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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 13 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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It is official: the Linux Journal website is no more

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

A promise was made to keep the website up and a promise was broken. As of yesterday evening, the website officially went down and with it 25 years of hard work from wonderful authors.

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OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results

Filed under
SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results
    Dear all,
    
    The vote has ended and the results have been released.
    
      Do we change the project name?
    
      Yes    42
      No    225
    
    Regards,
    
    Ish Sookun
    
  • openSUSE votes not to change its name

    The openSUSE project has been considering a name change as part of its move into a separate foundation since (at least) June. A long and somewhat controversial vote of project members has just come to an end, and the result is conclusive: 225-42 against the name change.

Where To Try Nextcloud Service for Free?

Filed under
Server
OSS

Nextcloud is server-based free software all-in-one alternative to Google Drive with plugins capability that you can install to your server. It is very great, with it you can create file server for your office, with awesome additional plugins like LibreOffice Online ("Collabora") & Video Conference ("Talk") you can install as you wish. But if you do not have server to install it, where you can test out a Nextcloud service for free? There is a good news. Actually, Nextcloud Project already provides a gratis demo server at try.nextcloud.com everybody could use. By creating a free account, you can instantly test out Nextcloud with your friends. Enjoy!

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PinePhone: Everything You Need to Know About This Linux Smartphone

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

The PinePhone specs, price and design are all tailored towards keeping it a super low $149 price point.

Pitched as a cheap alternative to Android and iOS devices, the PinePhone is built for Linux enthusiasts and developers who will appreciate its privacy-minded open source software and its hardware kill switches.

But let’s be totally clear: the Pinephone isn’t out to one-up Samsung’s latest handset or rival flagship devices from other OEMs. It’s has more humble ambitions: provide a reliable, open, hackable (and potentially upgradeable) smartphone platform, powered by Linux.

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Kdenlive is Now Available on the Snap Store

Filed under
KDE

Its arrival on the store will simplify installation of the non-linear editing tool across Linux distributions.

Prior to now an AppImage had been the ‘recommended’ way for Linux users to download and run Kdenlive on Linux desktops like Ubuntu (and if you’re a fan of that method you needn’t worry: the AppImage version isn’t going away).

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • AMDVLK 2019.Q4.2 Brings Several More Extensions, Game Tuning

    AMDVLK 2019.Q4.2 is out today as AMD's second open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver update for the fourth quarter.

    With a while since 2019.Q4.1, today's update is fairly notable especially with newly supported Vulkan extensions. Now wired up for this AMD Vulkan Linux driver is VK_KHR_shader_subgroup_extended_types, VK_KHR_pipeline_executable_properties, VK_KHR_timeline_semaphore, VK_KHR_shader_clock, and VK_KHR_spirv_1_4. Also new is computeFullSubgroups support.

  • The Khronos Group have now released a Vulkan Guide to get you started

    The Khronos Group seems to be making another big push for Vulkan API adoption lately, after putting up an official GitHub repository of code samples they've now done a Vulkan Guide.

    Another joint effort between Khronos members, with an aim of it being "the perfect place to get started with the API". It's aimed to be a mostly light read, that links to many other helpful resources for learning Vulkan development. They say it's "intended to help better fill the gaps about the many nuances of Vulkan".

  • Managing software and services with Cockpit

    The Cockpit series continues to focus on some of the tools users and administrators can use to perform everyday tasks within the web user-interface. So far we’ve covered introducing the user-interface, storage and network management, and user accounts. Hence, this article will highlight how Cockpit handles software and services.

    [...]

    Because Cockpit uses systemd, we get the options to view System Services, Targets, Sockets, Timers, and Paths. Cockpit also provides an intuitive interface to help users search and find the service they want to configure. Services can also be filtered by it’s state: All, Enabled, Disabled, or Static. Below this is the list of services. Each row displays the service name, description, state, and automatic startup behavior.

  • Fedora Stakeholders Debate Statically Linking Python For Better Performance

    A surprisingly controversial proposal for Fedora 32 is to shift from dynamically linking Python 3 with the libpython3.X.so library to static linking. The change can yield double digit percentage improvements to Python scripts but at the cost of larger on-disk space. 

    There is a change proposal for next spring's Fedora 32 release to switch to static linking with Python 3 and its library. A 5~27% improvement has been reported as the possible benefit to Fedora though that may vary depending upon the actual Python workload. 

  • Partnering with Nutanix to run Windows and Linux desktop apps on GCP
  • The FreeBSD Migration To OpenZFS Is Still Looking To Be A Great Change

    Last year it was decided that FreeBSD's ZFS code would be re-based on OpenZFS (ZFS On Linux) code for ultimately better support and functionality as well as largely unifying the open-source ZFS ecosystem. While still transitioning towards the OpenZFS code-base, for FreeBSD it's still looking to be a positive move and one that will pay off for all parties involved. 

  • CEO Of Security Company Behind Unorthodox Penetration Tests Wants To Know Why His Employees Are Still Being Criminally Charged

           

             

    A couple of months ago, security researchers performing a very physical penetration test of an Iowa courthouse were arrested for breaking and entering. They were also charged with possessing burglar's tools, which they did indeed possess.

  • You’ve Been Served…with Subpoena-Themed Phishing Emails

                 

                   

    According to researchers, the phishing emails are spoofing the UK Ministry of Justice, aiming to capitalize on scare tactics to convince targets to click on an embedded link to “learn more about the case” by saying that the recipient has 14 days to comply with the subpoena notice. If the target clicks on the link, he or she will find themselves infected with Predator the Thief, a publicly available information-stealing malware that’s not often seen in phishing campaigns.

  • Publishers Should be Making E-Book Licensing Better, Not Worse

    Macmillan, one of the “Big Five” publishers, is imposing new limits on libraries’ access to ebooks—and libraries and their users are fighting back.

    Starting last week, the publisher is imposing a two-month embargo period on library ebooks. When Macmillan releases a new book, library systems will be able to purchase only one digital copy for the first eight weeks after it’s published. Macmillan is offering this initial copy for half-price ($30), but that has not taken away the sting for librarians who will need to answer to frustrated users. In large library systems in particular, readers are likely to experience even longer hold queues for new Macmillan e-book releases. For example, under the new Macmillan embargo, the 27 branches of the San Francisco Public Library system, serving a city of nearly 900,000 people, will have to share one single copy right when the demand for the new title is the greatest.

  • Tuya helps you easily Design & Manufacture your own Smart Home Solutions

    One person in the LetsControlIt forum thread linked above explains the stock firmware can be updated over-the-air via a Raspberry Pi 3/3+ board using a project named Tuya-Convert.

    [...]

    I stopped there, so sorry there won’t be any CNX Software branded devices, but we can see it’s 5-steps process with functions definition, app UI design, hardware debug, advanced features, and mass production.

    The company also claims to offer “Military-grade AES and HTTPS WAN/LAN encryption”, but Michael Steigerwald, founder of the German IT security startup VTRUST, disproved the claim as the messages contain “canttouchthis” unencrypted password, at least that was the case in December 2018.

    So if you ever wanted to launch your own brand, it looks to be an easy way to get started, but you may want to handle the firmware & software part on your own.

  • The EU declares war on e-waste

    As of 2021, manufacturers across Europe will be required to improve both the reparability and service life of devices such as washing machines, refrigerators, dishwashers, electric motors, light sources and LED screens. Manufacturers must also be more precise when it comes to including energy consumption information on the labels of their products and providing replacement parts for at least 10 years after purchase.

    Laptops and smartphones, however, are not covered under the new rules — more on that later.

  • PyCharm 2019.3 Beta

    We’re very excited to announce the Beta release for PyCharm 2019.3, a feature-complete preview of the upcoming release. Give the Beta build a go and try all the new functionality – download it from our website.

  • Webinar Recording: “Visual SQL Development with PyCharm” with Maxim Sobolevskiy

    This week we had a webinar with Maxim Sobolevskiy, the DataGrip Product Marketing Manager, showing the wonderful, magical Database tool in PyCharm. The webinar recording is now available.

Compact edge-AI computer runs Ubuntu on Jetson TX2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Axiomtek’s compact, rugged “AIE500-901-FL” edge-AI computer runs Linux on a hexa-core Jetson TX2 and offers 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.1 Gen1, 2x COM or CAN, and M.2, mini-PCIe, and HDMI 2.0.

Axiomtek is back with another fanless, rugged computer for AI that runs Ubuntu Linux 18.04 on Nvidia’s Jetson TX module. The 171 x 110 x 57mm AIE500-901-FL shares many of the features of two other recent TX-based computers from Axiomtek: the larger 366.83 x 210 x 83mm eBOX560-900-FL and the smaller, 141 x 106 x 55mm eBOX800-900-FL.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Video: Ubuntu MATE 19.10, Pinebook Pro, 'User Error' Show

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies
  • Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Full Review

    Ubuntu MATE is a special flavor of Ubuntu that focuses on the classic desktop. With the release of 19.10, the developers focus on ironing out bugs and streamlining the experience. Did they succeed? In this review, I will show you around the new release with a special focus on stability.

  • Ubuntu MATE 19.10 - Overview of the Installation Process

    Ubuntu MATE is a special flavor of Ubuntu that focuses on the classic desktop. In this video, I'll show you the entire installation process on real hardware. You'll see the process from beginning to end, and we'll perform an installation while wiping out the current OS.

  • Pinebook Pro Unboxed, Booted, Then Taken Apart [Video]

    The second batch of Pinebook Pro pre-orders went live this week, just as buyers of the first wave begun to receive their devices!

    And, naturally, as you’d expect, in true millennial tech ownership style, a swathe of Pinebook Pro unboxing videos started to sprout out of the web’s fertile mantle.

    Including the following comprehensive run-through by YouTuber jpakkane1 (a link to which landed in the omg! tip box yesterday, so thanks Sadat!).

    This 10 minute clip has everything you could possibly want to see: a literal unboxing; first boot experience; side-by-side comparison with (unfair klaxon sound) a 13.1″ MacBook (!); and connection to an external display.

  • Episode Ctrl V | User Error 78

    Paying attention to all the Linux users we never hear from, being less clever than we thought, and our biggest fears.

    Plus alternatives to copy paste, and whether Popey loves pink.

The 6 Best PostgreSQL Monitoring Tools in 2019

Filed under
Server
Software

The main point of monitoring PostgreSQL databases is to ensure that the data they hold is available whenever it is needed and that their performance—i.e. how fast they respond to queries—remains within acceptable parameters. Today, we’re having a look at a few of the best PostgreSQL monitoring tools.

We’ll start off by briefly explaining what PostgreSQL is, where it is coming from and how it came to be. After all, it can only help to know a bit more about what we’re trying to monitor. Then, we’ll specifically discuss the monitoring of PostgreSQL databases. We’ll learn how database servers should be considered in their entirety and that the best monitoring will not only include the actual database software but also the underlying operating system and hardware. We’ll then get to the core of this post as we introduce the best PostgreSQL monitoring tools we could find and give you a brief review of each one.

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Games: Small Mode returns to Steam, Chasm and Summer Daze at Hero-U

Filed under
Gaming
  • Small Mode returns to Steam, Broadcast Settings appear on Linux and more on Steam Cloud Gaming

    Valve continue upgrading the experience for the new Steam Library with another Beta update available now.

    I know plenty of people missed Small Mode, well the good news is that it has returned! If you go to View -> Small Mode in the top menu it will now correctly switch to it. It has been updated too, so you can view your Collections in it too. Don't know what Small Mode is?

    [...]

    For the Linux client, Valve updated vaapi decoding to libva2 compatibility, they applied some fixes to free disk space checking due to issues with some NFS mounts and Steam Input's F12 binding was fixed as well. See the full changelog here.

  • Sweet action-adventure Chasm is now available on itch.io

    Bit Kid have just recently put up their successfully crowdfunded action-adventure game Chasm on itch.io. Announced a few days ago, it's good to see more developers support the very indie friendly store.

    In Chasm you play as a new recruit taking on your first mission for the Guildean Kingdom. You investigate various rumours about a vital mine being shut down, but what you discover is worse than you had imagined. The whole town is empty, kidnapped by supernatural creatures emerging from the depths. That's the basic setup anyway, although each play-through will be different thanks to the randomized map.

  • Summer Daze at Hero-U is successfully funded and on the way to Linux

    Summer Daze at Hero-U, the prequel to Hero-U: Rogue to Redemption from Lori and Corey Cole has been funded on Kickstarter so that's another game on the way to Linux.

    Their campaign ended a few days ago with $106,155 in funding (just over their 99k goal), showing that there's plenty of gamers out there interested in a Visual Novel that mixes in light RPG and adventure game elements. It did look a bit touch-and-go a few days before the end, thankfully though they got a good boost at the end of the campaign to push it over.

Software: QEMU 4.2, libredwg 0.9.2, Footnotes and Endnotes in LibreOffice Writer

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Software
  • QEMU 4.2 Cycle Kicks Off With Inaugural Release Candidate

    The initial release candidate for the upcoming QEMU 4.2 is now available as a sizable update to this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

  • libredwg-0.9.2 released

    This is a minor patch update. 
    Added the -x,--extnames option to dwglayers for r13-r14 DWGs, 
    Fixed some more leaks, 
    Added DICTIONARY.itemhandles[] for r13 and r14, 
    Added geom utils to some programs: dwg2SVG and dwg2ps, 
    Added basic POLYLINE_2D and LWPOLYLINE support to dwg2SVG. 

  • Footnotes and Endnotes in LibreOffice Writer

    A note is a string of text placed at the bottom of a page in a book or document or at the end of a chapter, volume or the whole text. The note can provide an author's comments on the main text or citations of a reference work in support of the text. Footnotes are notes at the foot of the page while endnotes are collected under a separate heading at the end of a chapter, volume, or entire work.

Programming/Container: Sysdig Report, CNCF, SaaS and Qt Software Development Kit (Qt SDK)

Filed under
Development
Server
  • 4 container usage takeaways from the 2019 Sysdig report

    You probably already knew that most of the containers created by developers are disposable, but did you realize that half of them are only around for less than five minutes? That and other fascinating details are available in the latest annual container report from Sysdig, a container security and orchestration vendor.

    This is the company’s third such report. The results are obtained from their own instrumentation collected from a five-day period last month of the more than 2 million containers used by their own customers. This means the results could be somewhat skewed toward more experienced container developers.

    Nevertheless, the report merits some scrutiny. Here are four important takeaways.

  • CNCF Adopts Longhorn Storage Project from Rancher Labs

    Based on 30,000 lines of Go code employed to create separate engine and management plane, Longhorn is significantly lighter than traditional storage software because it builds on existing Linux storage primitives, Liang says. It also doesn’t require a dedicated storage administrator to deploy and manage. It’s designed from the ground up to be used by the same team managing the Kubernetes cluster, he notes, adding modern storage hardware such as solid-state drives (SSDs) and NVMe backplanes made it easier to build Longhorn without compromising performance.

    While some applications might want to access block storage directly, Liang says Rancher Labs expects most organizations will layer a file system on top of Longhorn to access various forms of persistent storage.

  • Lessons From A Failed SaaS - Building SaaS #37

    In this episode, we talked about the things I learned from my SaaS project and some of the reasons why it failed to succeed financially. We dug into the technical and marketing challenges that I faced and what went wrong.

    I’m shutting down my side project, College Conductor. The SaaS never achieved a sustainable level of success. I started the site to help my wife with her college consulting business. As you can see from what follows, the site didn’t mange to deliver what she (or anyone else) really needed.

  • Setup Complete Qt SDK on Ubuntu Eoan Ermine

    Qt Software Development Kit (Qt SDK) includes Qt Creator IDE & Qt Framework Libraries with Full Code Examples among other things. On Ubuntu 19.10, if you want to develop GUI applications with Qt, you need to install that Qt SDK first with a C++ compiler. Installing it on 19.10 is slightly different to different to 18.04 as this involves configuring GNU GCC C++ compiler on 19.10. After setup, you will have a ready, complete Qt SDK with Creator, Designer, Linguist, and Assistant works with G++ compiler. I hope this will be useful for you all. Happy hacking!

Key FOSS stakeholders gather to shape Open Source Beyond 2020

Filed under
OSS

On 14-15 November 2019, the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Informatics, DIGIT and Directorate‑General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, CONNECT are holding a joint workshop to discuss the future of Open Source Software and Open Source Hardware Beyond 2020, at Avenue de Beaulieu 25, Brussels.

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Create Vector Graphics with Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

Vector graphics consist of shapes, called objects, which are simple geometric primitives: points, lines, curves, circles, and polygons. The shapes are all based on mathematical equations, to represent images in computer graphics. It is possible to edit each object separately, for example, by changing the shape, colour, size and position. By combining paths that are straight or curved and various colors and shading very detailed illustrations can be created.

As vector-based images are not made up of a specific number of dots, they can be precisely scaled without any reduction in the image quality. Unlike vector graphics, bitmap images are resolution dependent. This means that it is difficult to alter the size of a bitmap without sacrificing a degree of image quality. Vector graphics also have simpler storage, and the option to convert a vector graphic to a bitmap if needed.

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My first open source contribution: Talk about your pull request

Filed under
OSS

Previously, I wrote about keeping your code relevant when making a contribution to an open source project. Now, you finally click Create pull request. You're elated, you're done.

At first, I didn’t even care whether my code would get merged or not. I had done my part. I knew I could do it. The future lit up with the many future pull requests that I would make to open source projects.

But of course, I did want my code to become a part of my chosen project, and soon I found myself googling, "How long does it take for an open source pull request to get merged?" The results weren’t especially conclusive. Due to the nature of open source (the fact that anyone can participate in it), processes for maintaining projects vary widely. But I found a tweet somewhere that confidently said: "If you don’t hear back in two months, you should reach out to the maintainers."

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: mintCast, Linux Headlines, LINUX Unplugged, This Week in Linux, Full Circle Weekly News, OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Alpha 1 Run Through

  • mintCast 321.5 – Wololo

    In our Innards section, we decide when it’s the right time to suggest switching to Linux.

  • 2019-11-12 | Linux Headlines

    Python’s package manager looks forward to some much-needed love, PeerTube and Termshark both have major releases, and Mozilla joins forces to push WebAssembly outside the browser.

  • Distro Disco | LINUX Unplugged 327

    Get to know our Linux Users Group a little better and learn why they love their Linux distros of choice, and the one thing they’d change to make them perfect.

  • Episode 87 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, Pine64 announces the pre-orders for the PinePhone are coming this week! AMD Announces Latest Threadripper & Ryzen 9 CPUs. We’ve got the results from the openSUSE Name Change vote. In Distro News, Ubuntu pledges support for Raspberry Pis, elementary OS Adds Flatpak Support, and we got new releases from KaOS and Chrome OS. Microsoft confirms that their Edge browser is coming to Linux. Linus Torvalds was interviewed recently where he declared he is ‘Not a Programmer Anymore’, we’ll take a closer look at that. In Linux Gaming News, Steam releases beta support for Containers in Steam for Linux. Google Reveals Stadia Launch Games and further info on the service. We also got some really interesting news from Valve where they might launch their own Stadia competitor called “Steam Cloud Gaming”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #153
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    In this video, we are looking at OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Alpha 1. Enjoy!

today's howtos

Debian reconsiders init-system diversity

The immediate motivation for a reconsideration would appear to be the proposed addition of elogind, a standalone fork of the systemd-logind daemon, to Debian. Elogind would provide support for systemd's D-Bus-based login mechanism — needed to support small projects like the GNOME desktop — without the need for systemd itself. The addition of elogind has been controversial; it is a difficult package to integrate for a number of reasons. Much of the discussion has evidently been carried out away from the mailing lists, but some context on the problem can be found in this bug report. In short: merging elogind appears to be complex enough that it would be hard to justify in the absence of a strong commitment to the support of non-systemd init systems. It seems possible that this commitment no longer exists across the distribution as a whole; the purpose of a general resolution would be to determine whether that is the case or not. Read more

Android Leftovers