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Monday, 10 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:41pm
Story 5 Screen Recorders for the Linux Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:34pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Now Rolling Out to Ubuntu Phone Users, Here's What's New Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:29pm
Story The December 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine MeeMaw 07/12/2018 - 4:30pm
Story Mesa 18.3.0 Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 3:53pm
Story Linux Networking Performance To Improve Thanks To Retpoline Overhead Reduction Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 3:38pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 9:07am
Story Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 9:06am
Story Software and Howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 9:05am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 9:01am

Watch 'Battlefield 5' Multiplayer Running Flawlessly On A Linux Gaming Rig

Filed under
Gaming

Have you heard? Linux is aggressively on its way to becoming a first-class citizen in the gaming space, and a recent video highlighting Battlefield V gameplay on Linux drives the point home. Yep, that's an EA game, but I attribute some of this success to Valve. Earlier this year, Valve threw its resources and financial support into the Wine ecosystem, resulting in Proton. Now literally thousands (so far) of Windows-only Steam games are running on Linux, playable by simply clicking the install button in the Steam for Linux client.

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Raven: An Open Source Desktop RSS Reader

Filed under
Software
Web

Raven is a relatively new open source RSS reader app for Windows, macOS and Linux (hurrah) that I’ve been eager to try out.

This week I finally found some time to dig into this deliciously well designed desktop RSS feed reader, and in this post I’ll provide you with an overview of what it does, what it can’t do, and how I think it could be even better.

But before we go any further you may want to made aware that this open-source, cross-platform RSS reader is built using Electron.

Not fussed? Me, either, but that fact will be a deal-breaker for some.

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DragonFlyBSD 5.4 & FreeBSD 12.0 Performance Benchmarks, Comparison Against Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Coincidentally the DragonFlyBSD 5.4 release and FreeBSD 12.0 lined up to be within a few days of each other, so for an interesting round of benchmarking here is a look at DragonFlyBSD 5.4 vs. 5.2.2 and FreeBSD 12.0 vs. 11.2 on the same hardware as well as comparing those BSD operating system benchmark results against Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, Clear Linux, and CentOS 7 for some Linux baseline figures.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4 introduced NUMA optimizations, upgrading from GCC5 to GCC8 as the base compiler, HAMMER2 file-system improvements, and many other enhancements built up over the past half-year.

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A Journey on Budgie Desktop #3: Applets

Filed under
Reviews

Continuing second part, here I will discuss about Applets which can be added to Budgie Desktop. I highlight several of more than 20 applets available today: NetSpeed, Clocks, Brightness, Alt+Tab, Global Menu, Workspace Wallpapers, Weather, and Screenshot applets. If you wonder what it is, an "applet" in Budgie is the same as "extension" on GNOME or "widget" on KDE Plasma. Now, for this article I make a journey in installing them and putting them around my desktop and I have much fun. I really love to see things that I didn't see on another desktop environments before and I find many here. Who know that we can still use global menu even in Budgie, considering Unity has been dropped and Budgie itself is still new? Who know tif here is a splendid screenshot tool (with more features than built-in GNOME Screenshot) created solely for Budgie? I won't know until I tried them. I hope it will be more interesting for you this time and you can go try them now. Enjoy!

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Security: Reproducible Builds, Updates and Windows Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #188
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • EternalSuffering: NSA Exploits Still Being Successfully Used To Hijack Computers More Than A Year After Patching [Ed: TechDirt calls Micrososft Windows-running machines with NSA back doors just “computers” (ha! How convenient an excuse; blame the user for back doors!)]

    More of the same, then. Perhaps not at the scale seen in the past, but more attacks using the NSA's hoarded exploits. Hoarding exploits is a pretty solid plan, so long as they don't fall into the hands of… well, anyone else really. Failing to plan for this inevitability is just one of the many problems with the NSA's half-assed participation in the Vulnerability Equities Process.

    Since the tools began taking their toll on the world's computer systems last year, there's been no sign the NSA is reconsidering its stance on hunting and hoarding exploits. The intelligence gains are potentially too large to be sacrificed for the security of millions of non-target computer users. It may claim these tools are essential to national security, but for which nation? The exploits wreaked havoc all over the world, but it would appear the stash of exploits primarily benefited one nation before they were inadvertently dumped into the public domain. Do the net gains in national security outweigh the losses sustained worldwide? I'd like to see the NSA run the numbers on that.

GNOME: Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo", Daniel García Moreno and Amber

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell In Ubuntu 19.04 Should Be Faster, Ubuntu Devs Still Working On New Installer

    Being more than a month past the Ubuntu 18.10 release, development on Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" is progressing at full-speed.

    Ubuntu 19.04 is starting to take shape with more changes queuing for this next six-month installment to Ubuntu Linux. Over the past week in particular have been several development changes/additions worth pointing out from their development summary.

  • I tried and I failed.

    This summer, during the GUADEC 2018, the GNOME foundation announces some job positions. One of that job was for a Gtk+ core developer. I tried to get that job and after a long period I was rejected.

    The final developer selected for this possition is Emmanuel Bassi, a very active developer in the core of GNOME and the one that's behind the great The History of GNOME Podcast.

    To be honest, I really wanted that job. It's a dream job for me, working fulltime in a free software project, by a foundation, with the great GNOME technology and community.

    But I've to say that just when I saw the foundation announcement about this position I thought about ebassi, because as far as I know, he's the best one to do that job. In any case, I wanted to give a try and go for that job, I didn't know about other people going for it, so maybe I can do it.

  • Amber Is A Cool Ambiance-Inspired Gtk / Gnome Shell Theme

    Amber is a Gtk+ 3, Gtk+ 2 and Gnome Shell theme inspired by Ubuntu's Ambiance theme.

    Amber uses slightly different colors than Ambiance, and no gradients for the applications toolbar, while still reminding of the ex-default Ubuntu theme (Ambiance was default until Ubuntu 18.10, when the default theme was changed to Yaru).

    Designed by Mattias (lassekongo83), known for his work on the beautiful Zuki themes, Amber "is almost finished", with some polishing being on the todo list, or so it says on its repository page. The theme looks great on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop (with Gtk 3.24 and Gnome Shell 3.30), and I've been using it for about a week with no issues.

Games: Insurgency: Sandstorm, Battle Royale, Life Goes On

Filed under
Gaming
  • Insurgency: Sandstorm releases soon, Linux support still confirmed with no ETA

    Insurgency: Sandstorm, the team-based, tactical FPS that's acting as a sequel to the first standalone Insurgency title is releasing soon. Linux is coming, but no ETA.

    [...]

    While it's not exactly different to what they said before, the importance of this is that NWI continue to confirm they will be doing Linux support. I think getting that confirmation more than once is important. It keeps the Linux version in their minds and shows them there's interest when people keep asking about it. Such shooters might be quite common on Windows, but they're lacking on Linux.

  • Geneshift has tweaked the Battle Royale mode, graphical style and introduced challenges

    Geneshift, the impressive action game that has a single-player and co-op campaign, various multiplayer modes and a Battle Royale game mode has a big update out.

    Firstly, they've introduced a "Complete Edition" which all existing owners will get free. It seems the main game has now moved over to a focus on the Battle Royale modes, with the Complete Edition DLC containing all the other content. I assume, the BR mode will be free to play with this change.

  • Life Goes On | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Native

    Life goes on running on Ubuntu Linux natively. Kill yourself. No seriously, kill yourself. Numerous times to help yourself along in the level! An interesting take on a 2d platformer where death is helpful!

Best Xfce distro of 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The current calendar year is slowly converging toward its end. That means one thing! Well, two things. Festivities and liver stress testing for most people (that?s one thing), and Linux distro evaluation. Indeed, the past almost-year has gone by with many an ISO etched and booted. Following the tradition from the previous few years, we shall examine the annual landscape and do some awards, and the first desktop environment to undergo the verbal treatment shall be Xfce.

Before we begin, please remember. This is an entirely subjective article. It is also an article with a limited scope, because there are so many distros and only so few Dedoimedos ? Highlander style, there be only one. Hence, I will focus on the systems I?ve tested and tried. If you don?t see your favorite Linux here, don?t go all crusading on me right away. Instead, comment down your own experience, and perhaps next year, I may choose those over and among the many samplings and delights out there. Now, let us peacefully and civilly proceed.

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Plymouth Lands Its Tighter Integration With UEFI Flicker-Free Boot Experience

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora-led effort for perfecting the flicker-free Linux boot experience has landed its Plymouth boot splash screen changes for reusing the UEFI boot/logo screen during the boot process.

Red Hat's Hans de Goede has merged into the Plymouth graphical boot system support for the ACPI BGRT extension, which is an ACPI table that indicates where the UEFI firmware drew the system/motherboard logo at initialization time... Plymouth is now re-using that initial system power-on screen as part of the Linux boot process to provide a very smooth and seamless boot experience.

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Open source predictions for 2019

Filed under
OSS

Crystal ball? Are you there? Fine. I'll go it alone.

2018 was a rollicking fun year for open source, filled with highs, lows, and plenty of in-between. But what will 2019 hold for Linux and open source software? Let's shrug off the continued introductory dialog and prognosticate.

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Best Linux Marketing Campaigns

Filed under
Linux

I have long held the opinion that one of the biggest problems holding back Linux-based systems from dominating (market-share-wise) in the desktop computing space...is marketing. Our lack of attention-grabbing, hearts-and-minds-winning marketing is, in my oh-so-humble opinion, one of the most glaring weaknesses of the Free and Open Source Software world.

But, in a way, me saying that really isn't fair.

The reality is that we have had some truly fantastic marketing campaigns through the years. A few even managed to break outside of our own Linux-loving community. Let's take a stroll through a few of my favorites.

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SMARC module runs Linux on i.MX8M

Filed under
Linux

Axiomtek’s “SCM180” SMARC module features NXP’s dual- or quad-core i.MX8M SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC plus TPM, GbE, HDMI 2.0, MIPI-DSI/CSI, and support for up to -40 to 85°C temperatures.

We cover a lot of Axiomtek products, but most are embedded systems or SBCs rather than computer-on-modules, which include last year’s Apollo Lake based Q7M311 Qseven module. We missed the company’s first SMARC module — the i.MX6 based SCM120. Now Axiomtek has returned with a second SMARC module with its SCM180, which taps NXP’s more recent, Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M SoC. The only other i.MX8M-based SMARC module we’ve seen is Seco’s SM-C12.

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All the F-Words in Linux Kernel Code Have Been Replaced with “Hug”

Filed under
News

To comply with the new code of conduct, all the F-words in the Linux kernel code are being replaced with “hug”.
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Games: Beholder 2, Lost in Sky: Violent Seed, Garden Variety Body Horror, Damsel

Filed under
Gaming
  • Become an officer in a ministry of a totalitarian state, Beholder 2 is out now

    What will you do with the power to control? Beholder 2 seems it will ask that question and it's out now with Linux support.

  • Lost in Sky: Violent Seed, an intense story-based action platformer will have Linux support

    While the release is a little while away, we have it confirmed that the story-based action platformer Lost in Sky: Violent Seed will have Linux support. We spoke to the developer earlier today, who confirmed Linux support to us.

    It will mix-in comic book styled storytelling, with intense action platformer segments and I have to say it does look pretty good.

  • Garden Variety Body Horror, a 90's styled survival-horror has Linux support

    Here's one we missed that released. Garden Variety Body Horror, a 90's styled survival-horror that acts as a sequel to Prototype Mansion released with Linux support.

    When they say 90's, they're not kidding. It looks like a game that would have fit in well on something like the original PlayStation.

  • The challenging action-platformer 'Damsel' is now available on Linux

    Damsel from Screwtape Studios is a mighty fine looking action-platformer set in a dark cartoon-like world and it's now on Linux. It was only recently we noted that it looked like it was coming, didn't take long after that!

    Released yesterday, the developers noted that Linux (and Mac) support arrived with a few other tweaks to the game to make it a little more accessible. Apart from a few gameplay tweaks, they also added support for using the OpenDyslexic font if you have trouble reading the in-game text which is a nice feature.

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More in Tux Machines

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal. We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake! Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about. Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist

Games: DiRT 4, SuperTuxKart and The 10 Best Free Linux Games

  • DiRT4 Power Slides onto Linux in 2019
    DiRT 4 is the latest instalment of the popular franchise to drift on to free software platforms (as well as a non-free software platform in macOS). It follows on from the successful Linux release of DiRT Rally last spring. DiRT 4 was originally released on Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in June 2017 and has garnered plenty of praise, positive reviews and high review scores.
  • SuperTuxKart Spruces Up Its In-Game Visuals
    SuperTuxKart, the famous free software kart racer, is picking up some improved visuals within the in-game user interface and racing screens. Detailing their plans on the game’s official dev blog, the team behind the iconic racer have shared more details about the graphical spit and polish they’ve given the game ahead of its next major release.
  • Refreshing the GUI
    Online multiplayer won't be the focus of this new blog post : we will tell you more about it when launching the official beta in the coming weeks. Instead, we'll tell you more about the many changes in the game's UI.
  • The 10 Best Free Linux Games
    There are plenty of excellent games on Linux, and a fair amount of them are completely free. Some are open source, and others are fairly big names available through Steam. In every case, these are quality games that you can play any time on Linux at absolutely no cost.