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Friday, 22 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora 30 Will Have Firefox Wayland By Default But Could Be Reverted If Too Buggy

Filed under
Red Hat
Moz/FF

The plan to use the Wayland-native version of Firefox by default for Fedora Workstation 30 atop GNOME has been tentatively approved by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo).

At this morning's FESCo meeting, the Fedora stakeholders approved of this late change to ship the Wayland-enabled version of Firefox by default, after they've been carrying this spin of Firefox in their package repository for several cycles but haven't made use of it out-of-the-box. This Firefox Wayland version will be used by Fedora 30 straight-away when running on the GNOME Shell Wayland session.

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Also: Bodhi 3.13.1 released

5 of the Best Linux Distros for Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi debuted in 2012, and since then the tiny computer and its successors have powered countless projects. While you can install regular Ubuntu on a Raspberry Pi, there are plenty of more specialized Linux distributions available. This list includes options that can handle everything from general computing to creating a tiny portable arcade.

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Mesa 18.3.4

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 18.3.4 is now available.

In this release we have:

A fix in the XvMC state-tracker, which was causing some video attributes to
not take affect. On the video front the VAAPI state tracker has seen
improvements with VP9 streams while the amdgpu driver advertises all available
profiles.

On Intel side we have compiler fixes and extra PCI IDs for Coffee Lake and
Ice Lake parts. In the Broadcom drivers a couple of memory leaks were
addressed and the NEON assembly should compile properly on armhf.

Other drivers such as radeonsi, nouveau and freedreno have also seen some
love. The RADV driver has seen addressed to compile correctly with GCC9
amongst other changes.

The Xlib based libGL have been addressed to work with X servers, which lacks
the MIT-SHM extension such as XMing.

To top it up we have a few fixes to the meson build system.

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Also: Mesa 18.3.4 Brings VA-API VP9 Improvements, More Coffeelake/Icelake IDs For Intel

Cutelyst 2.7.0 released, async is back!

Filed under
Development
KDE

Cutelyst a Qt/C++ Web Framework just got a new version. This time bringing back proper async support.

Perl Catalyst Framework was conceived as a sync/blocking framework, due that the Mojolicious framework was created, NodeJS and a few other web frameworks have pushed the async programming to the web. Performance wise being async doesn’t mean you get faster response times, rather the opposite, the need to unroll stack and make extra calls makes a CPU bound application slower.

But depending on the problem to solve it allows you to serve more users at the same time, using the same CPU cores. A typical modern application might receive a request from a Phone App then do a REST API call to an external API which might take 2ms or 200ms for the reply. While waiting for the response, typical sync/blocking applications can’t process more requests, or have to spawn more threads increasing RAM consumption and leveraging concurrency to the OS scheduler. On an Async web application, you can process another request while you wait for the previous request, thus possibly making the first request reply to be sent back to the user at a later time than if there was a dedicated process just waiting for his reply.

So, both ways have pros and cons and IMHO I’d like to support them both. When I started Cutelyst I thought that if I ever need async I could have a local QEventLoop to wait for the reply and would be able to deal with async requests, not recently I found out that supporting QEventLoop was causing stack overflow due it being used in pipelined scenarios, after that I removed it’s usage and performance improved in PlainText tests of TechEmpower, so I advised against using it and marked Cutelyst as not async.

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New Audiocasts: LHS and Destination Linux

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #272: The Weekender XXIV

    Good grief! It's the latest edition of the Weekender! In this episode, the hosts put together a list of amateur radio contests and special events, upcoming open source conferences and a hefty does of hedonism that blends together and goes down like a luxurious sippin' whiskey. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have an amazing upcoming fortnight.

  • Destination Linux EP108 – Ubuntu Studio Amped Up

    On this episode of Destination Linux, we discuss some news for Makulu Linux, GNOME 3.32, IPFire 2.21 and more. We’ll also check out a cool new system deployment tool that could change how multi-booting is done. Then we’ll check out a new desktop offering from ZaReason as well as an overclocking tool for Team Green users. Later in the show we’ll talk about some Linux Gaming news and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

Games: Battle Motion and The Bard's Tale IV: Barrows Deep

Filed under
Gaming

GNU Leveraged for Spying

Filed under
GNU
Microsoft

Debian: INN 2.6.3, Netplan and LTS Work

Filed under
Debian
  • INN 2.6.3

    INN 2.6.3 has been released. This is a bug fix and minor feature release over INN 2.6.2, and the upgrade should be painless. The main ISC downloads page will be updated shortly; in the meantime, you can download the new release from ftp.isc.org or my personal INN pages. The latter also has links to the full changelog and the other INN documentation.

    The big change in this release is support for Python 3. Embedded Python filtering and authentication hooks for innd and nnrpd can now use version 3.3.0 or later of the Python interpreter. Python 2.x is still supported (2.3.0 or later).

  • Netplan support in FAI

    The new version FAI 5.8.1 now generates the configuration file for Ubuntu's netplan tool. It's a YAML description for setting up the network devices, replacing the /etc/network/interfaces file. The FAI CD/USB installation image for Ubuntu now offers two different variants to be installed, Ubuntu desktop and Ubuntu server without a desktop environment. Both are using Ubuntu 18.04 aka Bionic Beaver.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Kali Linux 2019.1 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Welcome to our first release of 2019, Kali Linux 2019.1, which is available for immediate download. This release brings our kernel up to version 4.19.13, fixes numerous bugs, and includes many updated packages.

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Security: new systemd vulnerability, antivirus and more

Arne Exton's Six-in-One MultiBootCD Updated with Latest GNU/Linux Releases

Filed under
Linux

EXTON Linux MultiBootCD 6-OS is a live, bootable ISO image that consists of six popular and minimalist GNU/Linux distributions, including Gparted Live, 4MLinux, Tiny Core Linux, Porteus Linux, PuppEX Slack64, and SliTaz Linux. The latest version, build 190215, is here to update several of these bundled OSes.

As such, EXTON Linux MultiBootCD 6-OS Build 190215 ships with 4MLinux 28.0, Porteus 4.0, Tiny Core Linux 10.0, SliTaz 5.0, and PuppEX Slack64 160822, a GNU/Linux distribution based on the popular Puppy Linux operating system. Also included is the older GParted Live 0.26.1-5 distribution.

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LibreOffice-Based Collabora Online 4.0 Adds New Look, Numerous Improvements

Filed under
LibO

Collabora Online 4.0 comes almost a year after the previous release with a new look that refreshes the toolbar icons, colors, and layout, adds a new icon to let users hide the menu bar, as well as various other smaller tweaks to simplify the user interface while giving users a more enjoyable and productive LibreOffice Online experience.

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Programming with Python

Filed under
Development
  • Made With Mu: A Steady Hand and Heart

    I first met Les at PyCon UK back in 2013. I was coordinating the education track where we had around 40 teachers and 100 kids turn up over two days. This was an impossible endeavour for a single person to take on. Happily, the founding principle of the education track was to bring together, without prejudice, a collaborative and open community of people involved or interested in Python in education. Les was one of several folks who selflessly contributed for the benefit of the whole community: be it moving furniture to turn meeting rooms into classrooms, setting up and configuring equipment, helping out as a teaching assistant or participating in conversations and debates around Python in education, Les was making positive contributions. He was a role model who showed he was open, welcoming and helpful to anyone who turned up.

  • Podcast.__init__: Unpacking The Python Toolkit For Chaos Engineering

    Chaos engineering is the practice of injecting failures into your production systems in a controlled manner to identify weaknesses in your applications. In order to build, run, and report on chaos experiments Sylvain Hellegouarch created the Chaos Toolkit. In this episode he explains his motivation for creating the toolkit, how to use it for improving the resiliency of your systems, and his plans for the future. He also discusses best practices for building, running, and learning from your own experiments.

  • Answering Python questions from readers

    Every so often, I’ve asked readers of my free, weekly “Better developers” newsletter to send me their Python problems. And every so often, I get a chance to answer their questions, going through their Python problems and trying to solve them.

Chamferwm: A Vulkan-Powered X11 Window Manager

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While we have talked about the possibilities of writing a Vulkan Wayland compositor and there was even a short-lived Vulkan renderer for KDE's KWin, it's also possible to write a X11 window manager around the Vulkan interfaces.

Chamferwm is a new tiling X11 window manager that features a Vulkan compositor. Chamferwm doesn't support Wayland at this point but is written using Vulkan and XCB for the X11 bits. This tiling window manager already supports a lot of standard window management functionality, all rendering is done with Vulkan and there is support for user-supplied shaders for decorations/borders, and support as well for using an external compositor.

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Linux 5.0 I/O Scheduler Benchmarks On Laptop & Desktop Hardware

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Our past tests have shown that while most Linux distributions default to "none" for their I/O scheduler on NVMe solid-state storage, that isn't necessarily the best scheduler decision in all cases. Here are tests using the Linux 5.0 Git kernel using laptop and desktop hardware while evaluating no I/O scheduler, mq-deadline, Kyber, and BFQ scheduler options.

Out today is the latest installment of our routine I/O scheduler kernel benchmarks. For this round of testing using a Linux 5.0 Git kernel atop Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, tests were done on an AMD Ryzen 5 2400G desktop and Intel Core i7 8550U laptop. The Ryzen 5 2400G had a Corsair Force MP500 120GB NVMe SSD. The laptop was a Dell XPS 9370 with Samsung PM961 solid-state drive. EXT4 was the file-system in use on both systems and with the default mount options.

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Top 20 Parrot OS Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Parrot Security OS is an Open source lightweight distro based on Debian Testing and also it doesn’t have mere Pentesting tools but it contains everything that Security researchers, security developers or privacy aware people might need. Unlike Kali Linux, it also has anonymity, cryptography and development tools with a loot of cool features. Here we’ll review some famous tools of Parrot Security OS which make it a preferable distribution among others.

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GCC 8.3 Released and GCC 9 Plans

  • GCC 8.3 Released
    The GNU Compiler Collection version 8.3 has been released. GCC 8.3 is a bug-fix release from the GCC 8 branch containing important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in GCC 8.2 with more than 153 bugs fixed since the previous release. This release is available from the FTP servers listed at: http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html Please do not contact me directly regarding questions or comments about this release. Instead, use the resources available from http://gcc.gnu.org. As always, a vast number of people contributed to this GCC release -- far too many to thank them individually!
  • GCC 8.3 Released With 153 Bug Fixes
    While the GCC 9 stable compiler release is a few weeks away in the form of GCC 9.1, the GNU Compiler Collection is up to version 8.3.0 today as their newest point release to last year's GCC 8 series.
  • GCC 9 Compiler Picks Up Official Support For The Arm Neoverse N1 + E1
    Earlier this week Arm announced their next-generation Neoverse N1 and E1 platforms with big performance potential and power efficiency improvements over current generation Cortex-A72 processor cores. The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) ahead of the upcoming GCC9 release has picked up support for the Neoverse N1/E1. This newly-added Neoverse N1 and E1 CPU support for GCC9 isn't all that surprising even with the very short time since announcement and GCC9 being nearly out the door... Arm developers had already been working on (and landed) the Arm "Ares" CPU support, which is the codename for what is now the Neoverse platform.

Android Leftovers