Red Hat CloudForms 4.7 released

    There's an old, wise IT statement: "Never fix what's broken." Of course, there's an equally true tech management thought, which goes: "You snooze, you lose." So, trying to satisfy both the tortoises and hares of IT, Red Hat's newest version of its old-school CloudForms management tool comes ready to integrate with Red Hat's DevOps program of choice: Ansible Tower.

Security: Class Action Against Apple, Massive Data Dumps, More on CVE-2019-5736

Filed under
Security
  • Apple sued because two-factor authentication is inconvenient

    Class-action lawsuit, filed by one Jay Brodsky in California takes issue with the fact that two-factor authentication (2FA) can't be disabled after two weeks of use, which "imposes an extraneous logging in procedure that requires a user to both remember password; and have access to a trusted device or trusted phone number." Yep, that's 2FA alright.

  • Apple being sued because two-factor authentication on an iPhone or Mac takes too much time

    The suit, filed by Jay Brodsky in California alleges that Apple doesn't get user consent to enable two-factor authentication. Furthermore, once enabled, two-factor authentication "imposes an extraneous logging in procedure that requires a user to both remember password; and have access to a trusted device or trusted phone number" when a device is enabled.

  • 617M Hacked Accounts Up For Sale To Make “Life Easier” For Hackers

    A hacker is selling 617 million stolen accounts online collected from 16 popular websites on Dream Market Cybersouk which can be accessed on the Tor network.

    As reported by The Register, the data can be purchased for less than $20,000 Bitcoin and comprises of account holder names, passwords, and email IDs. Buyers need to crack the hashed, one-way encrypted passwords before using them.

  • 620 million accounts stolen from 16 hacked websites now for sale on dark web, seller boasts

    Some 617 million online account details stolen from 16 hacked websites are on sale from today on the dark web, according to the data trove's seller.

    For less than $20,000 in Bitcoin, it is claimed, the following pilfered account databases can be purchased from the Dream Market cyber-souk, located in the Tor network:

    Dubsmash (162 million), MyFitnessPal (151 million), MyHeritage (92 million), ShareThis (41 million), HauteLook (28 million), Animoto (25 million), EyeEm (22 million), 8fit (20 million), Whitepages (18 million), Fotolog (16 million), 500px (15 million), Armor Games (11 million), BookMate (8 million), CoffeeMeetsBagel (6 million), Artsy (1 million), and DataCamp (700,000).

    Sample account records from the multi-gigabyte databases seen by The Register appear to be legit: they consist mainly of account holder names, email addresses, and passwords. These passwords are hashed, or one-way encrypted, and must therefore be cracked before they can be used.

  • Researchers Warn of Malicious Container Escape Vulnerability

    A new serious vulnerability in container technology was publicly reported on Feb. 11, one that could potentially enable an attacker to gain unauthorized access to the host operating system.

    Container technology led by the Docker engine has become increasingly popular in recent years as a way to build and deploy applications into isolated segments, on top of a server operating system. At the core of the modern container technology stack is a low-level component known as runc, which spawns and runs containers. The new CVE-2019-5736 vulnerability is a flaw in runc that could enable a malicious container to escape the confines of its isolated process segment.

  • PyPy v7.0.0, Vulernability Affecting runc and Container Technologies, Ubuntu for ARM-based Windows Laptops, antiX MX v18.1

    A vulnerability was just discovered (CVE-2019-5736) affecting runc and the management of container technologies which include Docker, cri-o, containerd, Kubernetes, etc. Learn more about this security hole and the ways it is being patched here.

  • Container Bug Allows Attackers to Gain Root Access on Host Machine

Programming: LibreOffice Teaches C++, IBM Explores Clang for C/C++, Python Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Google's Chrome OS "Wilco" Driver Working Towards Mainline Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

For years now Google has been designing their own embedded controller (EC) for use within Chromebooks / Chrome OS devices.

But after about five years of the "ChromeOS EC" (cros_ec), there is a new embedded controller they have been working on. Coming soon to the mainline Linux tree will be the kernel support for a new ChromeOS "Wilco" Embedded Controller.

Wilco is Google's new embedded controller wired up over an eSPI bus. The new driver doesn't yield much to get excited about, however, but great that Google continues working on their own ECs and they are backed by open-source firmware and first-rate Linux support given their Chrome OS usage.

Read more

Also: Better Bluetooth sound quality on Linux

Removing Profanity from the Source Tree

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds recently stepped away from kernel development temporarily in order to think about how to be less harsh with developers in certain situations. Simultaneous with his departure was a patch introducing a new Code of Conduct into the kernel source tree. The effects of this are beginning to be felt.

Jarkko Sakkinen recently posted a patch to change a kernel comment containing the word "fuck" to use the word "hug" instead. So the code comment, "Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds fucked it up" would become "Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds hugged it up".

Steven Rostedt replied to this, saying that the code in question had changed so much that the original comment was out of date, and it should just be removed entirely. He said, "that will be an accurate change with or without CoC."

Jonathan Corbet remarked, "I'd much rather see either deletion or a rewrite over bleeping out words that somebody might not like." And Jiri Kosina agreed, saying, "turning comments into something that often doesn't make sense to anybody at all is hardly productive."

Sergey Senozhatsky pointed out that Linus was the author of the original self-deprecating comment. He asked, "Linus has made a comment, in his own words, about his own code. Why would anyone be offended by this?"

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Nautilus Exif, PDF And Audio Metadata Tag Columns Extension For Ubuntu

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

These metadata tags added by the Nautilus Columns extension are not only useful for a quickly look at some particular audio, pdf or image information from the Nautilus list view, but also to sort some files by a particular metadata tag column to easily identify the files you're looking for.

Nautilus Columns is currently maintained by Spanish blogger Atareao, and it only supports English, Spanish and Galician languages.

Judging from the extension code, it's also supposed to support some video formats as well, but no information was shown for such files on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop, so it probably needs some fixes in this area. Audio, PDF and Exif metadata was displayed with no issues on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop.

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Games: Million to One Hero, Barotrauma, JUMPGRID and Pygame

Filed under
Gaming
  • Fun platformer 'Million to One Hero' where you can make your own adventures is releasing soon

    Million to One Hero from Spanish developer Over the Top Games seems like a very promising platformer and they've announced the release is this month.

    We previously highlighted the game earlier this month, at that time they did not have a release date available. They've since announced that it's going to be available on Linux right at release, which will be on February 27th.

  • Barotrauma, a co-op submarine adventure set on Jupiter's moon Europa is promising, has a demo

    For those after a more sci-fi take on the co-op submarine adventure, Barotrauma seems like it could be quite fun.

    Currently in a closed-beta before an Early Access release on Steam, you can actually grab an earlier version direct from their website here. They're not taking on any more for the closed-beta, so the demo should still give a small glimpse into what's possible.

  • JUMPGRID is a fantastic 2D dodge-em-up that will give your fingers a workout

    Did you enjoy Super Hexagon? JUMPGRID is a brand new dodge-em-up with simple and addictive gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

  • Moving the player object in Pygame

    In the last chapter we have created the animation effect for the player object and in this chapter, we will move the player object in the x-axis. We will leave the wall and boundary collision detection mechanism to the next chapter. In the last chapter we have already linked up the keyboard events with the game manager class and in this chapter, we only need a slight modification to move the player across the scene when the left or the right arrow key has been pressed. One of the problems with the pygame event module is that we need to activate the repeated event detection process by our-self with this single line of code before the module can send the repeated keypress event (which means when someone is holding the same key on the keyboard) to us.

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