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Monday, 11 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mesa 17.3 Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 7:31pm
Story Qt Creator 4.5 Open-Source IDE Improves Android and CMake Support Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 7:27pm
Story Qt 5.10 Released with Qt 3D Studio Graphical Editor, Numerous Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 7:24pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 7:21pm
Story ReactOS Now Natively Supports More Filesystems Than all Windows OSes Combined Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 7:10pm
Story Debian 10 "Buster" Will Ensure Automatic Installation of Security Upgrades Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 7:06pm
Story GeckoLinux Brings Flexibility and Choice to openSUSE Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2017 - 6:52pm
Story Sessions And Cookies – How Does User-Login Work? Mohd Sohail 08/12/2017 - 6:48pm
Story OnionShare – Share Files Anonymously Mohd Sohail 08/12/2017 - 4:31pm
Story Manjaro Linux - One Of The Finest Linux Distros Mohd Sohail 08/12/2017 - 4:26pm

ReactOS 0.4.7

Filed under
OS
  • ReactOS 0.4.7 released!

    The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.7 as we continue to work on releasing every three months.

    We’re especially pleased to present this release as the very first one that’s been developed in our new Git/GitHub repository. Moving from Subversion to GitHub has proven to be an invaluable way to reach new testers, users and improve the overall awareness of the ReactOS project.

  • ReactOS 0.4.7 Released As The Latest For "Open-Source Windows"

    At the end of October ReactOS 0.4.7-RC1 was released as the newest test release for this open-source operating system project continuing to work on re-implementing the Windows APIs. That official v0.4.7 release is now available.

POP!_OS - Ubuntu, bang, curtain

Filed under
Reviews

POP!_OS is a rather average Gnome spin of a Gnome-based Ubuntu, which itself is a pale shadow of its former self. System76 did create their own operating system, but it is not drastic enough to warrant a special place in the charts as an independent entry - this is true for 94% of all distros - and not good enough in the first place. It does somewhat improve Aardvark, but it's still a weak offering.

We had hardware issues before we ever got into the live session, all sorts of hardware problems in the installed system, the ergonomics are awful, Samba performance is flaky, overall system responsiveness is average. Package management and updates are rather robust and good and so is smartphone support, but then you need Gnome extensions and codecs to really experience the desktop as it's meant to be. All in all, you can accomplish all of this on your own in any which Gnome, or use something that actually has a sane layout and offers genuine productivity, like Plasma or Windows.

This is an interesting experiment, but ultimately, I can't see a reason why anyone would prefer this over stock Ubuntu (with Unity, a good ole 14.04 LTS), Plasma or even any other tailored Debian-based Gnome system. The differences aren't large or important enough, and there are way too many bugs and issues, making it an even more difficult choice. Overall, POP!_OS deserves something like its 4/10 for its debut. There's only so much you can do with a broken foundation. Well, let's see how this one evolves. For now, skip.

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Games: Bridge Constructor, Empires of the Undergrowth, Pizza Connection, The Escapists

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Kernel Developer: Kees Cook

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Security is paramount these days for any computer system, including those running on Linux. Thus, part of the ongoing Linux development work involves hardening the kernel against attack, according to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report.

This work, according to report authors Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman, involves the addition of several new technologies, many of which have their origin in the grsecurity and PaX patch sets. “New hardening features include virtually mapped kernel stacks, the use of the GCC plugin mechanism for structure-layout randomization, the hardened usercopy mechanism, and a new reference-count mechanism that detects and defuses reference-count overflows. Each of these features makes the kernel more resistant to attack,” the report states.

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Linux then, and why you should learn it now

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It started back in 1983 with another operating system known as UNIX, first released in 1971. In 1983, the GNU Project was started to create a complete UNIX-compatible operating system, but the project was stalled and had a missing kernel. Around 1987, a UNIX-like operating system for students was released called MINIX, but its licensing prevented it from being distributed freely. Irritated by the licensing of MINIX, Linus Torvalds at the University of Helsinki began working on his own operating system kernel. His kernel was released in 1991, and when combined with the GNU components and open source licensing, it became the Linux operating system we know today.

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Kali Linux Review: Not Everyone’s Cup of Tea

Filed under
Reviews

In this review of Kali Linux, we try to answer regular questions like what is Kali Linux, what is the use of Kali Linux and whether beginners should use Kali Linux or not?
Read more

Getting started with Turtl, an open source alternative to Evernote

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Just about everyone I know takes notes, and many people use an online note-taking application like Evernote, Simplenote, or Google Keep. Those are all good tools, but you have to wonder about the security and privacy of your information—especially in light of Evernote's privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you really need to turn to an open source tool.

Whatever your reasons for moving away from Evernote, there are open source alternatives out there. Let's look at one of those alternatives: Turtl.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS and Programming: DeepVariant, Embedded Linux Conference, Voice Dataset, Glibc, NuttX and More

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • Google makes AI tool for precision medicine open source

    Google announced Monday an open source version of DeepVariant, the artificial intelligence tool that last year earned the highest accuracy rating at the precisionFDA’s Truth Challenge.

    The open source tool comes as academic medical centers, hospitals, insurance companies and other healthcare organizations are gearing up for if not already embarking on artificial intelligence, cognitive computing and machine learning as well as precision medicine and the genomic sequencing that entails.

    Likewise, Google rivals IBM and Microsoft are all moving into the healthcare AI space while much speculation surrounds Apple and Amazon making forays into the space.

  • One Month Left to Submit Your Talk to ELC + OpenIoT Summit NA 2018

    Embedded Linux Conference (ELC), happening March 12-14 in Portland, OR, gathers kernel and systems developers, and the technologists building the applications running on embedded Linux platforms, to learn about the newest and most interesting embedded technologies, gain access to leading experts, have fascinating discussions, collaborate with peers, and gain a competitive advantage with innovative embedded Linux solutions.

  • Mozilla Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Engine and Voice Dataset

    After launching Firefox Quantum, Mozilla continues its upward trend and releases its Open Source Speech Recognition Model and Voice Dataset. Well, Mozilla is finally back!

    In the past few years, technical advancements have contributed to a rapid evolution of speech interfaces and, subsequently, of speech-enabled devices powered by machine learning technologies. And thanks to Mozilla’s latest efforts, things look better than ever.

  • Glibc Rolls Out Support For Memory Protection Keys

    While kernel side there's been Memory Protection Keys support since Linux 4.9 and work has already landed in GCC and Clang, the glibc GNU C Library is finally adding support for MPK.

  • Scheme For NuttX

    To fix the first problem, I decided to try and just implement scheme. The language I had implemented wasn't far off; it had lexical scoping and call-with-current-continuation after all. The rest is pretty simple stuff.

    To fix the second problem, I ported the interpreter to NuttX. NuttX is a modest operating system for 8 to 32-bit microcontrollers with a growing community of developers.

  • SD Times news digest: Android Oreo 8.1 (Go edition), Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, and Django 2.0

Slax Linux – A Modern, Portable and Fast Linux Operating System

Filed under
Debian

Today’s OS review is on a somewhat mini version of Slackware OS – a LiveCD OS that can be run directly from a USB stick, CD drive, or even RAM, without needing to install it on your PC’s hard drive.

First, let’s begin with the facts.

Slax is small Live Debian-based Linux distro that can be regarded as the Minimalist’s OS. It is Live because you can run it right from a USB stick and it works with a plethora of filesystems including NTFS, FAT, EXT (ext2,ext3,ext4), and btrfs.

It was developed by Tomas Matejicek from the Czech Republic with a Monolithic kernel type to be fully customizable using Slackware packages and Slax modules – which, of course, are also open-source.

Read more

More Debian:

  • Announcing sources.debian.org

    We're happy to announce that Debsources, the Web application that
    allows to browse and search the entire source code of all Debian
    releases, is now hosted on the official Debian infrastructure and
    available at https://sources.debian.org.

  • Sources.Debian.Org Launches To Provide Easy Access To Debian Source Code

    For those wanting to easily browse the source-code to all Debian packages, it can now be trivially done so from your hardware.

    DebSources is a platform for viewing the Debian source-code via the web in searchable form and for all Debian releases. Previously DebSources was deployed to unofficial Debian infrastructure, while now it's made official and running on Debian.org hardware.

Software: libblockdev and udisks, Portainer, Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
  • Release time again for libblockdev and udisks!

    A new month has come and that means new releases of libblockdev and UDisks2 have come too. We are trying to stick to the golden rule of successful open-source projects - "Release early, release often." - and even if there are no major changes and no new major features, we do regular releases every month. Usually the target date is the end of the month which then in reality means a new release is done at the beginning of the month that follows. And that is exactly what happened this time too. libblockdev-2.15 was released on December 1st and UDisks-2.7.5 on December 4th.

  • Talk about UDisks2

    A talk about UDisks2 was given at the OpenAlt 2017 conference in Brno, Czech Republic on November 5th 2017. It summarizes the history and evolution of the UDisks project and provides an insight into the development and big changes that have been happening in the last two years.

  • Portainer – A Simple Docker Management GUI

    Everyone knows, day to day technology is moving to next level because earlier we had a dedicated servers (Development, Test, and Production) for every applications.

    Later we have migrated most of the Development & Test servers to Virtual Environment (VPS – Virtual Private Server), Now most of the IT infrastructure is moving to containers to save the IT infrastructure cost.

    Linux containers application is one of the revolution application in the IT, and docker is part of it. By default docker was not come with any GUI and we have to manage through CLI.

  • Vivaldi releases version for Linux-based ARM devices

    The Norwegian browser company Vivaldi Technologies has released an experimental version of its Vivaldi browser for Linux on ARM devices, including the Raspberry Pi.

    This includes the Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 — single-board ARM based computers with over 14 million units sold worldwide — as well as CubieBoard, ASUS Tinker Board and others.

More on OpenStack and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server

Android 8.1 Ready, iPhone Left Further Behind

Filed under
Android
  • Android 8.1 Oreo goes final, rolling out now to Pixel and Nexus devices

    After two developer previews, Android 8.1 Oreo is ready for the masses. Google announced that the new OS is rolling out now and is posting system images for the Pixel 2 and 2 XL, the Pixel 1 and 1 XL, the Pixel C tablet, and the Nexus 6P and 5X. The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code drop should be happening now, too.

    Android 8.1 Oreo is a minor maintenance release after the major update of Android 8.0. The biggest feature in 8.1 is a new "Neural Networks API" (NNAPI), which is designed for running machine-learning operations on mobile devices. Phones with specialized machine-learning hardware can hardware accelerate this API, while older devices can use a CPU fallback mode. The API provides a base layer, higher-level, machine-learning framework to plug into, like Google's TensorFlow Lite.

  • Android 8.1 Oreo Officially Released for Supported Pixel and Nexus Devices

    A bit early than expected, Google seeded today the final Android 8.1 Oreo software update to supported Pixel and Nexus devices, also releasing the binary images for those who want to update manually.

  • iPhone X is a setback for Apple in the race against Android

    The spotty availability of the iPhone X has taken a toll on Apple — and boosted Android phones.

    The iPhone’s market share tumbled in key regions during the third quarter as Apple struggled to meet demand in the weeks after the iPhone X launch, while phones running on Google’s Android operating system increased, according to a study released Tuesday.

Christmas Gift ideas for GNU/Linux Fans!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

But what about the Linuxbeard guy behind the twelve monitors? What do you get him? Well, here are some awesome gift ideas for the techy we all know!

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Mozilla on Fake News and Legal Disputes

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Woke up and thought you were in a different reality? Reality Redrawn Challenge launches with a total prize value of $40,000

    It’s not often I get to invite artists and developers to collaborate together so I’m excited to see how they respond to the Reality Redrawn Challenge from Mozilla which launches today. The boundaries between truth and fiction are becoming harder to define, in part because of the proliferation of fake news and other forms of misinformation. Mozilla wants to shed light on this by sponsoring public demonstrations, using mixed reality and other art media that make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral.

    We live in strange times in which legitimate news organizations such as CNN have to launch advertising campaigns to remind people what real information is. Meanwhile social networks that connect millions more people struggle to help them differentiate truth from fiction and to define their unplanned role as media platforms.

    Throughout historic moments of upheaval people have used art to make sense of what appears to be dystopian reality. The west side of the Berlin wall became one of the largest canvases in the world as Berliners attempted to make sense of their divided city, while the east side remained blank as none were allowed to get close enough to paint. I also like to remember that Jazz icon and civil rights activist Nina Simone set an enduring challenge to all artists when she asked “how can you be an artist and not reflect the times?”

  • Mozilla Files Cross-Complaint Against Yahoo Holdings and Oath

    Yahoo Holdings and Oath filed a complaint against Mozilla on December 1, 2017, claiming that we improperly terminated the agreement between Mozilla and Yahoo. Today, in response, Mozilla filed a cross-complaint against Yahoo Holdings and Oath for breach of contract.

    While this is a legal matter and much of it is confidential, as Mozilla, we want to share as much information as we can in the spirit of our values of openness and transparency.

    We will create a wiki page with links to relevant public court documents – over time we expect to add more content as it becomes public.

Security: Security Updates, Reproducible Builds, Leaks, FUD, and Botnets

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #136
  • Massive Breach Exposes Keyboard App that Collects Personal Data On Its 31 Million Users

    In the digital age, one of the most popular sayings is—if you're not paying, then you're not the customer, you're the product.
    While downloading apps on their smartphones, most users may not realize how much data they collect on you.
    Believe me; it’s way more than you can imagine.
    Nowadays, many app developers are following irresponsible practices that are worth understanding, and we don't have a better example than this newly-reported incident about a virtual keyboard app.
    A team of security researchers at the Kromtech Security Center has discovered a massive trove of personal data belonging to more than 31 million users of the popular virtual keyboard app, AI.type, accidentally leaked online for anyone to download without requiring any password.

  • Vortex and Bugware Ransomware Use Open Source Tools to Target .NET Users [Ed: 'News' sites continue to frame Microsoft Windows malware as "open source" to distract from the real culprit]

    A pair of ransomware variants called Vortex and Bugware are encrypting victims’ files by using open source repositories and targeting .NET users, researchers warned. Based on an investigation published by Zscaler, those affected by the two families are being hit with demands that, in the case of Vortex, start at $100 and double within less than a week.

  • 100,000-strong botnet built on router 0-day could strike at any time

    Attackers have used an advanced new strain of the Mirai Internet-of-things malware to quietly amass an army of 100,000 home routers that could be used at any moment to wage Internet-paralyzing attacks, a researcher warned Monday.

    Botnet operators have been regularly releasing new versions of Mirai since the source code was openly published 14 months ago. Usually, the new versions contain minor tweaks, many of which contain amateur mistakes that prevent the new releases from having the punch of the original Mirai, which played a key role in a series of distributed denial-of-service attacks that debilitated or temporarily took down Twitter, GitHub, the PlayStation Network and other key Internet services.

  • Germany Preparing Law for Backdoors in Any Type of Modern Device

    German authorities are preparing a law that will force device manufacturers to include backdoors within their products that law enforcement agencies could use at their discretion for legal investigations. The law would target all modern devices, such as cars, phones, computers, IoT products, and more.

    Officials are expected to submit their proposed law for debate this week, according to local news outlet RedaktionsNetzwerk Deutschland (RND).

Server: Pivotal, OpenStack, CoreOS

Filed under
Server
  • Pivotal Expands Cloud Foundry and Container Services

    Pivotal announced the latest update to its Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform on Dec. 5, along with a preview of the company's Kubernetes-powered container service and the launch of a new serverless effort.

    Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF), Pivotal's core platform since the company was spun out from VMware in April 2013, is based on the open-source Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS) project. The PaaS market has shifted over the last four years and so has Pivotal, which is why the new Kubernetes and serverless projects are important to the company and its customers.

  • OpenStack Launches Open Source ‘Kata Containers’ Project

    The OpenStack Foundation today announced a new open source project — Kata Containers. Its goal is to unite the security advantages of virtual machines (VMs) with the speed and manageability of containers.

    The project is designed to be hardware agnostic and compatible with the Open Container Initiative (OCI) specification for Docker containers as well as the container runtime interface (CRI) for Kubernetes.

  • OpenStack Launches Kata Containers Project to Improve Security

    The OpenStack Foundation announced a new effort called Kata Containers on Dec. 5, in a bid to help organizations deploy and run containers more securely in the cloud.

    The Kata Containers project will be run as a separate project from the main OpenStack cloud platform, with its own governance and project direction. At the core of Kata Containers are code contributions from Intel with Clear Containers and Hyper with runV. Other companies supporting the project at launch include 99cloud, AWcloud, Canonical, China Mobile, City Network, CoreOS, Dell/EMC, EasyStack, Fiberhome, Google, Huawei, JD.com, Mirantis, SUSE, Tencent, Ucloud and ZTE.

  • CoreOS Adds Latest Kubernetes Release, Open Source Model to Tectonic

Linux 4.14.4, 4.9.67, 4.4.104, and 3.18.86; Loop-AES Updated

Filed under
Linux
  • Stable kernel updates

    Stable kernels 4.14.4, 4.9.67, 4.4.104, and 3.18.86 have been released. They all contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

  • 4.14.4,
  • 4.9.67
  • 4.4.104
  • 3.18.86
  • Loop-AES Updated For Linux 4.14~4.15 Kernel Compatibility

    It's been a while since last having anything to report on with Loop-AES as a long-standing means for offering transparent data encryption in the form of a loopback device. The project is now out with a new release providing out-of-tree compatibility with Linux 4.14/4.15 kernels.

    Loop-AES continues to offer data encryption via various ciphers to support data/swap encryption with this out-of-tree module that continues to support kernels going back to the Linux 2.0 days while still working on modern-day kernels too. Loop-AES offered much more practicality a decade ago but these days LUKS/dmcrypt-based encryption continues to work great, eCryptfs is still around and kicking, and EXT4 has implemented fscrypt-based encryption support too.

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Linux Kernel 5.0 is Coming in the Summer of 2018

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