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Wednesday, 15 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE Full and Mini ISOS updated to 2010.11 Texstar 25/11/2010 - 2:16am
Blog entry working quake 1 srlinuxx 25/11/2010 - 1:50am
Blog entry unreal gold install srlinuxx 24/11/2010 - 3:10am
Blog entry new quake 2 install srlinuxx 23/11/2010 - 7:41am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 64-bit Texstar 19/11/2010 - 4:01pm
Blog entry GNOME 2.32.1 desktop updated for PCLinuxOS Texstar 19/11/2010 - 3:22am
Blog entry echo "Hello World" JULinux 20/09/2010 - 7:02pm
Blog entry ChromeOS in VirtualBox Texstar 09/08/2011 - 7:56am
Blog entry Spideroak. Doing Dropbox better than Dropbox.. fieldyweb 11/12/2011 - 8:39pm
Blog entry Parted Magic - The Ultimate Linux Tool fieldyweb 27/11/2011 - 7:31pm

KDE: Astronomy on KDE, MQTT/GSoC, Konversation Tip

Filed under
KDE
  • Astronomy on KDE

    I recently switched to KDE and Plasma as my main desktop environment, so I thought I'd start digging into some of the scientific software available on KDE. First up is KStars, the desktop astronomy program.

  • LabPlot's MQTT in the finish line

    Hello everyone. GSoC is coming to its end, so I think that I should give a report about what's been done since the last post, and also make a brief evaluation, summary of the project itself.

    As I've written in my last post, the main focus was on improving the quality of the code, cleaning, optimizing and properly documenting it. And also making it more comestible for other developers.

    The next step was searching for bugs and then fixing them. In order to do this properly, I implemented a unit test for the main MQTT related features. This proved to be useful since it helped discover several hidden bugs and errors which were all corrected. The main features, that tests were developed for, are: checking if a topic contains another one, checking if two topics are "common topics" (meaning they only differ at only one level, and are the same size), managing messages, subscribing&unsubscribing.

  • PSA: Use SASL in konversation

    You probably have seen that Freenode has been getting lots of spam lately.

    To protect against that some channels have activated a flag that only allows authenticated users to enter the channel.

    If you're using the regular "nickserv" authentication way as I was doing, the authentication happens in parallel to entering the channels and you'll probably be rejected from joining some.

Julia 1.0

Filed under
Development

The much anticipated 1.0 release of Julia is the culmination of nearly a decade of work to build a language for greedy programmers. JuliaCon2018 celebrated the event with a reception where the community officially set the version to 1.0.0 together.

[...]

Try Julia by downloading version 1.0 now. If you’re upgrading code from Julia 0.6 or earlier, we encourage you to first use the transitional 0.7 release, which includes deprecation warnings to help guide you through the upgrade process. Once your code is warning-free, you can change to 1.0 without any functional changes. The registered packages are in the midst of taking advantage of this stepping stone and releasing 1.0-compatible updates.

The single most significant new feature in Julia 1.0, of course, is a commitment to language API stability: code you write for Julia 1.0 will continue to work in Julia 1.1, 1.2, etc. The language is “fully baked.” The core language devs and community alike can focus on packages, tools, and new features built upon this solid foundation.

Read more

Also: Julia 1.0 Released, 2018 State of Rust Survey, Samsung Galaxy Note 9 Launches Today, Margaret Dawson of Red Hat Named Business Role Model of the Year in Women in IT Awards and Creative Commons Awarded $800,000 from Arcadia

GNOME’s Ace Retro Gaming App Just Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
GNOME
Gaming

Forget Super Smash Bros Ultimate; the best gaming related revelations this week concern the epic GNOME Games app.

The next version of this handy arcade front will let you navigate the GUI using your gamepad, browse and play MSX and Nintendo Virtual Boy games, and load your ROM library faster than a Sonic game can scream ‘SEAAAGAAA!’.

Read more

Educational Linux distribution Edubuntu has been (just about) discontinued

Filed under
Ubuntu

A few years ago the developers of Edubuntu that the Ubuntu-based operating system for teachers and students was going to skip the update to Ubuntu 16.04 and stay on Ubuntu 14.04 indefinitely. The two lead developers came to that decision after realizing that after a decade of working on the project, they didn’t have time to devote to keeping the operating system up to date.

As an open source project, the developers were hoping that someone else might be willing to step up and take over leadership of the project, but that hasn’t happened.

You can still download and use Edubuntu 14.04.5 today, but it’s based on a 4-year-old version of Ubuntu. And when Canonical pulls the plug on support for Ubuntu 14.04 in April, 2019 then the latest version of Edubuntu will also be unsupported.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Ring-KDE 3.0.0 has been released

Filed under
KDE

It has been some time. I come back from the shadows to announce the release of Ring-KDE 3.0.0, A GNU Ring.cx client. GNU Ring is a secure and distributed communication platform based on open standards. It weaves industry standard technologies to work together and provides audio calls, video conferences, chat, screen sharing and peer to peer file transfer between you and your friends. Additionally, its use of open standards allows to bridge to various other systems like the main phone network or SIP compatible devices.

When joining the GNU Ring, no servers or centralized accounts are needed. Beside an optional blockchain-based way to reserve your username against takeover, nothing leaves your device. All your data is kept under your control. Ring-KDE provides a simple wizard to help you create credentials or import your personal information from other devices.

Read more

Also: Ring-KDE 3.0 Released To Use The GNU's Distributed Communication Platform

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Operating System Support Extended Until June 30, 2019

Filed under
SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, the OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 operating system is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 and the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. Like previous openSUSE Leap 42 point releases, openSUSE Leap 42.3 was supposed to receive 18 months of support, until January 2019.

However, both the openSUSE Project and parent company SUSE decided to give users more time to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 release, which is based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 operating system series, by continuing to deliver updates to the openSUSE Leap 42.3 release, and the openSUSE Leap 42 series, for six more months.

Read more

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Will Finally Bring Automatic Updates, but Only for Flatpaks

Filed under
GNOME

One of the coolest, long-anticipated feature coming to the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment this fall is automatic updates. Yes, you're reading it right, the GNOME Project is enabling automatic software updates for you so you won't have to worry about if you're running the latest version of a software or not, but only for Flatpaks at this time.

According to Richard Hughes, the new automatic updates feature has been implemented in the GNOME Software package manager and will be available as part of the GNOME 3.30 release this fall, enabled by default only for Flatpak apps, the universal binary format for Linux-based operating systems, along with an option in preferences to disable it.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.17.14, 4.14.62, 4.9.119, 4.4.147 and 3.18.118

Filed under
Linux

GNOME Development Updates

Filed under
GNOME
  • libgepub + rust

    In 2010 I was working with evince, the gnome PDF document viewer, trying to add some accessibility to PDF files. That was really hard, not because GTK+ or ATK technology but because the PDF format itself. The PDF format is really cool for printing because you know that the piece of paper will look the same as the PDF doc, and because it's vector it scales and don't loose quality and files are smaller than image files, but almost all PDF files have not any metadata for sections, headings, tablets or so, this depends on the creation tool, but it's really hard to deal with PDF content text, because you don't know event if the text that you're reading is really in the same order that you read from the PDF.

    After my fight against the PDF format hell and poppler, I discovered the epub format that's a really simple format for electronic books. An epub is a zip with some XML files describing the book index and every chapter is a xhtml and xhtml is a good format compared to PDF because you can parse easily with any XML lib and the content is tagged and well structured so you know what's a heading, what's a paragraph, etc.

    So I started to write a simple C library to read epub files, thinking about add epub support to evince. That's how libgepub was born. I tried to integrate libgepub in evince, I've something working, rendering with webkit, but nothing really useful, because evince needs pages and it's not easy to split an xhtml file in pages with the same height, because xhtml is continuous text and it adapts to the page width, so I give up and leave this branch.

  • My final report for GSoC 2018

    The Google Summer of Code 2018 is coming to an end for me, so it means that it’s time for the final report!

    [...]

    I’ve created a media (although for now it only works with pictures) viewer for Fractal. Its purpose is to easily have a better view of the images within a room, to be able to zoom in and out of them, to navigate between the different images of the room in the chronological order, to enter in a full screen mode and to save a copy of the media in the filesystem. I made a first implementation and then had to do a lot of other improvements. I’ve spent about a month working on it.

    There is still the need to improve the zoom of the media viewer as the pictures are a little bit blurred and it’s not possible to zoom beyond 100%. There are optimizations to do as the application becomes very slow when trying to zoom beyond 100% on large pictures.

  • GUADEC 2018

    A few weeks ago I attended GUADEC in Almeria, Spain. The travel was a bit of an adventure, because Julian and I went there and back from Italy by train. It was great though, because we had lots of time to hack on Fractal on the train.

    [...]

    On Monday I attended the all-day Librem 5 BoF, together with my colleagues from Purism, and some community members, such as Jordan and Julian from Fractal.

    We talked about apps, particularly the messaging situation and Fractal. We discussed what will be needed in order to split the app, make the UI adaptive, and get end-to-end encryption. Daniel’s work on the database and Julian’s message history refactor are currently laying the groundwork for these.

    On the shell side we talked through the design of various parts of the shell, such as keyboard, notifications, multitasking, and gestures. Though many of those things won’t be implemented in the near future, we have a plan for where we’re going with these, and getting designers and developers in one room was very productive for working out some of the details.

    We also discussed a number of exciting new widgets to make it easier to get GNOME apps to work at smaller sizes, such as a new adaptive preferences window, and a way to allow modal windows to take up the entire screen at small sizes.

Software: Security Scanners, Cockpit and Terminalizer

Filed under
Software
  • 5 Tools to Scan a Linux Server for Malware and Rootkits

    There are constant level of high attacks and port scans on Linux servers all the time, while a properly configured firewall and regular security system updates adds a extra layer to keep the system safe, but you should also frequently watch if anyone got in. This will also helps to ensure that your server stays free of any program that aims at disrupting its normal operation.

    The tools presented in this article are created for these security scans and they are able to identity Virus, Malwares, Rootkits, and Malicious behaviors. You can use these tools make regularly system scans e.g. every night and mail reports to your email address.

  • Cockpit 175

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 175.

  • Terminalizer - Tool to Record Terminal Sessions on Linux

    Have you ever thought about how you can record your Linux terminal? Terminalizer is a fancy and highly customizable CLI tool that records and renders terminal activity and can make an animated GIF image from it. It can work well on Ubuntu, CentOS, Arch Linux, SUSE, RedHat, Fedora, etc. In this tutorial, we'll take you through how you can install and capture/record your Linux terminal.

    Before installing terminalizer, ensure you have Node.js and npm installed.

Linux Foundation and Kernel News

Filed under
Linux

Nitrux – A Beautiful, Portable Apps-Focused Linux Distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Nitrux is a free, beautiful, open-source Ubuntu-based distribution with a focus on beauty, user efficiency, and portable universal app formats. It currently ranks #76 on DistroWatch’s popularity hits per day chart.

It supports portable universal application formats including AppImage and Snaps and is based on the latest Ubuntu development branch and the latest KDE Plasma desktop version.

Read more

OpenSUSE/SUSE: openSUSE Leap 42.3 and Kubic's Change of Heart

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Operating System Support Extended Until June 30, 2019

    The openSUSE Project announced this week that they'd extended support for the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system with six more months to allow more users to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 release.

    Launched on July 26, 2017, the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 and the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. Like previous openSUSE Leap 42 point releases, openSUSE Leap 42.3 was supposed to receive 18 months of support, until January 2019.

  • An Exciting New Direction

    It’s been over a year since we started the Kubic project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and sharing with you all our plans for the future.

  • OpenSUSE Kubic Shifts Focus Following Self-Reflection

    OpenSUSE's Kubic project that has been home to their container-related technologies as well as the atomicly-updated openSUSE "MicroOS" will be making some changes.

9 Simple Ways to Effectively use Less Command in Linux

Filed under
Linux

Learn to use less command in Linux for viewing large files and tracking log files. Most common usage of the less command explained in this tutorial.
Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Women in IT Awards USA winner: Margaret Dawson, Red Hat

    Margaret has led teams at companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500 firms including Amazon, Microsoft and HP. She grew up in Detroit and began her career in the automotive industry, an experience that helped her feel at home in the similarly male-dominated technology sector.

    She has a passion for mentoring women in technology and has made it her mission to share the lessons she has learned with others and to mentor them in their own journeys.

  • How do tools affect culture?

    Most of the DevOps community talks about how tools don’t matter much. The culture has to change first, the argument goes, which might modify how the tools are used.

    I agree and disagree with that concept. I believe the relationship between tools and culture is more symbiotic and bidirectional than unidirectional. I have discovered this through real-world transformations across several companies now. I admit it’s hard to determine whether the tools changed the culture or whether the culture changed how the tools were used.

  • GPU Accelerated SQL queries with PostgreSQL & PG-Strom in OpenShift-3.10

    In the OpenShift 3.9 GPU blog, we leveraged machine learning frameworks on OpenShift for image recognition. And in the How To Use GPUs with DevicePlugin in OpenShift 3.10 blog, we installed and configured an OpenShift cluster with GPU support. In this installment, we will create a more sophisticated workload on the cluster – accelerating databases using GPUs.

    One of the key parts of any machine learning algorithm is the data (often referred to as the data lake/warehouse, stored as structured, semi-structured or unstructured data).

    A major part of machine learning pipelines is the preparation, cleaning, and exploration of this data. Specifically removing NAs (missing values), transformations, normalization, subsetting, sorting, and a lot of plotting.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock returned -15.52% negative Quarterly performance
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) CEO & President James M Whitehurst Sold $6.3 million of Shares
  • Sigma Planning Corp Increases Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • PHPUnit 7.3

    RPM of PHPUnit version 7.3 are available in remi repository for Fedora ≥ 25 and for Enterprise Linux (CentOS, RHEL...).

  • Reducing the use of non-glibc allocators in Fedora

    Memory allocation for applications is a bit of a balancing act between various factors including CPU performance, memory efficiency, and how the memory is actually being allocated and deallocated by the application. Different programs may have diverse needs, but it is often the kind of workload that the application is expected to handle that determines which memory allocator performs best. That argues for a diversity of memory allocators (and allocation strategies) but, on the other hand, that complicates things for Linux distributions. As a result, Fedora is discussing ways to rein in the spread of allocators used by its packages.

  • Copr has a brand new API

    New Copr version is here and after several months of discussions and development, it finally brings a brand new API. In this article, we are going to see why it was needed, how it is better than previous API versions (i.e. why you should be happy about it) and try some code samples.

Games and Wine

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Extreme downhill freeriding game 'Descenders' updated with the Ring of Fire update

    The latest update to Descenders adds in the fifth environment to play through named Volcano, which gives you a different way to play. The interesting thing about the Volcano environment, is that you have to unlock it in a very specific way with the developer teasing that "it involves fiery rings of fire". Instead of stunts, this environment uses tectonics instead. In other words, you're in for a bumpy ride.

    In addition to the new environment, which is pretty darn tough to actually reach, they've also added in more new stuff. Along with now having a Linux version that works properly.

    In this update there's also another new bonus level for you to find, they've expanded the "Freeride" mode where you tweak the settings to build your own track to add in the special build crew feature, which gives you certain modifiers like smoother curves or reducing speed wobble. There's also new items for you to unlock as well.

  • It Looks Like A Steam 64-Bit Client Could Finally Be Near

    It looks like Valve could be prepping to finally ship a 64-bit Steam client, possibly coinciding with their long talked about Steam UI/UX overhaul.

    Valve today shipped a new beta release with just one listed change, "Added support for shipping different binaries to 64bit vs 32bit operating systems in Steam self-updater. This support is being added in preparation for future updates."

    The ability for the Steam update to ship different binaries depending upon architecture would be a prerequisite for being able to introduce a 64-bit Steam client while retaining the 32-bit client too... They don't explicitly say it's for shipping a 64-bit Steam client soon, but it's 2018 after all, and there wouldn't be much of a reason to otherwise be adding this capability to the Steam updater...

  • DXVK Introducing Per-Game Configuration Files

    While DXVK is capable of running a great deal of Direct3D 11 games via Vulkan within Wine, a number of games have required various workarounds for either getting the game to properly work in the first place or to run efficiently. Those per-game settings are now being punted off into a per-game configuration system.

  • VK9 - Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan - Completes 27th Milestone

    It's not nearly as far along as DXVK that is allowing D3D11-over-Vulkan and already running great numbers of games in a performant manner under Wine, but the VK9 project for implementing Direct3D 9 over Vulkan has now hit its twenty-seventh milestone.

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More in Tux Machines

Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

The Amiga community remains one of the most passionate and inventive we have ever seen, even now, decades after Commodore’s demise. A couple of weeks back, we featured just a few recent projects that were designed to breathe new life into aging Amiga systems, or at the very least ensure they remain repairable for the foreseeable future. Our article explaining how to build a cheap Amiga emulator using a Raspberry Pi was immensely popular as well. Today, however, we stumbled across a video that encapsulates the ingenuity of many of the more technical folks in the Amiga community. What it shows is an Amiga 3000UX, equipped with a Voodoo 3 card and BigFoot Networks Killer NIC M1, running some software – including Quake – on the Killer NIC’s on-board Power PC processor. Read more

New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4
    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion. Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

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