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Friday, 15 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Dark Mode on Apple’s macOS? Linux did it First

Filed under
Linux

Last year, Apple introduced the highly anticipated “dark mode” feature on their macOS (Mojave) desktop operating system. Many Apple fans regarded it as a cool and useful enhancement to their desktop user interface. It allowed users to turn on the system-wide dark color scheme and encouraged third-party app developers to offer a dark mode for their Mac apps. If you are thinking that Apple is the first to use this feature on the desktop, think again.

As far as I can remember, Linux is the first desktop OS that lets users easily customize the UI and provided plenty of dark theme options. I think Ubuntu started the trend in using darker themes out of the box several years ago, and they did it in a more elegant way when compared to other Linux distros. Elegant in a way that the dark scheme UI was consistently used and built-in apps were using dark themes.

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Firefox Tips, Mozilla Against Facebook, DRM (EME) in GNU/Linux and MiUnlockTool Against Bootloader Lockdown

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Change look & feel of Firefox pinned tabs

    Here's a curious corner case for you. About a year ago, Firefox Quantum introduced a whole bunch of radical changes in how it works and behaves, the biggest among them the switch to WebExtensions. This move made a lot of friendly, powerful extensions not work anymore, including a range of tab management addons. On the upside, Firefox also brought about the integrated tab pinning feature. It works nicely. But.

    Pinned tabs will detach from the tab bar and position themselves to the left, somewhat like a typical desktop quicklaunch icon area. So far so good, but the corner case be here! As it happens, the pinned tabs are relatively narrow, which means quick stab 'n' open action isn't quite possible. You need to be accurate positioning your mouse cursor, and that could slow you down. There does not seem to be a trivial option to change the width of the pinned tabs. Hence this guide.

  • Mozilla Open Letter: Facebook, Do Your Part Against Disinformation

    Is Facebook making a sincere effort to be transparent about the content on its platform? Or, is the social media platform neglecting its promises?

    Facebook promised European lawmakers and users it would increase the transparency of political advertising on the platform to prevent abuse during the elections. But in the very same breath, they took measures to block access to transparency tools that let users see how they are being targeted.

    With the 2019 EU Parliamentary Elections on the horizon, it is vital that Facebook take action to address this problem. So today, Mozilla and 32 other organizations — including Access Now and Reporters Without Borders — are publishing an open letter to Facebook.

  • Review of Igalia’s Multimedia Activities (2018/H2)

    EME is a specification for enabling playback of encrypted content in Web bowsers that support HTML 5 video.

    In a downstream project for WPE WebKit we managed to have almost full test coverage in the YoutubeTV 2018 test suite.

    We merged our contributions in upstream, WebKit and GStreamer, most of what is legal to publish, for example, making demuxers aware of encrypted content and make them to send protection events with the initialization data and the encrypted caps, in order to select later the decryption key.

    We started to coordinate the upstreaming process of a new implementation of CDM (Content Decryption Module) abstraction and there will be even changes in that abstraction.

  • MiUnlockTool unlocks Xiaomi phones' bootloader on macOS and Linux

    MiUnlockTool is a third party bootloader unlock utility which runs on Linux and macOS. The official Xiaomi tool for unlocking bootloader is Windows only.

Fedora, Red Hat and IBM

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 30 Will Get Bash 5.0 But Yum's Death Sentence Postponed To F31

    Fedora's Engineering and Steering Committee approved new work around the in-development Fedora 30. 

    Originally Fedora 29 was going to drop the old Yum package manager bits now that the DNF package manager has been in good shape for years and is largely a drop-in replacement to Yum. That didn't happen for Fedora 29 and just recently was proposed to drop Yum 3 for Fedora 30, but with that change coming in late and some tooling bits not ready in time, that has been diverted to Fedora 31. FESCo approves of dropping Yum 3 for Fedora 31 and is hoping it will be removed right after Rawhide branches for F30, giving plenty of time to fix any issues that may come up or other unexpected problems. 

  • Measuring user experience success with building blocks

    PatternFly is an open source design system used by Red Hat to maintain visual consistency and usability across the product portfolio. When the PatternFly team started work on PatternFly 4, the next major version of the system, they focused a large part of their effort on evolving the visual language. But how would users respond to the new look and feel?

    To get the raw and unfiltered feedback the team needed, Sara Chizari, a UXD user researcher, planned a reaction study with a fun twist and then headed to Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

  • Backup partners target Red Hat Ceph Storage

    Red Hat Ceph Storage provides object, block and file data services for organizations modernizing their hybrid-cloud and data analytics infrastructures. With the release of Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2, improved performance and functionality is driving new storage use cases in the modernized datacenter.

    In addition to data security and integrity, organizations must consider their strategy around data protection, backup and archiving. Whether you are backing up your enterprise application data as part of a disaster recovery strategy, or you are performing deep archives of sensitive records, rich media, or regulated data, Red Hat works with industry-leading backup, recovery and archiving partners to certify Ceph as a backup target for your most important data.

  • Effortless API creation with full API lifecycle using Red Hat Integration (Part 1)

    Nowadays, API development with proper lifecycle management often takes days if not weeks to get a simple API service up and running. One of the main reasons behind this is there are always way too many parties involved in the process. Plus there are hours of development and configuration.

  • Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

    Microservices architecture is taking over software development discussions everywhere. More and more companies are adapting to develop microservices as the core of their new systems. However, when going beyond the “microservices 101” googled tutorial, required services communications become more and more complex. Scalable, distributed systems, container-native microservices, and serverless functions benefit from decoupled communications to access other dependent services. Asynchronous (non-blocking) direct or brokered interaction is usually referred to as messaging.

    Managing and setting up messaging infrastructure components for development use was usually a long prerequisite task requiring several days on the project calendar. Need a queue or topic? Wait at least a couple weeks. Raise a ticket with your infrastructure operations team, grab a large cup of coffee, and pray for them to have some time to provision it. When your development team is adopting an agile approach, waiting days for infrastructure is not acceptable.

  • Settling In With IBM i For The Long Haul

    If nothing else, the IBM i platform has exhibited extraordinary longevity. One might even say legendary longevity, if you want to take its history all the way back to the System/3 minicomputer from 1969. This is the real starting point in the AS/400 family tree and this is when Big Blue, for very sound legal and technical and marketing reasons, decided to fork its products to address the unique needs of large enterprises (with the System/360 mainframe and its follow-ons) and small and medium businesses (starting with the System/3 and moving on through the System/34, System/32, System/38, and System/36 in the 1970s and early 1980s and passing through the AS/400, AS/400e, iSeries, System i, and then IBM i on Power Systems platforms.

    It has been a long run indeed, and many customers who have invested in the platform started way back then and there with the early versions of RPG and moved their applications forward and changed them as their businesses evolved and the depth and breadth of corporate computing changed, moving on up through RPG II, RPG III, RPG IV, ILE RPG, and now RPG free form. Being on this platform for even three decades makes you a relative newcomer.

Programming: GCC, Django and Python

Filed under
Development

FSF/FSFE: FSF Annual Report and FSFE Planet Improvement

Filed under
GNU
  • FSF Fiscal Year 2017 Annual Report now available

    The Annual Report reviews the FSF's activities, accomplishments, and financial picture from October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2017. It is the result of a full external financial audit, along with a focused study of program results. It examines the impact of the FSF's events, programs, and activities, including the annual LibrePlanet conference, the Respects Your Freedom (RYF) hardware certification program, and the fight against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM).

    "Software filters the information we receive about the world, the messages we put out into the world, and even the way we physically move in the world," said FSF executive director John Sullivan in his introduction to the FY2017 report. "If the software is not free 'as in freedom'... the consequences for the rest of us will be loss of democracy, privacy, security, freedom of speech, freedom of movement -- and even loss of life."

    The FSF publishes its financials and annual report as part of their commitment to transparency. Along with its strong financial health, accountability and transparency are the reasons the FSF is a Charity Navigator Four Star Charity.

  • FSFE Planet has been refurbished

    If you are reading these lines, you are already accessing the brand-new planet of the FSFE. While Björn, Coordinator of Team Germany, has largely improved the design in late 2017, we tackled many underlying issues this time.

Linux Foundation: Kubernetes, ODPi, and Open Mainframe Project (OMP)

Filed under
Linux
  • Gain Valuable Kubernetes Skills and Certification with Linux Foundation Training

    Quick, what was the the most dominant technology skill requested by IT firms in 2018? According to a study from job board Dice, Kubernetes skills dominated among IT firm requests, and this news followed similar findings released last year from jobs board Indeed. The Dice report, based on its available job postings, found that Kubernetes was heavily requested by IT recruiters as well as hiring managers. As SDX Central has reported: “Indeed’s work found that Kubernetes had the fastest year-over-year surge in job searches among IT professionals. It also found that related job postings increased 230 percent between September 2017 and September 2018.”

  • ODPi Announces New Egeria Conformance Program to Advance Open Metadata Exchange Between Vendor Tools

    ODPi, a nonprofit Linux Foundation project, accelerating the open ecosystem of big data solutions, today announced the ODPi Egeria Conformance Program, which ensures vendors who ship ODPi Egeria in their product offerings are delivering a consistent set of APIs and capabilities, such that data governance professionals can easily build an enterprise-wide metadata catalog that all their data tools can easily leverage.

    Egeria is one of the open source projects under the ODPi umbrella. ODPi aims to be a standard for simplifying, sharing and developing an open big data ecosystem.

  • Open Mainframe Project Advances Modern Mainframe with Production Ready Zowe 1.0

    The Open Mainframe Project (OMP) announced today that Zowe, an open source software framework for the mainframe that strengthens integration with modern enterprise applications, is now production ready less than six months after launching. Any enterprise or solution developer can access the Zowe 1.0 source code or convenience build and incorporate it into their products or services with the agility and scalability of a cloud platform.

    Hosted by The Linux Foundation, the Open Mainframe Project is comprised of business and academic leaders within the mainframe community that collaborate to develop shared tool sets and resources. OMP launched Zowe, the first-ever open source project based on z/OS, last August to serve as an integration platform for the next generation of tools for administration, management and development on z/OS mainframes.

Graphics: Pixman, Vulkan, Sway and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Pixman 0.38 Released With Meson Build System Support

    Pixman 0.38 is out this morning to kick off a new week of open-source software releases. Pixman is the pixel manipulation library used by the X.Org Server, Cairo, and other Linux software projects.

    The Pixman 0.38 release isn't the most exciting update and in fact only a handful of changes over Pixman 0.36 from last November, which itself was the first update to this library in three years. Pixman doesn't see too much activity these days thanks in part to more software using Vulkan and OpenGL to benefit from GPU hardware acceleration. The two primary changes of Pixman 0.38.0 is introducing Meson build system support and implementing floating point gradient computation.

  • Vulkan 1.1.100 Released Ahead Of Vulkan's Third Birthday

    Vulkan 1.1.100 was published this morning as the latest version of this high-performance, multi-platform graphics and compute API.

    While the patch version rolled over to 100, that's about as exciting as this update gets to Vulkan API with no major changes to mark this milestone. There aren't any great new extensions or major changes to this version number, but just some documentation/specification clarifications and corrections.

  • Sway 1.0 Close To Release For This Very Promising Wayland Compositor

    Out today is the second release candidate of the feature-packed Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor that continues to be inspired by the i3 window manager.

    Since last week's Sway 1.0 RC1, the compositor entered its feature freeze until the stable release happens. As such, in today's Sway 1.0 RC2 update is just a variety of bug/regression fixes.

    The Sway 1.0 development over the past number of months has brought a lot of improvements and new features from multi-GPU support, support for new Wayland protocols, video capture support, integration around the WLROOTS library, tablet support, and many other additions.

  • NVIDIA's VDPAU Picks Up HEVC 4:4:4 Support

    While NVIDIA is no longer active promoting their Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix "VDPAU" in favor of the cross-platform, CUDA-focused Video Codec SDK with NVENC/NVDEC, the VDPAU library still sees some rare activity from time to time.

    As the first commits since November, last week libvdpau added support for the HEVC 4:4:4 profile to the VDPAU API. This support for H.265 4:4:4 video decoding was added to the libvdpau API and presumably will be exposed by the NVIDIA proprietary driver shortly if it's not already in place with its own VDPAU library build.

Security: Updates, SS7, Docker, Thunderbolt, Django

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • SS7 Cellular Network Flaw Nobody Wants To Fix Now Being Exploited To Drain Bank Accounts

    Back in 2017, you might recall how hackers and security researchers highlighted long-standing vulnerabilities in Signaling System 7 (SS7, or Common Channel Signalling System 7 in the US), a series of protocols first built in 1975 to help connect phone carriers around the world. While the problem isn't new, a 2016 60 minutes report brought wider attention to the fact that the flaw can allow a hacker to track user location, dodge encryption, and even record private conversations. All while the intrusion looks like ordinary carrier to carrier chatter among a sea of other, "privileged peering relationships."

    Telecom lobbyists have routinely tried to downplay the flaw after carriers have failed to do enough to stop hackers from exploiting it. In Canada for example, the CBC recently noted how Bell and Rogers weren't even willing to talk about the flaw after the news outlet published an investigation showing how, using only the number of his mobile phone, it was possible to intercept the calls and movements of Quebec NDP MP Matthew Dubé.

    But while major telecom carriers try to downplay the scale of the problem, news reports keep indicating how the flaw is abused far more widely than previously believed. This Motherboard investigation by Joseph Cox, for example, showed how, while the attacks were originally only surmised to be within the reach of intelligence operators (perhaps part of the reason intelligence-tied telcos have been so slow to address the issue), hackers have increasingly been using the flaw to siphon money out of targets' bank accounts, thus far predominately in Europe...

  • Doomsday Docker Security Hole Uncovered

    Red Hat technical product manager for containers, Scott McCarty, warned: "The disclosure of a security flaw (CVE-2019-5736) in runc and docker illustrates a bad scenario for many IT administrators, managers, and CxOs. Containers represent a move back toward shared systems where applications from many different users all run on the same Linux host. Exploiting this vulnerability means that malicious code could potentially break containment, impacting not just a single container, but the entire container host, ultimately compromising the hundreds-to-thousands of other containers running on it. While there are very few incidents that could qualify as a doomsday scenario for enterprise IT, a cascading set of exploits affecting a wide range of interconnected production systems qualifies...and that's exactly what this vulnerability represents."

  • Doomsday Docker security hole uncovered
  • It starts with Linux: How Red Hat is helping to counter Linux container security flaws

    The disclosure of a security flaw (CVE-2019-5736) in runc and docker illustrates a bad scenario for many IT administrators, managers, and CxOs. Containers represent a move back toward shared systems where applications from many different users all run on the same Linux host. Exploiting this vulnerability means that malicious code could potentially break containment, impacting not just a single container, but the entire container host, ultimately compromising the hundreds-to-thousands of other containers running on it. A cascading set of exploits affecting a wide range of interconnected production systems qualifies as a difficult scenario for any IT organization and that’s exactly what this vulnerability represents.

    For many Red Hat end users, it’s unlikely that this flaw gets that far. IT organizations using Red Hat Enterprise Linux to underpin their Linux container and cloud-native deployments are likely protected, thanks to SELinux. This vulnerability is mitigated by the use of SELinux in targeted enforcing mode, which prevents this vulnerability from being exploited. The default for SELinux on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is targeted enforcing mode and it is rarely disabled in a containerized environment.

  • Kubernetes, Docker, ContainerD Impacted by RunC Container Runtime Bug

    The Linux community is dealing with another security flaw, with the latest bug impacting the runC container runtime that underpins Docker, cri-o, containerd, and Kubernetes.

    The bug, dubbed CVE-2019-5736, allows an infected container to overwrite the host runC binary and gain root-level code access on the host. This would basically allow the infected container to gain control of the overarching host container and allow an attacker to execute any command.

  • Thunderbolt preboot access control list support in bolt

    Recent BIOS versions enabled support for storing a limited list of UUIDs directly in the thunderbolt controller. This is called the pre-boot access control list (or preboot ACL), in bolt simply called "bootacl". The devices corresponding to the devices in the bootacl will be authorized during pre-boot (and only then) by the firmware. One big caveat about this feature should be become obvious now: No device verification can happen because only the UUIDs are stored but not the key, so if you are using SECURE mode but enable preboot ACL in the BIOS you effectively will get USER mode during boot.

    The kernel exposes the bootacl via a per-domain sysfs attribute boot_acl. Every time a device is enrolled, boltd will automatically add it to the bootacl as well. Conversely if the device is forgotten and it is in the bootacl, boltd will automatically remove it from the bootacl. There are is small complication to these seemingly straight forward operations: in BIOS assist mode, the thunderbolt controller is powered down by the firmware if no device is connected to it. Therefore when devices are forgotten boltd might not be able to directly write to the boot_acl sysfs attribute. In a dual boot scenario this is complicated by the fact that another operating system might also modify the bootacl and thus we might be out of sync. As the solution to this boltd will write individual changes to a journal file if the thunderbolt controller is powered down and re-apply these changes (as good as possible) the next time the controller is powered up.

  • Django security releases issued: 2.1.6, 2.0.11 and 1.11.19

Games: Adapt or Perish, Axis & Allies Online, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and Pygame

Filed under
Gaming
  • Adapt or Perish, the open world customizable RTS is now out

    Adapt or Perish, the latest game from Phr00t's Software is officially out today. It's an open world RTS with a huge amount of customization thanks to your ability to design your own units.

  • Beamdog have announced Axis & Allies Online, an official adaptation of the tabletop classic

    Beamdog have just announced their latest game, Axis & Allies Online [Official Site], an official adaptation of the tabletop classic and it's coming to Linux.

    Awesome news, since Beamdog have supported Linux well with their previous games like Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition, Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition, Planescape: Torment: Enhanced Edition and more.

  • Total War: THREE KINGDOMS has been delayed

    While we know that Total War: THREE KINGDOMS is coming to Linux thanks to a port from Feral Interactive, it's not clear when and now it's been delayed.

    Originally confirmed for Linux back in September of last year, where they said it would be available "shortly after" the Windows version. The Total War team has today announced that the Windows version has now moved to release on May 23rd, so we're in for a longer wait.

  • Create the player animation

    Hello and welcome back, in this chapter we will create a method which will accept either an x increment or y increment from the game manager object that accepts those increments from the main pygame file when the user presses on the up, down, left or the right arrow key on the keyboard. We will not make the player moves yet in this chapter but just animate that player object, we will make the player moves in the next chapter. There are three files that we need to edit here. First is the player sprite class, we will add in the set x and set y method which will later use to animate the player object.

antiX MX 18.1 Distro Released with Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" Updates

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Debian

Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch," antiX MX 18.1 updates the mx-installer, which is based on gazelle-installer, to address bug that lead to crashes during installation of the GRUB bootloader, adds support in mx-repo-manager to lists even more repository mirrors, and improves MX-PackageInstaller and MX-Conky.

Another important area improved in antiX MX 18.1 is the antiX live-USB image, which now features persistence up to 20GB of disk space, as well as much better UEFI boot capabilities, especially when running it on 64-bit UEFI systems. The devs consider creating a "full-featured" antiX live-USB for 32-bit UEFI systems as well.

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SMARC module taps high-end i.MX8 SoC with Linux BSP

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Android
Linux

The MSC SM2S-IMX8 is a Linux-supported SMARC module with a hexa-core i.MX8 SoC, up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, optional WiFi/BT, a dual GbE controller, plus 4K video, SATA III, PCIe, and optional -40 to 85°C.

Avnet-owned MSC Technologies offers a variety of SMARC modules including the Intel Apollo Lake based SM2F-AL, the i.MX6 driven MSC SM2S-IMX6, and the more recent, i.MX8M based MSC SM2S-IMX8M. Now it has posted a product page for a similar MSC SM2S-IMX8, which uses NXP’s more powerful i.MX8.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Google open sources ClusterFuzz

    The fuzzing software is designed to automatically feed unexpected inputs to an application in order to unearth bugs.

    Google originally wrote ClusterFuzz to test for bugs in its Chrome web browser, throwing 25,000 cores at the task. In 2012, Google said that ClusterFuzz was running around 50 million test cases a day on Chrome. So far it’s helped find some 16,000 bugs in the web browser.

    [...]

    ClusterFuzz has been released under version 2.0 of the Apache License.

  • Google open-sources ClusterFuzz, a tool that has uncovered 16,000 bugs in Chrome

    Ever heard of “fuzzing”? It’s not what you think — in software engineering, the term refers to a bug-detecting technique that involves feeding “unexpected” or out-of-bounds inputs to target programs. It’s especially good at uncovering memory corruption bugs and code assertions, which normally take keen eyes and a lot of manpower — not to mention endless rounds of code review.

    Google’s solution? Pass the fuzzing work off to software. Enter ClusterFuzz, a cheekily named infrastructure running on over 25,000 cores that continuously (and autonomously) probes Chrome’s codebase for bugs. Two years ago, the Mountain View company began offering ClusterFuzz as a free service to open source projects through OSS-Fuzz, and today, it’s open-sourcing it on GitHub.

  • Last week of early birds!

    We do have some parts of the schedule fixed: the trainings and some initial speakers.

    The trainings are open enrollment courses at a bargain price, where parts of the dividends goes to financing the conference. This year we have two great trainers: Michael Kerrisk of manpage and The Linux Programming Interface fame, and Chris Simmonds, the man behind the Mastering Embedded Linux Programming book and a trainer since more than 15 years. The trainings held are: Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux and Fast Track to Embedded Linux. These are both one day courses held in a workshop format.

  • Closing AGPL cloud services loop-hole: a MongoDB approach

    The problem comes with software-as-a-service. Large cloud or hosted services providers have found ways to commercialise popular open source projects without giving anything back, thus limiting software freedom intended by the licensors. The business model primarily focuses on offering managed services, e.g. customisation, integration, service levels and others, to a freely available open source component and charging a fee for this. Open source projects do not usually have the scale to effectively withstand such competition by providing similar offerings. To say the least, this pattern incentivises the writing of the software in closed source code.

    AGPL is not enough to capture such a services scenario. Commercial entities rarely modify open source components and, if they do, releasing corresponding source code to such modifications does not affect their proprietary interests or revenue flow.

Raspberry Pi Founder Shares 10 Things You May Not Have Known

Filed under
Linux

With nearly 25 million units sold, Raspberry Pi is the one of the most popular computing platforms of all-time, and for good reason. A favorite of makers everywhere, these tiny, single-board systems give you enough processing power to run a robot or a retro arcade machine and they start at only $5 (£4.65).

We caught up with Pi Creator and current Raspberry Pi Trading Ltd (the product arm of the Raspberry Pi Foundation) CEO Eben Upton to talk about the fascinating story behind these puny powerhouses and where they're going. In a 40-minute interview, Upton detailed the project's humble beginnings, dished on the next-generation Raspberry Pi, explained why the company keeps selling old devices and told us about the time Google CEO Eric Schmidt called him an idiot.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Dell XPS 13 9380 + Intel Core i7 8565U Ubuntu Linux Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

At the end of January, Dell announced the Dell XPS 13 9380 Developer Edition laptop as an upgraded version of the XPS 9370 with now having Intel Whiskey Lake CPUs and other minor improvements. Over the past two weeks I've been testing out the Dell XPS 9380 with Intel Core i7 8565U processor with 256GB of NVMe SSD storage and 16GB of RAM. Here are benchmarks of the Dell XPS 9380 compared to several other laptops running Ubuntu Linux as well as looking at the system thermal and power consumption among other metrics.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Working To Be Released This Week With New Hardware Enablement Stack

20 Best Raspberry Pi Projects That You Can Start Right Now

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

The Rasberry Pi is a tiny little computer board that lets students, experts, and hobbyists build innovative computing projects at a very affordable cost. Since its inception 6 years ago, it has enjoyed widespread popularity, thanks to the infinite range of possibilities this system offers. The single board computer is now in its third major version and is being widely used for numerous tech projects around the world. If you’re looking for the best raspberry pi projects to get you started with this fantastic platform, you’re at the right place. Today, we’ll present to you 20 raspberry pi projects you can take on, starting from basic level to advanced.

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Android Leftovers

Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB NVMe Linux SSD Benchmarks

Announced at the end of January was the Samsung 970 EVO Plus as the first consumer-grade solid-state drive with 96-layer 3D NAND memory. The Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs are now shipping and in this review are the first Linux benchmarks of these new SSDs in the form of the Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB MZ-V7S500B/AM compared to several other SSDs on Linux. The Samsung 970 EVO Plus uses the same Phoenix controller as in their existing SSDs but the big upgrade with the EVO Plus is the shift to the 96-layer 3D NAND memory. Available now through Internet retailers are the 250GB / 500GB / 1TB versions of the 970 EVO Plus at a new low of just $130 USD for the 500GB model or $250 USD for the 1TB version. A 2GB model is expected to ship this spring. Read more

elementary 5 "Juno"

In the spring of 2014 (nearly five years ago), I was preparing a regular presentation I give most years—where I look at the bad side (and the good side) of the greater Linux world. As I had done in years prior, I was preparing a graph showing the market share of various Linux distributions changing over time. But, this year, something was different. In the span of less than two years, a tiny little Linux distro came out of nowhere to become one of the most watched and talked about systems available. In the blink of an eye, it went from nothing to passing several grand-daddies of Linux flavors that had been around for decades. This was elementary. Needless to say, it caught my attention. Read more

Audiophile Linux Promises Aural Nirvana

Linux isn’t just for developers. I know that might come as a surprise for you, but the types of users that work with the open source platform are as varied as the available distributions. Take yours truly for example. Although I once studied programming, I am not a developer. The creating I do with Linux is with words, sounds, and visuals. I write books, I record audio, and a create digital images and video. And even though I don’t choose to work with distributions geared toward those specific tasks, they do exist. I also listen to a lot of music. I tend to listen to most of my music via vinyl. But sometimes I want to listen to music not available in my format of choice. That’s when I turn to digital music. Read more