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Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Foundation on Compliance and Openwashing Examples Roy Schestowitz 1 08/12/2018 - 11:35am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 1 08/12/2018 - 10:52am
Story Programming With Python and Node.js in GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 10:26am
Story Raven: An awesome news reader Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 10:20am
Story ROE Kernel Hardening Continues To Restrict KVM VMs To Only Its Own Memory Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 10:11am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 9:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 8:59am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 8:55am
Story Play Tetris at your Linux terminal Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 8:53am
Story AMD Adding New Vega 10 & Vega 20 IDs To Their Linux Driver Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 8:24am

Take a break at the Linux command line with Nyan Cat

Filed under
Linux

We're now on day six of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar, where we explore some of the fun, entertaining, and in some cases, utterly useless toys available for your Linux terminal. All are available under an open source license.

Will they all be unique? Yes. Will they all be unique to you? I don't know, but, chances are you'll find at least one new toy to play with by the time our advent calendar is done.

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Servers: SUSE, Red Hat, Docker and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
  • Transformation: It’s Not Just for Caterpillars!
  • Red Hat: Industry 4.0 use cases will drive 5G rollout

    Industrial use cases reveal that there is money to be made from 5G but telcos must adapt their business models if they are to capitalise on this opportunity

  • Decipher Technology Studios Announces Red Hat ISV Business Partnership
  • Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux 7.5 Earns FIPS 140-2 Certification Renewal; Paul Smith Quoted

    The company said Nov. 8 the FIPS 140-2 security certification renewal serves to validate Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other products such as Ceph Storage, CloudForms and OpenStack Platform for public sector deployments.

    “Regardless of technological advances, protecting sensitive information remains a top priority for every government entity, from executive agencies to state-level organizations,” said Paul Smith, senior vice president and general manager for Red Hat’s public sector business in North America.

  • Docker CEO Continues to Grow Container Business Opportunities
  • ​CNAB: Docker and Microsoft's Cloud Native Application Bundle
  • Red Hat Shares ― Special edition: This year in open source
  • New Contributor Workshop Shanghai

    We recently completed our first New Contributor Summit in China, at the first KubeCon in China. It was very exciting to see all of the Chinese and Asian developers (plus a few folks from around the world) interested in becoming contributors. Over the course of a long day, they learned how, why, and where to contribute to Kubernetes, created a pull requests, attended a panel of current contributors, and got their CLAs signed.

    This was our second New Contributor Workshop (NCW), building on the one created and led by SIG Contributor Experience members in Copenhagen. Because of the audience, it was held in both Chinese and English, taking advantage of the superb simultranslation services the CNCF sponsored. Likewise, the NCW team included both English and Chinese-speaking members of the community: Yang Li, Xiang Peng (Peter) Zhao, Puja Abbassi, Noah Abrahams, Tim Pepper, Zach Corleissen, Sen Lu, and Josh Berkus. In addition to presenting and helping students, the bilingual members of the team translated all of the slides into Chinese. 51 students attended.

  • Minimum viable Kubernetes

    The appeal of Kubernetes is universal. Application development, operations and infrastructure teams recognise diverse reasons for its immediate utility and growing potential — a testament of Kubernetes’ empathetic design. Web apps, galvanised by the 12 factor pattern as well as microservice-structured applications find a native habitat in Kubernetes. Moreover, there is a growing list of analytics and data streaming applications, Function-as-a-Service platforms and deep/machine learning, frameworks that benefit from Kubernetes’ functionality. Add to the mix a deep desire to decouple applications from VMs, increase portability for hybrid cloud operations, and a voracious appetite from the business for continuous innovation. The intrinsic diversity of goals and expectations make the decision for the most appropriate Kubernetes solution challenging. Here, we will explore what constitutes a minimal viable Kubernetes environment from a developer and operations perspective.

Linux Plumbers Conference 2018 Coverage by LWN

Filed under
Linux
  • Bringing the Android kernel back to the mainline

    Android devices are based on the Linux kernel but, since the beginning, those devices have not run mainline kernels. The amount of out-of-tree code shipped on those devices has been seen as a problem for most of this time, and significant resources have been dedicated to reducing it. At the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference, Sandeep Patil talked about this problem and what is being done to address it. The dream of running mainline kernels on Android devices has not yet been achieved, but it may be closer than many people think.

    Android kernels, he said, start their life as a long-term stable (LTS) release from the mainline; those releases are combined with core Android-specific code to make the Android Common Kernel releases. Vendors will pick a common kernel and add a bunch more out-of-tree code to create a kernel specific to a system-on-chip (SoC) and ship that to device manufacturers. Eventually one of those SoC kernels is frozen, perhaps with yet another pile of out-of-tree code tossed in, and used as the kernel for a specific device model. It now only takes a few weeks to merge an LTS release into the Android Common Kernel, but it's still a couple of years before that kernel shows up as a device kernel. That is why Android devices are always running ancient kernels.

  • A panel discussion on the kernel's code of conduct

    There has been a great deal of discussion around the kernel project's recently adopted code of conduct (CoC), but little of that has happened in an open setting. That changed to an extent when a panel discussion was held during the Kernel Summit track at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference. Panelists Mishi Choudhary, Olof Johansson, Greg Kroah-Hartman, and Chris Mason took on a number of issues surrounding the CoC in a generally calm and informative session.

    Kroah-Hartman began by apologizing for the process by which the code was adopted. Linus Torvalds wanted something quickly, Kroah-Hartman said, so the process was rushed and a lot of political capital was burned to get the code into the kernel. He has since been trying to make up for things by talking to a lot of people; while he apologized for how things happened, he also insisted that it was necessary to take that path. The "code of conflict" that preceded the current code was also pushed into the kernel over a period of about three weeks; "we have been here before", he said.

  • The kernel developer panel at LPC

    The closing event at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) was a panel of kernel developers. The participants were Laura Abbott, Anna-Maria Gleixner, Shuah Khan, Julia Lawall, and Anna Schumaker; moderation was provided by Kate Stewart. This fast-moving discussion covered the challenges of kernel development, hardware vulnerabilities, scaling the kernel, and more.

    The initial topic was entry into kernel development, and the panelists' experience in particular. Khan, who got started around seven years ago, said that her early experience was quite positive; she named Tim Bird as a developer who gave her a lot of good advice at the beginning. Abbott started by tracking down a bug that was causing trouble internally; after getting some feedback, she was able to get that work merged into the mainline — an exciting event. Schumaker started with a relatively easy project at work. Lawall, instead, started by creating the Coccinelle project back around 2004. Her experience was initially somewhat painful, since the patches she was creating had to go through a lot of different maintainers.

    It had been a busy week at LPC, Stewart said, asking the panelists what stood out for them. Khan called out the networking track as a place where she learned a lot, but also said that the conference helped her to catch up with what is going on with the kernel as a whole, which is not an easy thing to do. She mentioned the sessions on the kernel's code of conduct and the creation of a maintainer's handbook.

  • Toward a kernel maintainer's guide

    "Who's on Team Xmas Tree?" asked Dan Williams at the beginning of his talk in the Kernel Summit track of the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference. He was referring to a rule for the ordering of local variable declarations within functions that is enforced by a minority of kernel subsystem maintainers — one of many examples of "local customs" that can surprise developers when they submit patches to subsystems where they are not accustomed to working. Documenting these varying practices is a small part of Williams's project to create a kernel maintainer's manual, but it seems to be where the effort is likely to start.

    In theory, Williams said, kernel maintenance is a straightforward task. All it takes is accumulating patches and sending a pull request or two to Linus Torvalds during the merge window. In this ideal world, subsystems are the same and there is plenty of backup to provide continuity when a maintainer takes a vacation. In the real world, though, the merge window is a stressful time for maintainers. It involves a lot of work juggling topic branches, a lot of talking to people (which is an annoying distraction), and the fact that Torvalds can instinctively smell a patch that is not yet fully cooked. Maintenance practices vary between subsystems, and there is no backup for the maintainers in many of them. It is hard for a maintainer to take a break.

  • Updates on the KernelCI project

    The kernelci.org project develops and operates a distributed testing infrastructure for the kernel. It continuously builds, boots, and tests multiple kernel trees on various types of boards. Kevin Hilman and Gustavo Padovan led a session in the Testing & Fuzzing microconference at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) to describe the project, its goals, and its future.

    KernelCI is a testing framework that is focused on actual hardware. Hilman is one of the developers of the project and he showed a picture of his shed where he has 80 different embedded boards all wired up as part of the framework. KernelCI came out of the embedded space and the Arm community; there are so many different hardware platforms, it became clear there was a need to ensure that the code being merged would actually work on all of them. Since then, it has expanded to more architectures.

  • Filesystems and case-insensitivity

    A recurring topic in filesystem-developer circles is on handling case-insensitive file names. Filesystems for other operating systems do so but, by and large, Linux filesystems do not. In the Kernel Summit track of the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), Gabriel Krisman Bertazi described his plans for making Linux filesystems encoding-aware as part of an effort to make ext4, and possibly other filesystems, interoperable with case-insensitivity in Android, Windows, and macOS.

    Case-insensitive file names for Linux have been discussed for a long time. The oldest reference he could find was from 2002, but it has come up at several Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summits (LSFMM), including in 2016 and in Krisman's presentation this year. It has languished so long without a real solution because the problem has many corner cases and it is "tricky to get it right".

Devices: Texas Instruments, Old Computer That Can be Paired With Raspberry Pi, and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • TI’s first 64-bit SoC debuts on Linux-driven Phytec module

    Phytec’s “phyCore-AM65x SOM” and dev kit runs Linux on TI’s new AM65x SoC, which combines 4x Cortex-A53 cores, a PowerVR GPU, 2x Cortex-R5F MCUs, and 6x real-time PRU chips that support up to 6x TSN capable GbE ports.

    Texas Instruments recently began sampling its first 64-bit ARMv8 SoC. The dual- or quad-core Cortex-A53 based Sitara AM65x will first appear on two TI evaluation module kits, as well as Phytec’s phyCore-AM65x SOM module and development kit, which will arrive in Q1 2019 (see farther below).

  • Yet Another Restomod Of The Greatest Computer Ever

    The current plans are to attach a modem to this SE/30, have it ring into a Raspberry Pi, and surf the web over a very slow connection. There is another option, though: You can get a WiFi adapter for the SE/30, and there’s a System 7 extension to make it work. Yes, we’re living in the future, in the past. It’s awesome.

  • Valve wants you to turn your Raspberry Pi into a makeshift Steam Link box

    Gaming giant Valve has revealed a Steam Link app that's in beta for both the Raspberry Pi 3 and Pi 3+, which can turn the microcomputer into a rough take on the Steam Link box that allows for Steam games to be streamed from a PC to a TV if the box is connected to the same network.

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With OpenVPN

Filed under
Interviews

Chromium-based Iridium and Google Chrome Version 71

Filed under
Google
Web

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If we're talking in terms of the Linux OS here, which we usually are, you're going to be able to unwrap a business server as soon as the box is delivered to your office. Ready made for your needs, available to upload whatever kind of data and security onto, a Linux operated network for your small company could just be the very thing to kickstart your operations. After all, you need to take the time to get your entire network and company policy set up, and that could be a good week or even a month out of your timeframe!

And if you've got something ready to be operated off of immediately, all of the employees you work with can set up their accounts and get to logging on with this network as soon as they're required to. It's a streamlined process that might just be invaluable to your deadline of opening up your doors for the first time.

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What’s new in Lubuntu 18.10

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Lubuntu 18.10 is the latest release of Lubuntu. this release officially uses the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) version 0.13.0 as the main desktop environment.

Lubuntu 18.10 has switched to using the Calamares system installer in place of the Ubiquity installer that other flavors use. Calamares is a universal installer framework that aims to be easy, usable, beautiful, pragmatic, inclusive, and distribution-agnostic.

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The "EXT4 Corruption Issue" Has Been Fixed In Linux 4.20, Backport Pending To 4.19

Filed under
Linux

The EXT4 file-system corruption issue on Linux 4.19 that also affected 4.20 development builds is now case closed for this pesky data corruption issue.

As outlined yesterday, this "EXT4 file-system corruption problem" was actually an issue in the BLK-MQ code within the kernel's block subsystem. That article yesterday has more background information and that problem in the multi-queue block I/O code indeed turned out to be what was causing the problem that's been happening going back to Linux 4.19-rc1 and persisting through the various Linux 4.19 point releases and also Linux 4.20 Git. Disks on Linux 4.19+ were only vulnerable if using BLK-MQ and using no I/O scheduler.

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Graphics: AMD, Vulkan and ARM

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Linux 4.20 Picks Up 6 x 4K Display Support For Vega 20, Initial RX 590 Support Fixes

    Usually this late into a current Linux kernel development cycle the DRM graphics driver fixes don't tend to be too notable, but that's certainly not the case with today's batch of AMDGPU and TTM fixes sent off to the DRM tree.

    Highlights of the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver fixes today come down to:

    - Support for being able to drive six 4K displays with the upcoming Vega 20 GPUs... Up until now Vega 20 would top out at 4 x 4K displays due to the minimum dcf clock value set, but now that's been corrected with a one line patch that will allow up to six 4K displays to function with the upcoming Radeon Instinct Vega 20 products.

  • VK_KHR_shader_float_controls and Mesa support

    Khronos Group has published two new extensions for Vulkan: VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and VK_KHR_shader_float_controls. In this post, I will talk about VK_KHR_shader_float_controls, which is the extension I have been implementing on Anvil driver, the open-source Intel Vulkan driver, as part of my job at Igalia. For information about VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and its implementation in Mesa, you can read Iago’s blogpost.

    The Vulkan Working Group has defined a new extension VK_KHR_shader_float_controls, which allows applications to query and override the implementation’s default floating point behavior for rounding modes, denormals, signed zero and infinity. From the Vulkan application developer perspective, VK_shader_float_controls defines a new structure called VkPhysicalDeviceFloatControlsPropertiesKHR where the drivers expose the supported capabilities such as the rounding modes for each floating point data type, how the denormals are expected to be handled by the hardware (either flush to zero or preserve their bits) and if the value is a signed zero, infinity and NaN, whether it will preserve their bits.

  • ARM Posts New "Komeda" Linux DRM/KMS Display Driver

    ARM developers have posted their first public patches for the new "Komeda" display driver for the Linux kernel that offers DRM/KMS integration.

    ARM's Komeda display driver is for supporting the D71 and later display processors. The Mali D71 is a big redesign to ARM's display IP that is more modularized and offers new functionality compared to their older display processors. Those unfamiliar with the D71 hardware and features but curious can learn more via community.arm.com.

Deepin Builds a Better Linux Desktop

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

Deepin 15.8, released last month, is loaded with more efficient layout tweaks that give the distribution greater functionality and maturity.

Deepin, based in China, shed its Ubuntu base when with the 2015 release of version 15, which favored Debian Linux. That brought numerous subtle changes in the code base and software roots. Ubuntu Linux itself is based on Debian.

The chief distinguishing factor that accounts for Deepin's growing popularity is its homegrown Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE). One of the more modern desktop environments, it is one of the first Linux distros to take advantage of HTML 5 technology.

Coinciding with the base affiliation change, the developers, Deepin Technology, slightly changed the distro's name. What was "Deepin Linux" is now "deepin." That subtle rebranding is an attempt to differentiate previous releases named "Deepin," "Linux Deepin" and "Hiweed GNU/Linux."

Regardless of whether the name is rendered as "deepin" or "Deepin Linux," this distro offers users an eloquent, modern-themed Linux OS. It is easy to use and comes with high-quality software developed in-house.

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today's howtos and programming

Filed under
HowTos
  • Going serverless with Chalice and AWS lambda
  • Linux Fu: Turn a Web App into a Full Program
  • How To Install and Configure Redis on Debian 9
  • Intro to Apache Kafka and Kafka Streams for Event-Driven Microservices on DevNation Live
  • Sets in Python

    In this article, we will be discussing the various operations that can be performed on sets in Python.

  • PyCharm 2018.3.1

    PyCharm 2018.3.1 is now available, with various bug fixes.

  • Create your own Telegram bot with Django on Heroku – Part 10 – Creating a view for your bot’s webhook

    This time, I will provide you with the last piece of the puzzle to make your bot available to the world. You will learn how to write and wire the Python code to actually use all that we have prepared so far. At the end of this part, your bot will be able to receive and store each message sent to it by registered users. And since it’s already more than a month since I published the previous article in this series, let’s not waste any more time and jump right in!

  • This Week in Rust 263

    This week's crate is cargo-call-stack, a cargo subcommand for whole-program call stack analysis. Thanks to Jorge Aparicio for the suggestion!

  • Blueprint for a team with a DevOps mindset

    I've had the privilege to work with some of the brightest minds and leaders in my 33 years of software engineering. I've also been fortunate to work for a manager who made me question my career daily and systematically broke down my passion—like a destructive fire sucking the oxygen out of a sealed space. It was an unnerving period, but once I broke free, I realized I had the opportunity to reflect on one of the greatest anti-patterns for effective teams.

    It should come as no surprise that the culture of an organization and its engineering teams is the greatest challenge when embarking on a DevOps mindset transformation. The organization needs to influence through leadership and autonomy, promoting a culture of learning and experimentation, where failure is an opportunity to innovate, not persecute. Fear of retribution should be frowned upon like the archaic Indian practice of Sati. Teams need to feel they are operating in a safe environment, understand what the transformation entails, and know how they will be affected.

It's Time To Say Farewell To MPX In The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

We knew MPX support was on its way out of the kernel especially after GCC dropped its compiler-side support for it. It looks now like the Memory Protection Extensions support will be removed from Linux 4.21.

Dave Hansen issued a pull request today for removing the Intel MPX support from the Linux kernel by way of the x86 staging tree.

The Memory Protection Extensions support is being dropped from the mainline kernel, as the PR states, "the benefits of keeping the feature in the tree are not worth the ongoing maintenance cost."

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Watch 'Battlefield 5' Multiplayer Running Flawlessly On A Linux Gaming Rig

Filed under
Gaming

Have you heard? Linux is aggressively on its way to becoming a first-class citizen in the gaming space, and a recent video highlighting Battlefield V gameplay on Linux drives the point home. Yep, that's an EA game, but I attribute some of this success to Valve. Earlier this year, Valve threw its resources and financial support into the Wine ecosystem, resulting in Proton. Now literally thousands (so far) of Windows-only Steam games are running on Linux, playable by simply clicking the install button in the Steam for Linux client.

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Raven: An Open Source Desktop RSS Reader

Filed under
Software
Web

Raven is a relatively new open source RSS reader app for Windows, macOS and Linux (hurrah) that I’ve been eager to try out.

This week I finally found some time to dig into this deliciously well designed desktop RSS feed reader, and in this post I’ll provide you with an overview of what it does, what it can’t do, and how I think it could be even better.

But before we go any further you may want to made aware that this open-source, cross-platform RSS reader is built using Electron.

Not fussed? Me, either, but that fact will be a deal-breaker for some.

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DragonFlyBSD 5.4 & FreeBSD 12.0 Performance Benchmarks, Comparison Against Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Coincidentally the DragonFlyBSD 5.4 release and FreeBSD 12.0 lined up to be within a few days of each other, so for an interesting round of benchmarking here is a look at DragonFlyBSD 5.4 vs. 5.2.2 and FreeBSD 12.0 vs. 11.2 on the same hardware as well as comparing those BSD operating system benchmark results against Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, Clear Linux, and CentOS 7 for some Linux baseline figures.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4 introduced NUMA optimizations, upgrading from GCC5 to GCC8 as the base compiler, HAMMER2 file-system improvements, and many other enhancements built up over the past half-year.

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A Journey on Budgie Desktop #3: Applets

Filed under
Reviews

Continuing second part, here I will discuss about Applets which can be added to Budgie Desktop. I highlight several of more than 20 applets available today: NetSpeed, Clocks, Brightness, Alt+Tab, Global Menu, Workspace Wallpapers, Weather, and Screenshot applets. If you wonder what it is, an "applet" in Budgie is the same as "extension" on GNOME or "widget" on KDE Plasma. Now, for this article I make a journey in installing them and putting them around my desktop and I have much fun. I really love to see things that I didn't see on another desktop environments before and I find many here. Who know that we can still use global menu even in Budgie, considering Unity has been dropped and Budgie itself is still new? Who know tif here is a splendid screenshot tool (with more features than built-in GNOME Screenshot) created solely for Budgie? I won't know until I tried them. I hope it will be more interesting for you this time and you can go try them now. Enjoy!

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