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Quick Roundup

OSS: Blockchain, DeepBrain, Redox OS, OpenBuilds, Red Hat Summit and FOSSASIA

  • It's About Time DApps Unlocked the Mass-Market Momentum for Blockchain
    There’s more to Blockchain technology than Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. At its fundamental level, Blockchain technology engenders trusts in inherently trustless environments. Protocol blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, GoChain, Steem and xDai have provided a launchpad for developers to work on DApps. DApps are typically open source applications not owned by anyone, immune from downtimes; and that cannot be shut down by a government or its agencies. The rapid proliferation of Decentralized Applications (DApps) powered a bull run in cryptocurrencies in 2017. Right now, there are more than 2000 DApps designed to solve specific market problems across industries such as health, data storage, finance, gaming, and governance.
  • DeepBrain Chain outlines release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta in progress report
    DeepBrain Chain detailed the release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta of its AI Training Net, which allows users to rent computing power to train artificial intelligence algorithms. DeepBrain Chain claimed numerous feature inclusions and and improvements, many pertaining to the scheduling and activation of tasks. In DBC 0.3.6.0, if an AI training task has been stopped a specified period of time, its storage will be deleted automatically. However, the task can be restarted at any time before deletion. If a node has been restarted, reactivation of any previous training tasks will require manual user authorization. [...] A decision was made recently by the community concerning the open source licensing of DeepBrain Chain’s code. Over 55 percent of the members polled voted to not make the code fully open source by the end of March.
  • Redox OS 0.5.0
    It has been one year and four days since the last release of Redox OS! In this time, we have been hard at work improving the Redox ecosystem. Much of this work was related to relibc, a new C library written in Rust and maintained by the Redox OS project, and adding new packages to the cookbook. We are proud to report that we have now far exceeded the capabilities of newlib, which we were using as our system C library before. We have added many important libraries and programs, which you can see listed below.
  • Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust
    It's been just over one year since the previous release of Redox OS while today this Rust-written operating system has finally been succeeded by Redox OS 0.5.  It's taken a while since the previous release of Redox OS as they have been focusing their attention on Relibc, a C library implementation written within the Rust programming language. Relibc is now used as the operating system's default C library.
  • Get Moving with New Software from OpenBuilds
    If you’re reading Hackaday, you’ve probably heard of OpenBuilds. Even if the name doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve absolutely seen something on these pages that was built with their components. Not only is OpenBuilds a fantastic place to get steppers, linear rails, lead screws, pulleys, wheels, and whatever else you need to make your project go, they’re also home to an active forum of people who are passionate about developing open source machines. As if that wasn’t enough reason to head over to the OpenBuilds website, [Peter Van Der Walt] recently wrote in to tell us about some new free and open source software he and the team have been working on that’s designed to make it easier than ever to get your creations cutting, lasing, milling, and whatever else you could possibly imagine. If you’ve got a machine that moves, they’ve got some tools you’ll probably want to check out.
  • Dive into developer-focused sessions at Red Hat Summit
    Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and it’s shaping up to be best Red Hat developer event ever. This year, attendees will get to choose from more than 300 sessions, not to mention booth presentations, parties, labs, and training. To help you cut through the clutter, we’ve created a list of developer specific activities and sessions that will help you shape your Red Hat Summit experience. Most of these sessions are part of the Cloud-Native App Dev track, with a few other sessions that we think will appeal to you as a developer. For more information on these sessions, visit the Red Hat Summit session listing page and sort by “cloud-native app dev” track.
  • 10th year of FOSSASIA
    This FOSSASIA was special as it marked its 10th year! It was quite impressive to witness a FOSS conference to continue growing this long with growing community. The four day conference schedule was packed with various interesting talks, workshops, hackathon and other engaging activities.

Reducing sysadmin toil with Kubernetes controllers

Kubernetes is a platform for reducing toil cunningly disguised as a platform for running containers. The element that allows for both running containers and reducing toil is the Kubernetes concept of a Controller. [...] The canonical example of this in action is in how we manage Pods in Kubernetes. A Pod is effectively a running copy of an application that a specific worker node is asked to run. If that application crashes, the kubelet running on that node will start it again. However, if that node crashes, the Pod is not recovered, as the control loop (via the kubelet process) responsible for the resource no longer exists. To make applications more resilient, Kubernetes has the ReplicaSet controller. The ReplicaSet controller is bundled inside the Kubernetes controller-manager, which runs on the Kubernetes master node and contains the controllers for these more advanced resources. The ReplicaSet controller is responsible for ensuring that a set number of copies of your application is always running. To do this, the ReplicaSet controller requests that a given number of Pods is created. It then routinely checks that the correct number of Pods is still running and will request more Pods or destroy existing Pods to do so. By requesting a ReplicaSet from Kubernetes, you get a self-healing deployment of your application. You can further add lifecycle management to your workload by requesting a Deployment, which is a controller that manages ReplicaSets and provides rolling upgrades by managing multiple versions of your application's ReplicaSets. Read more

Android Leftovers

Server: IBM, LAMP and Kubernetes

  • A HATS For Many Occasions
    IBM gives customers plenty of options when it comes to its Rational Host Access Transformation software, including several modes of operation, different runtime options, and support for different operating systems in screen modernization engagements. With last week’s launch of HATS version 9.7, the development and deployment options got even wider. Regardless of which downstream options a HATS customer ultimately chooses, it all starts out basically the same on the front side of the sausage machine: Customers come to HATS because they have a 5250 (or 3270 or VT100) application that they want to transform, but they don’t want to go through the hassle, expense, and risk of modifying the IBM i, z/OS, or Unix application’s source code.
  • Six top skills that you should acquire in 2019
    There is a growing demand for the fullstack development skill set, which is the ability to develop tech both on the front-end/client side and back-end/server side. As you can’t learn all, select combinations like MEAN or LAMP stack.
  • Kubernetes and the Enterprise
    The reason we were having this conversation was around SUSE’s Cloud Application Platform (CAP). This is our Kubernetes focused Cloud Foundry distribution. And as part of the Kubernetes focus, we have been supporting and running SUSE CAP on Azure’s AKS for the last year or so. The conversation continued with observations that Kubernetes was clearly the future across IT. Yet to date, Cloud Foundry still has a good following with the large enterprise. And the thinking was that the Cloud Foundry approach really helped the large enteprise work with their applications, even if the applications were purely ‘container’ applications. Cloud Foundry makes the container-side of managing your ‘container’ application transparent. This approach ultimately lowers the tasks, breadth of tooling, and knowledge you have to surround Kubernetes with. It was with this thought, that a light-bulb went on.

Baidu open-sources NLP model it claims achieves state-of-the-art results in Chinese language tasks

Filed under
OSS

Baidu, the Beijing conglomerate behind the eponymous Chinese search engine, invests heavily in natural language processing (NLP) research. In October, it debuted an AI model capable of beginning a translation just a few seconds into a speaker’s speech and finishing seconds after the end of a sentence, and in 2016 and 2017, it launched SwiftScribe, a web app powered by its DeepSpeech platform, and TalkType, a dictation-centric Android keyboard.

Building on that and other previous work, Baidu this week detailed ERNIE (Enhanced Representation through kNowledge IntEgration), a natural language model based on its PaddlePaddle deep learning platform. The company claims it achieves “high accuracy” on a range of language processing tasks, including natural language inference, semantic similarity, named entity recognition, sentiment analysis, and question-answer matching, and that it’s state-of-the-art with respect to Chinese language understanding.

Read more

How to use Spark SQL: A hands-on tutorial

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

In the first part of this series, we looked at advances in leveraging the power of relational databases "at scale" using Apache Spark SQL and DataFrames. We will now do a simple tutorial based on a real-world dataset to look at how to use Spark SQL. We will be using Spark DataFrames, but the focus will be more on using SQL. In a separate article, I will cover a detailed discussion around Spark DataFrames and common operations.

I love using cloud services for my machine learning, deep learning, and even big data analytics needs, instead of painfully setting up my own Spark cluster. I will be using the Databricks Platform for my Spark needs. Databricks is a company founded by the creators of Apache Spark that aims to help clients with cloud-based big data processing using Spark.

Read more

Also: Scaling relational databases with Apache Spark SQL and DataFrames

4 questions Uber's open source program office answers with data

Filed under
OSS

It's been said that "Software is eating the world," and every company will eventually become a "software company." Since open source is becoming the mainstream path for developing software, the way companies manage their relationships with the open source projects they depend on will be crucial for their success.

An open source program office (OSPO) is a company's asset to manage such relationships, and more and more companies are setting them up. Even the Linux Foundation has a project called the TODO Group "to collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs".

Read more

Kernel: LWN on Linux 5.1 and More, 'Lake'-named Hardware

Filed under
Linux
  • 5.1 Merge window part 1

    As of this writing, 6,135 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 5.1 release. That is approximately halfway through the expected merge-window volume, which is a good time for a summary. A number of important new features have been merged for this release; read on for the details.

  • Controlling device peer-to-peer access from user space

    The recent addition of support for direct (peer-to-peer) operations between PCIe devices in the kernel has opened the door for different use cases. The initial work concentrated on in-kernel support and the NVMe subsystem; it also added support for memory regions that can be used for such transfers. Jérôme Glisse recently proposed two extensions that would allow the mapping of those regions into user space and mapping device files between two devices. The resulting discussion surprisingly led to consideration of the future of core kernel structures dealing with memory management.

    Some PCIe devices can perform direct data transfers to other devices without involving the CPU; support for these peer-to-peer transactions was added to the kernel for the 4.20 release. The rationale behind the functionality is that, if the data is passed between two devices without modification, there is no need to involve the CPU, which can perform other tasks instead. The peer-to-peer feature was developed to allow Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) network interface cards to pass data directly to NVMe drives in the NVMe fabrics subsystem. Using peer-to-peer transfers lowers the memory bandwidth needed (it avoids one copy operation in the standard path from device to system memory, then to another device) and CPU usage (the devices set up the DMAs on their own). While not considered directly in the initial work, graphics processing units (GPUs) and RDMA interfaces have been able to use that functionality in out-of-tree modules for years.

    The merged work concentrated on support at the PCIe layer. It included setting up special memory regions and the devices that will export and use those regions. It also allows finding out if the PCIe topology allows the peer-to-peer transfers.

  • Intel Posts Linux Perf Support For Icelake CPUs

    With the core functionality for Intel Icelake CPUs appearing to be in place, Intel's open-source developers have been working on the other areas of hardware enablement for these next-generation processors.

    The latest Icelake Linux patches we are seeing made public by Intel is in regards to the "perf" subsystem support. Perf, of course, is about exposing the hardware performance counters and associated instrumentation that can be exercised by user-space when profiling performance of the hardware and other events.

  • What is after Gemini Lake?

    Based on a 10 nm manufacturing process, the Elkhart Lake SoC uses Tremont microarchitectures (Atom) [2] and features Gen 11 graphics similar to the Ice Lake processors [3]. Intel’s Gen 11 solution offers 64 execution units, and it has managed over 1 TFLOP in GPU performance [4]. This can be compared with the Nvidia GeForce GT 1030 which offered a peak throughput of 0.94 TFLOPs [5]. Code has already been added in the Linux mainline kernel [6] suggesting a possible Computex announcement and mid to late 2019 availability [7].

GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and GNOME Bugzilla

Filed under
GNOME
  • Parental controls hackfest

    Various of us have been meeting in the Red Hat offices in London this week (thanks Red Hat!) to discuss parental controls and digital wellbeing. The first two days were devoted to this; today and tomorrow will be dedicated to discussing metered data (which is unrelated to parental controls, but the hackfests are colocated because many of the same people are involved in both).

  • GNOME Bugzilla closed for new bug entry

    As part of GNOME’s ongoing migration from Bugzilla to Gitlab, from today on there are no products left in GNOME Bugzilla which allow the creation of new tickets.
    The ID of the last GNOME Bugzilla ticket is 797430 (note that there are gaps between 173191–200000 and 274555–299999 as the 2xxxxx ID range was used for tickets imported from Ximian Bugzilla).

    Since the year 2000, the Bugzilla software had served as GNOME’s issue tracking system. As forges emerged which offer tight and convenient integration of issue tracking, code review of proposed patches, automated continuous integration testing, code repository browsing and hosting and further functionality, Bugzilla’s shortcomings became painful obstacles for modern software development practices.

    Nearly all products which used GNOME Bugzilla have moved to GNOME Gitlab to manage issues. A few projects (Bluefish, Doxygen, GnuCash, GStreamer, java-gnome, LDTP, NetworkManager, Tomboy) have moved to other places (such as freedesktop.org Gitlab, self-hosted Bugzilla instances, or Github) to track their issues.

Security: Turris, New BSD Router Project Release and PuTTY Has Holes

Filed under
Security
  • Turris: secure open-source routers

    One of the other things it is doing is creating open-source home routers. It started because CZ.NIC wondered about how safe home users are from network attacks. Are there active attacks against home users? And, if so, how frequent are they and what kinds of attacks are being made? To figure out the answer, the organization created Project Turris to create a secure router that it gave away. These routers would monitor the network and report suspicious traffic back to the project. They also served as endpoints for some honeypots that the project was running.

    CZ.NIC wanted to make the Turris router "the right way", he said, so the organization made it all open source. The router has automatic security updates and users are given root access on the device. It also sported some "interesting hardware", Hrušecký said; it had a two-core PowerPC CPU, 2GB of RAM, and 256MB of NAND flash.

    Based on the information provided by the Turris routers, CZ.NIC researchers started publishing reports about what they were finding. That led some people to ask if they could get the routers themselves, because they felt that other router makers were "not doing things right". That led to the creation of commercial Turris routers: the Turris Omnia (which was reviewed here in 2016) and the upcoming Turris Mox. Those routers will still allow people to participate in the research if they choose to.

    Building the routers with free and open-source software (FOSS) is really the only way to go, he said. The project knew that it was not going to be able to compete with small, cheap routers, so it created routers with lots of capability that would allow them to run lots of different kinds of services. FOSS makes it easy to get started on a project like this because there is lots of available software that can be easily integrated into the OS.

    These routers allow users to do whatever they want and people believe they are more capable than they truly are, Hrušecký said. That means they break things in "really creative ways". Sometimes they will make custom changes, completely outside of the OS framework, which get overwritten with the next automatic update. These are "tricky problems" to handle; the project would not have if it locked its users out. At some "dark moments" he understands why some companies do that.

  • BSD Router Project Release 1.92 (2019/03/20)
  • Putty 0.71 Fixes Weakness That Allows Fake Login Prompts

    The latest version of PuTTY SSH and Telnet client adds protection against spoofing the terminal authentication prompt to steal login info. Recently released, the update comes after a 20-month hiatus and fixes a total of eight security issues.

    An attacker taking advantage of this weakness could allow authentication on a malicious server with no password and at the start of the session send the text PuTTY shows when prompting for the private key passphrase.

Audiocasts: This Week in Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Linux in the Ham Shack, Going Linux and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

Filed under
Interviews
  • Episode 59 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ll talk about some big releases from the GNOME desktop environment, Sway window manager, distro releases from Lakka, KNOPPIX and UBports’ Ubuntu Touch. I’ve got a couple of announcements for this show, TuxDigital and a Linux Conference I will be attenting so be sure to check out that segment. We’ll also check out some new releases from Audacity, Mesa drivers, NetworkManager, TLP project and more. We’ll also look at a new file sharing service provided by Mozilla. Then we’ll discuss some news from the Linux Foundation, Debian and Humble Bundle. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews.

  • FLOSS Weekly 522: Railroader

    Railroader is a security static analysis tool for applications that use Ruby on Rails. Railroader will examine custom code to look for potential problems, and warn about them. Railroader can't find every vulnerability, but it's a great tool to help find problems before they hurt anyone. It is a static analysis tool - that means it does not try to run the application users are analyzing. Railroader is an OSS fork of the Brakeman project, which has gone proprietary

  • LHS Episode #276: Logical Volume Management Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 276 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take a relatively in-depth look at the world of Logical Volume Management under Linux. LVM is a method for creating redundant, scalable and highly available disk volumes that can span multiple physical drives and media types. The topic is more immersive than could be covered in one episode but this should be a good initial primer for anyone looking to explore what LVM can offer. Thanks for listening.

  • Going Linux #365 · Listener Feedback

    We hear from George about Windows and printers. Roger and Gord also comment on printers. Many questions as always, and a report of problems installing the Software Center.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 801

Graphics: Gallium3D, NVIDIA, AMD Radeon and SVT-AV1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's Iris Gallium3D Driver Lands Support For Fast Color Clears

    Intel's Iris Gallium3D driver may now see slightly better performance in some scenarios thanks to fast color clears support having landed.

    The Iris driver continues picking up new features and optimizations ahead of its debut next quarter in Mesa 19.1 as the next-generation successor to Intel's long-standing i965 "classic" Mesa driver. The Iris Gallium3D driver is focused on supporting Broadwell "Gen 8" graphics and newer.

  • NVIDIA 418.56 Linux Driver Released With GeForce MX230 / MX250 Support

    Out for GDC week is the NVIDIA 418.56 Linux driver as the latest stable update to their current long-lived driver release branch.

    New hardware support with the NVIDIA 418.56 Linux driver is support for the GeForce MX230 and MX250.

  • Radeon GPU Analyzer 2.1 Adds Vulkan Support In Its GUI, Other Debug Improvements

    AMD has launched a new version of its open-source Radeon GPU Analyzer (RGA) software under the GPUOpen umbrella.

    The Radeon GPU Analyzer allows the offline compiler and code analysis for DirectX/OpenGL/Vulkan/OpenCL code with various nifty features catered towards AMD GPUs. This is an important tool for game/graphics developers trying to study performance bottlenecks or other issues happening on Radeon hardware.

  • SVT-AV1 Can Now Achieve 1080p @ 60 FPS AV1 Video Encoding On Select Configurations

    The performance out of Intel's SVT video encoders for offering great CPU-based video encoding performance for the likes of HEVC / AV1 / VP9 continues maturing quite nicely. Since discovering Intel's open-source work at the start of February and benchmarking it several times since, its performance has continued to improve particularly for the SVT-AV1 encoder.

    The work on SVT-AV1 is notable considering all of the other CPU-based AV1 video encoders have been notoriously slow. As of the latest performance optimizations in their Git tree, when using the 8th level encoding pre-set, SVT-AV1 should be capable of achieving up to 1080p @ 60 FPS when using a Xeon Platinum 8180 processor. That's quite a beefy CPU, but the results are impressive when considering where the SVT-AV1 performance was even at one week ago.

Servers: Kubernetes, SUSE, Red Hat and Istio/Microservices

Filed under
Server
  • Portworx Boosts Cloud-Native Data Security and Disaster Recovery

    ortworx announced the latest edition of its namesake cloud-native storage and data management platform on March 20, providing users with new security and disaster recovery capabilities.

    Portworx Enterprise 2.1 integrates a new feature the company has dubbed PX-Security, which provides granular role-based access controls that go beyond what are natively available in the open-source Kubernetes cloud-native container orchestration system. Data backup is being enhanced with the new PX-DR disaster recovery feature that provides low latency resiliency for critical data recovery.

    "Kubernetes alone can't meet all of an enterprise's application needs," Murli Thirumale, co-founder and CEO of Portworx, told eWEEK. "There are needs around security monitoring, and particularly data storage and data management that are needed to really allow adoption of containers and Kubernetes orchestration across a wide set of application platforms."

  • A Look Back and What's in Store for Kubernetes Contributor Summits

    As our contributing community grows in great numbers, with more than 16,000 contributors this year across 150+ GitHub repositories, it’s important to provide face to face connections for our large distributed teams to have opportunities for collaboration and learning. In Contributor Experience, our methodology with planning events is a lot like our documentation; we build from personas – interests, skills, and motivators to name a few. This way we ensure there is valuable content and learning for everyone.

  • 3 Reasons Every Enterprise Should Use Kubernetes

    As those who follow me online know, I’ve long been a fan of Kubernetes—and it’s clear I’m not alone. Kubernetes is less than five years old and it’s become the de facto container management system across the globe. In fact, back in Forrester’s cloud predictions for 2018 experts were already declaring Kubernetes the victor in the “war for container orchestration dominance.”[1] Its popularity has only grown since then and CIOs across industries are considering it the gold standard for container management, especially when it comes to supporting their DevOps efforts.

  • Three Ways Long Term Service Pack Support (LTSS) Makes the Life of Enterprise IT Easier
  • Knative: What developers need to know

    Knative is not just a hot topic in software development, it’s a whole new way to look at services and functions. As a developer, what do you need to know to take advantage of this cutting-edge technology? Are there important design or implementation considerations? Let’s take a look.

  • Quarkus 0.12.0 released

    Quarkus, a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework, was announced in early March, and now Quarkus 0.12.0 has been released and is available from the Maven repository. The quickstarts, guides, and website also have been updated, and 213 issues and PRs are included in this release. That’s quite a few updates, but in particular check out the new metrics, health check, and Kafka guides. Also, this release requires GraalVM 1.0.0-RC13 for Building a Native Executable.

  • How Service Meshes Are a Missing Link for Microservices

    “We are coming to all those communities and basically pitching them to move, right? We tell them, ‘look, monolithic is very complicated — let’s move to microservices,’ so, they are working very, very hard to move but then they discover that the tooling is not that mature,” Idit Levine, founder and CEO of Solo.io, said. “And actually, there are many gaps in the tooling that they had or used it before and now they’re losing this functionality. For instance, like logging or like debugging microservices is a big problem and so on.”

    Levine, whose company offers service mesh solutions, also described how service meshes were designed to “solve exactly this problem,” during a podcast episode of The New Stack Analyst hosted by Alex Williams, founder and editor-in-chief of The New Stack, with Janakiram MSV, a The New Stack Correspondent and principal of Janakiram & Associates.

    One of the first things organizations notice when migrating away from monolithic to microservices environments is how “suddenly you’re losing your observability for all of the applications,” Levine said. “That’s one thing that [service meshes] is really big in solving.”

    Then there is security. Making sure that applications and microservices are secure involves different dynamics than monolithic security does in a number of ways. “Are microservices allowed to talk to each other or are they not?” Levine said. “How you do all this policy about who’s allowed to talk to whom and if it’s secure” is a major consideration.

    Routing can also pose problems. “It’s about making sure that the pipe is available to all those microservices with all of the connections,” Levine said. “This is one of three problems any organization will have once they try to move to microservices — and that’s exactly why service mesh is needed because it’s solving those problems.”

    The early development of service meshes can be traced back to when Google, IBM and other firms created Istio, Levine noted. “And the reason I believed that they did it is because they looked at their Linkerd and they just said, ‘yeah, the idea is very solid but the implementation is not the best.’”

    The issue, Levine said, was how the Java code “was very, very heavy and then there was a lot of overhead in the performance and the installation and the overall solution.”

Linux Foundation: DataPractices, Kodi and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Linux Foundation Adds a Project for Building Data Best Practices

    The Linux Foundation today added a new project, called DataPractices.org, which acts as a template for data best practices. The project will offer open coursework for data teamwork in an effort to create a vendor-neutral community to establish these practices and increase data knowledge.

    The project was initially created by data.world, a data catalog platform for data and analysis, as a data practices manifesto. The manifesto contains the values and principles that create an effective, modern, and ethical approach to data teamwork. According to Brett Hurt, data.world co-founder and CEO, the main goal of the project is to “raise the level of data literacy across the ecosystem.”

    Data teamwork, said Hurt, is a method for bringing together “your data practitioners, subject matter experts, and other stakeholders by removing costly barriers to data discovery, comprehension, integration, and sharing.” He added that this method enables companies to “achieve anything with data, faster.”

    Under the Linux Foundation, DataPractices.org will continue and further the work started by data.world’s manifesto. The manifesto is up on the Linux Foundation’s website (and available to sign) and contains a number of values and principles.

  • The Kodi Foundation Officially Joins Forces with The Linux Foundation

    Ever since the first line of its code was written, there was the idea of creating Kodi (known as XBMC back in the day) based on open-source principles. This means that the source code of this application is available for anyone to access, see, review, and edit as they see fit. And now, the Kodi Foundation has joined the Linux Foundation in a not-as-surprising move as these organizations share the same core values.

    In a freshly-published blog post, Kodi’s development team explains the reasons why it has joined the Linux Foundation as an Associate Member. This move will allow Kodi’s team to work with similar organizations, spread their reach, and to improve their own software in the long run. The Linux Foundation has both corporate members and individual supporters, with companies like Google, Microsoft, Huawei, Intel, IBM, Oracle, Samsung, and many others on board.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces Kingsoft Cloud as Gold Member

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus, today announced that Kingsoft Cloud has joined the Foundation as a Gold member.

    Kingsoft Cloud, a unit of Kingsoft Group, is a leading global cloud computing service provider. According to recent research from IDC, Kingsoft is among the top three cloud computing companies in China. The company offers a broad portfolio covering cloud server, physical cloud host, relational database, object storage, load balancing, VPN, CDN, cloud security, cloud DNS, and more, as well as cloud-based solutions for the government and enterprises in vertical industries.

    “By joining CNCF, we look forward to contributing to a more holistic integration of open source technologies across real-world business scenarios,” said Liu Tao,General Manager for Product Center of Cloud Computing and Partner of Kingsoft Cloud. “Becoming a Gold member will not only increase our power to innovate with cutting-edge technologies, but the practical experience Kingsoft Cloud brings can help the CNCF community deploy its projects across commercial application scenarios.”

The Many Flavors of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Linux is not as popularly used in both the security- and user-focused computing worlds as other OSes such as Windows and macOS, but it can still be used for both. In fact, depending on your needs, there are many different flavors of Linux you can use.

And the different versions have key differences between them. Aside from security user-focused distros, there are what can be considered unique Linux distros that have their own specific uses, weird as they may be. This article will detail some of the many flavors of Linux available today and will leave you with a better understanding of their differences, and you will be in a better position to select the distro of Linux for your needs.

Read more

Programming: ISO C++ Standards Committee, Rust, Python and Programming Language Rankings

Filed under
Development
  • Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Kona, February 2019

    A few weeks ago I attended a meeting of the ISO C++ Standards Committee (also known as WG21) in Kona, Hawaii. This was the first committee meeting in 2019; you can find my reports on 2018’s meetings here (November 2018, San Diego), here (June 2018, Rapperswil), and here (March 2018, Jacksonville). These reports, particularly the San Diego one, provide useful context for this post.

    This week marked the feature-complete deadline of C++20, so there was a heavy focus on figuring out whether certain large features that hadn’t yet merged into the working draft would make it in. Modules and Coroutines made it; Executors and Networking did not.

    Attendance at this meeting wasn’t quite at last meeting’s record-breaking level, but it was still quite substantial. We continued the experiment started at the last meeting of running Evolution Incubator (“EWGI”) and Library Evolution Incubator (“LEWGI”) subgroups to pre-filter / provide high-level directional guidance for proposals targeting the Evolution and Library Evolution groups (EWG and LEWG), respectively.

  • Comparing Machine Learning Methods

    When working with data and modeling, its sometimes hard to determine what model you should use for a particular modeling project. A quick way to find an algorithm that might work better than others is to run through an algorithm comparison loop to see how various models work against your data. In this post, I’ll be comparing machine learning methods using a few different sklearn algorithms.

  • Python Sets: Cheat Sheet
  • Unique sentinel values, identity checks, and when to use object() instead of None
  • The [IBM-sponsored] RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2019
  • This Week in Rust 278
  • Speed: Default value vs checking for None
  • Book Review: Mission Python
  • How To Create A ‘Hello, World!’ Application With Django

    Django is a high-level full stack open source web framework written in Python, that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. Django comes with lots of advance functionalities baked in which saves developers a lot of time. The simplicity Django offers lets developers focus more on writing the app instead of rewriting the same wheel. Since it’s release in 2003 Django has proven to be the most productive framework for Python developers to know more about Django read: Django – Web Framework For Perfectionists

    In this article, we will create the traditional “Hello, World!” app, which will basically display the string ‘Hello, world!’ in the browser. This might be your first Django app so pay close attention to the core principles of Django which we will discuss later in the article.

  • Announcing Public Anaconda Package Download Data

    I’m very happy to announce that starting today, we will be publishing summarized download data for all conda packages served in the Anaconda Distribution, as well as the popular conda-forge and bioconda channels. The dataset starts January 1, 2017 (April 2017 for Anaconda Cloud channels) and will be updated roughly once a month. We hope these data will help the community understand how quickly new package versions are being adopted, which platforms are popular for users, and track the usage of different Python versions. For example, this dataset can be used to see how the Python 2 to 3 transition has been progressing for the past 2 years:

  • [Older] BPF: A Tour of Program Types

2MP, MIPI-CSI stereo cam runs Linux on Jetson

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Linux
Hardware

E-con’s STEEReoCAM is a 2-megapixel MIPI CSI-2 stereo vision camera designed to work with Jetson TX2 and Xavier modules using a Linux-based TaraXL SDK.

E-con Systems has launched a MIPI CSI-2 connected follow-on to its USB 3.0 linked TaraXL stereo vision camera. Like the TaraXL, the new STEEReoCAM is designed to work with Nvidia’s hexa-core Jetson TX2 compute module and runs the Linux-based, CUDA-accelerated TaraXL SDK. Like its four-camera, CSI-2 driven e-CAM130_CUXVR camera, it also supports the new octa-core Jetson AGX Xavier module.

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Games: SteamOS, Oxygen Not Included, Kingdom Rush Origins, Stadia and WineVulkan

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Gaming
  • SteamOS is alive with a new beta and updated drivers, also a new Steam Client Beta is out

    Valve haven't given up on their home-grown Linux distribution yet, with SteamOS seeing another beta update. Additionally, there's another Steam Client Beta update about.

    As far as updates to SteamOS go, the last time they actually announced anything was with the 2.170 update back in January but they have actually been doing multiple newer builds since then you can see here. Just today, they officially announced the SteamOS 2.183 beta and the gist of it is this...

  • Oxygen Not Included from Klei Entertainment to leave Early Access in May with new content

    Oxygen Not Included, the incredible space-colony sim from Klei Entertainment is leaving Early Access in May and they've detailed some of what's coming and future plans.

    Before I get started, I just want to mention how much I love Oxygen Not Included. It fills me with wonder as much as it charges me with rage at times, especially when all my people are sick and throwing up everywhere or urinating in our clean water. It has a fantastic style to it too, although Klei games always look good (Don't Starve being another example of this). It's quite amusing to rename your people too, makes it quite hilarious when someone you know well goes around wrecking the place. Every game is a new challenge, every cavern you dig into might have something awesome and it's just good fun.

  • Kingdom Rush Origins expanded again recently, the Forgotten treasures expansion is out

    Kingdom Rush Origins, the excellent tower defense game from Ironhide Game Studio is seeing some great updates, with another campaign named Forgotten treasures now up.

  • Google Announces Stadia Cloud Gaming Service Powered by Linux and Vulkan

    Google announced today during the GDC (Game Developers Conference) 2019 conference a new cloud-based video game streaming platform called Stadia.
    With Stadia, Google aims to take on Nvidia's GeForce NOW and Valve's Steam Link game streaming services by offering users select and original titles developed in-house, as well as instant access to your games library, which you'll be able to stream virtually anywhere in up to 4K HDR resolutions at 60 frames per second.

    "To build Stadia, we’ve thought deeply about what it means to be a gamer and worked to converge two distinct worlds: people who play video games and people who love watching them. Stadia will lift restrictions on the games we create and play—and the communities who enjoy them," said Phil Harrison, Vice President and GM, Google Stadia.

    Stadia promises to be an advanced game streaming powered by Google's globally connected network of data centers that combine server class CPU, GPU, RAM, and storage to deliver 24/7 gaming to players around the world and unlimited resources to game developers who want to create original and gorgeous games.

  • Wine Has Landed The Necessary Patches For Vulkan 1.1 Support

    The "WineVulkan" code within Wine for exposing the Vulkan API to Windows games/applications now supports the requirements to last year's Vulkan 1.1 base specification

Debian Project: GitLab and Debian, Graphing Debian Trends and Securing E-mails

Filed under
Debian
  • Jonathan Carter: GitLab and Debian

    As part of my DPL campaign, I thought that I’d break out a few items out in blog posts that don’t quite fit into my platform. This is the first post in that series.

    When Debian was hunting for a new VCS-based collaboration suite in 2017, the administrators of the then current platform, called Alioth (which was a FusionForge instance) strongly considered adopting Pagure, a git hosting framework from Fedora. I was a bit saddened that GitLab appeared to be losing the race, since I’ve been a big fan of the project for years already. At least Pagure would be a huge improvement over the status quo and it’s written in Python, which I considered a plus over GitLab, so at least it wasn’t going to be all horrible.

    The whole discussion around GitLab vs Pagure turned out to be really fruitful though. GitLab did some introspection around its big non-technical problems, especially concerning their contributor licence agreement, and made some major improvements which made GitLab a lot more suitable for large free software projects, which shortly lead to its adoption by both the Debian project and the Gnome project. I think it’s a great example of how open communication and engagement can help reduce friction and make things better for everyone. GitLab has since became even more popular and is now the de facto self-hosted git platform across all types of organisations.

  • Lucas Nussbaum: Call for help: graphing Debian trends

    It has been raised in various discussions how much it’s difficult to make large-scale changes in Debian.

    I think that one part of the problem is that we are not very good at tracking those large-scale changes, and I’d like to change that. A long time ago, I did some graphs about Debian (first in 2011, then in 2013, then again in 2015). An example from 2015 is given below, showing the market share of packaging helpers.

  • Antoine Beaupré: Securing registration email

    I've been running my own email server basically forever. Recently, I've been thinking about possible attack vectors against my personal email. There's of course a lot of private information in that email address, and if someone manages to compromise my email account, they will see a lot of personal information. That's somewhat worrisome, but there are possibly more serious problems to worry about.

    TL;DR: if you can, create a second email address to register on websites and use stronger protections on that account from your regular mail.

Embedded Linux system has five GbE ports for Time Sensitive Networking

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The system’s 82 x 50mm SMARC-sAL28 module runs a Yocto Project based Linux stack (with U-Boot) on the TSN-capable LS1028A, which offers dual 1.3GHz Cortex-A72 cores. The SMARC-sAL28 provides the KBox A-230-LS with 4GB of soldered DDR3L with ECC, as well as 2GB to 64GB eMMC 5.1 storage.

TSN offers guaranteed latency and Quality of Service (QoS) with time synchronization to enable “a timely and highly available delivery of data packets,” says Kontron. TSN Ethernet can replace more expensive, proprietary fieldbus technology while also offering the advantage of being able to “simultaneously communicate seamlessly to the IT level.”

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Samba 4.10.0 Available for Download

Filed under
Software

This is the first stable release of the Samba 4.10 release series.
Please read the release notes carefully before upgrading.

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Also: Samba 4.10 Released With Pre-Fork Process Model Improvements, Full Support For Python 3

today's leftovers

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Misc
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More in Tux Machines

OSS: Blockchain, DeepBrain, Redox OS, OpenBuilds, Red Hat Summit and FOSSASIA

  • It's About Time DApps Unlocked the Mass-Market Momentum for Blockchain
    There’s more to Blockchain technology than Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. At its fundamental level, Blockchain technology engenders trusts in inherently trustless environments. Protocol blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, GoChain, Steem and xDai have provided a launchpad for developers to work on DApps. DApps are typically open source applications not owned by anyone, immune from downtimes; and that cannot be shut down by a government or its agencies. The rapid proliferation of Decentralized Applications (DApps) powered a bull run in cryptocurrencies in 2017. Right now, there are more than 2000 DApps designed to solve specific market problems across industries such as health, data storage, finance, gaming, and governance.
  • DeepBrain Chain outlines release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta in progress report
    DeepBrain Chain detailed the release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta of its AI Training Net, which allows users to rent computing power to train artificial intelligence algorithms. DeepBrain Chain claimed numerous feature inclusions and and improvements, many pertaining to the scheduling and activation of tasks. In DBC 0.3.6.0, if an AI training task has been stopped a specified period of time, its storage will be deleted automatically. However, the task can be restarted at any time before deletion. If a node has been restarted, reactivation of any previous training tasks will require manual user authorization. [...] A decision was made recently by the community concerning the open source licensing of DeepBrain Chain’s code. Over 55 percent of the members polled voted to not make the code fully open source by the end of March.
  • Redox OS 0.5.0
    It has been one year and four days since the last release of Redox OS! In this time, we have been hard at work improving the Redox ecosystem. Much of this work was related to relibc, a new C library written in Rust and maintained by the Redox OS project, and adding new packages to the cookbook. We are proud to report that we have now far exceeded the capabilities of newlib, which we were using as our system C library before. We have added many important libraries and programs, which you can see listed below.
  • Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust
    It's been just over one year since the previous release of Redox OS while today this Rust-written operating system has finally been succeeded by Redox OS 0.5.  It's taken a while since the previous release of Redox OS as they have been focusing their attention on Relibc, a C library implementation written within the Rust programming language. Relibc is now used as the operating system's default C library.
  • Get Moving with New Software from OpenBuilds
    If you’re reading Hackaday, you’ve probably heard of OpenBuilds. Even if the name doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve absolutely seen something on these pages that was built with their components. Not only is OpenBuilds a fantastic place to get steppers, linear rails, lead screws, pulleys, wheels, and whatever else you need to make your project go, they’re also home to an active forum of people who are passionate about developing open source machines. As if that wasn’t enough reason to head over to the OpenBuilds website, [Peter Van Der Walt] recently wrote in to tell us about some new free and open source software he and the team have been working on that’s designed to make it easier than ever to get your creations cutting, lasing, milling, and whatever else you could possibly imagine. If you’ve got a machine that moves, they’ve got some tools you’ll probably want to check out.
  • Dive into developer-focused sessions at Red Hat Summit
    Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and it’s shaping up to be best Red Hat developer event ever. This year, attendees will get to choose from more than 300 sessions, not to mention booth presentations, parties, labs, and training. To help you cut through the clutter, we’ve created a list of developer specific activities and sessions that will help you shape your Red Hat Summit experience. Most of these sessions are part of the Cloud-Native App Dev track, with a few other sessions that we think will appeal to you as a developer. For more information on these sessions, visit the Red Hat Summit session listing page and sort by “cloud-native app dev” track.
  • 10th year of FOSSASIA
    This FOSSASIA was special as it marked its 10th year! It was quite impressive to witness a FOSS conference to continue growing this long with growing community. The four day conference schedule was packed with various interesting talks, workshops, hackathon and other engaging activities.

Reducing sysadmin toil with Kubernetes controllers

Kubernetes is a platform for reducing toil cunningly disguised as a platform for running containers. The element that allows for both running containers and reducing toil is the Kubernetes concept of a Controller. [...] The canonical example of this in action is in how we manage Pods in Kubernetes. A Pod is effectively a running copy of an application that a specific worker node is asked to run. If that application crashes, the kubelet running on that node will start it again. However, if that node crashes, the Pod is not recovered, as the control loop (via the kubelet process) responsible for the resource no longer exists. To make applications more resilient, Kubernetes has the ReplicaSet controller. The ReplicaSet controller is bundled inside the Kubernetes controller-manager, which runs on the Kubernetes master node and contains the controllers for these more advanced resources. The ReplicaSet controller is responsible for ensuring that a set number of copies of your application is always running. To do this, the ReplicaSet controller requests that a given number of Pods is created. It then routinely checks that the correct number of Pods is still running and will request more Pods or destroy existing Pods to do so. By requesting a ReplicaSet from Kubernetes, you get a self-healing deployment of your application. You can further add lifecycle management to your workload by requesting a Deployment, which is a controller that manages ReplicaSets and provides rolling upgrades by managing multiple versions of your application's ReplicaSets. Read more

Android Leftovers

Server: IBM, LAMP and Kubernetes

  • A HATS For Many Occasions
    IBM gives customers plenty of options when it comes to its Rational Host Access Transformation software, including several modes of operation, different runtime options, and support for different operating systems in screen modernization engagements. With last week’s launch of HATS version 9.7, the development and deployment options got even wider. Regardless of which downstream options a HATS customer ultimately chooses, it all starts out basically the same on the front side of the sausage machine: Customers come to HATS because they have a 5250 (or 3270 or VT100) application that they want to transform, but they don’t want to go through the hassle, expense, and risk of modifying the IBM i, z/OS, or Unix application’s source code.
  • Six top skills that you should acquire in 2019
    There is a growing demand for the fullstack development skill set, which is the ability to develop tech both on the front-end/client side and back-end/server side. As you can’t learn all, select combinations like MEAN or LAMP stack.
  • Kubernetes and the Enterprise
    The reason we were having this conversation was around SUSE’s Cloud Application Platform (CAP). This is our Kubernetes focused Cloud Foundry distribution. And as part of the Kubernetes focus, we have been supporting and running SUSE CAP on Azure’s AKS for the last year or so. The conversation continued with observations that Kubernetes was clearly the future across IT. Yet to date, Cloud Foundry still has a good following with the large enterprise. And the thinking was that the Cloud Foundry approach really helped the large enteprise work with their applications, even if the applications were purely ‘container’ applications. Cloud Foundry makes the container-side of managing your ‘container’ application transparent. This approach ultimately lowers the tasks, breadth of tooling, and knowledge you have to surround Kubernetes with. It was with this thought, that a light-bulb went on.