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Raku Programming

Filed under
Development
  • vrurg: The Report On New Coercions Part 2

    I didn’t expect my previous report to have a continuation, but here it goes. When the initial implementation of new coercions was merged, I started checking if there’re any tickets in the issue tracker which can now be closed. One of them, #2446, is related to coercions but still needed a fix. As long as I was looking into the ticket, it was becoming clear to me that the time has come for an itch I had had for quite some time already.

  • Day 1: Why Raku is the ideal language for Advent of Code – Raku Advent Calendar

    Now that it’s December, it’s time for two of my favorite traditions from the tech world: the Raku Advent Calendar and Advent of Code. These two holiday traditions have a fair amount in common – they both run from December 1 through Christmas, and both involve releasing something new every day during the event. Specifically, the Raku Advent Calendar releases a new blog post about the Raku programming language, while Advent of Code releases a new programming challenge – which can be solved in any language.

    (In this post, I’ll be referring to Advent of Code as “AoC” – not to be confused with the American politician AOC who, to the best of my knowledge, does not program in Raku.)

    For me, Raku and AoC are the chocolate and peanut butter of tech Advent season: each is great on its own, but they’re even better in combination. If your only goal is to solve AoC challenges, Raku is a great language to use; on the other hand, if your only goal is to learn Raku, then solving AoC challenges is a great way to do so. This post will explain how Raku and AoC are such a good fit and then provide some resources to help us all get started solving AoC challenges.

  • nomen est omen | Playing Perl 6␛b6xA Raku

    Even with the help of his time machine, delivering all presents in a single night keeps Santa extremely busy. With little time to spare he does all his coding in Raku. One of the advantages of time travel, is the option to use the last version of the last programming language.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2020.48 DevRoom on FOSDEM

    Next year’s FOSDEM will be an online event only, on 6/7 February 2021. It will also have a Raku Programming Language DevRoom track, shared with Perl. Please contact JJ Merelo (on Twitter or on the #raku IRC channel) if you are interested in giving a presentation about your experiences with Raku!

Nitrux 1.3.5 Released with Latest KDE Plasma and Applications

Filed under
Linux

The KDE Plasma and Ubuntu-based distribution Nitrux 1.3.5 released with its latest version. Here we take a look at what's new, download links, features and more.
Read more

WWW: WordPress, Chrome, Mozilla

Filed under
Server
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Half of Websites Will Be WordPress-Driven by 2025 / Digital Information World

    Based on CMS usage trends, now available for 2019 and most of the current year, several outlets have projected that WordPress will be the driving force behind half of all websites by 2025. According to the newest numbers by W3Techs, its usage is growing by 2.47% per year on average. If it continues at this rate, WordPress will surpass 50% market share, potentially within the next five years.

    [...]

    The pandemic has hastened the shift from brick-and-mortar to e-commerce by roughly five years. Today's 'online first' strategy is commonplace for many new and established businesses. However, as of 2019, less than two-thirds of small businesses had a website. For many business thought-leaders, the idea that a brand is too small or unsuitable for online trade ceases to exist. In the post-millennial marketplace, stores without an online presence give the impression that you're no longer in business.

    The trajectory of WordPress has historically depended on the demands of its users. It's continuously unfolded to cater to millions of bloggers and webmasters around the globe. Improvements such as REST API and the Gutenberg editor means WordPress is now better placed to contend with closed-source competitors Shopify, Wix, and Squarespace. Furthermore, you can anticipate developers will see WordPress as a simple solution to power the expansion of all varieties of mobile and web apps.

  • Chrome to remove HTTP/2 Push

    Chromium developers have announced that they plan to remove support for HTTP/2 server push from the market-leading browser engine. Server push lets web servers preemptively send clients resources it expects them to request later. The technique can reduce the number of network round-trips required before the client has all the resources it needs to display a page. The announcement cited high implementation complexity, low adoption among websites, and questionable performance gains as the reason for the removal.

    Server push is an optional feature introduced in the HTTP/2 standard. Chrome can remove it and remain compatible with the HTTP/2 standard. When used correctly, server push can greatly improve page-load times. It also enables use-cases like instant redirects.

  • celery-batches 0.4 released!

    Earlier today I released a version 0.4 of celery-batches with support for Celery 5.0. As part of this release support for Python < 3.6 was dropped and support for Celery < 4.4 was dropped.

  • This Week in Glean: Glean is Frictionless Data Collection

    So you want to collect data in your project? Okay, it’s pretty straightforward.

Freedom-Centric Mobile: Librem 5 and 'Edge' postmarketOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets
  • A Media Center in Your Pocket – Purism

    While the Librem 5 is a phone, it’s also a general-purpose computer. This allows the Librem 5 to act as a media center, game station, server, ultra-mobile PC, or whatever you can personally imagine.

  • postmarketOS in 2020-11: Edge & Donations

    Two weeks ago, a wlroots release was pushed to Alpine that caused Phosh to crash. This is a good example of things that can go wrong when using the edge channel of postmarketOS (as opposed to stable). The bug was reported to the postmarketOS issue tracker (precisely the right move!) and within the next eight hours until we could close that issue, it was pinned down to the wlroots 0.12.0 upgrade, Phosh developers were informed, log messages were analyzed but were not useful and eventually the "offending" commit was found with git bisect. It turned out that the commit was a feature and not a bug, it made wlroots terminate connections if some API protocol was not followed as intended whereas it would just ignore this previously. An issue was created in the Phosh tracker, and a patch was submitted to Alpine edge to revert that specific commit until Phosh follows that specific API as it was intended (likely soon).

    The story told above was certainly not worth writing a regular blog post about, it was so quickly resolved that if each time we dealt with issues like these it would be hard to find the proper blog posts among these edge breakage reports. But still, it would be nice if there was something like a second blog where people running postmarketOS edge can quickly find information about such issues while they are ongoing. The solution we arrived at is a second blog, which will only have such breakage reports from postmarketOS edge.

Camus Video Chat: The Open-source Privacy-aware Video Cat Meeting tool that you have been waiting for

Filed under
Software

Camus is a lightweight cross-platform real-time peer-to-peer video chat application. It's built with Python3 and ready to be deployed on server with simple few steps.

We have reviewed and listed several open-source video applications on Medevel.com, but most of them require time and skills to install and use. It's not the case with Camu which is created by a solo developer using several technologies to make it a good alternative for Google Meet, meet.jit.si and of course zoom.

In glance, Camus offers similar functionalities to the competing apps like text messaging, customizable video quality, high audio quality and desktop sharing.

It's also can be installed easily on any Linux distribution that support Snap or on a web server with Docker.

The main reason why do like Camus is its easy install as it takes far more time to install and configure than most of the alternative apps we tested and used before.

Read more

Also: Empathy first: Driving growth through people leadership

Devices/Embedded: NanoPi, Arduino and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • NanoPi R4S SBC launched with optional metal case for $45 and up

    We found NanoPi R4S board in a work-in-progress Wiki last month. The tiny single board computer is designed for headless applications but comes with much better specifications compared to similar boards with a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor with up to 4GB RAM, dual Gigabit Ethernet, and USB 3.0 ports.

    At the time we had limited information, but FriendlyELEC has now started selling the board for $45 and up, together with an optional metal case for a fanless operation that should ensure very good cooling.

  • Rockchip RK3568 processor to power edge computing and NVR applications

    We recently reported on the Rockchip developer conference (RKDC) 2020, and especially the upcoming Rockchip RK3588 Cortex-A76/A55 processor that packs a lot of power and features, and is now scheduled to launch in Q3 2021.

    But as you can imagine there were other products revealed during the conference, including the new Rockchip RK3568, similar to the previously announced RK3566, and designed for edge computing and network video recorder (NVR) applications.

  • Tiger Lake module supports industrial models

    Portwell’s “PCOM-B656VGL” Compact Type 6 module runs on 11th Gen Core CPUs including embedded “E” and industrial “GRE” models with up to 64GB DDR4-3200, 4x displays, 4x USB 3.2 Gen2, and 9x PCIe lanes, including 4x Gen4.

  • i.MX8M based SMARC module adds crypto chip and optional TSN

    Adlink’s rugged, Linux-ready “LEC-iMX8M” SMARC module combines a quad -A53 i.MX8M with a crypto chip plus up to 4GB DDR3L, up to 64GB eMMC, and support for HDMI 2.0a with 4K, 2x MIPI-CSI2, and up to 2x GbE with optional TSN.

    Earlier this month, we reported on Adlink’s SMARC 2.1 form-factor LEC-IMX8MP module with NXP’s AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus. Adlink has also posted a preliminary product page for a SMARC 2.1 module that builds on the standard, similarly quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M. The rugged LEC-iMX8M module is notable for its additional, AES-128-enabled cryptography chip with hardware key storage for up to 16 keys, certificates, or data.

  • Arduino Blog » Creating a continuum tentacle-like robot with Arduino

    Continuum robots — which look like a tentacle or perhaps an elephant’s trunk — use a series of linkage sections and internal tendons to move both horizontally and vertically. While they may seem quite exotic, in the video below element14 Presents’ DJ Harrigan breaks down how he built one with an Arduino Mega and a fairly simple list of parts.

Oracle/Red Hat/Fedora: Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment, ABRT, XWayland, Satellite and Ansible

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Announcing Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment Release 1.2

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment Release 1.2. This release includes several enhancements focused on improving the security and compliance of customer environments. Release 1.2 also includes new versions of core components, including Kubernetes, CRI-O, Kata Containers, and Istio.

    Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment is an integrated suite of software components for the development and management of cloud-native applications. Based on the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Open Container Initiative standards, Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment delivers a simplified framework for installations, updates, upgrades, and configuration of key features for orchestrating microservices.

  • EOL of EL6 and EL7 and removal Customer portal support - ABRT

    For a long time, we talked about EOLing EL6 and EL7. What does it actually mean?

    RHEL 6 is going to be EOL at the end of this month (30th November 2020). We will no longer build ABRT packages for EL6 and we will stop supporting EL6 as content.

    RHEL 7 is still active but quite old. ABRT team will stop testing, building, and developing on top of RHEL7. We are going to focus on RHEL 8 and upcoming RHEL and Fedora. We still support RHEL 7 as content (e.g., in ABRT Analytics).

  • Fedora Looks To Provide Standalone XWayland Package Tracking X.Org Server Git - Phoronix

    With the X.Org Server being "abandonware" but at the same time the upstream XWayland portion of the codebase continuing to be worked on, Fedora developers at Red Hat are looking at splitting XWayland into its own standalone package to make it easier to ship it without having to use the rest of the xorg-server code-base.

    While Red Hat developers previously worked to manage X.Org Server releases, there isn't much upside to that these days and they would rather ship a standalone XWayland package for Fedora users rather than go through the process of new xorg-server releases.

  • Preparing for RHEL Extended Life Cycle Support with Red Hat Satellite and the Ansible Automation Platform

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6 was introduced more than 10 years ago, on November 9, 2010. Originally branched from Fedora 12, RHEL 6 has spent the last 10 years faithfully running Linux workloads. After more than a decade of faithful service, RHEL 6’s lifespan is nearly up: on November 30th, RHEL 6 will move out of Maintenance Support 2 and into Extended Life Cycle Support (ELS).

    Today, we’ll walk through how to prepare our Red Hat Satellite server for the switch of RHEL 6 to ELS, as well as adjusting our currently registered systems. We’ll be doing both of these things via Ansible and the newly introduced redhat.satellite Ansible Collection.

Kernel: IWD, OpenZFS and Mesa

Filed under
Linux
  • Intel IWD 1.10 With DHCP v6 Support - Phoronix

    Version 1.10 of Intel's IWD "iNet Wireless Daemon" has been released as the increasingly useful alternative to the likes of WPA_Supplicant for Linux systems.

    Intel's open-source wireless daemon for Linux systems continues adding in more features and improvements. While it started out with a focus on minimalism and embedded use-cases, IWD is being evaluated for possible use on Ubuntu among other Linux distributions.

  • Notable Developer Starts Patreon to Fund Apple Silicon Linux Port - MacRumors

    Developer Hector Martin, who describes himself as someone who "likes putting Linux on things," has launched a plan create a Linux port for Apple Silicon Macs.

  • OpenZFS 2.0 Released With Unified FreeBSD/Linux Support, Many New Features - Phoronix

    OpenZFS 2.0 has been officially released! OpenZFS 2.0 marks a major step forward for open-source ZFS file-system support for what started out as ZFSOnLinux but is now OpenZFS with unified FreeBSD and Linux support (macOS support is still being pursued as well) and this release also bringing many new features.

  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 20.3.0-rc3
    Hi list,
    
    Mesa 20.3-rc3 is now available for general consumption. This is a few
    days late thanks to the US Thanksgiving holiday. I think we're
    pretty close to having .0 this week, just one issue left on the tracker.
    
    Dylan
    
  • Mesa 20.3 Is Near With Lavapipe Vulkan, Raspberry Pi V3DV, Better AMD RDNA2 Support - Phoronix

    The weekly release candidates of Mesa 20.3 fell off the wagon last week due to the US Thanksgiving holiday but now is updated today for Mesa 20.3-RC3.

    Mesa 20.3-RC3 is out and things are looking good for the stable release potentially in a week or two. There remains just one blocker bug left before Mesa 20.3.0 could be cleared for release.

Server: HPC, Anthos, Proxmox and Config Managers

Filed under
Server
  • The Redemption Of AMD In HPC

    Many of the technologists at AMD who are driving the Epyc CPU and Instinct GPU roadmaps as well as the $35 billion acquisition of FPGA maker Xilinx have long and deep experience in the high performance computing market that is characterized by the old school definition of simulation and modeling workloads running on federated or clustered systems. And so, it is no surprise that when AMD plotted its course back into the datacenter, it had traditional HPC customers, who flocked to its Opteron processors in droves in the middle 2000s, in mind.

    AMD president and chief executive officer, Lisa Su, hails from IBM Microelectronics and notably headed up the “Cell” hybrid CPU-GPU processor that was used in Sony game consoles as well as the $100 million “Roadrunner” petaflops-busting supercomputer, which set the stage for hybrid supercomputing in 2008 when it was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. (Significantly, it paired dual-core Opteron processors with the Cell accelerators, themselves with Power4 cores and eight vector processing units that could do math or process graphics.) Papermaster led the design of several generations of Power processors at IBM, including many that were employed in federated RISC/Unix systems that predated Roadrunner. Interestingly, Brad McCredie, who took over processor design at Big Blue after Papermaster left and founded the OpenPower consortium, joined AMD in June 2019 to take over development of its GPU platforms.

  • Google Anthos now available on bare-metal servers - SiliconANGLE

    Abdelrazik and Seroter said Anthos on bare metal enables customers to leverage their existing hardware investments, as it has minimum system requirements of just 4 cores, 32 gigabytes of RAM and 128GB of disk space. Customers can choose their own operating system too, with support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1/8.2, CentOS 8.1/8.2 and Ubuntu 18.04/20.04 LTS.

  • Proxmox vs VMware Comparison

    Proxmox virtual machines (VM) are highly popular with home server aficionados, whereas VMware sits squarely at the front of the enterprise VM market. Both of these tools offer free and paid versions, but with vastly different features and support at that level. This article compares the use cases, license options, performance, and extra features for Proxmox vs. VMware.

  • Ansible vs. Chef vs. Puppet vs. SaltStack: A comparison

    For teams that oversee ecosystems and software packages, configuration management tools have the power to boost operational consistency. But which products deserve attention?

  • Review the top configuration management tools in DevOps

    Change is an essential part of IT, but it's often disruptive. An adjustment to one asset can throw other resources out of alignment -- sometimes in ways no one anticipated. Those misconfigurations can result in poor performance, application inconsistencies or noncompliance.

    To avoid those outcomes, configuration management delivers documentation, consistent maintenance and change controls. These capabilities help an organization not only identify its IT assets but also understand the relationships between those assets.

GNU Projects: Development, Releases and Revisionism

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Behistun - News: Development of Behistun - The Gungadin Software Tools [Savannah]

    Development has now proceed at a good pace. The initial focus has been the development of configuration tools for setting up a Gnu System, in the form of the Gungadin Software Tools.

  • An Introduction to GNU Radio

    A beginners’ introduction to using GNU radio to create simple amateur radio projects. Starting from the beginning Heather will introduce the GNURadio programming environment, develop a little of the theory needed to understand SDRs and then go on to use some simple GNURadio blocks to build a receiver based on one of the super cheap SDRs. Finally, she will show how to build more complex radio systems and where to go to take things to the next level.

  • Denemo - News: Version 2.5 is imminent. Please test! [Savannah]
  • November GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: Nineteen new GNU releases

    19 new GNU releases in the last month (as of November 25, 2020):
    automake-1.16.3
    bison-3.7.4
    complexity-1.13
    emms-6.0
    gama-2.11
    gmp-6.2.1
    gnucobol-3.1
    gnunet-0.14.0
    gnupg-2.2.25
    grep-3.6
    guix-1.2.0
    libredwg-0.11.1
    mdk-1.3.0
    parallel-20201122
    taler-0.8.1
    texinfo-4.1
    unifont-13.0.04
    units-2.21
    zile-2.4.15

  • What the Heck Is That? [Ed: The Times just simply deletes GNU from history]

    UNIX was the first operating system designed to work on multiple platforms. It has appeared in the New York Times Crossword 31 times, most recently in the Nov. 26 puzzle by Neville Fogarty.

    UNIX was first released in September 1969 by engineers at Bell Labs, and it is the basis for hundreds of operating systems, according to the IEEE.

    [...]

    Linux was developed as a free and open alternative to a UNIX descendant, and it has since become the backbone of as many as two-thirds of all internet servers and all of the top 500 supercomputers. Android phones and Chromebooks also use derivatives of Linux.

    Linux is also known for its penguin logo/mascot, Tux.

Security Leftovers: Patches, Reproducible Builds, Microsoft Ransom, FUD and CFAA

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (c-ares, libass, raptor, rclone, and swtpm), Debian (libproxy, qemu, tcpflow, and x11vnc), Fedora (asterisk, c-ares, microcode_ctl, moodle, pam, tcpdump, and webkit2gtk3), Mageia (jruby and webkit2), openSUSE (buildah, c-ares, ceph, fontforge, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kernel, LibVNCServer, mariadb, thunderbird, ucode-intel, and wireshark), Red Hat (firefox, rh-mariadb103-mariadb and rh-mariadb103-galera, and thunderbird), SUSE (binutils, libssh2_org, LibVNCServer, libX11, and nodejs12), and Ubuntu (mysql-8.0 and qemu).

  • Free software activities in November 2020 - Chris Lamb

    One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security. However, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third-parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into ostensibly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

  • Open Source Security Episode 226 – Door 01: Advent calendars

    Josh and Kurt talk about advent calendars. We are publishing 25 5 minute episodes in 25 days. Also portable X-ray machines.

  • Ransomware Attack Closes Baltimore County Public Schools [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Schools were closed Wednesday, one day earlier than scheduled for Thanksgiving. On Saturday, the district announced on Twitter that classes would be closed for two additional days on Monday and Tuesday due “to the recent ransomware attack.”

  • Ransomware attack prompts Baltimore County Public Schools to close [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Baltimore County is not the only school district in the country that has faced a ransomware attack recently. Since the academic year began, 77 school systems across the country have fallen victim to ransomware attacks. Fourteen of those cyber breaches took place in September alone.

  • Reminder: support for root certificates with kernel mode signing capabilities ends next year

    Microsoft will remove support for root certificates with kernel mode signing capabilities in the Microsoft Trusted Root Program in the first half of 2021.

    The change affects devices running Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system only, and drivers that have expired as part of the change won't load, run or install anymore on Windows 10 devices.

  • Is 2020 the Year of the Linux Malware Pandemic? [Ed: Provocative garbage, enumerating stuff the user needs to actually install on GNU/Linux, stuff that has nothing to do with GNU/Linux, and no mention of back doors in Windows (holes by design)]
  • Computer Fraud and Abuse Act: Van Buren v. US

    18 U.S.C. 1030(a). The broad and potentially uncertain scope of “exceeds authorization” is the Focus of the Supreme Court’s November 30, 2020 oral arguments in Van Buren v. United States.

    As a police officer, Mr. Van Buren was authorized to search the Georgia Crime Information Center database, but only for police business. As part of a broader FBI sting, Van Buren agreed to and did-actually search the database at the request of private citizen (Albo). In particular, Albo paid Van Buren $6,000 to search the license-plate records of a prostitute that Albo was considering hiring.

    [...]

    18 U.S.C.A. § 1030(e)(6). Martin’s simple statutory argument: As a police officer, he was authorized to access and obtain the license-plate information, even if he did so here for an inappropriate reason. The 11th Circuit disagreed and followed its prior precedent in U.S. v. Rodriguez (11th Cir. 2010). Rodriguez is a closely parallel case of an SSA employee who conducted personal searches on the SSA databases. In that case, the 11th Circuit affirmed the CFAA conviction.

    One underlying issue here is that the 11th Circuit’s approach seemingly makes it a federal crime for an individual to obtain information after violation of a terms-of-use. The government argues that prosecutorial discretion is sufficient to avoid these concerns and that the statute should be “specifically and authorized” individuals, not the general public.

    [...]

    The government repeatedly worked to draw an analogy between the information at issue here and property rights. The case may turn on the extent that the Supreme Court finds that analogy appropriate. In particular, the government will likely win if we think of exceeding access as a form of “stealing information” as parallel to that of a brick-and-mortar store employee taking money from the till. The employee has access to the money, but exceeds access by taking it out.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Stop Taking Regular Notes; Use a Zettelkasten Instead

    Because the notes stay as separate notes. Ideas and knowledge remains scattered as individual pieces. In regular note-taking, connections between ideas are not made by default. When reviewing a note, other relevant notes (i.e., ideas) don’t present themselves. If your notes are digital, you might do a free-text search. If not, you might flip through your notebooks, or worse, not bother.

    I didn’t realise this was an issue until I stumbled upon the Zettelkasten, which emphasizes building connections between notes.

  • [Old] 2020-07-20 Does a Gemini certificate need a Common Name matching the domain?

    It’s a rhetoric question. I think it does not because the Gemini world uses “trust on first use” (TOFU). That is, a Gemini client visits a Gemini server for the first time, and if it doesn’t know the certificate, it silently stores a fingerprint of said certificate. The next time the Gemini client visits the same Gemini server, the client verifies that the fingerprint still matches. If it does, then nobody has been meddling with the encryption. If it has changed, a warning is usually shown to the user.

    Trust on first use

    The benefit is that we can use self-signed certificates. No promises are made, and you might run into a trap on your first use, but once you begin to trust a site, you can be sure that nobody is meddling with your encryption as long as the fingerprints stay the same.

  • [Old] Recursive Regular Expression

    PCRE 4.0 and later introduced regular expression recursion, this allow to re-execute all or a part of the regular expression on the unmatched text. To use recursive regex, you use (?R) or (?0).

    When the regex engine reaches (?R). This tells the engine to attempt the whole regex again at the present position in the string. If you want only to reapply a specific part of the regex then you use the grouping index: (?1), (?2)

    Using this, we can solve more complex problems with regex. Let's start by a more simple one and try to detect palindromes:

  • Recursive Regular Expressions

    This allows us to construct something really interesting - we can define a regular expression that has itself in the "code" part. The result is a recursive regular expression!

    One of the classical problems that a regular expression can't match is the language 0n1n, i.e., a string with a number of zeroes followed by an equal number of ones. Surprisingly, using the lazy regular subexpressions this problem becomes tractable!

    Here is a Perl regular expression that matches 0n1n: [...]

  • Basename Command in Linux | Linuxize

    basename is a command-line utility that strips directory and trailing suffix from given file names.

  • Getting started with Stratis – up and running - Fedora Magazine

    When adding storage to a Linux server, system administrators often use commands like pvcreate, vgcreate, lvcreate, and mkfs to integrate the new storage into the system. Stratis is a command-line tool designed to make managing storage much simpler. It creates, modifies, and destroys pools of storage. It also allocates and deallocates filesystems from the storage pools.

    Instead of an entirely in-kernel approach like ZFS or Btrfs, Stratis uses a hybrid approach with components in both user space and kernel land. It builds on existing block device managers like device mapper and existing filesystems like XFS. Monitoring and control is performed by a user space daemon.

    Stratis tries to avoid some ZFS characteristics like restrictions on adding new hard drives or replacing existing drives with bigger ones. One of its main design goals is to achieve a positive command-line experience.

  • Install PHP 8.0 on CentOS, RHEL or Fedora - Remi's RPM repository - Blog

    Here is a quick howto upgrade default PHP version provided on Fedora, RHEL or CentOS with latest version 8.0.

  • LXer: Laptop Dual Boot Project

    Its cool, it is a 15” ASUS VivoBook, with an Intel core i3 10th gen running Windows 10 on it. It has a 120gig HD with 80 of them still free to use. All I have done to it is install Chrome and LibreOffice 7.0. That’s it. So far everything I do on my laptop I do on the internet so I only use Chrome while being connected to the internet. I’ve had my new laptop for a couple of months now and being the lover of Linux and all things FOSS I really want to use Linux instead of Windows but I need to keep Windows around in case I need it for something I just absolutely can’t do without it. I also need to keep Windows so that in case I need to I can take advantage of the 2 year warranty that came with the laptop.

    So, the answer? I want to install Linux onto a USB drive and boot into Linux from there. That way the laptop stays in “stock” condition. I have two jump-drives, a 16gig and an 8gig that I can use to install different versions of Linux onto and see if they work with my laptop’s hardware. I have loved Linux and all things FOSS for the last 15 years or so and I have learned a lot but I make no claims on being an expert. That distinction is for others who know far more than I. One of those people is my good friend Donald Carter. We have known each other for..what is it? 10, 15 years now, I’ve lost count. He is an expert. I’m not.

    I’m just dangerous enough to want to mess with the hardware I own and software I use. He has been supporting computer hardware and software in one form or another for a long time. I asked Don for his help and he said yes. Thank the Gods! So here we go..

  • How to Install Budgie Desktop on Ubuntu

    The Budgie desktop is a fast, simple, and elegant desktop environment. It's a lightweight desktop environment that combines stability and a traditional-looking Ubuntu look-and-feel. Written in C and Gnome based, Budgie desktop is developed by Solus project and is now integrated with Ubuntu Budgie.

    In this guide, we will show you how to install Budgie desktop 20.10 on Ubuntu 18.04/20.04.

  • How To Install PHP 8 on Debian 10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PHP 8 on Debian 10. For those of you who didn’t know, PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a popular server scripting language known for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages. PHP is a widely-used programming language on the Web.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of PHP 8 on a Debian 10 (Buster).

New YouTube Videos: MX Linux 19.3, Startx, Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install Python 3.9 on CentOS/RHEL 8 – TecAdmin

    Recently, Python development team released latest stable version of Python 3.9. You can download it from its official pages. New version comes with multiple new features and security updates. Python 3.9 uses a new more flexible parser, based on PEG, which replaces LL parser. In the next Python versions the old parser will be deleted.

    This tutorial describe you to how to install Python 3.9 on CentOS 8 and RHEL 8 systems. In this tutorial, we will install Python from the source code.

  • How to Install Jitsi Meet on CentOS 8 - RoseHosting

    Quick guide on how to install Jitsi Meet on CentOS 8. We've made the steps easy to follow so you can have Jitsi Meet running in no time.

  • How to create and use a CodeCommit GIT Repository on AWS

    CodeCommit hosts Git-based repositories and is a fully managed service by AWS. Teams can use it to collaborate on code in a secure and highly scalable way. It helps us to eliminate the need of having our own self-hosted Source Code Management (SCM) system and manage it on our own.

  • How to use bash if -z and if -n for testing strings in Linux

    There are different string operators available in bash scripting language which can be used to test strings. The -z and -n operators are used to verify whether the string is Null or not. In this guide, we will test these string operators using the if statement in Centos 8.

  • How to Open and Edit Files and Folders on Debian GNOME Desktop as an Administrator

    In Linux, there always seems to be an ingenious way of getting things done. For any task, there’s always more than one command-line utility to execute it in a better way. The Linux stat command is a command-line tool used to display detailed information about a file. In this guide, we highlight 8 stat command usages in Linux. This works across all Linux distributions.

  • How to Open and Edit Files and Folders on Debian GNOME Desktop as an Administrator

    While working with files and folders as a Linux Administrator, we frequently need to access and edit files and folders that require root/super-user permissions. We usually perform this task through the Debian Terminal(the command line utility) using the sudo function. However, when we need to edit files that require root privileges through the Graphical Interface, we need to have a solid workaround for that.

    The latest versions of Debian, like Debian 10, comes with a default file manager by the name of Nautilus. This open source file manager created for our GNOME desktops gives us a way to manage our files and applications. It also lets us open and edit our files and folders as a Debian administrator.

  • How to Deploy a Clojure Web Application with Nginx on Ubuntu 20.04

    Clojure is a modern, dynamic and powerful programming language on the Java platform. It is based on the LISP programming language and has compilers that make it possible to be run on both Java and .Net runtime environment. Clojure helps you to build systems from the ground up without touching Java code directly. Currently, it is used by many large companies including, Walmart and Puppet Lab.

    In this tutorial, we will explain how to deploy a Clojure Web Application on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to get Linux to see the FEITIAN fingerprint reader for FIDO2 security - TechRepublic

    There are quite a lot of security devices available for users and admins to work with. Many of these devices offer the ability to save credentials such that only with that device present, can you log in to an account. That's fundamentally how FIDO2 works, and there are plenty of companies that make such devices.

  • How to reset your Linux password with the Ubuntu live disk

    Did you forget your password on your Linux PC? Can’t get back in? Don’t worry! You can use the Ubuntu live disk to reset your password! In this guide, we’ll show you how to do it!

  • How to install WPS Office 2019 on Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install WPS Office 2019 on Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How to install FireAlpaca on a Chromebook with Crossover 20

    Today we are looking at how to install FireAlpaca on a Chromebook with Crossover 20. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    This tutorial will only work on Chromebooks with an Intel or AMD CPU (with Linux Apps Support) and not those with an ARM64 architecture CPU.

pip 20.3 release

Filed under
Development

On behalf of the Python Packaging Authority, I am pleased to announce

that we have just released pip 20.3, a new version of pip. You can

install it by running `python -m pip install --upgrade pip`.

This is an important and disruptive release -- we explained why in a

blog post last year

Read more

Western Digital WD_BLACK SN850 NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This month Western Digital introduced the WD_BLACK SN850 as the latest PCI Express 4.0 solid-state drive hitting the market. The WD_BLACK SN850 is a surprisingly strong performer if looking to upgrade to PCIe 4.0 solid-state storage, competing with the fastest of the consumer drives currently available.

The WD_BLACK SN850 makes use of Western Digital's G2 controller and 96L TLC NAND flash memory. The 1TB drive being tested today is rated for 7,000 MB/s sequential reads and 5,300 MB/s sequential writes and 1 million IOPS for random reads and 720k IOPS for random writes.

Read more

GNU Octave 6.1 Released with Improvements / New Functions

Filed under
Development
GNU

GNU Octave 6.1 was released a few days ago with numerous improvements, bug-fixes, and a list of new functions.

Changes in Octave 6.1 include...

There’s no PPA repository contains the new release package at the moment of writing.

Before the official Snap package and the community maintained Flatpak package publish the new package, you can download & build GNU Octave from the source tarball...

Read more

RISC-V, the Linux of the chip world, is starting to produce technological breakthroughs

Filed under
Hardware

A decade ago, an idea was born in a laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley to create a lingua franca for computer chips, a set of instructions that would be used by all chipmakers and owned by none.

It wasn't supposed to be an impressive new technology, it was merely supposed to get the industry on the same page, to simplify chip-making in order to move things forward.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Five practical guides for managing Linux terminal and commands [Ed: People from Linux Foundation are renaming GNU programs "LINUX"]
  • Add a subcommand showing GNU Guix history of all packages

    Hello, everyone! I'm Magali and for the next three months, I'll be an Outreachy intern in the GNU Guix community. As part of my Outreachy application process, I made my first ever contribution to Free Software adding a package to Guix, and since then I'm eager to begin contributing even more. My task for this three-month period is to add a subcommand showing the history of all packages. Although Guix makes it possible to install and have an older version of a package, it isn't as easy to find, for example, the commit related to these versions. The subcommand I'll implement will be something like guix git log. The idea is that, for instance, when the user invokes guix git log --oneline | grep msmtp, a list with all the commits, one per line, related to msmtp, will be shown.

  • WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 2

    Welcome to the second part of this series introducing Ansible collection for JCliff. This new extension is designed for fine-tuning WildFly or Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) configurations using Ansible. In Part 1, we installed JCliff and its Ansible collection and prepared our environment. We set up a minimal, working playbook for installing JCliff on the target system. In this article, we will focus on configuring a few of our WildFly server’s subsystems.

  • Bpytop on openSUSE

    I recently published an article about how great Bashtop is on openSUSE, and when I was nearly done with it, I was told about Bpytop. Since I was going through the final edit, I didn’t just want to dump what I did before but rather, follow it up with Bpytop. I am not sure how far behind the curve I am now and maybe there is something even cooler out there but before anyone tells me what the latest hotness is in terminal, system monitoring applications, I am feverishly writing about this What is so great about Bpytop? If you are a nerd about what your system is doing and like to see the numbers, charts graphs, etc, and you have previously enjoyed Bashtop, Bpytop is going to send tingles of joy down your finger tips. The little bits of information it gives you from CPU load, load average, and frequency is superb. The chart it produces on the CPU usage looks fantastic and really makes you wonder how they accomplished this when it is only in text mode. Truly a feat of terminal engineering!

  • Work-around in Linux to switch between single-sided and double-sided printing | Fitzcarraldo's Blog

    I use Gentoo Linux on my laptop, and have drivers installed for quite a few printer manufacturers and models, as I work in multiple offices and they have a wide range of printers and MFPs. To date I have had no trouble printing single-sided (‘simplex’) and double-sided (‘duplex’) documents on the printers that support duplex printing. However, one of the offices I have been working in recently has a Konica Minolta bizhub C368, a floor-standing MFP, and the printer in this MFP did not enable me to switch between single-sided and double-sided printing even though Windows users in the same office could. This article explains how I managed to switch between the two printing modes.

  • [Older] LFCS - Scheduling Tasks

    Sometimes it is necessary to have tasks execute at specific times. Automating tasks to run at specific times can be a very necessary administrative function. Even on a home system tasks can be automated to reduce your time from ‘babysitting’ your system.

  • Everything you need to know about Kubernetes namespaces. - UX Techno

    Kubernetes namespaces is a virtual cluster being created within the actual Kubernetes cluster. This will bring separation between the different Kubernetes objects such as Pods, deployments and service etc. This will comes handy in order to separate your cluster environment wise or among the different teams.

Daiki Ueno: What’s new in GnuTLS 3.7.0

On behalf of the GnuTLS team, I am pleased to present GnuTLS 3.7.0, the first cut of the 3.7 series. This is the result of several months of planning and work by 25 contributors and includes feature enhancements and behavior changes, such as removal of deprecated functions and tightening of system requirements. In this entry, I will try to detail some notable features in the release. API for on-demand CA certificates retrieval During the TLS authentication phase, the server typically presents a chain of X.509 certificates, from the end-entity certificate to the trusted CA certificate. The AIA extension allows the server to omit certain portion of the certificate chain, by pointing to the location where the client can download the missing certificates. Although GnuTLS provides a means to override the certificate verification logic completely through callbacks, this task is error-prone and thus desired to be supported natively. Sahana Prasad introduced the new set of API that allow applications to safely complement the certificate chain. The API is already being used in glib-networking. Read more

Kernel: Zen 3, Bootlin and Collabora

  • EPYC Zen 3 CPU Support Coming To Linux's AMD_Energy Driver - Phoronix

    In addition to AMD Zen 1/2/3 PowerCap RAPL support coming for the Linux 5.11 kernel, the hwmon-next Git branch has also queued initial support for Zen 3 processors within the AMD_Energy driver. The AMD_Energy driver was introduced earlier this year and merged for Linux 5.8 for easily exposing AMD CPU energy metrics -- albeit the list of supported CPU models was later restricted to EPYC CPUs.

  • Videos and slides of Bootlin's talks at Live Embedded Event 2020 - Bootlin's blog

    Yesterday, Bootlin co-organized and participated to the first edition of Live Embedded Event, a new online conference dedicated to embedded systems topics. In addition to co-organizing the event, we also gave four different talks at this conference, and we are happy to share the slides and videos of our talks.

  • Linux 5.11 Adding An "Inhibited" Feature To Temporarily Disregard Select Input Devices - Phoronix

    This input inhibited property is being led by Google ChromeOS engineers in conjunction with Collabora and the initial use-case for inhibiting input from select devices is a 2-in-1/laptop use-case where the keyboard may be folded under the screen for creating a tablet-like experience. This new property allows for such a property to be created in user-space so that when such a keyboard folding event occurs it could inhibit the input from that given device. Other use-cases will also surely materialize.

Open Hardware/Modding: Open-Source Firmware Conference (OSFC 2020), Arduino, Raspberry Pi and PINE64

  • AMD Is Making Progress On Open-Source Firmware - Initially With OpenBMC - Phoronix

    While we are still waiting to see what AMD might do for returning to open-source AGESA or better supporting Coreboot and the like, they are making some inroads with open-source firmware support -- beyond the context of Chromebooks where they continue to engage due to Google's engineering requirements. AMD is working to "align with the industry direction of open-source firmware stacks" with their initial focus being on open-source OpenBMC firmware support for their server platforms. AMD's Supreeth Venkatesh spoke at this week's virtual Open-Source Firmware Conference (OSFC 2020) on the work they are pursuing around OpenBMC. It was acknowledged that this work is being done due to the industry direction these days of preferring open-source firmware stacks (and being "a good open-source citizen") but stopped short of outlining any other open-source firmware plans at this time outside of OpenBMC. Given the customer interest and industry trends they have been working to support open-source OpenBMC support on the AMD server reference platforms. From the presentation, it looks like Twitter's engineering team has been involved with the bring-up and among the interested users but surely other key industry players are also taking note.

  • $25 TTGO T5 4.7-inch e-Paper Display comes with ESP32 WiFi & Bluetooth SoC

    We’ve very recently covered M5paper IoT development kit based on ESP32 WiSoC, and equipped with a 4.7-inch touchscreen e-Ink display together with a 1,150mAh battery all nicely packed into an enclosure. It looks great, but costs $69, so if you’d like to integrate this type of ESP32 connected display into your own project at a lower cost, you may be interested in TTGO T5 4.7-inch e-Paper display with 16 gray levels fitted with an ESP32-WROVER-E module with 16MB flash, and 8MB PSRAM. [...] The company says the display can be programmed with the Arduino IDE, ESP-IDF or MicroPython, but they only provide sample code for Arduino based on EPDiy E-Paper Driver project. Typical applications listed by LilyGO include desktop weather station, STEM education, and IoT device.

  • Private Git Web Portal in Raspberry PI With Gogs
  • Pine Store Community Pricing & Online Retail Stores

    In 2021 you’ll see online retail Pine stores open in Europe, North America and possibly also worldwide at a later stage. Let me start by making one thing clear – the current Pine Store isn’t going away and the pricing in the Pine Store will remain unchanged. You’ll always be able to buy and pre-order your devices from pine64.com at a community-oriented price point. The retail stores will function alongside the Pine Store, not replace it, and offer a different customer experience. In this blog I’ll explain the rationale behind this strategy.

    PINE64 is not a business

    First things first – PINE64 is a community, not a business, and the Pine Store’s sole purpose is to serve this community by providing FOSS development-friendly hardware. Sales numbers and revenue are not, and never were, a driving force behind this project; making the next fun and often experimental device was and still is. Some devices, such as the original Pinebook, were even sold at a loss at times – simply because we knew people wanted one. Seriously.