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Sunday, 16 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt
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    neilheaney
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:53pm
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  • 10/01/2017 - 11:50pm
    relativ7

GPL Dodge and Compliance

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • Why does macOS Catalina use Zsh instead of Bash? Licensing [iophk: "s/patents/software patents/g; :("]

    So, it’s no surprise that Apple’s moving its users away from Bash. I’m also not surprised to see Apple favor Zsh. For starters, it’s licensed under the MIT License, and therefore doesn’t contain the controversial language surrounding patents and Tivoization.

  • The Redmi S2, aka Y2, gets its Android Pie update

    That may not be a huge deal to some users, however. Xiaomi is also obliged to release the S2/Y2's kernel sources in order to remain compliant with GNU's general public licence.

Servers Closing Down (MariaDB and IBM)

Filed under
Server
  • MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4 Now Available, Pulumi Announces Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS, KDE Launches Plasma 5.16, IBM Announces Its List of Women Pioneers for AI in Business and Microway Provides Clemson University with an NVIDIA DGX-2 Supercomputer

    MariaDB today announces the release of MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4, "code-named 'Restful Nights' for the peace of mind it brings enterprise customers". The press release notes that this version "is a new, hardened and secured Server (different from MariaDB Community Server aka MariaDB Server) and has never been available before. MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4 includes features not available in the community version that are focused on solving enterprise customer needs, providing them with greater reliability, stability and long-term support in production environments."

  • MariaDB opens up on locked down Enterprise Server

    MariaDB finally took the wraps off its Enterprise Server product today, which it said was aimed at massive deployments where scale and security are more important than rushing out new features for developers.

    The product was first flagged up back in February, and scheduled to appear in “spring”. We’ll leave it to you to check your calendar and decide whether it hit its deadline.

    “It’s one thing to experiment with open source, to evaluate it,” said MariaDB’s senior director of product marketing Shane Johsnon. “But once you move to the stage where you’re migrating mission critical applications to it, or you’re deploying it at massive scale you encounter new types of challenges, not necessarily functional challenges.”

    So, security in MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4 has been boosted, with end-to-end encryption for multi-master clusters. At the same time, the company has clamped down on plugins, with only those deemed tested and production-ready permitted.

    [...]

    MariaDB ES will be GPL, said Johnson, “It’s the community version that gets GA’d with additional QA and additional plugins. The result of that is Enterprise Server.”

  • Server Buying Cools, But It's Cool – Don't Panic

    When a market is comprised of hundreds of thousands of customers, things tend to level out and are a lot more predictable than when there are relatively few customers. Before the public clouds took off a decade ago and before the hyperscalers created such large infrastructures to support billions of users running their applications, server buying was a lot smaller and it was also more predictable. Things tended to grow slowly, methodically and they also took time to slow down because not everyone felt an economic decline or a transition to a new system architecture at the same time.

    That is no longer so with the modern server business. Enterprises are offloading some of their compute needs to the public clouds, and in other cases they are employing services provided by the hyperscalers – email, collaboration, and so on – instead of hosting them in their own datacenters. The hyperscalers and cloud builders are at the front of the line ahead of any new server chip generation, and they tend to buy aggressively ahead of the formal launches by Intel and AMD, and if the most recent quarter is any test, they are slowing down server purchases as they await the right time to invest in future chips from those two companies.

  • IBM i Roadmap Promises A Long Ride, Few Bumps

    It would be hard to find a group of enterprise IT shops that are more conservative – meaning averse to risk – than the IBM midrange. Arguably, IBM System z mainframe shops are even more risk averse, but perhaps it is a matter more of scale than degree. In the average IBM i shop, one person – or maybe a handful of people – is keeping risk at bay, while in a mainframe shop there could be dozens or hundreds that are trying to steer the ship without rocking the boat.

    Every now and then, Big Blue publishes an IBM i Strategy And Roadmap document to trying to calm the fears of the IBM i faithful while at the same time trying to fire them up a little. It is a delicate balance, and such documents are generally not full of information. But there are always some things to consider and that can be used to make the ongoing case that the IBM i platform deserves to be preserved in the enterprise and to have continuing investment. So it is with the 2019 edition of the IBM i Strategy And Roadmap, which you can get at this link.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Firmware Reverse-Engineering Using NSA Software Continues

    Earlier this month we reported on a new Google Summer of Code project making use of NSA software to help with firmware reverse engineering. So far that effort seems to be paying off of using Ghidra.

    Ghidra is the US National Security Agency's open-source project designed to assist in reverse engineering. Ghidra is similar to IDA Pro and other decompilers/disassemblers. The focus of the GSoC 2019 project has been integrating the support to make it suitable as a tool to help with firmware reverse-engineering.

  • Application lifecycle management for container-native development

    Ultimately, developers are expensive, but they are the domain experts in what they build. With development teams often being treated as product teams (who own the entire lifecycle and support of their applications), it becomes imperative that they control the end-to-end process on which they rely to deliver their applications into production. This means decentralizing both the ALM process and the tooling that supports that process. In this article, we’ll explore this approach and look at a couple of implementation scenarios.

  • Teaching algorithmic ethics requires an open approach

    his trend could have profoundly positive impacts on humanity. Consider, for example, the ways in which AI applications have already proven revolutionary in medical diagnosis. But with and alongside the benefits these systems promise are also serious risks, for the growing unchecked use of algorithms in this fashion risks dangerously amplifying inequality and concentrating power in the hands of the few. Other related problems may accompany this, such as the increased commodification of personal information absent consumer protections, or the buildout of digital surveillance infrastructures that are more often than not turned against already marginalized or oppressed populations.

    One of the most promising mechanisms for combating the dangerous encroachment of individual agency and power through algorithms is open education. Policymakers and advisors educated on these ethical technology issues can make informed regulatory decisions, technologists can increase their awareness of the impacts of their designs, and citizens and consumers can adequately understand how algorithmic systems are impacting their everyday lives. Where knowledge is power, education can provide that knowledge.

  • OOP Method Types in Python: @classmethod vs @staticmethod vs Instance Methods
  • Multiple Linear Regression with Python
  • Testing Complex Systems with Maintainable Test Suites
  • Kubernetes Operators Best Practices

    Kubernetes Operators are processes connecting to the master API and watching for events, typically on a limited number of resource types.

    When a relevant event occurs, the operator reacts and performs a specific action. This may be limited to interacting with the master API only, but will often involve performing some action on some other systems (this could be either in cluster or off cluster resources).

Luminance HDR: An Open Source Software for LDR/HDR Imaging in Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

Luminance HDR is an open source application based on Qt5 toolkit for LDR/HDR image processing. It’s a complete workflow for high-quality imaging including HDR and LDR formats. Luminance HDR offers a simple to use and intuitive graphical user interface. It’s a cross-platform application which supports Windows OS, Mac OS, and Linux system.

As I mentioned above that this software supports a wide range of HDR and LDR formats out of the box. Worth mentioning HDR formats are radiance RGBE, tiff formats, openEXR, PFS native format, raw image formats, etc. JPEG, PNG, PPM, PBM, TIFF, FITS all those are mentionable LDR formats, it does supports.

Read more

10 Best Raspberry Pi Alternatives Comparison: x86 And ARM SBCs For 2019

Filed under
Linux

In the search for the best Raspberry Pi alternatives, we often forget that the original Pi-SBC is arguably one of the most versatile pieces of hardware. The Raspberry Pi 3 B+ stays true to its $35 price tag and offers unmatched adaptability. However, most of us like having options.

It is one of the reasons why Raspberry Pi alternatives are selling like hot cakes on the market. Although these boards are inspired by the Raspberry Pi SBC, they’re far more powerful and diverse in their functionality. For example, some Raspberry Pi alternatives like the LattePanda Alpha 864s allow users to connect with an external GPU in the small SBC.

Read more

KDE neon 5.16 Out

Filed under
KDE

KDE neon 5.16 is out featuring Plasma 5.16. Download the ISO now or upgrade your installs.

With Diversity in mind this edition features an Ice Cold themed wallpaper to make those in the southern hemisphere feel included.

Read more

Games: Steam, Police Stories, Commandos 2 HD Remaster and Rocket League

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam is Getting a Major Redesign and This is What it Looks Like

    A massive redesign of the desktop Steam client is on the way — and newly leaked screenshots give us an early glimpse of how it’ll look.

    The SteamDB Twitter account reports: “A work in progress version of the new Steam client interface leaked through an update to the Chinese CSGO launcher.”

    March brought word that Valve was prepping a fresh coat of paint for its hugely Steam desktop client. Now, a few months on, we can take closer look at the planned changes thanks to a recent leak.

    Naturally SteamDB couldn’t resist sharing some screenshots of the Steam redesign as it currently stands.

  • Police Stories has some good-looking top-down tactical action, releasing September

    Even more news out of E3 as Police Stories, a top-down shooter with an emphasis on tactics and not just firing-first is going to release on September 19th with a new trailer. It's confirmed to be coming to Linux, it has Linux system requirements up and ready and the publishers website also very clearly lists it!

    Their slightly different take on the top-down shooter genre has me quite excited, with you being able to fire-off warning shots and get criminals to surrender which looks pretty great. They say your actions are scored in real-time, so being overly aggressive might result in you not getting a good enough score for the next mission so they really do want you to be a little more careful.

  • Commandos 2 HD Remaster announced, Kalypso Media bringing it to Linux

    Here's an exciting one for you, Kalypso Media have today announced the Commandos 2 HD Remaster and it's coming to Linux. After acquiring the rights to Pyro Studios’ franchises in 2018, Kalypso Media is starting their E3 with a bit of a bang.

    The Commandos 2 HD Remaster is being developed by Yippee Entertainment, with Kalypso Media publishing and they've confirmed right away it will support Linux! They also announced a Praetorians HD Remaster although that will not have Linux support, which is being done by a different developer.

  • Rocket League's Radical Summer event and limited-time Ghost Hunt mode is live, here's a look at it

    Psyonix have put up their latest in-game event for Rocket League, with the Radical Summer event now live. They also have a new limited-time Ghost Hunt mode and a Ghostbusters Ecto-1 Car Pack DLC. Let's take a look at it all!

    As a reminder, the Radical Summer event will be lasting a whole nine weeks, with this first Blockbusters phase that lasts until July 1st. During the event, you will be able to earn Cassettes which you then redeem for special items. Through each three-week phase of the event, the items you can redeem will change. However, all the items will appear together at the end of the event to allow you to get as many as you want with your Cassettes.

i.MX8M COM and carrier support NVMe

Filed under
Linux

MYIR’s -30 to 80°C tolerant “MYC-JX8MX CPU Module” runs Linux on a quad -A53 i.MX8M with 1GB or 2GB LPDDR4 and 8GB eMMC. A “MYD-JX8MX” dev board adds 5x USB 3.0 plus mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 for NVMe.

MYIR, which has spun several embedded modules and SBCs with NXP’s low-power, Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UL and i.MX6 ULL, such as its MYC-Y6ULX module and MYD-Y6ULX-HMI dev board, has launched its first board based on one of NXP’s much more powerful i.MX8 processors. The 82 x 52mm, $99 and up MYC-JX8MX CPU Module features the i.MX8M and connects via a 314-pin MXM 3.0 edge finger to a $279 and up MYD-JX8MX dev board. The -30 to 80°C ready product is aimed at applications including scanning/imaging, building automation and smart home, HMI, and machine vision.

Read more

Stable kernels 5.1.9, 4.19.50, 4.14.125, 4.9.181, and 4.4.181

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1.9

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.9 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.50
  • Linux 4.14.125
  • Linux 4.9.181
  • Linux 4.4.181

Deluge BitTorrent Client 2.0

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Deluge BitTorrent Client 2.0 Released With Sequential Downloads, Now Uses Python3 And Gtk3

    Deluge BitTorrent client has reached version 2.0 stable recently, after more than 2 years since the previous stable release. The new stable Deluge version comes with major changes, including code ported to Python 3, Gtk UI ported to Gtk 2, sequential downloads support, a new logo, and much more.

    Deluge is a free and open source BitTorrent client that runs on Linux, Windows, macOS and *BSD. It's written in Python, and it includes a text console, a web interface, and a graphical desktop interface that uses Gtk.

  • Deluge 2.0.0 Major version is Released after continuous development of 2 Years and 5 Months

    The Deluge development team is proudly announced the new major version release of Deluge 2.0.0 on 06 June, 2019.

    In the following days (Deluge 2.0.1 on 07 June, 2019 & Deluge 2.0.2 on 08 June, 2019), they had been released the minor version of Deluge in the same branch to fix some of the issue, which have reported by users.

  • Welcome to the Deluge BitTorrent Project

    Latest Deluge release 2.0.2 available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows.

I Finally Have a Dedicated Linux Laptop Again (But You Won’t Be Jealous)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Prior to now I’d been making do with a co-opted Acer Chromebook R11 as my go-to Linux portable. While that machine is perfect for travelling (and boasts a great screen) let’s just say the modern Ubuntu desktop isn’t a comfortable fit with just 2GB RAM!

And prior to that it was a succession of low-power, low-end netbooks — that’s how long it’s been!

Now, not being rich (a recurring theme) my budget for a new Linux laptop was a modest £400 max. That put the sort of Linux laptops I regularly write about — Slimbook, Entroware, StationX, Dell, et al — out of my reach.

Sob.

But thankfully all the major laptop makers offer a range of mid-level Windows 10 notebooks that were in my grasp.

Budget aside, my main requirements were thus: it had to be new; 12-14-inch screen; a minimum of 8GB RAM; and a processor that, ideally, wasn’t a Celeron.

Read more

Also: Bug Report Update: Linux Apps Working In Dev Channel Again

Open Source Music Creation Tool ‘LMMS’ Scores Its First Update in 4 Years

Filed under
Software

Once pitched as a free Fruityloops (now FL Studio) clone, LMMS has matured into a brilliant beat maker (okay, digital audio workstation) in its own right.

The app boasts an easy-to-use interface, lots of tools, and plenty of advanced features, including support for VST instruments.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Whiskey Lake-U based UP Xtreme SBC starts at $282

    On Kickstarter: Aaeon has launched its $282 and up, Whiskey Lake-U based “UP Xtreme” SBC With up to 16GB RAM, 2x GbE with TSN, 4x USB 3.1, SATA, HDMI, DP, and expansion via M.2, mini-PCIe, and 40- and 100-pin connectors.

    Aaeon has gone to Kickstarter to launch the world’s fastest community-backed hacker board. Running Ubuntu or Yocto Linux, Android, or Windows 10 on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake U-series Core processors, the UP Xtreme is very close to the prototype detailed back in March. Additions include new USB 3.1 and TSN support and a new Celeron 4305U equipped model that enables a lower than expected entry price of $282 (249 Euros) with 4GB RAM.

  • [Older] Free OS to power computers in schools

     

    The Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education (KITE) has rolled out the new version named “IT@School GNU/ Linux 18.04”. Based on the Ubuntu OS LTS edition, the system features several free applications customised as per the State school curriculum.

     

    [...]

     

    Apart from the financial savings, the biggest advantage of the Free OS is its ability to be modified and shared.  

  • [Older] Making physics lab work easier

     

    The use of open source software in ExpEYES enables modifications in the source code for new experiments that would be added to the list. The recently rolled out IT@School GNU/ Linux 18.04 operating system by KITE has incorporated the ExpEYES applications.

  •  

Audiocasts/Shows: Texas Linux Fest, This Week in Linux, Full Circle Weekly News and More

Filed under
Interviews
  • Mic And Coke | The Friday Stream 6

    The funniest 17 seconds from Texas Linux Fest and we learn some remarkable things about our crew’s past.

  • Episode 69 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have a LOT of new releases to talk about from applications to distros and even some hardware news. GParted has finally reached the 1.0 milestone, Krita 4.2 & Zorin OS 15 were released this week, and some Security News was released regarding the HiddenWasp Malware so we’ll talk about all of that. In Hardware news, AMD announced their new Ryzen 3000 series CPU and we also got some product updates from System76 & Dell. In Window Manager News, we got some updates from HerbsluftWM and IceWM. Later in the show, we’ll discuss some Linux Gaming News as Google announces news for Google Stadia, Unity Tech announces that the Unity Editor is now available for Linux and we’ll take a look at an open source handheld console called the PyGamer. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #134
  • ZEEEE Shell! | Coder Radio 361

    Apple is shaking up the foundations of UI development with SwiftUI and raising developer eyebrows with a new default shell on MacOS.

    Plus feedback with a FOSS dilemma and an update on our 7 languages challenge.

  • Podcast interviews where I talk about Python's governance

    Over the past two months I have given two podcast interviews where I talk about how we handled Guido's retirement, chose our new governance model, and what being on the inaugural steering council has been like.

    Now that I have "talked it out" at least twice I don't plan to blog about this topic until something more substantial happens with the steering council. Because of this decision I figured it was worth linking to the interviews in case anyone was waiting for me to write a post on Python's governance.

KDE and GNOME: Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo, KDE GSoC Projects, Kate & C++ Developer Survey and Sumaid Syed's GSoC Work on GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo

    With the completion of my first milestone for my GSoC project: Nextcloud Integration on Plasma Mobile, plasma mobile accounts settings now enables the users to add their nextcloud accounts via webview.

    Well! didn’t accounts setting already provide the method to add nextcloud/owncloud accounts? Yes, this functionality was already implemented by the owncloud plugin in kaccounts-providers project. Then, why did I re-implement the same thing?

    As I mentioned, now accounts can be added via webview.

  • First week of GSOC, Piece Table Implement

    Hi! Last week was start of the GSOC coding period. So I started my project. Also I opened my code on the KDE git. https://cgit.kde.org/scratch/songeon/kmarkdownparser.git/

    If you are interested in my project feel free to look and give me some advices.

  • KIOFuse: 32-bit Support

    The first two weeks of the GSoC coding period are now over.

    Firstly, a mapping between KIO errors and FUSE errors has now been established. Previously all KIO Job errors were simply sent back to FUSE as EIO, which isn’t entirely accurate. The mapping now provides more accurate error replies.

    A major new addition is 32-bit support. KIOFuse did not compile on 32-bit but these compilation errors have now been alleviated. They mostly stemmed from the fact that size_t has a different size on different architectures, and that file sizes should always be represented as off_t anyway.

  • Kate & C++ Developer Survey

    While browsing the ISO C++ homepage I stumbled over the results PDF of the Second Annual C++ Foundation Developer Survey “Lite”.

    I was astonished that Kate made it into the “Which development environments (IDEs) or editors do you use for C++ development?” results.

    ;=) Seems not only I use it as my normal editor for working on C++ code.

  • Sumaid Syed: First Two Weeks

    Jean Felder ( My mentor for GSoC project) and Marinus Schraal (GNOME Music Maintainer) suggested that I propose a plan of the whole project. Now trust me! This is the much more difficult than actual coding!
    I usually work on my personal projects and start working from scratch, but here the project involves so many different libraries, so I really struggled with making a plan with a proper timeline.

  • What is my Project?

    In this case, all we need to do is extract those mbids and store them in tracker. Tracker is a file indexing and search framework, which GNOME Music relies on. Hence it’s necessary to extract and index mbids in tracker from file.

Ubuntu: Design, GNOME, 'Fridge' and Zorin OS 15 Installation Guide with Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Design Team: Design and Web team summary – 10 June 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical.  Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS With Latest GNOME Update Now Plays Nicely For 120~144Hz Displays

    For those running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the default GNOME Shell desktop experience, the latest stable release update of Mutter now fixes the support for running on high refresh rate (above 60Hz) displays. 

    Ubuntu 18.04's GNOME desktop had been capped to running at 60Hz. The non-60Hz support had been fixed upstreamed but only as of this past week was patched for GNOME 3.28 used by the Bionic Beaver.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 582
  • Step by Step Zorin OS 15 Installation Guide with Screenshots

    Good News for all the Zorin users out there! Zorin has launched its latest version (Zorin OS 15) of its Ubuntu based Linux distro. This version is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, since its launch in July 2009, it is estimated that this popular distribution has reached more than 17 million downloads. Zorin is renowned for creating a distribution for beginner level users and the all new Zorin OS 15 comes packed with a lot of goodies that surely will make Zorin OS lovers happy. Let’s see some of the major enhancements made in the latest version.

Mozilla: Firefox Desktop Telemetry, NN at the Federal Communications Commission and These Weeks in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Data Science is Hard: Validating Data for Glean

    Glean is a new library for collecting data in Mozilla products. It’s been shipping in Firefox Preview for a little while and I’d like to take a minute to talk about how I validated that it sends what we think it’s sending.

    Validating new data collections in an existing system like Firefox Desktop Telemetry is a game of comparing against things we already know. We know that some percentage of data we receive is just garbage: bad dates, malformed records, attempts at buffer overflows and SQL injection. If the amount of garbage in the new collection is within the same overall amount of garbage we see normally, we count it as “good enough” and move on.

    [...]

    At this point, aside from the “metrics” ping which is awaiting validation after some fixes reach saturation in the population, Glean has passed all of these criteria acceptably. It still has a bit of a duplicate ping problem, but its clock skew and latency are much lower than Firefox Desktop’s. There are some outrageous clients sending dozens of pings over a period that they should be sending a handful, but that might just be a test client whose values will disappear into the noise when the user population grows.

  • It’s time for the US Senate to Save the Net

    On the one year anniversary of the Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of net neutrality, Mozilla is joining millions of people across the internet to once again stand up to protect the open internet.

    When the FCC gutted net neutrality protections last year, we filed our lawsuit because we believed that repeal was unlawful. We also believed taking on the FCC was the right thing to do for the future of the internet and everyone who uses it.

    Until the Senate listens to the American people and protects the open Internet, Mozilla v. FCC continues to be net neutrality’s best hope.

    But it’s time our Senators do what they were elected to do – represent their constituents, and pass net neutrality legislation that has overwhelming support and protects Americans. With a victory in the courts, or bipartisan legislation, we can ensure that people – and not big cable and telephone companies – get to choose what they see and do online.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 59
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More in Tux Machines

The best, until OpenMandriva does better: released OMLx 4.0

Exciting news! Shortly after the release candidate we are very proud to introduce you the fruit of so much work, some visible and much more behind the scenes and under the hood. OpenMandriva Lx is a cutting edge distribution compiled with LLVM/clang, combined with the high level of optimisation used for both code and linking (by enabling LTO, and profile guided optimizations for some key packages where reliable profile data is easy to generate) used in its building. OMLx 4.0 brings a number of major changes since 3.x release... Read more Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Released With AMD Zen Optimized Option, Toolchain Updates

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)
    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented. Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that. However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.
  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek
    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.
  • Load-Bearing Internet People
    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.
  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture
    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this. In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find. Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations. The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.

OSS Leftovers

  • Letter of Recommendation: Bug Fixes
    I wouldn’t expect a nonprogrammer to understand the above, but you can intuit some of what’s going on: that we don’t need ImageMagick to scale images anymore, because the text editor can scale images on its own; that it’s bad form to spell-check hex values, which specify colors; that the bell is doing something peculiar if someone holds down the alt key; and so forth. But there’s also something larger, more gladdening, about reading bug fixes. My text editor, Emacs, is a free software project with a history going back more than 40 years; the codebase itself starts in the 1980s, and as I write this there are 136,586 different commits that get you from then to now. More than 600 contributors have worked on it. I find those numbers magical: A huge, complex system that edits all kinds of files started from nothing and then, with nearly 140,000 documented human actions, arrived at its current state. It has leaders but no owner, and it will move along the path in which people take it. It’s the ship of Theseus in code form. I’ve probably used Emacs every day for more than two decades. It has changed me, too. It will outlive me. Open source is a movement, and even the charitably inclined would call it an extreme brofest. So there’s drama. People fight it out in comments, over everything from semicolons to codes of conduct. But in the end, the software works or it doesn’t. Politics, our personal health, our careers or lives in general — these do not provide a narrative of unalloyed progress. But software, dammit, can and does. It’s a pleasure to watch the code change and improve, and it’s also fascinating to see big companies, paid programmers and volunteers learning to work together (the Defense Department is way into open source) to make those changes and improvements. I read the change logs, and I think: Humans can do things.
  • The Top 17 Free and Open Source Network Monitoring Tools
    Choosing the right network monitoring solution for your enterprise is not easy.
  • Hedge-fund managers are overwhelmed by data, and they're turning to an unlikely source: random people on the internet
    Alternative data streams of satellite images and cellphone-location data are where managers are now digging for alpha, as new datasets are created every day. And hedge funds have been spending serious cash searching for those who can take all this information and quickly find the important pieces. Now, as margins shrink and returns are under the microscope, hedge funds are beginning to consider a cheaper, potentially more efficient way to crunch all this data: open-source platforms, where hundreds of thousands of people ranging from finance professionals to students, scientists, and developers worldwide scour datasets — and don't get paid unless they find something that a fund finds useful.
  • TD Ameritrade Is Taking Its First Steps Towards Major Open Source Contributions
    STUMPY is a python library to identify the patterns and anomalies in time series data. STUMPY has benefited from open source as a means to shorten development roadmaps since the early 2000s and it represents a new opportunity for TD Ameritrade to give back to the developer community.
  • The Future of Open Source Big Data Platforms
    Three well-funded startups – Cloudera Inc., Hortonworks Inc., and MapR Technologies Inc. — emerged a decade ago to commercialize products and services in the open-source ecosystem around Hadoop, a popular software framework for processing huge amounts of data. The hype peaked in early 2014 when Cloudera raised a massive $900 million funding round, valuing it at $4.1 billion.
  • No Easy Way Forward For Commercial Open Source Software Vendors
    While still a student in 1995, Kimball developed the first version of GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) as a class project, along with Peter Mattis. Later on as a Google engineer, he worked on a new version of the Google File System, and the Google Servlet Engine. In 2012, Kimball, Mattis, and Brian McGinnis launched the company Viewfinder, later selling it to Square.
  • 6 Reasons Why Developers Should Contribute More To Open Source
    Even by fixing minor things like a bug in a library or writing a piece of documentation can also help the developers to write readable or maintainable code. They can independently suggest to the community and generally tend to stick by the rules of writing a code that is easy to understand. The fact that the code will be exposed to everyone naturally makes them write focus on making it readable.
  • WIDE Project, KDDI develop router with open-source software, 3.2T-packet transmission
    The WIDE Project has adopted a router developed by Japanese operator KDDI. The router runs open-source software, and will be used with the networks operated and managed by the WIDE Project. The router will use open-source software with up to 3.2T-packet transmission. For this project, KDDI plans to start tests this month to verify the practical utility and interoperability of these routers when put to use in the actual service environment. The WIDE Project will be in charge of network administration and definition of requirements for router implementation.
  • Lack of progress in open source adoption hindering global custody’s digitisation
    Custody industry is lagging behind the rest of the financial services sector for open source projects, according to industry experts.
  • TNF: Industry should be focusing on open source development
    According to O'Shea, open source and the community are helping firms to find and attract experienced technology talent “uber engineers”.
  • Google Open Sources TensorNetwork , A Library For Faster ML And Physics Tasks
    “Every evolving intelligence will eventually encounter certain very special ideas – e.g., about arithmetic, causal reasoning and economics–because these particular ideas are very much simpler than other ideas with similar uses,” said the AI maverick Marvin Minsky four decades ago. Mathematics as a tool to interpret nature’s most confounding problems from molecular biology to quantum mechanics has so far been successful. Though there aren’t any complete answers to these problems, the techniques within domain help throw some light on the obscure corners of reality.
  • Open source to become a ‘best practice’
    There are many magic rings in this world… and none of them should be used lightly. This is true. It is also true that organisations in every vertical are now having to work hard and find automation streams that they can digitise (on the road to *yawn* digital transformation, obviously) and start to apply AI and machine learning to. Another key truth lies in the amount of codified best practices that organisations now have the opportunity to lay down. One we can denote a particular set of workflows in a particular department (or team, or group, or any other collective) to be deemed to be as efficient as possible, then we can lay that process down as a best practice.
  • 10 Open-Source and Free CAD Software You Can Download Right Now
    Many CAD software products exist today for anyone interested in 2D or 3D designing. From browser tools to open-source programs, the market is full of free options available for hobbyists or small companies just starting out.