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Friday, 19 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux 4.19-rc8

Filed under
Linux

As mentioned last week, here's a -rc8 release as it seems needed.

There were a lot of "little" pull requests this week, semi-normal for
this late in the cycle, but a lot of them were "fix up the previous fix
I just sent" which implies that people are having a few issues still.

I also know of at least one "bad" bug that finally has a proposed fix,
so that should hopefully get merged this week. And there are some
outstanding USB fixes I know of that have not yet landed in the tree (I
blame me for that...)

Anyway, the full shortlog is below, lots of tiny things all over the
tree. Please go and test and ensure that all works well for you.
Hopefully this should be the last -rc release.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.19-rc8 Released With A Lot Of "Tiny Things"

Kali Linux for Vagrant: Hands-on

Filed under
Linux

I recently saw the announcement for Kali Linux on Vagrant. I have been a huge fan of Kali Linux for a very long time, and I am interested in virtualization (and currently using VirtualBox in an educational environment), so this was a very interesting combination to me. I have now installed it on a few of my systems, and so far I am quite impressed with it.

The logical place to start is with a brief overview of Vagrant itself. What is Vagrant? According to their web page:

Vagrant is a tool for building and managing virtual machine environments in a single workflow

What Vagrant actually does is provide a way of automating the building of virtualized development environments using a variety of the most popular providers, such as VirtualBox, VMware, AWS and others. It not only handles the initial setup of the virtual machine, it can also provision the virtual machine based on your specifications, so it provides a consistent environment which can be shared and distributed to others.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Vulkan Cracks 2,500 Projects On GitHub

    After cracking 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub earlier this year, this week it passed the milestone of having more than 2,500 projects.

    Granted, some of these projects referencing Vulkan are still in their primitive stages, but of the 2,500+ projects are a lot of interesting Vulkan-using projects from RenderDoc to countless game engine initiatives, various code samples, the AMDVLK driver stack, and countless innovative efforts like GLOVE for OpenGL over Vulkan to Kazan for a Rust-written CPU-based Vulkan implementation and a heck of a lot more.

  • GNOME's Geoclue 2.5 Brings Vala Support, WiFi Geolocation For City-Level Accuracy

    GNOME's Geoclue library that provides a D-Bus service for location information based on GPS receivers, 3G modems, GeoIP, or even WiFi-based geolocation has been baking a lot of changes.

  • Geoclue 2.5.0

    Here is the first release in the 2.5 series.

  •  

  • Wine-Staging 3.18 Released With Some New Patches While Other Code Got Upstreamed

    It has been a very exciting weekend for Linux gamers relying upon Wine for running Windows titles under Linux... There was the routine bi-weekly Wine 3.18 development release on Friday but yesterday brought transform feedback to Vulkan and in turn Stream Output to DXVK to fix up a number of D3D11 games. Today is now the Wine-Staging 3.18 release.

    Wine-Staging 3.18 doesn't incorporate any changes around the Vulkan code (there is a Wine patch needed by DXVK for this new functionality), but does include a lot of other stuff. Wine-Staging 3.18 implements more functions in the user32 code, including cascade windows, GetPointerType, and others. On the Direct3D front are a few additions to WineD3D, including the ability for the Direct3D 10 support to work with the legacy NVIDIA Linux driver. There is also a kernel fix for allowing Steam log-ins to work again with Wine Staging.

Fedora: A Look at Fedora Workstation 29 and NeuroFedora Update

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Workstation 29 Is Looking Up To Be Another Impressive Release, Looking Great

    In addition to Ubuntu 18.10 releasing soon, Fedora 29 is set to be release by month's end if all goes well.

    I have been running the latest Fedora 29 packages on a number of test boxes and overall it's been running great. Yes, for the past few years I've been back to running Fedora on my main production system (after a few years of a falling out but besides that being a big user going back to the Fedora Core days), but Fedora 29 in particular is feeling really quite polished and great.

  • NeuroFedora update: week 41

    In week 41, we finally announced NeuroFedora to the community on the mailing list and on the Fedora Community Blog. So, it is officially a thing!

    There is a lot of software available in NeuroFedora already. You can see the list here. If you use software that is not on our list, please suggest it to us using the suggestion form.

OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Brave and Firefox Latest

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor

     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

  •  

  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved

    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing.

    "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday.

    RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then.

    Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.

  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel

    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs!

    Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches.

    One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Filed under
Security

GNOME: GTK, Librem and Fractal

Filed under
GNOME
  • A Clean GTK Theme Specially Designed for Laptop and Desktop

    The search for cool and new themes never stops. While digging through the thousands of themes in websites, search results – I found this cool and simple GTK theme – Stylish. Stylish is designed for GTK 3, GTK 2 and GNOME Shell. It comes with 6 base types of combinations with 4 color variants.

  • Linux Smartphone Librem 5 Will Ship With GNOME 3.32

    Last month, Purism announced that its Librem 5 Linux smartphone will ship in April 2019; earlier, it was scheduled to arrive in January 2019.

    It seems that the developers will now get sufficient time to ship their phone with GNOME 3.32. In a blog post, the project urged the app developers to “use libhandy 0.0.4 and up, use GTK+ 3.24.1 and up and target GNOME 3.32!”

  • Redesign of the invite dialog in Fractal (part 1)

    This month, I’ve had some time to work on the redesign of the invite dialog in Fractal. There is a dialog used for inviting users in a room you are in or inviting a user to start a direct chat with them. In this dialog, you can search for users by usernames. The result of this search is shown in a list below the search entry and you can click on the GtkListBox‘s rows to select users (in the case of direct chat invitations, the latest selected user will be the only one selected) and you can then click on the button “Invite” to send invitations to all selected users.

Review: Reborn OS 2018.09.09 and Nitrux 1.0.15

Filed under
Reviews

This month I spent some time digging through the waiting list and trimming projects that have not survived the harsh and demanding growing period of their first year of existence. Among them I found a project which seemed simple on the surface, an Antergos-based distribution offering even more install-time options than its parent. What caught my attention was the specific list of extra options: 15 desktop environments to choose from, able to run Android apps through the Anbox compatibility software, optional Flatpak support, and the Mycroft desktop assistant. All of this on a rolling release base provided by Arch Linux.

The distribution is called Reborn OS and I downloaded what was, at the time, the latest build. Reborn is available as a 64-bit build only. The ISO I downloaded was 1.5GB in size and, booting from this ISO brought up the Budgie desktop environment. At the top of the desktop is a panel with the application menu, a couple of quick-launch buttons and a system tray. The Budgie desktop seemed to respond well once it finished loading and I was eager to get started.

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KDE: Supporting KDE via AmazonSmile, Krita Fundraiser, Qt-Related Hirings, KDE Project Funding

Filed under
KDE
  • Support KDE via AmazonSmile

    For quite some time, the KDE e.V. – KDE’s non-profit organization – is listed in the AmazonSmile program.

  • The Last Day of the Krita Sprint and the Last Day of the Krita Fundraiser

    We fully intended to make a post every day to keep everyone posted on what’s happening here in sunny Deventer, the Netherlands.

  • Who is Hiring?

    Just as quick info: For some time, there is a sticky thread on r/cpp about who is hiring C++ developers. This thread gets cleaned quarterly, so all the open jobs listed there are likely still open.

  • KDE chalks up another year with cash to back community

    The KDE Project, a group that puts out a desktop environment that is used by numerous GNU/Linux distributions, has received two big donations that will enable it to do more to support the community, according to the president of the project, Lydia Pintscher.

    In a Twitter thread to mark the 22nd birthday of the project — which came to life on 14 October 1996 — Pintscher said over the past year the project had rallied behind the three goals that it cared about: privacy, onboarding and usability and productivity.

    KDE was started by German software developer Matthias Ettrich with the aim of providing GNU/Linux users with all the functionality that Windows had at the time.

  • Screen reader accessibility for the Plasma desktop

    It’s been rather quiet when it comes to accessibility in KDE land for a while. But I’m very happy to see some movement and fresh energy, moving in a good direction.

    If you’re curious about making our software available to more users, improving it for everyone (for example keyboard usability), now is the time to join. We are talking on the accessibility mailing list. It’s still to early to say what the exact plan will look like, but there will be progress. Thanks to the last Randa meeting, we reached the point where a few things in Plasma do work with a screen reader, enough to let a few brave souls experiment with it. Now we’ll have to structure what needs improvements, I could imaging defining some workflows.

Fediverse and Mastodon

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Spritely: towards secure social spaces as virtual worlds

    If you follow me on the fediverse, maybe you already know. I've sent an announcement to my work that I am switching to doing a project named Spritely on my own full time. (Actually I'm still going to be doing some contracting with my old job, so I'll still have some income, but I'll be putting a full 40 hours a week into Spritely.)

    tl;dr: I'm working on building the next generation of the fediverse as a distributed game. You can support this work if you so wish.

  • The demise of G+ and return to blogging (w/ mastodon integration)

    I’m back to blogging, after shutting down my wordpress.com hosted blog in spring. This time, fully privacy aware, self hosted, and integrated with mastodon.

    Let’s talk details: In spring, I shutdown my wordpress.com hosted blog, due to concerns about GDPR implications with comment hosting and ads and stuff. I’d like to apologize for using that, back when I did this (in 2007), it was the easiest way to get into blogging. Please forgive me for subjecting you to that!

    Recently, Google announced the end of Google+. As some of you might know, I posted a lot of medium-long posts there, rather than doing blog posts; especially after I disabled the wordpress site.

Testing Ubuntu 18.10 and Lubuntu 18.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • You Can Help Ubuntu This Weekend Test The Near-Final Cosmic Cuttlefish

    If all goes well, the Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" release will happen on 18 October but for that to happen they could use your help this weekend testing their release candidate spins.

    Running a few days behind with ideally their RC builds should have been spinning on Thursday (11 October) but instead being announced on Saturday (13 October), there are non-final but test-friendly Cosmic RC builds now coming out for all Ubuntu 18.10 flavors.

  • Help test Lubuntu 18.10 Release Candidates!

    Please, help us test Lubuntu Release Candidates. You can find the link to the dailies on our downloads page. When you’re done, so we know you tested, please get an Ubuntu SSO account (if you don’t have one already) and report the result on iso.qa.ubuntu.com. This means you, i386 testers. It’s your time to shine!

KaOS 2018.10

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.14.0 was announced just a few days ago and is already included in this ISO. Highlights of this version include a new Display Configuration widget for screen management which is useful for presentations, the Audio Volume widget now has a built-in speaker test feature moved from Phonon settings, Plasma now warns on logout when other users are logged in, fixed non-centered task switchers on Wayland and the Kickoff application menu now switches tabs instantly on hover.

A new Glibc 2.27/GCC 7.3.1 based toolchain is among the many changes to the base of the system. Updates to Boost, ICU, x265, Protobuf, Net-SNMP, Qt required the rebuild of a large percentage of the KaOS repositories.

Read more

Also: KaOS 2018.10 Released With KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop, Wayland 1.16

Servers: Containers, Xen and Databases

Filed under
Server
  • Cloud Foundry Goes All-In With Kubernetes

    Further proof probably isn't needed to confirm that Kubernetes has become the de facto standard when it comes to container orchestration, but if you need more, the Cloud Foundry Foundation announced this week that it has taken on two new Kubernetes-focused projects.

  • Xen & Databases

    I'm running PostgreSQL and MySQL on my server that both serve different databases to Wordpress, Drupal, Piwigo, Friendica, Mastodon, whatever...

    In the past the databases where colocated in my mailserver VM whereas the webserver was running on a different VM. Somewhen I moved the databases from domU to dom0, maybe because I thought that the databases would be faster running on direct disk I/O in the dom0 environment, but can't remember the exact rasons anymore.

    However, in the meantime the size of the databases grew and the number of the VMs did, too. MySQL and PostgreSQL are both configured/optimized to run with 16 GB of memory in dom0, but in the last months I experienced high disk I/O especially for MySQL and slow I/O performance in all the domU VMs because of that.

Weekend Game Suggestions, Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury a Month Away

  • Saturday Mag: Linux gaming news odds and ends plus a look at a few things on sale

    A day early! Your new weekly roundup of odds and ends for Linux gaming that didn't make it into the main news this week, plus a look at some sales.

    Firstly, Encased, an "old school isometric turn-based RPG" that's currently on Kickstarter is planning Linux support. They've got 3 days to go and they've managed to hit their funding goal so we have another great looking game coming our way! They've only just scraped by though, hitting just over the €86K goal.

  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury thunders its way towards release on November 13th

    The latest expansion for the delightfully messy medieval grand strategy title will be with us soon. You’ll be able to take your faith and dynasty to new heights in with the upcoming content.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenBSD: New Dnsmasq, New OpenSSH and New OpenBSD

FOSS in Digital Currencies

  • Braiins OS: An Open Source Alternative to Bitcoin Mining Firmware
    The company behind Slush Pool recently rolled out the initial release of its ASIC miner firmware: Braiins OS. The operating system is advertised as “the very first fully open-source, Linux-based system for cryptocurrency embedded devices,” an alternative to the factory-default firmware that comes with most popular mining hardware. Upon visiting the project’s website, visitors are greeted with a clear message, a mantra that resonates with its related industry’s ethos: “Take back control.”
  • Cryptoexchange Coinbase open sources its security scanner tool Salus
    The renowned United States-based cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase always focuses on the security of its platform. Moreover, it has developed novel solutions to implementing security protocols to further strengthen their security. Furthermore, just recently, they announced that they are listing their security scanner execution tool, Salus as open source.
  • Crypto Exchange Coinbase Open-Sources Its Security Scaling Tool
    U.S.-based cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is making a recently developed automated security scaling tool available to the public. Called Salus, after the Roman the goddess of safety and well-being, the program can automatically choose to run and configure different security scanners and issue a report on the results, according to a Thursday blog post from Coinbase developer Julian Borrey. Available as an open-source tool on GitHub from today, Salus is said to offer the advantage of being able to centrally coordinate security scans across a large number of software storage repositories, avoiding having to configure a scanner for each different project.

Suddenly Linux runs in Android

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R. UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential! Read more

Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast