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Saturday, 23 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Foundation: The Kodi Foundation and Open Networking Summit

Filed under
Linux
  • Kodi Foundation Joins The Linux Foundation to Help Grow the Open Source Movement

    The Kodi Foundation was proud to announce today that it finally decided to join The Linux Foundation in their attempt to enrich the Open Source software ecosystem.

    As of today, The Kodi Foundation, the makers of the free, open-source, and cross-platform media center software known as Kodi (formerly XBMC), is now an Associate Member of The Linux Foundation in attempt to contribute their code to the Open Source software community and help similar projects evolve.

    "It seemed natural for us to join, given the fact that we are strong believers in the benefits of open-source software. We strongly believe that open-source is the best way to achieve awesome things. That was and still is what moves Kodi forward," stated The Kodi Foundation in a press release.

  • The Kodi Foundation joined the Linux Foundation

    The Kodi Foundation is very proud to announce that it has joined the Linux Foundation as an Associate Member. It seemed natural for us to join, given the fact that we are strong believers in the benefits of open-source software.

    We strongly believe that open-source is the best way to achieve awesome things. That was and still is what moves Kodi forward. Ever since XBMP, where this project started, a small group of like-minded individuals from different backgrounds have worked together to achieve a goal, taking advantage of each other's merits and talents.

  • Community Demos at ONS to Highlight LFN Project Harmonization and More

    A little more than one year since LF Networking (LFN) came together, the project continues to demonstrate strategic growth, with Telstra coming on in November, and the umbrella project representing ~70% of the world’s mobile subscribers. Working side by side with service providers in the technical projects has been critical to ensure that work coming out of LFN is relevant and useful for meeting their requirements. A small sample of these integrations and innovations will be on display once again in the LF Networking Booth at the Open Networking Summit Event, April 3-5 in San Jose, CA.

DragonFlyBSD Looking To Pursue 64-Bit ARM Port With Code Bounty

Filed under
BSD

While NetBSD has more than a half-dozen tier-one supported architectures and dozens more of tier two ports, DragonFlyBSD has been largely centered on x86_64 since their dropping of 32-bit x86 a while ago. Arm has largely remained off their radar but there seems to be some growing interest around seeing DragonFlyBSD on AArch64.

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Games: Two Point Studios, Convoy, Gloomhaven, GOG and End of The Culling

Filed under
Gaming

SiFive Rolls Out RISC-V HiFive1 Rev B Development Platform, $49 USD With FE310-G002 SoC

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

SiFive has announced an upgraded Freedom Everywhere SoC as well as the HiFive1 Revision B developer board using this FE310-G002 SoC.

The HiFive1 Revision B isn't to be confused with their HiFive Unleashed more that retails for $999 USD and is more akin to the traditional Arm developer boards we see that offer video output and other features. The HiFive1 is a mini development board without video output and can be connected to Arduino-compatible accessories and designed for real-time embedded use-cases. But this small embedded development board is available for $49 USD.

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SUSE: More on SUSE Manager, "Independence" Media Blitz and SUSECON 2019

Filed under
SUSE
  • Managing Linux in the Cloud

    SUSE Manager extends the ideals of DevOps to the cloud environment, unlocking a world of rapid deployment and automation.

  • Where next for SUSE?

    Where next for SUSE? The company mentioned its independence no less than 12 times in a recent notice to the press. Flush with investor money, can the business finally steer its own ship to success?

  • SUSECON 2019: These Industry Kingpins Have Something to Say

    I really learned a lot at this event. The access to people who know their stuff is something I did not expect. They are really helpful!

    I loved it. It was interesting and fun. Very good to meet other people and exchange experiences.

16 Best Free Linux Medical Imaging Software

Filed under
Software

Medical imaging is an essential, non-invasive, routine activity performed by radiographers and radiologic technologists. It’s a discipline of the health profession which involves using technology to capture images of the human body.

There are a number of reasons why capturing these images are important to our well-being. First, the images help in the identification and examination of diseases, and physical injuries such as broken bones and ruptured blood vessels, as well as assisting in diagnosing suitable treatments. Medical imaging is also crucial in an educational role.

Imaging capturing devices for medical purposes use the DICOM image format. DICOM is an acronym for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine. It’s the standard open image format used to handle, store, print and transmit information in medical imaging. This article focuses on software that lets you view images generated from DICOM devices.

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Programming: Tools, Demand, Sandboxed API, OpenMP, Radicle, Python and C

Filed under
Development
  • 20 Most Useful Tools for Programmers and Developers

    Programming can be a very hectic task, especially if you are handling a complex project. Sometimes even small projects can give you a hard time. Have you ever found yourself at the verge of giving up in the middle of a project?

    There are different programming tools that can simplify the coding process and improve your levels of productivity. Here are the 20 most helpful tools for programmers.

  • 10 Programming Languages That Are In Demand Among Top Hiring Companies

    Coding continues to be one of the most in-demand skills in the job market. Many professionals are considering getting into the field. Possessing the required skills in coding can open doors to some of the highest-paying jobs. One of the main questions that professionals have before getting started is about finding out which programming language to choose and what steps to take to get into coding. The best way to get started is by first understanding which languages are presently in demand, to make this easy online learning platform Simplilearn says that it has come up with a list of ten programming languages that developers and coding enthusiasts should look out for in 2019 to upskill themselves for a bigger paycheck and to excel at their job roles.

  • Google open-sources project for sandboxing C/C++ libraries on Linux

    Google has open-sourced today a project for sandboxing C and C++ libraries running on Linux systems. The project's name is the Sandboxed API, a tool that Google has been using internally for its data centers for years.

    The Sandboxed API is now available on GitHub, together with the documentation needed to help other programmers sandbox their C and C++ libraries and protect them from malicious user input and exploits.

    For ZDNet users unfamiliar with the term, "sandboxing" refers to running an app or source code inside a "sandbox."

  • What’s new in OpenMP 5.0

    A new version of the OpenMP standard, 5.0, was released in November 2018 and brings several new constructs to the users. OpenMP is an API consisting of compiler directives and library routines for high-level parallelism in C, C++, and Fortran programs. The upcoming version of GCC adds support for some parts of this newest version of the standard.

    This article highlights some of the latest features, changes, and “gotchas” to look for in the OpenMP standard.

  • Radicle – A P2P Stack for Code Collaboration

    Not too long ago I wrote an article about Codeanywhere, a cross-platform cloud IDE that features code collaboration. I recently came across an experimental project that is bound to change collaboration workflow and it goes by the name of Radicle.

    Radicle is a free and open-source P2P stack for code collaboration designed to be offline first, cryptographically secure, and programmable. It is written in a similarly-named programming language which is a deterministic Lisp derivative designed for creating P2P software.

    Radicle aims to transform the code collaboration experience by giving programmers a platform that encourages experimentation as they shape their workflow around specific contexts or projects.

  • Plotting the average directional movement index rating line with python
  • Get only the latest live match from NBA with python
  • Django Authentication — Login, Logout and Password Change/Reset
  • Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 13 - Bitwise Operators (Basics)

7 of the Best Data Recovery Tools for Linux

Filed under
Software

Did your screen just turn black or your laptop freeze without warning? Maybe your hard drive has started chirping. Worse yet, maybe you suddenly can’t save to your home partition.

All these signs of a corrupted or failing drive can cause you to sweat, but there’s no reason to immediately throw away your computer. Keep reading to learn about six Linux tools that can help you retrieve your data and get your digital life back on track.

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Best Command Line Download Accelerators for Linux

Filed under
Software

When working remotely or even locally, you often may need to obtain content from an external source. To get such content, especially when you don’t have any other options, you will want to use command line tools to get the job done.

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Ten Years After Part III - A Storied Conclusion

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Old habits are indeed hard to break, and especially if you don't really understand the reason why those habits have to change. The idea of a software repository just didn't make sense to most of our Reglue kids at first. I cannot count the times when I went to troubleshoot a problem on a Reglue computer to find the desktop riddled with .exe files of failed installations.

What isn't really surprising is that the kids did eventually pick up the whole installation process on their Linux machines, and mostly came to prefer it. But the parents? Not so much. I wish I had recorded some of the calls I got from irate parents or guardians because they couldn't install XYZ software on the computer. It didn't take me long to make sure to make sure that Mom or Dad were present when I explained that part during the orientation. At times, I had to remind those adults that the computer and software was engineered for the benefit of the student, not as a household computer. I mean, get TurboTax on your own machine. It helped some, but still....Adults, right?

[...]

By far the most vocal complaints concerned "needed" software not being available on Linux. We might as well just call out The Terrible Two. Photoshop and Microsoft Office. Now remember, the bulk of my work was done between 2005 and 2009. I never offered any excuses for Photoshop. The Gimp isn't Photoshop, no matter how you twist or turn it and trying to tell someone who uses Photoshop scholastically or professionally that The Gimp can replace Photoshop is a fools errand. Sure it can do a lot of what Photoshop can do but it's those pesky little items that The Gimp lacks that everyone got all bunched up over.

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Linux Distribution Review: elementary os

Filed under
Reviews

In the world of Linux, there are a number of distros for various purposes. Some target the new Linux users, some target advanced users. Some of the distros are also for specific fields, for example, medical, science, and even hacking!
Today, our topic of discussion is elementary OS. For general users, elementary OS is one of the finest distros out there. It aims to be modern, fast and beautiful without sacrificing simplicity and flexibility. You’ll find a ton of similarities with both Windows and MacOS, especially from MacOS. The interface and other tweaks mimic MacOS a lot.

Currently, the latest version of elementary OS is version 5.0, codenamed Juno. It’s a BIG upgrade over the previous version Loki (version 0.4.1).

Let’s check out the current latest elementary OS and what you can expect from it. It’s easy to grab and install in your machine right now! Learn how to install elementary OS.

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How to Change Shell in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

This quick tutorial shows how to check the running shell, available shell in the system and how to change the default shell in Linux.
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NVIDIA Jetson Nano: A Feature-Packed Arm Developer Kit For $99 USD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

One of the most interesting announcements out of NVIDIA's 2019 GTC conference is the introduction of the Jetson Nano, NVIDIA's latest Arm developer board featuring a Tegra SoC. This developer board is very different from the past Jetson boards in that it's aiming for a very affordable price point: just $99 USD.

NVIDIA Jetson developer boards have historically been several hundred dollars or in the case of the latest high-performance offering, the Jetson AGX Xavier commands a $1,299 USD price. The Jetson Nano will retail for just $99 USD though obviously the performance won't match that of the AGX Xavier. The Jetson Nano Developer Kit is passively cooled but there is a 4-pin fan header on the PCB and screw holes on the aluminum heatsink if you want to mount a fan for better cooling.

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Rugged computers run Linux on Jetson TX2 and Xavier

Filed under
Linux

Aitech is offering RedHawk Linux RTOS for its rugged, compact, Jetson TX2-based A176 Cyclone and new A177 Twister systems. There’s also a similar new Jetson Xavier based A178 Thunder computer.

Aitech, which has been producing embedded Linux-driven systems for military/aerospace and rugged industrial applications since at least 2004, announced that Concurrent Real-Time’s hardened RedHawk Linux RTOS will be available on two Linux-ready embedded systems based on the Nvidia Jetson TX2 module. With Redhawk Linux standing in for the default Nvidia Linux4Tegra stack, the military-grade A176 Cyclone and recently released, industrial-focused A177 Twister systems can “enhance real-time computing for mission-critical applications,” says Aitech.

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Python 3.4.10 and Python 3.5.7 Released

Filed under
Development
  • Python 3.4.10 is now available

    Python 3.4.10 is the final release in the Python 3.4 series. As of this release, the 3.4 branch has been retired, no further changes to 3.4 will be accepted, and no new releases will be made. This is standard Python policy; Python releases get five years of support and are then retired.

  • Python 3.5.7 is now available

Open Source Doesn’t Make Money Because It Isn’t Designed To Make Money

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

We all know the story: you can’t make money on open source. Is it really true?

I’m thinking about this now because Mozilla would like to diversify its revenue in the next few years, and one constraint we have is that everything we do is open source.

There are dozens (hundreds?) of successful open source projects that have tried to become even just modest commercial enterprises, some very seriously. Results aren’t great.

I myself am trying to pitch a commercial endeavor in Mozilla right now (if writing up plans and sending them into the ether can qualify as “pitching”), and this question often comes up in feedback: can we sell something that is open source?

I have no evidence that we can (or can’t), but I will make this assertion: it’s hard to sell something that wasn’t designed to be sold.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • What OpenDSP Means to the Future

    Open source software to standardize grid-edge technology.

  • These Emulators Bring WWII Cipher Machines Like Enigma To Your PC

    Alan Turing, the popular mathematician and computer scientist, developed Bombe, a device used for cracking Enigma codes and played a major role in World War II.

    GCHQ isn’t the first to bring emulators of code-breaking devices. If CodeChef’s emulator looks tedious, you can try this web-based Enigma emulator from Summerside Makerspace or this Enigma Simulator desktop app by Terry Long.

    Do give these online emulators from WWII a try and tell us about your experience in the comments section.

  •  

  • GNU Health installer 3.4.1

    The GNU Health installer (gnuhealth-setup) has been updated to 3.4.1.

  • AWS’ contribution to Elasticsearch may only further entrench the open source vendor and cloud war

    Last week, Amazon Web Services (AWS) announced it was launching an open source value-added distribution for search and analytics engine Elasticsearch. As AWS evangelist Jeff Barr put it, the launch would “help continue to accelerate open source Elasticsearch innovation” with the company “strong believers in and supporters of open source software.”

    Yet for industry-watchers and those sympathetic to the open source space, this has been seen as the latest move in a long-running spat between the developers and software vendors on one side, and the cloud behemoths – in particular AWS – on the other. So who is right?

    Previous moves in the market have seen a lot of heat thrown in AWS’ direction for, as the open source vendors see it, taking open source code to which they have not contributed and selling software as a service around it. MongoDB, Confluent and Redis Labs were the highest profile companies who changed their licensing to counter this threat, with reactions ranging from understanding through gritted teeth to outright hostility.

  • Andes Technology Strengthens the RISC-V EasyStart Alliance to 15 ASIC Design Service Partners

    As the first public CPU IP company in Asia, specializing in low-power, high-performance 32/64-bit processor IP cores and SoC design platform, Andes Technology Corporation (TWSE:6533) created a RISC-V promotion program called the “EasyStart” in July, 2018. The goal of the RISC-V EasyStart program is to help Andes’ design service partners catch the emerging opportunity in RISC-V based SoC design and development. The expanding global alliance now has 15 members and is on the way to its target 20 members in the near future.

    The alliance in alphabetical order includes Alchip, ASIC Land, BaySand, CMSC, EE solution, INVECAS, MooreElite, PGC, SiEn (Qingdao) Semiconductor, Silex Insight, Socle , XtremeEDA and 3 unnamed partners. These companies cover foundry process technologies from 90nm to 10nm and some provide both SoC design and turn-key service. The alliance partners will use Andes qualified V5 RISC-V processor cores to provide their end customers total RISC-V design service solutions.

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