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Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hackers May Have Already Defeated Apple’s USB Restricted Mode For iPhone

    Recently, the iPhone-maker announced a security feature to prevent unauthorized cracking of iPhones. When the device isn’t unlocked for an hour, the Lightning port can be used for nothing but charging. The feature is a part of the iOS 12 update, which is expected to launch later this month.

  • Cops Are Confident iPhone Hackers Have Found a Workaround to Apple’s New Security Feature

    Apple confirmed to The New York Times Wednesday it was going to introduce a new security feature, first reported by Motherboard. USB Restricted Mode, as the new feature is called, essentially turns the iPhone’s lightning cable port into a charge-only interface if someone hasn’t unlocked the device with its passcode within the last hour, meaning phone forensic tools shouldn’t be able to unlock phones.

    Naturally, this feature has sent waves throughout the mobile phone forensics and law enforcement communities, as accessing iPhones may now be substantially harder, with investigators having to rush a seized phone to an unlocking device as quickly as possible. That includes GrayKey, a relatively new and increasingly popular iPhone cracking tool. But forensics experts suggest that Grayshift, the company behind the tech, is not giving up yet.

  • How Secure Are Wi-Fi Security Cameras?
  • Trump-Kim Meeting Was a Magnet For Russian Cyberattacks

KDE: Usability and Productivity initiative, Kraft and Konsole

Filed under
KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 23

    This has been a bit of a light week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative, probably because everyone’s basking in the warm glow of a well-received release: KDE Plasma 5.13 came out on Tuesday and is getting great reviews!

  • Kraft Version 0.81 Released

    I am happy to announce the release of Kraft version 0.81. Kraft is a Qt based desktop application that helps you to handle documents like quotes and invoices in your small business.

    Version 0.81 is a bugfix release for the previous version 0.80, which was the first stable release based on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks5. Even though it came with way more new features than just the port, it’s first release has proven it’s stability in day-to-day business now for a few month.

  • Giving Konsole some love

    I started to hack in Konsole, and first I was afraid, I was petrified. You know, touching those hardcore apps that are the center of the KDE Software Collection.

    I started touching it mostly because some easy to fix bugs weren’t fixed, and as every cool user knows, this is free software. So I could pay for someone to fix my bugs, or I could download the source code and try to figure out what the hell was wrong with it. I choosed the second approach.

Zapcc Caching C++ Compiler Open-Sourced

Filed under
Development

Remember the Zapcc compiler that focused on lightning fast compiler times? It's now been open-sourced.

Zapcc is the LLVM/Clang-based C++ compiler that we have been covering since 2015 when it began promoting itself as a much faster C++ compiler than Clang itself. Zapcc employs aggressive caching and other techniques in an effort to significantly speed up compile times while being a drop-in replacement to GCC or Clang. Last year Zapcc reached the v1.0 milestone, but we haven't heard much since until finding out this weekend that it's been open-sourced.

Read more

Nomadic Working with NomadBSD 1.0.1 - BSD on a stick

Filed under
BSD

Recently I found a bit of time to poke around in the world of Linux and BSD distributions and possibly even get back in to the reviewing business now and then. NomadBSD seemed like an interesting project to try for somebody partial to the Slackware and BSD way of doing things, but still searching for a BSD that is actually working as a day to day OS while being reasonably responsive, i.e. not bloated and running well on old hardware. That means trim and fast, without the desktop environment and a browser gobbling up all the resources.

VirtualBSD was a fine piece but since its demise there hasn't been anything similar to dip your toes into FreeBSD to my knowledge, let alone the other flavors. I reviewed it here seven years ago. How many? Yes, time flies. To say it right away in order not to waste anybody's time, NomadBSD works, and it works beautifully. Well, with a small caveat in terms of connectivity, but we'll come to that.

As alluded to, "NomadBSD is a 64bit live system for USB flash drives, based on FreeBSD®. Together with automatic hardware detection and setup, it is configured to be used as a desktop system that works out of the box, but can also be used for data recovery" according to their website. It fits on a 4GiB USB flash drive and can be booted via BIOS and UEFI. Which is just as well as an old 4GiB Corsair Flash Voyager pen drive is all I had. Additional information on their Github account.

Read more

Linux 4.18 Outline

Filed under
Linux
  • AppArmor In Linux 4.18 Supports Audit Rule Filtering

    Sent out earlier this week were the AppArmor feature updates for the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window.

  • The Changes & New Features For Linux 4.18, Benchmarks Are Incoming

    With the early release of Linux 4.18-rc1, feature development on Linux 4.18 is over and it's onto roughly eight weeks worth of testing and bug fixes. For those that are behind in their Phoronix reading with our extensive and original reporting on the Linux 4.18 merge window happenings, here is our recap of the big changes that made it into Linux 4.18. We are also in the process of firing off the start of our Linux 4.18 kernel benchmarks.

  • Features That Didn't Make It For The Mainline Linux 4.18 Kernel

    There are many changes and new features for Linux 4.18 with the merge window having just closed on this next kernel version, but still there are some prominent features that have yet to work their way to the mainline tree.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE: OpenSUSE Leap 15 KDE Edition, Falkon in GSoC, Plasma in Slackware and Future KWin Work

Filed under
KDE
  • What’s New in openSUSE Leap 15 KDE Edition

    openSUSE Leap 15 has been released by OpenSUSE project. This released based on the upcoming SUSE Enterprise Linux 15 series that offers better stability and long-term support, also features updated components and technologies designed for power users.

    Major highlights of the openSUSE Leap 15 operating system include a new partitioner implemented in the installer, integration with the Kopano open-source groupware application suite, Firewalld as the default firewall management tool, a new classic “server” and “transactional server” system roles with read-only root filesystem and transactional updates, cloud optimizations, and a brand-new look that’s been closely aligned with SUSE Linux Enterprise.

  • [Falkon] Fifth week of coding phase, GSoC'18

    The week was totally involved in developing the GUI for QML Plugins.

    [...]

    Everything is fine upto this until I found that this didn't worked. My Mentor (David Rosca) explained that this is because the QWindow is not grabing mouse and keyboard events - which means that the window is not activated - so I added QWindow::requestActivate and It works like a charm!

  • [Slackware] Ktown in June ’18 – Plasma 5.13 in the ‘testing’ repo

    It’s that time of the month again. KDE tarballs have all been refreshed, and so this presents the opportunity to release a new package set for the Plasma 5 Desktop Environment… but then I found out that the new Plasma 5.13 depends on a minimum Qt5 version number of 5.10. Currently I have Qt 5.9.5 in my repository, and this is a LTS release (Long Term Support). The next LTS release will be 5.12 and this will not be available before end of 2018. Also, the current Plasma 5.12 has Long Term Support and the new Plasma 5.13 has not.

  • It’s not a good bye

    As you might have heard I decided to step down from my maintainer positions in KDE, especially KWin. Unfortunately I had to read very weird things about it and so I think it’s time to write about what it means that I am no longer maintainer of KWin.

    First of all: I’m not leaving KDE. I’m still contributing in form of code, bug management and reviews. And I intend to continue to do this.

    Second of all: I did not step down as maintainer because of the VDG or the usability group. I understand that my mail read like this, but it’s not the case. That I would step down as maintainer was inevitable and I’m sure it didn’t come as a general surprise to my fellow Plasma and KWin hackers. Personally I decided to step down as maintainer once the Wayland port is finished years ago. In my opinion KWin reached that state about two years ago. I continued to be maintainer to prepare for a good hand over. I deliberately reduced my involvement and passed responsibility to others. This was a long process and worked great in my opinion. As an example I want to point out the new and awesome blur effect introduced in 5.13. My first comment on the phabricator code review was that I’m not going to review it, but leave it to others. I think the result is great and I’m very happy how this worked out.

Events: Linux Accra Users Group (LAUG), SouthEast LinuxFest 2018 and BSDCan 2018

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux Accra: A haven for open source software enthusiasts

    If you’re a community-minded software enthusiast with some free time on Saturday afternoons then, the Linux Accra Users Group (LAUG) is probably the most important institution you may be hearing about only now.

    Consisting of open source and Linux hobbyists, professionals, enthusiasts, developers, as well as newbies, LAUG members meet over their shared interest in Linux and other software—to undertake related projects as well as offer assistance and resources to individual members’ projects.

  • SouthEast LinuxFest 2018 Recap

    SouthEast LinuxFest (SELF) just wrapped up, and we had a great time getting to visit with our friends on the East Coast. We had a steady stream of people stop by our booth to tell us how much they enjoy using FreeNAS. We answered questions about what’s new in FreeNAS, iXsystems storage solutions, and Project Trident (a new Open Source project focusing on BSD desktop development). TrueOS and Lumina Desktop also sparked the interest of many SELF attendees. A demo system was on display to showcase the current state of the Open Source projects we support and to emphasize the differences between FreeBSD-based projects and standard Linux Distributions.

  • BSDCan 2018 Recap

    BSDCan is special for starting at connecting airports around the world and ending informally at cafes around ByWard Market in Ottawa. Celebrating its 15th year, BSDCan 2018 tied with BSDCan 2015 for the record number of attendees at 280. This made for a busy, but never crowded, event where the hallway track is always just as important as the sessions tracks. Choosing which concurrent sessions to miss and deciding where to eat are probably the two most difficult decisions that BSDCan attendees face.

BSD: FreeBSD's New RC and Latest in OpenBSD Development

Filed under
BSD

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Vendors, Disclosure, and a bit of WebUSB Madness

    Was there any specific bug to report before we gave the talk? No, because it was widely discussed in the security scene that WebUSB is a bad idea. We believe we have demonstrated that by showing how it breaks U2F. There was no single issue to report to Google or Yubico, but a public discussion to trigger so WebUSB is fixed.

    [...]

    I do not know what “private outreach” means and why Yubico lied about being unable to replicate our findings in a call on March 2nd, even though they had it apparently working internally.

  • Librarian Sues Equifax Over 2017 Data Breach, Wins $600

    “The small claims case was a lot more about raising awareness,” said West, a librarian at the Randolph Technical Career Center who specializes in technology training and frequently conducts talks on privacy and security.

    “I just wanted to change the conversation I was having with all my neighbors who were like, ‘Ugh, computers are hard, what can you do?’ to ‘Hey, here are some things you can do’,” she said. “A lot of people don’t feel they have agency around privacy and technology in general. This case was about having your own agency when companies don’t behave how they’re supposed to with our private information.”

  • On the matter of OpenBSD breaking embargos (KRACK)
  • The UK's worst public sector IT disasters

Tux Machines Turns 14

Filed under
Site News

Man's clap

IN JUNE 2004 Tux Machines was registered, which makes this site nearly a decade and a half old. Running this site is more than a full-time job; it's not just a hobby but more like a 24/7 duty, not even with holidays or weekends off. But as long as people find the site useful, it makes all the work worthwhile. RIanne and I will keep refreshing our RSS feeds and keep this site abreast of the news.

Stable kernels 4.17.2, 4.16.16, 4.14.50, 4.9.109 and 4.4.138

Filed under
Linux

Linux 4.18-rc1

Filed under
Linux

You may think it's still Saturday for me, and that I should give you
one more day of merge window to send in some last-minute pull
requests, but I know better. I'm in Japan, and it's Sunday here. Plus
I hope to spend much of this Sunday on a boat (assuming the swells
allow it), so I'm closing the merge window early morning rather than
in the afternoon.

So here we are - no more merge window, so please don't even try to
send me updates any more. Just fixes, please.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.18-rc1 Kernel Released

Gnome 3.28 review - Minimalism gone wrong

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews

Gnome 3.28 brings in a few interesting changes to the Gnome table - not too many, though, this version isn't a radical revamp, more sort of a gradual progression of the basic idea behind the Gnome desktop environment. Not bad in that regard. Bad in every other regard.

Unfortunately - and this is nothing personal, all I care for is to be happy and productive with my desktops, and Gnome 2 was my favorite thing for years and years - Gnome 3.28 is a sterile, counterproductive pseudo-touch concept that serves little purpose on the desktop. It requires significant tweaking and immense changes under the hood to make presentable and usable, and even then, it works hard against the user. Performance is really bad, a decade-old laptop with anything other than Gnome works better than a contemporary model with Gnome, and you feel the sluggishness with every little thing you do. It's life-sapping. The more you multi-task the worse it gets.

All in all, Gnome 3.28 has changed little from the original Gnome 3 a few years ago. It is still not suited for purpose, it has not evolved in any way, and in fact, there are fresh new functional regressions in the product. It's getting more and more difficult to achieve simple things, and you're fighting against the desktop. Not how it's meant to be. Maybe Linux will make it big on the phone and tablet one day, and then Gnome could be a blast. But on traditional computing devices, it's a flop. Not recommended, I'm afraid. Take care.

Read more

Deepin 15.6 Linux OS Launches with Improved HiDPI Support, Light and Dark Themes

Filed under
OS
Linux

Coming more than six months after the previous release, Deepin 15.6 is here with a series of new desktop improvements to allow users to disable the display scaling function for HiDPI (High Dots Per Inch) screens, a revamped Deepin Manual to help newcomers accommodate better with the operating system, as well as yet another layer of desktop optimizations.

"Its clean user interfaces and the convenient interactions reduce the browsing and searching time, allowing users to have more time to work and study. The new release - deepin 15.6, offers the dedicated interfaces and easy-to-understand logics to help users start quickly. No matter which operating system was used before, you can get started easily," said the devs.

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Lazy FPU Vulnerability Now Patched for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, CentOS 7 PCs

Filed under
Security

Red Hat promised to release patches for the new speculative execution security vulnerability (CVE-2018-3665), which affects the "lazy restore" function for floating point state (FPU) in modern processors, leading to the leak of sensitive information, and the patches are now available for all Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 users. The company urges everyone using any of the systems listed below to update immediately.

Affected systems include Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server - Extended Update Support 7.5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 for IBM System z, POWER, ARM64 systems, Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Scientific Computing 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux EUS Compute Node 7.5, and Red Hat Virtualization Host 4.

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Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Artwork Proposals Call Welcomes Talented Artists

Filed under
Linux
Debian

If you're a talended artist and you want the millions of Debian users to see your work, you are invited to submit your best artwork for the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system, due for release in mid-2019. Submissions are opened until September 5, 2018, and need to meet some requirements.

While not the most important crieria, artworks are usually picked based on how they look more "Debian." Secondly, your artwork must integrate into the operating system without the need to patch any core software. And lastly, all submitted artworks must be clean and well designed to not annoy users.

Read more

Canonical Releases Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Kernel Security Update for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Earlier this week, Canonical released an important kernel security update for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, as well as other supported Ubuntu releases like Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, to address various vulnerabilities affecting the kernel packages for 64-bit machines, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) systems, and cloud environments.

Now, the same kernel patch that was made available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users on 64-bit, AWS, GCP, and cloud environments is now available for Raspberry Pi 2 devices too, fixing an issue (CVE-2018-1092) in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation discovered by Wen Xu, which could allow an attacker to crash the affected system by mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Fanless Skylake embedded PC loads up on PCIe

Teguar’s fanless, Linux-friendly “TB-5045” embedded PC features a 6th Gen Core CPU, up to 32GB DDR4, triple display support, 4x GbE, 6x USB, 4x serial, 2x external SATA bays, 3x mini-PCIe, and optional dual PCIe slots. Charlotte, North Carolina based Teguar Computers, which is new to the pages of LinuxGizmos, makes a variety of medical PCs, touch-panel computers, and other embedded gear, including a line of Waterproof PCs. The new, fanless TB-5045 box PC prefers to be high and dry, but it should fit in well in many rugged industrial environments. It offers 0 to 50°C support and a rugged steel housing with aluminum heatsink that is said to be resistant against shock and vibration. It also features a wide-range 9-36V DC via a 3-wire input. Read more

Flatpak 1.0 Linux Application Sandboxing & Distribution Framework Is Almost Here

While it's becoming very popular among Linux users as it is more and more adopted by Linux OS vendors, Flatpak is still considered an "under development" technology, and so it's not yet promoted on a mass scale as its rival Snap is by Ubuntu's mother company Canonical. However, Flatpak as it is right now, it's very usable, but it is yet to achieve the 1.0 version milestone, which usually marks a project as mature and ready for mass deployment. And it's now more closer than ever as the development team announced today the availability of the first Flatpak 1.0 pre-release version. Read more Also: Flatpak 1.0 Nears With Today's 0.99.1 Release

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Is Now Certified on Intel's NUC Mini PCs and IoT Boards

Released on April 21, 2016, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) is a long-term supported release that will receive security and software updates for five years, until April 2021, as well as a total of five point releases ending with Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS, which is expected to arrive in early August 2018. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is Canonical's 6th LTS release and the last to use the Unity desktop environment by default. The operating system is compatible with a wide-range of hardware components, including Intel's NUC mini PCs, but now, after a partnership between Intel and Canonical, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is officially certified for NUC devices. Read more

6 Open Source AI Tools to Know

In open source, no matter how original your own idea seems, it is always wise to see if someone else has already executed the concept. For organizations and individuals interested in leveraging the growing power of artificial intelligence (AI), many of the best tools are not only free and open source, but, in many cases, have already been hardened and tested. At leading companies and non-profit organizations, AI is a huge priority, and many of these companies and organizations are open sourcing valuable tools. Here is a sampling of free, open source AI tools available to anyone. Read more