Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 20 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Programming: Rust, Python, sphinxcontrib-spelling and More

Filed under
Development
  • How to generate a usable map file for Rust code - and related (f)rustrations

    Cargo does not produce a .map file, and if it does, mangling makes it very unusable. If you're searching for the TLDR, read from "How to generate a map file" on the bottom of the article.

  • Converting a Python data into a ReStructured Text table

    This probably exist but I couldn’t find it. I wanted to export a bunch of data from a Python/Django application into something a non-coder could understand. The data was not going to be a plain CSV, but a document, with various tables and explanations of what each table is. Because ReStructured Text seems to be the winning format in the Python world I decided to go with that.

  • Python Anywhere: Using MongoDB on PythonAnywhere with MongoDB Atlas

    Lots of people want to use MongoDB with PythonAnywhere; we don't have support for it built in to the system, but it's actually pretty easy to use with a database provided by MongoDB Atlas -- and as Atlas is a cloud service provided by Mongo's creators, it's probably a good option anyway Smile

    If you're experienced with MongoDB and Atlas, then our help page has all of the details you need for connecting to them from our systems.

    But if you'd just like to dip your toe in the water and find out what all of this MongoDB stuff is about, this blog post explains step-by-step how to get started so that you can try it out.

  • Toward a “Kernel Python”

    Prompted by Amber Brown’s presentation at the Python Language Summit last month, Christian Heimes has followed up on his own earlier work on slimming down the Python standard library, and created a proper Python Enhancement Proposal PEP 594 for removing obviously obsolete and unmaintained detritus from the standard library.

    PEP 594 is great news for Python, and in particular for the maintainers of its standard library, who can now address a reduced surface area. A brief trip through the PEP’s rogues gallery of modules to deprecate or remove1 is illuminating. The python standard library contains plenty of useful modules, but it also hides a veritable necropolis of code, a towering monument to obsolescence, threatening to topple over on its maintainers at any point.

    However, I believe the PEP may be approaching the problem from the wrong direction. Currently, the standard library is maintained in tandem with, and by the maintainers of, the CPython python runtime. Large portions of it are simply included in the hope that it might be useful to somebody. In the aforementioned PEP, you can see this logic at work in defense of the colorsys module: why not remove it? “The module is useful to convert CSS colors between coordinate systems. [It] does not impose maintenance overhead on core development.”

  • EuroPython: EuroPython 2019: Warning - Spoiler alert!

    The device was created and designed by Radomir Dopieralski, a long time EuroPython regular and enthusiastic Python device and robotics builder.

    The PewPew is a simplified game console, programmable with CircuitPython, a variant of MicroPython. It comes with a 64 LED display and a set of small buttons to drive the console.

    We will have one device per attendee with training or conference ticket and plan to give them out together with the badges.

  • sphinxcontrib-spelling 4.3.0

    sphinxcontrib-spelling is a spelling checker for Sphinx-based documentation. It uses PyEnchant to produce a report showing misspelled words.

  • Run-Length Encoding

Screencasts: Manjaro, Enso OS, Endless OS, Dead Cells on Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux

FreeBSD 11.3-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The first RC build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 11.3 Release Candidate Brings Different Fixes

Astra Linux-based mobile devices to get introduced in Russia

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A smartphone and two tablets based on the Astra Linux OS will be introduced in Russia, reports Vedomosti citing a joint statement put out by Mobile Inform Group, the producer of the devices, and of the Astra Linux group. The devices will be aimed at use in extreme conditions. Booking will become possible in September.

The MOG C55AL smartphone will feature a 5.5-inch screen, and the MIG T8AL and MIG T10AK tablets 8 and 10 inch screens, respectively. State institutions, the military, power, oil and gas companies, mining, industry and transport companies are expected to take up the devices.

Read more

Games: GOG Summer Sale Festival, The Expression Amrilato, Atari VCS

Filed under
Gaming
  • GOG are giving away Toonstruck during the Summer Sale Festival finale

    The GOG Summer Sale Festival is ending on Monday June 17th at 10 PM UTC, so GOG are now giving away copies of Toonstruck.

  • The Expression Amrilato, a Yuri Visual Novel that teaches some Esperanto has a same-day Linux release on GOG

    Currently stuck in release limbo on Steam, 'The Expression Amrilato' has been released on GOG today with full Linux support. Curiously, this Yuri Visual Novel will also teach you some of the Esperanto language.

    I will fully admit to being completely uncultured here, I had to google around about Esperanto for a while. I had never heard of it until I saw this game. If you didn't know either, Esperanto is an international auxiliary language, something meant to help people communicate when they don't share a common language. Well, that's what my Googling told me anyway…

  • Here’s how Atari VCS will run PC games

    Back when Atari was first describing the VCS, it tried to position it as a jack-of-all-trades console that would play retro Atari games on top of being a media player on top of also playing some PC games. Today we’re getting a better idea of how it’s going to do all of that, and a lot of its capability lies in its Sandbox Mode.

    When you boot up the VCS, Atari says that you’ll be greeted by a “color-splashed modern dashboard,” which is where you’ll access things like your apps and the Atari Store. It’s there you’ll also find a bold window in the center, which you can select to reboot the console into Sandbox Mode. With Sandbox mode, you’ll be able to run your choice of a number of operating systems via USB boot drive (Atari mentions Windows, Ubuntu, and Chrome OS specifically), allowing you to run PC games on the machine.

    With an AMD Ryzen processor and Radeon graphics at the core, along with either 4 or 8GB of RAM depending on the model you buy, it sounds like the Atari VCS will be similar in power to an entry-level gaming PC (a notion that it’s $280 price tag supports). The console supports USB and Bluetooth keyboards, mice, controllers, and “most other PC peripherals,” so you’ll don’t necessarily have to settle for playing PC titles with a gamepad if you don’t want to.

  • Can Fortnite Run on Linux?

    Can Fortnite run on Linux? It sure can!

    Valve has been trying to improve the appeal and usability of PC gaming on Linux and making big games available on the platform is one of those steps.

    It involves some tinkering to play some of the games, including Fortnite. Here's how to do it.

Best lightweight Linux distro of 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Modern Linux distros are designed to appeal to a large number of users who run modern hardware.

As a result, they have become too bloated for older machines, even if you manually delete files. Without a healthy dollop of system memory and an extra core or two, these distros may not deliver the best performance.

Thankfully, there are many lightweight distros, trimmed and tweaked by expert hands, which can be used to breathe new life into older hardware.

But there's one caveat to bear in mind when working with lightweight distros – they usually manage to support ancient kit by cutting away just about everything you take for granted, such as wizards and scripts which make everyday tasks easier.

That said, these lightweight distros are fully capable of reviving older hardware and can even function as a replacement of your current operating system, if you're willing to adjust to their way of working and install extra programs as necessary.

Read more

Regolith Linux is the i3 Ubuntu Spin You’ve Been Waiting For

Filed under
Ubuntu

Okay, okay. If you are sat there mouthing “what is i3?” at me with a confused, borderline-desperate look on your face, I’ll fill you in:

i3 is a tiling window manager created for X11 (the display manager most Linux distros use, including Ubuntu). i3 supports traditional horizontal vertical window tiling — think window snapping, but arranged and resized automatically — as well as stacking and tabbing.

The differences don’t end there, though.

Like me, you’re probably used to managing app windows with a mouse, but the i3 window manager is largely keyboard driven. The idea is that you use keyboard shortcuts to move, manage and arrange open apps and windows (though you can use a mouse too).

Read more

Give Ubuntu a Bold New Look with the Qogir Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The background imagery in the Nautilus file manager (the effect also apparently works with Nemo, but I haven’t tested it) is the most visually striking element in the Qogir theme.

It’s a love it/hate it gimmick, which explains why it’s rarely used. Personally I enjoy the visual flourish it adds (though it certainly helps if your desktop wallpaper compliments it).

Read more

Ubuntu: LXD, New Stuff and Snaps

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Development in LXD

    Most of my development is done in LXD containers. I love this for a few reasons. It takes all of my development dependencies and makes it so that they're not installed on my host system, reducing the attack surface there. It means that I can do development on any Linux that I want (or several). But it also means that I can migrate my development environment from my laptop to my desktop depending on whether I need more CPU or whether I want it to be closer to where I'm working (usually when travelling).

    When I'm traveling I use my Pagekite SSH setup on a Raspberry Pi as the SSH gateway. So when I'm at home I want to connect to the desktop directly, but when away connect through the gateway.

  • Snap Store Is Available for Ubuntu!, How to Install It?

    Snap is a software used to install software packages that can run on various Linux distributions. This time Snap Store can be installed and used like using the Software Center (on Ubuntu), or GNOME Software. This application was created specifically to make it easier for users when installing software packages on Snap.

    Actually, the Ubuntu Software Center and GNOME software can add the url of a software package and install it. But both of these applications will mix search results that are snap, flatpak and others.

  • Use Font Finder to Install Google Fonts on Ubuntu

    If you are in search of finding and using some pretty fonts for your Ubuntu desktop, applications, and web pages, Font Finder is there for your help.

  • An OpenJPEG Surprise

    My previous blog post seems to have resolved most concerns about my requests for Ubuntu stable release updates, but I again received rather a lot of criticism for the choice to make WebKit depend on OpenJPEG, even though my previous post explained clearly why there are are not any good alternatives.

    I was surprised to receive a pointer to ffmpeg, which has its own JPEG 2000 decoder that I did not know about. However, we can immediately dismiss this option due to legal problems with depending on ffmpeg. I also received a pointer to a resurrected libjasper, which is interesting, but since libjasper was removed from Ubuntu, its status is not currently better than OpenJPEG.

    But there is some good news! I have looked through Ubuntu’s security review of the OpenJPEG code and found some surprising results. Half the reported issues affect the library’s companion tools, not the library itself. And the other half of the issues affect the libmj2 library, a component of OpenJPEG that is not built by Ubuntu and not used by WebKit. So while these are real security issues that raise concerns about the quality of the OpenJPEG codebase, none of them actually affect OpenJPEG as used by WebKit. Yay!

  • Call for testing: chromium-browser deb to snap transition

    The chromium browser has been available as a deb package for all supported Ubuntu releases and as a snap since version 60, and the time has come to start transitioning away from the debs.

  • Canonical Announces Embedded Computer Manifold 2 for Drone Developers, Request For Help Testing Snap Package, PHP v7.4.0 Available, PyCharm 2019.2 EAP3 Released, Talks To Port Over Microsoft's Chromium-Based Edge browser To Linux

    Yesterday, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu announced the availability of Manifold 2, a high-performance embedded computer offered by leading enterprise drone manufacturer, DJI. This availability will allow developers access to containerized software packages (e.g. Snaps), allowing for infinite evolution and functionality changes.

    It looks as if Ubuntu is transitioning the Chromium Debian package to a Snap one. The community behind this effort is asking for assistance in testing the Snap package.

An Overview to deepin 15.10 GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For users who want to know latest deepin 15.10 before downloading it, this article is for you. In this version, deepin once again fulfills its commitment to be pretty and user friendly, as it brings a lot of new improvements in shapes and performance. Nw it introduces Auto Merge on desktop, along with new control for Sound Effects. The file manager got Advanced Search. It even got a new window manager, called dde-kwin, modified from KDE Kwin. And now it is rebased to Debian Stable instead of Unstable, for the users to get more timely security updates. I hope this short overview gives you enough information to finally try deepin 15.10.

Read more

Kernel: Linux Plumbers Conference, Wacom, ZFS On Linux and arch_status

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Open Printing Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Open Printing Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! In today’s world much is done online. But getting a hardcopy is still very much needed, even today. Then there’s the case of having a hardcopy and wanting to scan it to make it digital. All of this is needed to be functional on Linux to keep Linux-based and open source operating systems relevant. Also, with the progress in technology, the usage of modern printers and scanners is becoming simple. The driverless concept has made printing and scanning easier and gets the job done with some simple clicks without requiring the user to install any kind of driver software. The Open Printing organization has been tasked with getting this job done. This Microconference will focus on what needs to be accomplished to keep Linux and open source operating systems a leader in today’s market.

  • The Newest Wacom Intuos Pro Small Drawing Tablet To Be Supported By Linux 5.3

    Wacom's second-generation Intuos Pro Small digital drawing tablet will be supported by the upcoming Linux 5.3 kernel.

    Wacom drawing tablets continue to see improved Linux driver support and for this next cycle is support for this newest version of the Intuos Pro Small, a smaller tablet version coming in at about six inches by four inches (approximately 15 x 10 cm). While small, it still commands a premium at around $250 USD.

  • ZFS On Linux 0.8.1 Brings Many Fixes, Linux 5.2 Compatibility Bits

    Released at the end of May was the huge ZFS On Linux 0.8 release with many new features like native encryption, TRIM/discard support for SSDs, device removal, Python 3 compatibility with its tooling, pool check-points, and much more. Out today is now the first maintenance release following that big release.

  • /proc/pid/arch_status Is Coming To Show Architecture-Specific Details Of A Given Task

    To be exposed via /proc/[pid]/arch_status is a new interface for exposing architectural-specific information for a given Linux process.

    When CONFIG_PROC_PID_ARCH_STATUS is enabled, there will be this new arch_status file to expose any extra architecture specific information for a given task. At this point, it's just exposing the elapsed time since last using AVX-512.

Q4OS 3.7 Centaurus, testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are entering the final phase of the Q4OS 3 Centaurus development, so it's now officially frozen. On this occasion we have released a brand new 32bit Q4OS Centaurus installation media designed for older computers, as well as 64bit media cumulative update. Users can now easily deploy the Q4OS 3.7 testing release, if they want to become early adopters or just help with the testing. Please download 64bit, as well as 32bit iso images on the dedicated Testing releases webpage.

Please note, there is also a Q4OS for Windows installer on the downloads page available for users who want to install Linux from within Windows as easy as an application, even without need of partitioning.

Read more

Also: IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 133 ready for testing!

Enso OS Makes Xfce Elementary

Filed under
OS
Reviews

The most impressive aspect of Enso OS is the tweaked desktop that combines a somewhat modified Xfce environment with key elements from Elementary OS. The result could be a better alternative to Xubuntu, depending on your computing preferences.

For an early beta release of a relatively new Linux distribution, Enso OS has much going for it. This distro also has numerous areas where the developer must grow the infrastructure.

Enso OS is clearly a distro that bears watching over the next few releases.

Read more

Voice boards run Linux on Cortex-A35 based RK3308

Filed under
Linux

Hangzhou Wild Chip Tech has launched two open-spec “MDK3308” dev kits with 6-mic arrays that extend a Linux-driven “Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard” module running a quad -A35 Rockchip RK3308.

Over on AliExpress, there’s a new Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard module featuring a Cortex-A35 based Rockchip RK3308 SoC. The Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard sells for $23 (256MB RAM) or $26 (512MB) with 256MB NAND flash and 8GB eMMC. The module is also available in two open-spec, sandwich-style evaluation kits starting at $35.

Read more

Canonical's Linux Snap Store Adds 10 Distro-Specific Installation Pages For Every App

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snap Store -- a fairly distro-agnostic solution for easily installing a wide variety of apps -- is loaded up and ready to go in Linux distributions like Zorin OS and Ubuntu. It's also supported on dozens of others including Arch, Linux Mint, Manjaro and elementary OS, provided you install the Snapd service first. Now it looks like Canonical is striving to make the entire experience more user-friendly by serving up distro-specific landing pages for every single app in the Snap Store.

They look pretty slick, too.

For example, if you want to install something like Telegram, the Snap Store is ready to serve up a unique page, complete with an appropriately colored and logo-laden background explaining how to install both the required Snapd service and the app for the distro you're using. In the screenshot below, you'll notice commands to pull Snapd from the AUR (Arch User Repository), enable the service and then install Telegram Desktop.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Alpine 3.10.0 released

We are pleased to announce the release of Alpine Linux 3.10.0, the first in the v3.10 stable series. Read more Also: Alpine Linux 3.10 Brings Support For Intel's IWD, Better Arm Support

Open Invention Network, the Linux-based patent non-aggression community, exceeds 3,000 licensees

OIN's mission is to enable Linux, its related software, and its programmers to develop and monetize without being hogtied by patent fights. In Linux's early years, this was a constant threat. Now, thanks largely to the OIN's efforts to get everyone to agree on the basic open-source principle -- that's it's better and more profitable to share than to cling to proprietary property -- open-source software has taken off in the marketplace. The OIN isn't the first to take this concept and apply it to the Unix/Linux operating system family. After Novell bought Unix from AT&T, rather than keep fighting with Berkeley Software Design Inc. (BSDO) over possible Unix IP rights violations in BSD/OS, an early, commercial BSD Unix, Noorda famously declared that he'd rather compete in the marketplace than in court. This Unix case was settled in 1994. That was a one off. The OIN, which has grown by 50% in the last two years, has turned patent non-aggression into policy for thousands of companies. By agreeing to the OIN license, members gain access to patented inventions worth hundreds of millions of dollars while promoting a favorable environment for Linux and related open source software. Read more

today's howtos

Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE

  • What Is Razee, and Why IBM Open Sourced It
    The continuous delivery software that's been doing the heavy lifting on IBM's global Kubernetes platform is now open source.
  • View Source 5 comes to Amsterdam
    Mozilla’s View Source Conference is back for a fifth year, this time in Amsterdam, September 30 – October 1, 2019. Tickets are available now.
  • SUSE & SAP “A 20 years of Partnership”
  • SUSE on the IO500 List for HPC Storage
    If you haven’t been hanging around the Ceph world for a bit, you may not realize that Ceph was originally intended to provide a distributed file-system to service HPC clusters.  While this was the original intent, Ceph has taken a round-a-bout path to relevance in this space, especially given that we are only supporting multiple active MDS servers since the Luminous release.  The result is that we are, only now, really starting to see adoption in the HPC space, and mostly for the second tier storage needs. Enter, the science project.  Given an all-flash environment on SATA SSDS with a fast storage pool on Intel Optane for the metadata, would it be possible to provide a reasonable storage environment for HPC clusters?