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Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Graphics: NVIDIA, Mesa and CUDA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Open-Source NVIDIA Volta GV100 Support Queued For Linux 4.18

    Initial open-source driver support for the NVIDIA GV100 "Volta" GPUs will be introduced with the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle.

    Earlier this month I wrote about the initial open-source GV100 Volta patches coming out for the Nouveau Direct Rendering Manager while now that work has been queued into the DRM-Next tree ahead of the Linux 4.18 merge window opening in June.

  • The Open-Source ARM Mali "Panfrost" Driver Now Supports Textures & More

    The in-development Panfrost reverse-engineered, open-source driver for supporting ARM Mali T700 series graphics is now much more capable thanks to work carried out on their "half-way" Gallium3D driver in recent weeks.

    Alyssa Rosenzweig has provided an update on the Panfrost driver progress and their very early stage Gallium3D driver. Their recent code is quite a bit of progress considering where they were one month ago with just being able to render a cube.

  • CUDA 9.2 Released With GEMM Improvements

    We knew it was coming while today NVIDIA has rolled out the CUDA 9.2 stable release update.

    The CUDA 9.2 release includes speed-ups for launching CUDA kernels as well as faster performance for GEMM computational performance for half-precision and small N matrices. CUDA 9.2 also fixes a number of issues, including incorrect results with some GEMM calls on V100 Tensor Core GPUs and other BLAS problems.

  • Mesa 18.1 Released With Intel Shader Cache Default, OpenGL 3.1 ARB_compatibility

    First time Mesa release manager Dylan Baker has managed to release Mesa 18.1 on time as the Q2'2018 quarterly update to this OpenGL/Vulkan driver stack.

    While it feels like Mesa 18.0 was just recently released, it's already been a month and a half, which had arrived significantly late due to release delays. Fortunately, Mesa 18.1 is now available and hopefully allowing for a normal Mesa 18.2 release cycle for next quarter.

    Mesa 18.1 ships with the Intel OpenGL shader cache now being enabled by default, OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility context support for the prominent Gallium3D drivers, ARB_bindless_texture support for Nouveau NVC0 that is important for some newer Linux game ports like Dawn of War 3, EXT_semaphore support for RadeonSI, various other new OpenGL and Vulkan extensions being supported by Radeon and Intel, and other enhancements. See our Mesa 18.1 feature overview for a more thorough look at all of the changes that made it into this release.

Embracing and Extending Git, Push Notifications Harmful

Filed under
Development
  • Git Has A New Wire Protocol Yielding Much Greater Performance

    The Git Protocol Version 2 was announced today by Google as a major update to the distributed revision control system's wire protocol. Git protocol version 2 is much more efficient and yields significant performance benefits.

    The new Git wire protocol offers server-side filtering for references, easy extensibility for new features, and simplified client handling of the HTTP transport.

  • Introducing Git protocol version 2

    Today we announce Git protocol version 2, a major update of Git's wire protocol (how clones, fetches and pushes are communicated between clients and servers). This update removes one of the most inefficient parts of the Git protocol and fixes an extensibility bottleneck, unblocking the path to more wire protocol improvements in the future.

    The protocol version 2 spec can be found here.

    [...]

    We recently rolled out support for protocol version 2 at Google and have seen a performance improvement of 3x for no-op fetches of a single branch on repositories containing 500k references. Protocol v2 has also enabled a reduction of 8x of the overhead bytes (non-packfile) sent from googlesource.com servers. A majority of this improvement is due to filtering references advertised by the server to the refs the client has expressed interest in.

  • Push Notifications Considered Harmful

Hands-On with First Lubuntu 18.10 Build Featuring the LXQt Desktop by Default

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The Lubuntu development team promised to finally switch from LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment) to the more modern and actively maintained LXQt (Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment), and the switch is now official.

Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley approached us earlier today to inform that the latest Lubuntu 18.10 daily build is quite usable as he and his team did a lot of work in the past week to accommodate the LXQt desktop environment by default instead of the LXDE desktop environment.

The main difference between LXDE and LXQt is that the former is written with the GTK+ 2 technologies, which will eventually be phased out in favor of the more advanced GTK+ 3, and the latter is built using the Qt framework. However, it doesn't look like there are any plans for LXDE to move to GTK+ 3.

Read more

FreeBSD on the System76 Galago Pro

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Hey all, It’s been a while since I last posted but I thought I would hammer something out here. My most recent purchase was a System76 Galago Pro. I thought, afer playing with POP! OS a bit, is there any reason I couldn’t get BSD on this thing. Turns out the answer is no, no there isnt and it works pretty decently.

To get some accounting stuff out of the way I tested this all on FreeBSD Head and 11.1, and all of it is valid as of May 10, 2018. Head is a fast moving target so some of this is only bound to improve.

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Gaming startup Wonder is building an Android-powered Nintendo Switch competitor

Filed under
Android
  • Gaming startup Wonder is building an Android-powered Nintendo Switch competitor

    Andy Kleinman, the CEO and co-founder of secretive startup Wonder, thinks the game industry is finally ready for a truly hybrid piece of hardware — and he’s not talking about the Nintendo Switch. Sitting in The Verge’s San Francisco office late last month, he pulls what looks like a standard Android smartphone out of a mesh black case. It’s sleek, square cornered, and sports a massive screen.

    As good as it looks, it’s still a prototype device, crafted by notable Silicon Valley industrial designer Yves Behar. Wonder hopes it will be the centerpiece of an entertainment ecosystem for gamers and gadget heads who are fans of forward-looking tech. Unlike a standard Android phone, this device is running a custom layer of software, tentatively called WonderOS, that lets the company overclock the phone’s graphics processor like it were a PC gaming rig and allows the device to beam the display to a television when docked, much like a Switch.

  • “Android + Nintendo Switch?” — Wonder Is Making A Gaming Smartphone-Console Hybrid

    Mysterious gaming startup Wonder has revealed some interesting details of its upcoming gaming hardware. Thanks to an early prototype obtained by The Verge, it’s now confirmed that Wonder is working on an Android-powered device focused on gaming.

Ubuntu: Tennibot, Desktop Plans for 18.10, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Creating the world’s first robotic tennis ball collector with Ubuntu

    Why else did the Tennibot team turn to Ubuntu originally? “We needed something that was both light and compatible with libraries and existing software. Given the geographical spread of where the Tennibot would end up, our final choice needed to have remote upgrading capability too. And of course, both for ourselves plus our users who are not tech savvy, it needed to be solidly tested and stable” said Lincoln Wang, CTO at Tennibot.

    Haitham Eletrabi, CEO of Tennibot adds, “The compatibility with software like ROS and OpenCV makes the implementation and testing of Tennibot’s algorithms an easy task. The support from the Ubuntu community also simplifies debugging the device’s software. In addition, Ubuntu is so versatile with different sensors and components that it really makes it the more superior option for us.”

  • Desktop plans for 18.10

    Bionic is out the door and we’ve started the Cosmic cycle so I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you about our plans for this cycle, the sorts of features we want to work on and what you can expect from 18.10 when it arrives in October.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E11 – Station Eleven - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we reconstruct a bathroom and join the wireless gaming revolution. We discuss the Steam Link app for Android and iOS, the accessible Microsoft Xbox controller, Linux applications coming to ChromeOS and round up the community news.

Kubuntu Devs to Focus More on Supporting ARM Laptops & Raspberry Pi Than 32-Bit

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Earlier this month, the Kubuntu developers have confirmed to us that they won't support new 32-bit installations with the upcoming Kubuntu 18.10 release, and now they made it official.

Developer Valorie Zimmerman posted a message on the Kubuntu-devel mailing list a couple of days ago to officially announce that Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the last Kubuntu release to offer 32-bit ISO images, as starting with Kubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) they won't be supporting new 32-bit installations.

As already widely reported, the removal of the 32-bit install media revolution has begun amongst official Ubuntu flavors. The first to take the big step was Ubuntu MATE, followed closely by Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Studio, and Ubuntu Kylin. After an official proposal from developer Bryan Quigley, Xubuntu and Kubuntu followed too.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi, Klashwerks, Volvo/AGL/IVI

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi gets in touch with touch panels

    The Raspberry Pi 3 and RPi 3 Compute Module are quickly expanding into the industrial touch-panel market. Here’s a guide to six RPi-based contenders.

    In the smart home, voice agents are increasingly replacing the smartphone touchscreen interface as the primary human-machine interface (HMI). Yet, in noisier industrial and retail IoT environments, touchscreens are usually the only choice. The industrial touch-panel computer market has been in full swing for over a decade. Touch-panel systems based on Linux, and to a lesser extent, Android, are gaining share from those that use the still widely used Windows Embedded, and over the past year, several Raspberry Pi based systems have reached market. Here we look at six RPi-based touch-panels.

  • Gesture controlled dashcam and telematics computer has dual HD cameras

    Klashwerks has launched a $299, gesture controlled “Raven” dashcam, security system, navigation tool, and OBD-II telematics reporting device, which runs Android on a Snapdragon 650 and offers front- and cabin-facing HD cameras.

    Klashwerks’ Android-based Raven dashcam and automotive computer was a hit on Indiegogo and won a CES Innovation Award. Now it’s available publicly for $299.

  • Volvo runs with Android for Intel IVI, Linux will dominate

    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system on chip (SoC) to run In Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chip makers in this fast-growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving OS scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant.

Games: Steam, Retro, FOX n FORESTS

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Steam Link Android app is now out, works quite well so far

    Valve have officially put out a beta version of their new Steam Link Android app, which allows you to stream games from your Linux PC to your favourite device. As expected (and as Valve previously confirmed to us), it fully supports a Linux PC as the host device.

    As a reminder, you will need to update your Steam Controller's firmware in the Steam Beta Client. As we wrote about before, the Steam Controller was recently updated to support Bluetooth Low Energy mode in preparation for this. The Steam Link app is also compatible with a number of other Bluetooth pads as well.

  • The latest Steam Client update is out, breaks gamepads in Big Picture Mode on Linux & SteamOS

    The latest Steam Client update has left beta, bringing the Bluetooth Low Energy mode to everyone with the Steam Controller amongst other things. It also, sadly, broke other gamepad support in Big Picture mode.

    There's this bug report on Valve's GitHub, which has been open since May 9th. That only mentions PS3 controllers, but there's other bug reports open for other gamepads. I've tested it myself, with the Steam Controller working as normal and all other gamepads are broken on Linux in Big Picture Mode.

  • Retro-inspired arcade racer Slipstream to release May 21st, developed on Linux

    This is great, not long after the rather good release of Horizon Chase Turbo, we have another retro-inspired racer with Slipstream. This one is very interesting, since it was developed on Linux.

  • Season swapping action platformer FOX n FORESTS is now out

    FOX n FORESTS [Official Site] is another retro-inspired action platformer, although it does have a slight twist with the season changing mechanic.

    We're certainly not short on action platformers, especially retro inspired titles. To be fair though, there's not actually a great deal of them that are worth playing. Sure, there's a couple of excellent titles, but there's also a lot that just aren't any good.

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Events: KDE GSoC, PyCon, LinuxFest NorthWest

Filed under
OSS
  • Welcome Our New Google Summer of Code Students

    KDE Student Programs is happy to present our 2018 Google Summer of Code students to the KDE Community.

    Welcome Abhijeet Sharma, Aman Kumar Gupta, Amit Sagtani, Andrey Cygankov, Andrey Kamakin, Anmol Gautam, Caio Jordão de Lima Carvalho, Chinmoy Ranjan Pradhan, Csaba Kertesz, Demetrio Carrara, Dileep Sankhla, Ferencz Kovács, Furkan Tokac, Gun Park, Iván Yossi Santa María González, Kavinda Pitiduwa Gamage, Mahesh S Nair, Tarek Talaat, Thanh Trung Dinh, Yihang Zhou, and Yingjie Liu!

  • PyCon US 2018 Wrapup

    I attended PyCon US in Cleveland over the last week. Here’s a quick summary of the conference.

    Aside from my usual “you should go to PyCon” admonition, I’d like to suggest writing a summary like this every time you visit a conference. It’s a nice way to share what you found valuable with others, and also to evaluate the utility of attending the conference.

    I barely write a lick of Python anymore, so I mostly attend PyCon for the people and for the ideas. ome themes are common to PyCon: data science, machine learning, education, and core language. Of course, there’s always a smattering of other topics, too.

    During the poster session, I saw a poster on the Python Developers Survey 2017 from JetBrains. One statistic that surprised me: 50% of respondents use Python primarily for data analysis.

  • LinuxFest NorthWest 2018 Recap

    Nineteen years in, LinuxFest Northwest is the original community LinuxFest and is easily the lowest-stress event on my calendar. While Bellingham, Washington may seem like an odd place to host a conference, it is actually the natural end of the line for tech workers who migrate up the West coast from Silicon Valley in search of an affordable place to live and work where you can kayak after work. This lifestyle draw has created quite the tech scene in the Bellingham area and its proximity to the Canadian border makes LFNW an attractive destination for Vancouver, B.C. community members. Some attendees traveled from as far away as Germany and Taiwan, making this an international event despite its remote location. If you have never been to an LFNW, I encourage you to consider attending the 20th anniversary one in 2019!

Vim 8.1 is available!

Filed under
Software

Vim 8.1 is a minor release, a few new features have been added since Vim 8.0. A lot of bugs have been fixed, documentation was updated, etc.

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Ubuntu 18.10 Features: New Theme, Android Integration, Better Power Consumption

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you can imagine, Ubuntu 18.10 will come with a lot of new features and improvements, some of which Canonical planned for a long time but didn't manage to implement them in the recently released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system due to its long-term support status and the focus on stability and reliability.

So, like any other 9-month supported release, Ubuntu 18.10 will be a testbed for Canonical to try new things. Some of these include the ability to unlock your Ubuntu desktop with a fingerprint reader, integration with the KDE Connect Android app by default through GS Connect, a new installer, and a new system theme.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Aims To Lower Power Use, Default To New Desktop Theme

System76’s Oryx Pro Laptop Targets AI Developers

Filed under
News

System76’s latest laptop Oryx Pro is a beast in terms of configuration and it focuses on AI and Machine Learning developers. Read about the specifications and pricing
Read more

Security: Updates, EFAIL, DHCP, Ubuntu’s Snap Store

Filed under
Security

SD Times Open Source Project of the Week: Bazel

Filed under
Google
OSS

The project is led by a core group of contributors and Googlers, and managed by the community. The group of core contributors is self-managing and added by two supporting votes from other core contributors.

According to Google, some parts of Bazel will never make it into open source because it integrates with Google-specific technology or the company plans to get rid of those features in the future.

The Angular team has announced plans to migrate its build scripts with Bazel to get faster and more reliable incremental builds. As of Angular 6, Angular itself is now built with Bazel, according to Stephen Fluin, developer advocate for Angular. “Bazel is the build system that Google and the Angular team use to keep incremental builds under 2 seconds,” the team wrote in a post.

Bazel is already being used by companies such as Asana, Ascend.io, Databricks, Dropbox, Etsy, Google, Huawei, LingoChamp, Pinterest and Uber. Open-source projects using Bazel include Angular, Deepmind Lab, GRPC, gVisor, Kubernetes, Sonnet, TensorFlow and Trunk.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Addressing the Complexity of Big Data with Open Source

    Simple software is a thing of the past. Think about it: No program out there is created in a vacuum. Every program uses libraries, has run-time dependencies, interacts with operational environments, and reacts to human inputs. Free and opensource software, as a creative free-market approach to software development, provides more than one solution for every challenge. There are multiple compilers, operating systems, statistics packages (known today as machine learning), test frameworks, orchestration solutions, and so on. Each project moves at its own speed, releasing new features and adding new attributes. Imagine for a second that there is a need to combinea few of these complicated projects into a meta-complex system. It sounds quite sophisticated, doesn't it?

  • Review: Icinga enterprise-grade, open-source network monitoring that scales

    Continuing our quest for robust, enterprise-grade open source network monitoring, we tested Icinga Core 2 (version 2.8.1) and the stand-alone Icinga Web 2 interface. Created in 2009 as a fork of the Nagios network monitoring tool, Icinga has come a long way.

    We found Icinga to be a powerful monitoring tool with many great features. The Core install is straightforward and basic monitoring is easy with either pre-configured templates or plugins. However, we discovered that the Web install is a bit more complicated and could stand to be streamlined.

  • DigitalBits Foundation Networks Blockchain Companies In Open Source Consortium

    The DigitalBits Foundation is an open source project that provides development resources, infrastructure, events and education via a global transaction network and protocol. Loyalty program operators are able to tokenize their respective loyalty points as digital assets on this decentralized network and users can trade these various digital assets on-chain. DigitalBits latest addition is a partnership with Cogeco Peer 1, a global provider of business-to-business products and services.

    The Foundation’s vision is to see the DigitalBits blockchain help solve portability, security and liquidity issues with certain digital assets, such as Loyalty and Rewards programs, and help generate additional value for consumers, businesses and certain charitable organizations.

    Al Burgio, the founder and CEO, talked with Block Tribune about the organization.

  • How Will U.S. Tensions With China Affect Open Source Networking?

    There’s been a lot of drama in 2018 concerning the Chinese vendors Huawei and ZTE and their ability to do business in the United States. The fate of these companies seems inextricably tied to larger geo-political events.

    ZTE has been banned for seven years from buying components from U.S. companies for its products. And members of the U.S. Congress have attacked Huawei’s ability to do business in the country, claiming the vendor’s equipment poses a national security risk.

  • [Mozilla] SQL Style Guide
  • Lemonade introduces 'open-source' policy
  • Open source code is ubiquitous and so are many vulnerabilities [Ed: Black Duck again. Microsoft-connected FUD.]
  • How to make open source work for your company [Ed: Mac Asay claims "Microsoft's miraculous conversion from pariah to messiah in the open source world". He spreads a lie. Still trying to get a job there?]
  • Code & Supply is here for Pittsburgh’s ‘awesome’ software community

    The 2016 Abstractions conference drew software professionals from all over the world — many of them big names in the field, such as Larry Wall, who invented the Perl programming language; Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation and creator of GNU; and Raffi Krikorian, formerly of Twitter and Uber — which was one of Reese’s goals when he first started hosting Code & Supply’s meetups.

  • Open Source Calculator Teaches us about Quality Documentation

    Graphing calculators are one of those funny markets that never seem to change. Standardized testing has created a primordial stew of regulatory capture in which ancient technology thrives at modern retail prices while changing little. The NumWorks calculator certainly isn’t the first competitor to challenge the Texas Instruments dynasty with a more modern interface (and a design from this decade), but behind it’s subtle color pops and elegant lines lies the real gem; a fantastically well documented piece of open source hardware. The last time we wrote about the NumWorks, it was to demonstrate a pretty wild hack that embedded an entire Pi Zero but it’s worth drawing attention to the calculator itself.

Starting With GNU/Linux and GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • A beginner’s guide to Linux

    The key difference is that Linux is open source. In the most simple terms, it just means that no one single person or corporation controls the code. Instead, the operating system is maintained by a dedicated group of developers from around the world. Anyone who is interested can contribute to the code and help check for errors. Linux is more than an operating system; it is a community.

  • Why Linux apps on Chromebooks are a really big deal (really!)

    It may have gotten lost in the shuffle of all the Android P news at Google's I/O conference last week, but fear not, dear friends: Chrome OS has definitely not been forgotten.

    Google's been making steady progress in advancing its Chromebook operating system over the past several months, particularly around its efforts to further align Android and Chrome OS and turn Chromebooks into all-purpose productivity machines and Android tablet replacements. Practically every week, in fact, there's some new and noteworthy feature being added into the platform (something we've talked about a great deal in my weekly newsletter as of late).

    And though it wasn't in the keynote, a massive new development did sneak its way into Chrome OS during I/O: the quietly announced ability for Chromebooks to run Linux apps as if they were native applications, without the need for any complex and security-defeating configurations. Linux app support is on its way to the Pixelbook to start — currently in that device's developer channel and likely becoming available much more broadly before long.

More Coverage of AsteroidOS 1.0

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • AsteroidOS is a Linux-based platform that may be the Wear OS alternative you were looking for

    A Linux-based smartwatch platform that could function as an alternative to Android Wear OS is now finally available for download.

  • AsteroidOS v1.0 Released Wearable Open Source Operating System

    After being in development for a number of years the first release of the new AsteroidOS wearable operating system has been released, providing alternative for Android Wear and supporting a wide variety of Android based smartwatches. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the first stable AsteroidOS v1.0 release which is now available to download.

    Asteroid OS 1.0 has been created to provide all the features you’d expect of a modern wearable including notifications, agenda, alarm clock, calculator, music remote control, settings customisations, a stopwatch, a timer, and a weather forecast app. The difference between this and other operating systems is that AsteroidOS open-source operating system for smartwatches.

  • Open source Android Wear alternative AsteroidOS released

    After more than three years of development, AsteroidOS has finally reached the version 1.0 milestone. This open source smartwatch OS is designed to offer Android Wear owners an alternative, especially for older watch models that have stopped receiving Wear OS updates.

  • Open-Source AsteroidOS Launches As Wear OS Alternative

    AsteroidOS is an open-source alternative to Google’s Wear OS that’s been in development for quite some time, and now owners of compatible smartwatches can finally compile the OS for themselves and give it a try. The official website has a detailed guide for how to compile and install the OS, and it’s already compatible with a range of popular modern and older smartwatches like the LG Watch Urbane and ASUS ZenWatch 2. At this stage, AsteroidOS is pretty basic, with only a few essential apps like a calculator and alarm clock on board. There are also a number of connectivity options, including multiple versions of Bluetooth in low-power mode. The real draw, however, is that the OS is completely opened up to developers, with an SDK already available and the whole project being entirely open-source.

Plasma 5.13 Beta

Filed under
KDE

Thursday, 17 May 2018. Today KDE unveils a beta release of Plasma 5.13.0.

Members of the Plasma team have been working hard to continue making Plasma a lightweight and responsive desktop which loads and runs quickly, but remains full-featured with a polished look and feel. We have spent the last four months optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance and less memory consumption. Basic features like panel popups were optimised to make sure they run smoothly even on the lowest-end hardware. Our design teams have not rested either, producing beautiful new integrated lock and login screen graphics.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.13 Enters Beta with New Lock & Login Screens, Browser Integration

KDE Plasma 5.13 Beta Released With A Compelling Number Of Improvements

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu 18.04 Install and First Look, Canonical and Trilio Deal, Ubuntu Server Development and Shuttleworth's Controversy

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Install and First Look
    The long anticipated Ubuntu 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” Long Term Support (LTS) release has arrived… Let’s install it and take a look around.
  • Canonical Managed Cloud adds data protection and recovery with Trilio
    Canonical and Trilio announced today a partnership agreement to deliver TrilioVault backup and recovery solutions as part of BootStack, Canonical’s fully managed OpenStack private cloud solution. TrilioVault will also be made available as an option to Ubuntu Advantage support customers. As a result, users already taking advantage of the Ubuntu platform for their OpenStack deployment now have seamless access to the only OpenStack-native data protection solution on the market. Together, the two companies are pushing the boundaries of enterprise OpenStack clouds to become increasingly easier to build, simpler to manage, and more reliable in the event of a disaster.
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 22 May 2018
  • Ubuntu's Shuttleworth Creates Controversy with OpenStack Summit Vancouver Keynote
    The OpenStack Foundation is facing a bit of drama and controversy as it deals with issues related to a keynote delivered by Ubuntu Linux founder, Mark Shuttleworth at the OpenStack Summit here on May 21. Typically the OpenStack Foundation posts videos of all its session online within 24 hours, but with the Shuttleworth keynote, the video was apparently posted and then promptly removed. During his keynote, Shuttleworth took direct aim at his OpenStack competitor Red Hat, which apparently made some people in the OpenStack Summit community uncomfortable.

Offline Computing – 10 Apps for the Digital Nomad

In today’s always-connected, constantly-inturrupted world, it can often be rewarding to go offline. Disconnecting from the Internet doesn’t mean you have to buy a yurt, live on beans, and get no work done though! While there’s a ton of great apps in the Snap store which rely on a connection to function, there’s also a lot you can do offline. So whether you’re taking a trip that doesn’t offer (reasonably priced) in-flight wifi, or want to live life the digital nomad style, we’ve got some apps for you! These all work offline, so once installed you can work, study & play without a connection. Read more Also: Linux Release Roundup: GNOME Twitch, Shotwell & GIMP

Finally: Historic Eudora email code goes open source

The source code to the Eudora email client is being released by the Computer History Museum, after five years of discussion with the IP owner, Qualcomm. The Mac software was well loved by early internet adopters and power users, with versions appearing for Palm, Newton and Windows. At one time, the brand was so synonymous with email that Lycos used Eudora to brand its own webmail service. As the Mountain View, California museum has noted, "It’s hard to overstate Eudora’s popularity in the mid-1990s." Read more Also: The Computer History Museum Just Made Eudora Open Source