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Sunday, 20 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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MongoDB "open-source" Server Side Public License rejected

Filed under
OSS

MongoDB is open-source document NoSQL database with a problem. While very popular, cloud companies, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), IBM Cloud, Scalegrid, and ObjectRocket has profited from it by offering it as a service while MongoDB Inc. hasn't been able to monetize it to the same degree. MongoDB's answer? Relicense the program under its new Server Side Public License (SSPL). Open-source powerhouse Red Hat's reaction? Drop MongoDB from Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.

Red Hat's Technical and Community Outreach Program Manager Tom Callaway explained, in a note stating MongoDB is being removed from Fedora Linux, that "It is the belief of Fedora that the SSPL is intentionally crafted to be aggressively discriminatory towards a specific class of users." Debian Linux had already dropped MongoDB from its distribution.

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BSD: Trident 18.12 and LLVM/Clang Development

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BSD
  • Trident 18.12-RELEASE Available

    This version is based off the 18.12-stable branch of TrueOS (FreeBSD 13-CURRENT), using the new TrueOS distribution framework with several add-ons by Project Trident itself. The packages with this release were created from the TrueOS ports tree as-of January 7th. We are planning to release regular updates to packages every week or two depending on the state of the ports tree at any given time. In this release, both the Chromium and Iridium browsers have also been fixed and function normally again.

    18.12-RELEASE has been a long time in development, and we wish to say a bit “Thank You!” to everybody who has been helping test out the pre-release versions, find issues, submit fixes both to us and to upstream FreeBSD/TrueOS, and in general being a wonderful and supportive community! We look forward to continuing to work with all of you in making Project Trident amazing!

  • Google Is Hiring More LLVM/Clang Developers

    Android and Chrome are among their software now shipping in production that relies upon LLVM Clang rather than GCC or other alternatives, among other Google software projects. LLVM/Clang is also used by various internal projects at Google. Over the years Google developers have contributed back many improvements to upstream LLVM ranging from their Lanai processor back-end to security improvements to other language tooling on LLVM to performance optimizations.

  • LLVM 9.0 Is Now Open For Development, Releasing In Late 2019

    The code for the upcoming LLVM 8.0 release (Clang 8.0 included) is now branched and the release candidate process will begin shortly. That means LLVM 9.0 is now open for development on its master branch.

    Developers behind this compiler stack are planning to get out of the official LLVM 8.0.0 release by the end of February. The first release candidate is imminent and one or two more can be expected in February based upon how the testing proceeds.

Mozilla's Work on a New Browsers Called "Fenix"

Filed under
Android
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla Fenix: New Android browser's intriguing details start to surface

    The new non-Firefox browser for Android is apparently targeted at younger people, with Mozilla developers on GitHub tagging the description, 'Fenix is not your parents' Android browser'.

    Fenix mockups found by Mozilla contributor Sören Hentzschel and Ghacks suggest the makers of Fenix are turning the Firefox Android browser on its head, currently toying with the idea of putting the URL bar and home button down at the bottom of user interface.

    News of Fenix as a possible replacement surfaced in the middle of 2018 after someone spotted the new Mozilla mobile project on GitHub. Activity on the project has picked up in recent months.

  • Firefox Fenix for Android mockups

    Mozilla is working on a new web browser for Android to replace the currently available Firefox for Android mobile browser.

    Firefox users who use the browser on Android may have noticed that development slowed down in recent time. Updates are still released regularly but they address issues such as slowdowns, crashes, or security issues for the most part.

    The core reason for that is that Mozilla's working on Fenix, a new mobile browser for Android. Fenix is based on Android Components and GeckoView. In other words, Fenix will be powered by built-in components on Android and Mozilla's GeckoView.

  • Keep Smart Assistants from Spying on You with Alias, Security Advisory for Old scp Clients, Major Metasploit Framework Release, Mozilla Working on a New Browser for Android and VirtualBox 6.0.2 Is Out

    Mozilla is working on a new Android browser called Fenix. According to ZDNet, this "new non-Firefox browser for Android is apparently targeted at younger people, with Mozilla developers on GitHub tagging the description, 'Fenix is not your parents' Android browser'." In addition, mockups suggest that Fenix developers are "currently toying with the idea of putting the URL bar and home button down at the bottom of user interface."

CTL Announces $300 Rugged Chromebook Tablet for the Education Market

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Chromebook Tablet (seriously though, why can’t get rid of the “book” in that title?) education revolution is here. Acer started it, ASUS got in on it, and now CTL is getting in the game. Here’s the skinny.

You’d be forgiven if your first thought was “…who is CTL?,” because honestly, they’re not as well known as some of the other companies that are active in the Chrome OS market. Still, they make some fantastic Chromebooks and Chromeboxes (see, we don’t say “Chromebook Desktop,” so why aren’t they called Chrometabs?) designed to be more robust than the average Chrome OS device.

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Plasma ergonomics - Lessons in life

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KDE

The bugsy trends aren't unique to Plasma - this is the desktop all over. The agile thingie, the curse of quality and usability everywhere. Even looking at something like Windows, there are far more annoyances in Windows 8.1 than there were in Windows 7, and then a whole order of magnitude more still in Windows 10. These could be seemingly small things - and there sure ain't enough testing to begin with - but they can mean a world to the end user. And if Plasma wants to be top dog, it needs to do everything better than the competition. Today, I uncovered a fresh handful issues, and that's just a couple of extra months of rigorous usage. It will be interesting to see what happens a year or two down the road. Well, my Plasma journey continues. Stay tuned.

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Also: KDE Students Excel during Google Code-in 2018

today's howtos

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HowTos

Games: GameHub, Eastshade, Unsung Warriors, Littlewood, Unity, DYSMANTLE, ECON - Elemental Connection, Godly Corp, Emerald Shores and Heroes Ravage

Filed under
Gaming
  • GameHub – An Unified Library To Put All Games Under One Roof

    GameHub is an unified gaming library that allows you to view, install, run and remove games on GNU/Linux operating system. It supports both native and non-native games from various sources including Steam, GOG, Humble Bundle, and Humble Trove etc. The non-native games are supported by Wine, Proton, DOSBox, ScummVM and RetroArch. It also allows you to add custom emulators and download bonus content and DLCs for GOG games. Simply put, Gamehub is a frontend for Steam/GoG/Humblebundle/Retroarch. It can use steam technologies like Proton to run windows gog games. GameHub is free, open source gaming platform written in Vala using GTK+3. If you’re looking for a way to manage all games under one roof, GameHub might be a good choice.

  • Eastshade Release Date for Linux and Windows Announced Along With a New Trailer

    First-person exploration games haven't really been done to a major degree - even though things like Perfect have aimed to give you a bit of that. In cases like that, you have a game that relies on virtual reality to relax the user and allow you to explore a very small world. However, what the world lacks in size, it makes up for in terms of interactivity - but it is still very small-scale. Eastshade sets out to do something similar, but in a purely first-person viewpoint without relying on VR and greatly expanding on the size of the game's world.

  • 2D action adventure 'Unsung Warriors' has an expanded Prologue along with a Kickstarter

    I took a look at the Prologue of Unsung Warriors back in October last year and it was pretty good! They've now expanded it, put it on Steam and they have a Kickstarter going for the full game.

  • Littlewood, an RPG with a difference needs funding on Kickstarter

    Most RPGs focus on defeating some sort of evildoer, however Littlewood takes place after a Dark Wizard has already been defeated and it's your job to put everything back together.

    Inspired by the likes of Animal Crossing, Dark Cloud and Runescape it seems to be heavily focusing on the more peaceful side of gaming. It will have mining, crafting, fishing, bug catching, farming, cooking and so on. However, one feature sounds especially interesting! After the Dark Wizard was defeated, their monsters were sealed away into Tarott Cards you can collect and battle people with which I love the sound of.

    Even more interesting, is that it's being made by developer Sean Young of SmashGames who made Kindergarten, Roguelands and Magicite which all support Linux. They're very clear about supporting Linux once again, so that's fantastic to see them continue.

  • Unity have updated their Terms of Service and they seem a lot more fair
  • An update on the situation with NVIDIA graphical distortions in some Unity games on Linux

    Recently, I highlighted an issue in multiple Unity games where the graphics were distorted on Linux with using an NVIDIA GPU and I offered some workarounds. I now have an update on the issue to share from both Unity and NVIDIA.

    Firstly, on the Unity side at least some of it was a confirmed bug in Unity's handling of OpenGL. The bug report that was opened as a result of my chats with Unity, has noted that it's now solved in Unity 2019 and the fix should also be landing in Unity 2018.3.2f1.

  • DYSMANTLE from 10tons is an open world action RPG where you can ruin everything

    10tons Ltd the team behind Crimsonland, Neon Chrome, Time Recoil, JYDGE, Tesla vs Lovecraft and more have revealed their next title, DYSMANTLE.

  • ECON - Elemental Connection, a pretty sweet puzzle game about making a mosaic

    ECON - Elemental Connection was quite a surprise, a puzzle game that can be played both offline and online that has you take it in turns to build a mosaic.

    Note: Key provided by the developer.

    For those who prefer their more relaxing experiences to other action-packaged options, ECON is a little gem. Honestly, it's nothing to look at and you could easily pass it up since even on Steam it doesn't have a single user review. However, it's actually a pretty good tile-matching puzzler.

  • Godly Corp is a really weird game that has you manage an office as something like Cthulhu

    I will give the developer TR8 Torus Studios points for being weird and unique here, with Godly Corp having you manage an office with a long tentacle.

  • Emerald Shores, a SNES-inspired platformer with minigames and more has Linux support

    For those after their next retro platformer, the SNES-inspired Emerald Shores is out on Steam with Linux support.

  • Heroes Ravage, a rather unique online action game will support Linux

    Yet another interesting crowdfunded game to take a look at today, we have Heroes Ravage an online action game that has you play as both heroes and villagers.

    Heroes Ravage is an all-out battle for loot, only this time there are no NPCs as everyone is a player. Everyone is trying to hold onto their collected valuables, with players acting as the villagers able to hide them and set up traps. It's a 4on4 battle, with four heroes facing off against four villagers and I will admit it does sound very unique.

Top 15 Best Git Clients for Linux

Filed under
Development
Software

As a Linux user, you need to update software source code frequently. You may use a command line to do the task. But, when you need to handle a large project, then it becomes lengthy and difficult also. On the other hand, it is also quite impossible to point out the entire branch structure using the command line.

Nowadays, all the mastermind Linux users are frequently using Git tools for the software controlling management and development. The tasks are very simple and quite easier with git client Linux. That is why we take the step to introduce you to some of the best git clients for Linux.

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Best Audio Editors For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

You’ve got a lot of choices when it comes to audio editors for Linux. No matter whether you are a professional music producer or just learning to create awesome music, the audio editors will always come in handy.

Well, for professional-grade usage, a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) is always recommended. However, not everyone needs all the functionalities, so you should know about some of the most simple audio editors as well.

In this article, we will talk about a couple of DAWs and basic audio editors which are available as free and open source solutions for Linux and (probably) for other operating systems.

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600 days of postmarketOS

Filed under
OS
Android

postmarketOS is aiming for a ten year life-cycle for smartphones, see the all new front page for a short introduction if you are new around here. Today we'll cover what happened during the second half of 2018. Many have been wondering where we've been and why it took us so long to write a real update post. Is the project dead already? Weren't phone calls almost working? What happened?
Development has been going on continuously, so we are not dead. Maybe a little undead though, like some of the old and forgotten phones we are trying to revive, because we have not really gotten any closer to the goal of getting telephony working or turning a phone into a daily driver. The Nexus 5, while booting mainline with accelerated graphics and connecting to the cellular modem all with a free software userspace, still does not have working audio. That is one example, other devices have different problems. However, we have not been sitting idle and doing nothing these past few months!

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Also: Google hands out roses to preferred Android MDM vendors

Essential System Tools: Krusader – KDE file manager

Filed under
KDE

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at Krusader, a free and open source graphical file manager. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

Krusader is an advanced, twin-panel (commander-style) file manager designed for KDE Plasma. Krusader also runs on other popular Linux desktop environments such as GNOME.

Besides comprehensive file management features, Krusader is almost completely customizable, fast, seamlessly handles archives, and offers a huge feature set.

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Deepin Linux 15.9 Released with Support for Touchscreen Gestures, Faster Updates

Filed under
Linux

Packed with all the updates that have been released through the official channels since Deepin 15.8, the Deepin 15.9 update is here to add support for multiple touchscreen gestures, including click, double click, long press to open the context menu, as well as slide up and down, an on-screen keyboard, and faster updates thanks to a new Smart Mirror Switch function.

The Deepin 15.9 release also brings some performance optimizations by making power management more efficient and convenient to laptop and desktop users alike. "Whether your computer is connected to power supply or not, you can easily change the monitor and computer suspend time for different scenarios," explained the devs in today's announcement.

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LG smart TVs running webOS can now be rooted

Filed under
OS
Linux

Our “smart life” tech can be a bit restrictive at times. If you want to get a bit more out of it you can sometimes find a way to “root” or “jailbreak”. Usually when talking about these things we tend to refer to smartphones, tablets, or even a set-top box. Well, now you can root LG Smart TVs running the WebOS Linux-based operating system.

WebOS, a OS that was originally developed by Palm in 2009, is an operating system that LG uses in its consumer electronics portofolio – such as Smart TVs, refrigerators, and projectors.

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10GbE Linux Networking Performance Between CentOS, Fedora, Clear Linux & Debian

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those curious how the 10 Gigabit Ethernet performance compares between current Linux distributions, here are some benchmarks we ramp up more 10GbE Linux/BSD/Windows benchmarks. This round of testing was done on two distinctly different servers while testing CentOS, Debian, Clear Linux, and Fedora.

This is the first of several upcoming 10GbE test comparisons. For those article we are testing some of the popular enterprise Linux distributions while follow-up articles will also be looking at some other distros as well as Windows Server and FreeBSD/DragonFlyBSD. CentOS 7, Debian 9.6, Clear Linux rolling, and Fedora Server 29 were the operating systems tested for this initial round.

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Zipping files on Linux: the many variations and how to use them

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Some of us have been zipping files on Unix and Linux systems for many decades — to save some disk space and package files together for archiving. Even so, there are some interesting variations on zipping that not all of us have tried. So, in this post, we’re going to look at standard zipping and unzipping as well as some other interesting zipping options.

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Testing openSUSE, Manjaro, Debian, Fedora, and Mint Linux distributions on my new laptop

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE

Due to the recent unfortunate demise of a couple of my computers I found myself in need of a new laptop on rather short notice. I found an Acer Aspire 5 on sale at about half price here in Switzerland, so I picked one up. I have been installing a number of Linux distributions on it, with mostly positive results.

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Programming: Go, JavaScript, Data Science Programming Languages and PyFilesystem

Filed under
Development
  • How To Learn Go Programming Language

    First appeared in November 2009, Go is a statically typed, compiled programming language designed at Google. You might have just heard about this programming language in the past couple of years but recently, Go has started to gain significant popularity in the coding world.

    Being light-weight, open source, and suited for today’s microservices architectures, Go is an amazing choice for a language. Also known as Google’s Golang, this language was developed by some of the brilliant minds from Google who created the C programming language. Today, it is one of the fastest growing languages and it’s absolutely a great time to start learning and working with GO.

  • Review: The 6 best JavaScript IDEs

    Back in the ancient days when Java Swing was new and exciting, I enjoyed using Eclipse for Java development, but soon moved on to other Java IDEs. Five-plus years ago, when I did some Android development with Eclipse, I found the experience OK, but poky. When I tried to use Eclipse Luna with JSDT for JavaScript development in 2014, it constantly displayed false-positive errors for valid code that passed JSHint.

  • A Complete List of The Best Data Science Programming Languages

    Data science is one of the fastest-growing fields in America. Organizations are employing data scientists at a rapid rate to help them analyze increasingly large and complex data volumes. The proliferation of big data and the need to make sense of it all has created a vortex where all of these things exist together. As a result, new techniques, technologies and theories are continually being developed to run advanced analysis, and they all require development and programming to ensure a path forward.

  • PyFilesystem is greater than or equal to Pathlib

    I was reading a post by Trey Hunner on why pathlib is great, where he makes the case that pathlib is a better choice than the standard library alternatives that preceded it. I wouldn't actually disagree with a word of it. He's entirely correct. You should probably be using pathlib were it fits.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • SuiteCRM Announce the Release of SuiteCRM 7.11
  • Open Source for Enterprise Trends in 2019

    We know that open source is well established as the place where software innovation happens. Today enterprises are looking at open source even more closely for pro-active, adaptive and innovative technologies to deliver better customer experience. As we move into 2019, we see open source technology further making its mark in some of the key trends we are already experiencing.

  • Open source search engines attract developers
  • Alibaba Acquires Open Source Firm Data Artisans for $130M
  • Apache Flink Advances Enterprise Apps Aspirations With Alibaba

    There are a lot of different types of tools that are needed to enable modern enterprise apps. The ability to process data streams in real-time is one such needed tool and it's what the open source Apache Flink project enables.

    Apache Flink is an open-source stream processing framework for distributed, high-performing, always-available and accurate data-streaming applications. The lead developer and commercial organization behind Flink has been data Artisans, which was created by the core developers behind Flink itself. Data Artisans and by extension Apache Flink are getting a major vote of confidence, thanks to Chinese internet giant Alibaba.

  • Google Summer of Code mentor projects sought
  • Genode To Focus On Making Sculpt OS Relevant & Appealing In 2019

    The Genode operating system framework based on a micro-kernel design and various original user-space components continues going strong a decade since its start. But it hasn't achieved too much appeal outside of its niche even when it began working on "Sculpt" as an operating system for general purposes use-cases and supporting common PC/laptop hardware. But they hope to change that in 2019.

    Genode has published their 2019 roadmap and for this year they want to make "Sculpt OS relevant and appealing for a broader community."

  • How Enterprise IT Pros Can Contribute to Open Source Projects

    Undoubtedly, your company uses open source software. But the powers that be might express reluctance when developers want to create or maintain projects on company time. Here is a roadmap to help you convince them otherwise—starting with an internal open source project office.

    Open source innovation has a methodology all its own, and it doesn’t follow traditional business processes. The big difference is that open source development is collaborative rather than competitive. This attitude may come naturally to IT people, but not to managers and rarely to people in the C-suite....

    To change the corporate attitude about permitting developers to be embedded in open source projects, you need to get other departments to see the benefits in their own terms.

    One way to handle this is by finding allies outside software development circles. For instance, human resources execs could be on your side if you can convince them that companies that support open source development are more attractive to prospective employees. A CFO who is motivated by financial cost savings can “do the numbers” for you to, for argument’s sake, demonstrate that investing in a developer who spends 20 hours weekly working on an open source project is still more cost effective than purchasing a not-quite-right IT application.

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KDE: Usability & Productivity Report From Nate Graham

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 54
    This week in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative, something big landed: virtual desktop support on Wayland, accompanied by a shiny new user interface for the X11 version too. Eike Hein has been working on this literally for months and I think he deserves a round of applause! It was a truly enormous amount of work, but now we can benefit for years to come.
  • KDE Now Has Virtual Desktop Support On Wayland
    KDE landing virtual desktop support on Wayland this week is certainly quite exciting while also a new UI was added for the X11 virtual desktop support too. Some of the other KDE improvements that landed this week and relayed by Nate Graham include the digital clock widget now allowing adjustments to the date formatting, the KDE Information Center's USB devices section will now actually display all USB devices, wallpaper chooser view improvements, and various other improvements.

Screenshots/Screencasts: Robolinux 10.4 LXDE, deepin 15.9, and Parrot OS 4.5 KDE

Livepatching With Linux 5.1 To Support Atomic Replace & Cumulative Patches

With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle that should get underway in just over one month's time, there will now be the long in development work (it's been through 15+ rounds of public code review!) for supporting atomic replace and cumulative patches. Read more