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Saturday, 16 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus, Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle

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Gaming
  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 now available

    Unreal Engine 4.22 will be releasing soon with a number of fixes and updates. In the meantime, the first Preview is now available for download from the Epic Games launcher.

    Preview 1 includes support for real-time ray tracing, Editor Utility Widgets, Blueprint indexing optimizations, virtual production updates, Oculus Quest support and the Unreal Audio Engine is now on by default for new projects.

    A full list of the upcoming changes to this build are available on the Unreal Engine forums. We invite you to provide feedback on Preview 1, and all subsequent releases. Please keep in mind that Preview releases are intended only to provide a sample of what is going to be released in the update and are not production-ready.

  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Released With Real-Time Ray-Tracing

    Unreal Engine 4.21 back in November was a big update for Linux gamers in that this game engine now defaults to the Vulkan renderer and also had various other fixes. With today's Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 release, there are no Linux/Vulkan-specific changes mentioned, but some other interesting changes in general.

    The release notes as of Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 don't indicate any Vulkan or Linux focused changes, but aside from that there is some interesting changes. Arguably most interesting is having experimental support for real-time ray-tracing and path tracing though sadly that's limited for now to Direct3D 12 with DXR and not yet any Vulkan ray-tracing support.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus officially released for Linux, more content on the way

    Bulwark Studios and Kasedo Games have officially released Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus for Linux after having a 'soft launch' in December last year.

  • The Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle is out with some sweet Linux games

    It's almost midweek, time to refresh that gaming collection of yours with The Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle that has some Linux games available.

Security: Apple, 'Cloud', Containers and More FUD

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Security

Chrome OS 72

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS 72 brings improved support for Android, Linux apps and more

    Chrome OS 72 is starting to roll out to users with a wealth of changes, including a tablet mode, improvements for Android apps and plenty more.

    For one, Chrome OS 72 brings native Google Assistant and Android Pie to more Chromebooks. Those features initially came with Chrome OS 71 but were limited to the Pixel Slate.

    Speaking of the Slate, it and Chromebooks like it now have access to a tablet mode that should improve usability.

  • Google Outs Chrome OS 72 with Android Improvements, Picture in Picture Support

    Google promoted the Chrome OS 72 operating system to the stable channel, a release that introduces several improvements to make your Chromebook experience better, more secure, and enjoyable.
    The Chrome OS 72 release introduces numerous improvements, especially for dealing with Android files. Among these, we can mention external storage access support for Android apps via /storage dir and MediaStore APIs, and the ability to search app shortcuts for Android apps in the Launcher.

    To find an app shortcut, you need to right-click or long-press on an Android app. Chrome OS 72 also introduces Picture in Picture (PiP) support and touchscreen support in tablet mode for the Chrome web browser, and the ability to view saved Google Drive through from Backup and Sync in the Files app under My Drive/Computers.

Software: Top 10 Best Linux Media Server Software, Skrooge 2.18.0 and the Money Questions

Filed under
Software
  • Top 10 Best Linux Media Server Software

    Did someone tell you that Linux is just for programmers? That is so wrong! You have got a lot of great tools for digital artists, writers and musicians.

    We have covered such tools in the past. Today it’s going to be slightly different. Instead of creating new digital content, let’s talk about consuming it.

    You have probably heard of media servers? Basically these software (and sometimes gadgets) allow you to view your local or cloud media (music, videos etc) in an intuitive interface. You can even use it to stream the content to other devices on your network. Sort of your personal Netflix.

  • Skrooge 2.18.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.18.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • Paying money for things

    Sometimes it’s hard to make money from software. How do you make money from something that can be copied infinitely?

    Right now there are 3 software tools that I pay for. Each one is supplied by a small company, and each one charges a monthly or annual fee. I prefer software with this business model because it creates an incentive for careful, ongoing maintenance and improvement. The alternative (pay a large fee, once) encourages a model that is more like “add many new features, sell the new version and then move onto something else”.

  • Here's why investors are throwing money at startups that give away their software for free

    OSS Capital founder Joseph Jacks, whose venture capital firm focuses on open source startups, reckons that there was roughly $70 billion in mergers and acquisitions, private equity and IPOs involving open source last year. And he estimates that there's been another $2 billion in funding for commercial open source startups in the past year, as startups like Confluent, Neo4j, HashiCorp and GitLab raised money.

Latest Kernel Changes/Additions

Filed under
Linux
  • Radeon VII (Vega 20) Firmware Support Lands In Linux-Firmware.Git

    In addition to needing a recent version of the Linux kernel and Mesa (ideally, Linux 5.0 and Mesa 19.0 if enjoying the very best performance and features) for using a Radeon VII graphics card on Linux, you also need to have the necessary firmware binaries manually installed if not using the Radeon Software for Linux driver package. Those firmware bits are now in the linux-firmware.git repository.

  • Queued Linux Patches To Better Track AVX-512, Allowing For More Optimal Task Placement

    After going through several rounds of patch review in recent months, a patch series providing for tracking AVX-512 usage of tasks and exporting it to user-space is poised to be part of the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel.

    As using complex AVX-512 operations can lead to lower turbo frequencies for those cores, the Linux kernel will be providing better tracking of AVX-512 usage of tasks that is readable by user-space for programs doing their own task placement. If keeping AVX-512 usage to particular core(s) and not intermixing them with non-AVX tasks, better performance can be achievable due to the differing turbo frequencies of CPUs when running Advanced Vector Extensions.

  • Qualcomm FastRPC Driver Going Mainline For Offloading Tasks To The DSP

    The latest Qualcomm driver working its way to the mainline Linux kernel is the FastRPC driver and should arrive with Linux 5.1.

    FastRPC is an in-kernel IPC mechanism for clients to make remote method invocations across DSP/APPS boundaries. The intent of Qualcomm FastRPC is allowing tasks to be easily offloading to the DSP hardware, such as easily punting work from the Snapdragon processor to the Qualcomm Hexagon on capable SoCs.

  • PulseAudio Plugin Allows For Better Bluetooth Audio Quality On Linux

    Right now on most Linux distributions when using higher-end Bluetooth headphones, the low-end SBC audio codec ends up being utilized by default which is subpar for the potential audio quality of the more expensive headphones. Fortunately, there are PulseAudio modules that allow for the higher-end codecs to be used. 

    The low-complexity sub-band codec "SBC" is what ends up being used by default as it's native to Bluetooth and not proprietary or encumbered by patents. But newer headphones on the premium end of the spectrum also support LDAC, AptX-HD, and others with higher bit-rates yielding better audio quality.

Red Hat's OpenShift 4.0 and CloudForms 4.7

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Red Hat
  • The Modern Software Platform

    This is the first post in an ongoing series which will explore the changes, improvements, and additions we’re planning for the next big release of Red Hat OpenShift, version 4.0. Check in each week for more information that will prepare you for the shift to 4.0.

    From the time the fledgling Kubernetes community met at the Google office in Seattle for our first face-to-face meeting in the fall of 2014, I’ve believed that Kubernetes was a project that would transform how we build and run software. Over the last few years, we’ve seen countless others come around to that point of view (most enthusiastically, some grudgingly). At the same time, the public cloud providers have continued the massive investments in infrastructure and services that make IT and software easier, simpler, and available at a scale that few people anticipated when the decade began.

  • Red Hat CloudForms 4.7 released

    There's an old, wise IT statement: "Never fix what's broken." Of course, there's an equally true tech management thought, which goes: "You snooze, you lose." So, trying to satisfy both the tortoises and hares of IT, Red Hat's newest version of its old-school CloudForms management tool comes ready to integrate with Red Hat's DevOps program of choice: Ansible Tower.

Security: Class Action Against Apple, Massive Data Dumps, More on CVE-2019-5736

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Security
  • Apple sued because two-factor authentication is inconvenient

    Class-action lawsuit, filed by one Jay Brodsky in California takes issue with the fact that two-factor authentication (2FA) can't be disabled after two weeks of use, which "imposes an extraneous logging in procedure that requires a user to both remember password; and have access to a trusted device or trusted phone number." Yep, that's 2FA alright.

  • Apple being sued because two-factor authentication on an iPhone or Mac takes too much time

    The suit, filed by Jay Brodsky in California alleges that Apple doesn't get user consent to enable two-factor authentication. Furthermore, once enabled, two-factor authentication "imposes an extraneous logging in procedure that requires a user to both remember password; and have access to a trusted device or trusted phone number" when a device is enabled.

  • 617M Hacked Accounts Up For Sale To Make “Life Easier” For Hackers

    A hacker is selling 617 million stolen accounts online collected from 16 popular websites on Dream Market Cybersouk which can be accessed on the Tor network.

    As reported by The Register, the data can be purchased for less than $20,000 Bitcoin and comprises of account holder names, passwords, and email IDs. Buyers need to crack the hashed, one-way encrypted passwords before using them.

  • 620 million accounts stolen from 16 hacked websites now for sale on dark web, seller boasts

    Some 617 million online account details stolen from 16 hacked websites are on sale from today on the dark web, according to the data trove's seller.

    For less than $20,000 in Bitcoin, it is claimed, the following pilfered account databases can be purchased from the Dream Market cyber-souk, located in the Tor network:

    Dubsmash (162 million), MyFitnessPal (151 million), MyHeritage (92 million), ShareThis (41 million), HauteLook (28 million), Animoto (25 million), EyeEm (22 million), 8fit (20 million), Whitepages (18 million), Fotolog (16 million), 500px (15 million), Armor Games (11 million), BookMate (8 million), CoffeeMeetsBagel (6 million), Artsy (1 million), and DataCamp (700,000).

    Sample account records from the multi-gigabyte databases seen by The Register appear to be legit: they consist mainly of account holder names, email addresses, and passwords. These passwords are hashed, or one-way encrypted, and must therefore be cracked before they can be used.

  • Researchers Warn of Malicious Container Escape Vulnerability

    A new serious vulnerability in container technology was publicly reported on Feb. 11, one that could potentially enable an attacker to gain unauthorized access to the host operating system.

    Container technology led by the Docker engine has become increasingly popular in recent years as a way to build and deploy applications into isolated segments, on top of a server operating system. At the core of the modern container technology stack is a low-level component known as runc, which spawns and runs containers. The new CVE-2019-5736 vulnerability is a flaw in runc that could enable a malicious container to escape the confines of its isolated process segment.

  • PyPy v7.0.0, Vulernability Affecting runc and Container Technologies, Ubuntu for ARM-based Windows Laptops, antiX MX v18.1

    A vulnerability was just discovered (CVE-2019-5736) affecting runc and the management of container technologies which include Docker, cri-o, containerd, Kubernetes, etc. Learn more about this security hole and the ways it is being patched here.

  • Container Bug Allows Attackers to Gain Root Access on Host Machine

Programming: LibreOffice Teaches C++, IBM Explores Clang for C/C++, Python Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Google's Chrome OS "Wilco" Driver Working Towards Mainline Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

For years now Google has been designing their own embedded controller (EC) for use within Chromebooks / Chrome OS devices.

But after about five years of the "ChromeOS EC" (cros_ec), there is a new embedded controller they have been working on. Coming soon to the mainline Linux tree will be the kernel support for a new ChromeOS "Wilco" Embedded Controller.

Wilco is Google's new embedded controller wired up over an eSPI bus. The new driver doesn't yield much to get excited about, however, but great that Google continues working on their own ECs and they are backed by open-source firmware and first-rate Linux support given their Chrome OS usage.

Read more

Also: Better Bluetooth sound quality on Linux

Removing Profanity from the Source Tree

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds recently stepped away from kernel development temporarily in order to think about how to be less harsh with developers in certain situations. Simultaneous with his departure was a patch introducing a new Code of Conduct into the kernel source tree. The effects of this are beginning to be felt.

Jarkko Sakkinen recently posted a patch to change a kernel comment containing the word "fuck" to use the word "hug" instead. So the code comment, "Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds fucked it up" would become "Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds hugged it up".

Steven Rostedt replied to this, saying that the code in question had changed so much that the original comment was out of date, and it should just be removed entirely. He said, "that will be an accurate change with or without CoC."

Jonathan Corbet remarked, "I'd much rather see either deletion or a rewrite over bleeping out words that somebody might not like." And Jiri Kosina agreed, saying, "turning comments into something that often doesn't make sense to anybody at all is hardly productive."

Sergey Senozhatsky pointed out that Linus was the author of the original self-deprecating comment. He asked, "Linus has made a comment, in his own words, about his own code. Why would anyone be offended by this?"

Read more

Nautilus Exif, PDF And Audio Metadata Tag Columns Extension For Ubuntu

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GNOME
Ubuntu

These metadata tags added by the Nautilus Columns extension are not only useful for a quickly look at some particular audio, pdf or image information from the Nautilus list view, but also to sort some files by a particular metadata tag column to easily identify the files you're looking for.

Nautilus Columns is currently maintained by Spanish blogger Atareao, and it only supports English, Spanish and Galician languages.

Judging from the extension code, it's also supposed to support some video formats as well, but no information was shown for such files on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop, so it probably needs some fixes in this area. Audio, PDF and Exif metadata was displayed with no issues on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop.

Read more

Games: Million to One Hero, Barotrauma, JUMPGRID and Pygame

Filed under
Gaming
  • Fun platformer 'Million to One Hero' where you can make your own adventures is releasing soon

    Million to One Hero from Spanish developer Over the Top Games seems like a very promising platformer and they've announced the release is this month.

    We previously highlighted the game earlier this month, at that time they did not have a release date available. They've since announced that it's going to be available on Linux right at release, which will be on February 27th.

  • Barotrauma, a co-op submarine adventure set on Jupiter's moon Europa is promising, has a demo

    For those after a more sci-fi take on the co-op submarine adventure, Barotrauma seems like it could be quite fun.

    Currently in a closed-beta before an Early Access release on Steam, you can actually grab an earlier version direct from their website here. They're not taking on any more for the closed-beta, so the demo should still give a small glimpse into what's possible.

  • JUMPGRID is a fantastic 2D dodge-em-up that will give your fingers a workout

    Did you enjoy Super Hexagon? JUMPGRID is a brand new dodge-em-up with simple and addictive gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

  • Moving the player object in Pygame

    In the last chapter we have created the animation effect for the player object and in this chapter, we will move the player object in the x-axis. We will leave the wall and boundary collision detection mechanism to the next chapter. In the last chapter we have already linked up the keyboard events with the game manager class and in this chapter, we only need a slight modification to move the player across the scene when the left or the right arrow key has been pressed. One of the problems with the pygame event module is that we need to activate the repeated event detection process by our-self with this single line of code before the module can send the repeated keypress event (which means when someone is holding the same key on the keyboard) to us.

KDE Plasma 5.15 released

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE releases a new version of the Plasma desktop environment

    Say hello to Plasma 5.15, the newest version of KDE's acclaimed desktop environment.

    This February release of KDE Plasma comes with a wide range of new features and improvements. The main focus of developers has been stamping out all minor problems and papercuts of the desktop, aiming to make Plasma smoother and easier to use.

    Plasma's configuration interfaces have been redesigned, expanded and clarified to cover more user cases and make it simpler to adapt Plasma to everybody's needs. Plasma has also improved the integration of non-native applications, so Firefox, for example, can now optionally use native KDE open/save dialogs. Likewise, GTK and GNOME apps now respect the global scale factor used by high-DPI screens.

  • KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Six months in development, the KDE Plasma 5.15 desktop environment comes with a lot of changes to make your Plasma experience more enjoyable. These include various refinements to the configuration interfaces, new options for complex network configurations, redesigned icons, improved integration with third-party technologies and apps, and a much-improved Discover package manager.

    "For the first production release of 2019, the Plasma team has embraced KDE's Usability & Productivity goal and has been working on hunting down and removing all the papercuts that slow you down," reads today's announcement. "With this in mind, we teamed up with the VDG (Visual Design Group) contributors to get feedback on all the annoying problems in our software, and fixed them to ensure an intuitive and consistent workflow for your daily use."

  • KDE Plasma 5.15 Released With Wayland Improvements, Fixes To "Annoying Problems"

    The KDE community is out with their first big update to the Plasma desktop for 2019.

    Plasma 5.15 is a big update for KDE and among the many changes include:

    - Many Wayland improvements. There is support for more Wayland protocols, support for Wayland virtual desktops, and touch drag-and-drop support.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Action News 92

    A week of nasty security flaws, and a lack of patches... For some of us. Raspberry Pi opens a physical store, our thoughts on the new LibreOffice interface, and the new round of nasty flaws hitting all versions of Android.

    Plus new disk encryption coming to Linux, Intel releases their open source encoder for future video on the web, and more.

  • 2018 Open Source Yearbook: Download the PDF

    The 2018 Open Source Yearbook is the 4th annual community-contributed collection of the past year's top open source projects, people, tools, and stories.

    Submit the form below to download the free PDF to read the complete collection.

  • Community Member Monday: Khaled Hosny

    With LibreOffice 6.2 now available, we return to our regular chats with LibreOffice community members! Today we’re talking to Khaled Hosny, who is working on the software’s font handling and user interface…

Server: Kiwi TCMS, Kubernetes Operators, OpenFabrics Alliance and Linux Watch Command

Filed under
Server
  • Kiwi TCMS 6.5.3

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.5.3! This is a security, improvement and bug-fix update that includes new versions of Django, includes several database migrations and fixes several bugs. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org!

  • How to explain Kubernetes Operators in plain English
  • The State of High-Performance Fabrics: A Chat with the OpenFabrics Alliance

    The global high-performance computing (HPC) market is growing and its applications are constantly evolving. These systems rely on networks, often referred to as fabrics, to link servers together forming the communications backbone of modern HPC systems. These fabrics need to be high speed and highly scalable to efficiently run advanced computing applications. Often, there is also a requirement that the software that runs these fabrics be open source. It turns out that this description of high-performance fabrics is increasingly applicable to environments outside classical HPC, even as HPC continues to serve as the bellwether for the future of commercial and enterprise computing. Fortunately, the mission of the OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) has recently been updated to include accelerating the development of advanced fabrics and importantly to further their adoption in fields beyond traditional HPC.

  • Linux Watch Command

Laptops/Desktops: Chromebooks, MX Linux 18.1 and West of Loathing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Programming/Development: Measure, LLVM/Clang, HHVM and Android Development Courses

Filed under
Development
  • 6 lessons we learned building Measure, a contributor relationship management system

    At its core, Measure is, for lack of a better term, a contributor relationship management system. Measure consists of easy-to-understand widgets that can be arbitrarily displayed to build dashboards. It allows you to visualize and understand how people, both as individuals and as organizations, are interacting with open source projects on GitHub. It produces metrics that focus not only on code but also on contributors.

  • Asm-goto Support Added To LLVM, Helping Out Clang'ing Kernel Efforts

    LLVM has merged its support finally for supporting "asm goto" with this inline Assembly support needed for building the Linux x86/x86_64 kernel. 

    The LLVM asm-goto support was merged over the weekend while patches are pending against Clang to add the necessary bits to the C/C++ compiler front-end. 

    This satisfies a eight year old bug / feature request for handling "asm goto" by LLVM. This addition is notable since it's now one less barrier for being able to build the mainline Linux kernel off a vanilla LLVM/Clang compiler on x86_64 as an alternative to GCC. Unfortunately, some items still need to be addressed in reaching this mainline support goal.

  • Facebook Releases HHVM 4.0 With PHP No Longer Supported

    HHVM, formerly known as the HipHop Virtual Machine and what was born at Facebook as a higher-performance PHP implementation only to shift focus to running their own PHP-derived Hack programming language, has reached version 4.0 as it officially no longer supports PHP. 

    HHVM 4.0 doesn't drop support for executing PHP scripts entirely, which will likely happen in their next release when dropping the PHP tag. But in this release already they have removed functionality from PHP arrays that are not present in Hack arrays, deprecation of references, and dropping functions that inspect or alter the caller frame.

  • HHVM 4.0.0
  • 12 Best Android Development Courses
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More in Tux Machines

Fedora's Adoption of Cgroups V2 and Fedora Infrastructure Detective Work

  • Fedora 31 Planning To Use Cgroups V2 By Default
    While the Linux kernel has shipped Cgroups V2 as stable since early 2016, on Fedora and most other Linux distributions it hasn't been enabled by default over the original control groups "Cgroups" implementation. But come Fedora 31 later this year, they are now planning to make it the default. Enabling Cgroups V2 by default will allow systemd and the various Linux container technologies along with libvirt and friends to make use of the new features and improvements over the original Cgroups like offering a unified hierarchy. The new implementation also provides better consistency, purpose-driven flexibility, and other design improvements over the original control groups. It's taken a while for CGroups V2 to become the default due to interface changes compared to V1 and all of the important containers/tooling needing to be adapted to make use of it.
  • Fedora Infrastructure Detective Work: Mirrorlist 503's
    The Fedora Project Mirrorlist system has evolved multiple times in the last 10 years. Originally written by Matt Domsch it underwent an update and rewrite by Adrian Reber, et al a couple of years ago. For many years Fedora used a server layout where the front end web servers would proxy the data over VPN to dedicated mirrorlist servers. While this made sense when systems were a bit slower compared to VPN latency, it had become more troublesome over the last couple of years.

GNU FreeDink 109.6

  • GNU FreeDink 109.6
    This is the first official announcement for the new 109.x line with updated technologies (SDL2, OpenGL), WebAssembly support and many fixes and improvements.
  • GNU's RPG/Adventure Game Updated For SDL2, Defaults To OpenGL Rendering
    Of the many free software projects under the GNU umbrella, there aren't many games. One of the only titles is GNU FreeDink, which is out this weekend with its newest update after several active weeks of development.

Microsoft Now Calls Windows "Linux" (Misleading People)

Security Leftovers