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Saturday, 07 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GNOME programs go global

Filed under
GNOME

GUADEC not only offers a place for people to enjoy different sessions and workshops, but it’s also a unique opportunity to bring together the GNOME Foundation staff, board members, and Advisory Board for making strategic decisions.

While GUADEC has historically been in Europe, we are very excited that GUADEC 2020 will take place in Zacatecas, Mexico. This will provide an opportunity for people who have trouble traveling to Europe. By hosting the event on the North American continent, a whole new group of people will be able to join us to celebrate GNOME.

Another interesting event we have is GNOME.Asia. GNOME.Asia 2019 took place in Gresik, Indonesia between 11 – 13 of October at the Universitas Muhammadiyah Gresik (UMG). This too was a rousing success. It was the biggest event organized by the GNOME community in Asia, with the first day dedicated to workshops and the second and third days for presentations.

In 2019 we also worked with the KDE community on organizing LAS in Barcelona, Spain. LAS is designed to accelerate the growth of the Linux application ecosystem by bringing together everyone involved in creating a great Linux application user experience. Thanks to the generosity of sponsors and the hard work of the organizing team, attendance was free for everyone.

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Tails 4.1 is out

Filed under
Security
Web
Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Also: Tails 4.1 Anonymous OS Released with Latest Tor Browser, Linux Kernel 5.3.9

This Month in Mutter & GNOME Shell | November 2019

Filed under
Development
GNOME

GNOME Shell saw many improvements during November. The commit log was dominated by cleanups, but a few improvements and polishments also found their way into the code.

The authentication dialog received a batch of bugfixes, many cleanups of deprecated objects and functions landed. The top panel’s application name is now correctly sized by hiding the spinner near it.

GNOME Shell’s cache of icons and textures received a fix to invalidate properly when dealing with scaling changes. All-day events are properly displayed in the messaging menu now.

Finally, the Alt-Tab switcher now doesn’t mistakenly show an overflow indicator when the list of windows fits the screen size.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Brunch with Brent: Rocco | Jupiter Extras 36

    Brent sits down with Rocco of Big Daddy Linux for a conversation about the origins of Linux Spotlight, some shared behind-the-scenes podcasting perspectives, and just how great we feel about our linux community.

  • Canonical Releases Major Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 19.10 and 18.04 LTS

    Canonical released major kernel security updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux operating system series to address up to 15 security vulnerabilities.
    The biggest kernel security patch released in December 2019 is for Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and fixes 12 vulnerabilities affecting Linux 5.3's OverlayFS and ShiftFS drivers, the Wi-Fi driver stack, ARM Komeda display driver, VirtualBox guest driver implementation, ADIS16400 IIO IMU driver, and Intel OPA Gen1 Infiniband driver.

    Issues discovered in the AMD Audio CoProcessor driver, Qualcomm FastRPC driver, Cascoda CA8210 SPI 802.15.4 wireless controller driver, AMD Display Engine driver, and Chelsio T4/T5 RDMA driver were also addressed in this new kernel security update. The majority of these flaws could allow a local attacker to cause a denial of service (memory exhaustion or system crash).

  • A bug in Microsoft’s login system put users at risk of account hijacks

    Microsoft has fixed a vulnerability in its login system, which security researchers say could have been used to trick unsuspecting victims into giving over complete access to their online accounts.

    The bug allowed attackers to quietly steal account tokens, which websites and apps use to grant users access to their accounts without requiring them to constantly re-enter their passwords. These tokens are created by an app or a website in place of a username and password after a user logs in. That keeps the user persistently logged into the site, but also allows users to access third-party apps and websites without having to directly hand over their passwords.

    Researchers at Israeli cybersecurity company CyberArk found that Microsoft left open an accidental loophole which, if exploited, could’ve been used to siphon off these account tokens used to access a victim’s account — potentially without ever alerting the user.

  •      

  • Legendary Apple Designer Jony Ive Is Officially Out of the Company

           

    Legendary Apple designer Jony Ive has been removed from Apple’s Leadership page. The move suggests Ive’s departure from the company is complete.

Openwashing and Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub)

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • Vendors move away from open source database software licensing

    Database vendors have started to use their own open source style licenses in a bid to stave off cannibalization by large cloud players such as Amazon Web Services.

    The promise of open source database software is that users can freely use the code as they choose. Open source isn't just a marketing hook, but rather a well-defined set of licenses that have been approved as open source by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and are compliant with the Open Source Definition.

    Many database vendors have long used an open core model, in which the foundational model is an open source licensed code base, with added enterprise-grade features for reporting, scalability and management available under a proprietary license.

  • OmniOS Community Edition r151032e, r151030ae

    OmniOS Community Edition weekly releases for w/c 2nd of December 2019 are now available.

  • OmniOS Updated With Latest Intel Microcode, Better LX Zones Support For Newer Distros

    OmniOS r151032e ships with the newest Intel CPU microcode in order to address the JCC Erratum issue, there is a fix for supporting USB hard drives greater than 2TB, OpenJDK has been updated, better support for recent Linux distribution releases within LX Zones, ZFS fixes, fixes to the SMB support, and various other fixes. LX Zones is a SmartOS/OmniOS feature for running Linux software in a lighterweight-than-a-VM environment. 

  • A picture is worth a thousand base pairs

    Prospective users of these tools can find plentiful educational resources online, including video tutorials. The UCSC Genome Browser has two archived and searchable listservs, or electronic mailing lists: one for website and data questions, the other for queries on setting up and maintaining Genome Browser mirrors. JBrowse users can ask questions on Github or on the software’s open instant-messaging channel, but Holmes suggests contacting the developers directly. “We have some developers who really like getting feedback from users,” he says.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • 2019.48 Released Advent

    Thanks to the tireless efforts of release managers Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko-Aleksejev and Samantha McVey, this week finally saw a new Rakudo Compiler release again: 2019.11. For packagers, this is the first release that is fully relocatable. Kudos to the 65 contributors to this release! And kudos to Claudio Ramirez to immediately supply packages for many Linux distributions that now also support relocatable builds!

  • Introduction To Version Control System

    If you are a programmer or developer and working on software applications or any website, you will definitely require some versioning system to track the changes. Version Control System is also referred as SCM (Source Code Management) tools or RCS (Revision Control System).

    Version control is a method or a category of software tools that helps to keep a track of changes in the code so that if something goes wrong, we can make comparisons in different code versions and can easily revert to previous versions. It is very helpful when multiple developers are continuously working or changing the source code.

  • Sony Spresense 6-core MCU Development Board Now Supports Java
  • Cheat sheet for Java syntax

    No matter how often you write code, though, there's bound to be something you don't use often enough to type without a reference. Maybe you can't remember whether to include or import or how to parse incoming arguments. There are a few ways to bridge such a gap: you can use a robust IDE and let it autocomplete the obvious parts, or you can keep a cheat sheet handy to get a little control over all that dizzying syntax.

    While Java's too big to be contained on a two-page cheat sheet, whether you're new to programming or you only dip into Java every once and a while, this cheat sheet gets you up and running. Perhaps most importantly, it provides you with added context for what you're trying to remember. You don't have to blindly choose between prompts from your IDE for a private or public method; you can get clarity instead. And let our cheat sheet inspire you to create your own as you go. The next time you stumble over syntax that's not covered on this cheat sheet, open up a notebook or a text file and jot down the solution. When you get enough good ones, let us know what they are, and who knows? Maybe a sequel can be arranged!

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn C++

    C++ was designed by Bjarne Stroustrup with its first release in 1983. It’s a statically typed, free-form, multi-paradigm, portable, compiled, general-purpose programming language. C++ is regarded as an intermediate-level language, as it has a combination of both high-level and low-level language features. C++ was designed for systems and applications programming, extending the C programming language. Hence the name C++, the increment operator is written as ++.

    C++ remains a popular programming language. For example, it is heavily used in embedded systems, banking, and telecommunications.

    It is a superset of C that retains the efficiency and notational convenience of C, while providing facilities for stronger type checking, multiple inheritance, data abstraction, exception handling operator overloading, generic programming, and object-oriented programming. C++ has influenced many other languages including C#, Java, and the development of C.

  • syscall call-from verification

    The full commit details are well worth reading, as is the manual page for the (new) msyscall(2), and some associated discussion on tech@.

  • Deciding when to collect garbage

    In this article we'll take a look at the different techniques that can be used to decide when to collect garbage, how to implement such a technique, and what techniques a few programming languages out there use.

  • Remi Collet: Install PHP 7.4 on CentOS, RHEL or Fedora
  • Daniel Stenberg: libcurl video tutorial

    I’ve watched how my thirteen year old son goes about to acquire information about things online. I am astonished how he time and time again deliberately chooses to get it from a video on YouTube rather than trying to find the best written documentation for whatever he’s looking for. I just have to accept that some people, even some descendants in my own family tree, prefer video as a source of information. And I realize he’s not alone.

    So therefore, I bring you, the…

    libcurl video tutorial

    My intent is to record a series of short and fairly independent episodes, each detailing a specific libcurl area. A particular “thing”, feature, option or area of the APIs. Each episode is also thoroughly documented and all the source code seen on the video is available on the site so that viewers can either follow along while viewing, or go back to the code afterward as a reference. Or both!

    I’ve done the four first episodes so far, and they range from five minutes to nineteen minutes a piece. I expect that it might take me a while to just complete the list of episodes I could come up with myself. I also hope and expect that readers and viewers will think of other areas that I could cover so the list of video episodes could easily expand over time.

  • Email authentication: SPF, DKIM and DMARC out in the wild

    Email authentication has had a turbulent history - SMTP did not have a native form of authentication when it was designed, and all modern authentication methods are built on top of that system. This was not a problem in the 1980s because there were simply too few people emailing - the only ones using it were universities and corporations actively involved in building the internet. Since then we’ve got a variety of tools to attempt to verify emails, including SPF, DKIM, and DMARC, and I wanted to explore the actual usage of these authentication methods by the most popular sites and companies in the world - specifically, the top 100 domains and the Fortune 500 companies.

Ubuntu 19.10 offers ‘integrated’ AI/ML developer experience

Autumn (or Fall, depending on your level of Americanization) was a busy period… so busy in fact that the Computer Weekly Open Source Insider blog saw a number of milestone advancements go whizzing past.

Among those news items we’re catching up on as we approach the Christmas silly season is the latest update from Canonical on Ubuntu.

Canonical is positioning Ubuntu as (in its view) an operating system (OS) of choice for ‘most’ (it was clear not to say all) public cloud workloads, as well as the emerging categories of ‘smart gateways’, self-driving cars and advanced robots.

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Games: DXVK 1.4.6, Imperator: Rome and Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition

Filed under
Gaming
  • DXVK 1.4.6 Released With More Game Fixes For Direct3D 10/11 Over Vulkan

    DXVK 1.4.6 has fixes to fix rendering issues and the like with American Truck Simulator, Euro Truck Simulator 2, Final Fantasy XIV, and Warcraft III: Reforged. In the case of Warcraft III: Reforged, DXGI features should now allow DXVK to run the game. DXVK 1.4.6 also has crash fixes for mode changes or when closing a game as well as an issue where CPU-limited performance could degrade over time.

  • Imperator: Rome has a big Livy update released and the free Punic Wars DLC

    What could be a true turning point for Paradox Development Studio and Paradox Interactive with Imperator: Rome, a new update "Livy" is out along with the free Punic Wars DLC.

  • Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition continues advancing, cross-play with consoles now up

    You have to hand it to the developers at Beamdog, they certainly support their revamped RPG classics for a long time. Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition just got a big update too!

    The 1.79 stable patch is live and it comes alongside the launch of Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition on PS4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch and so Beamdog have enabled PC (Linux, macOS and Windows) online cross-play with Xbox (in January) and Switch (live now) but not the PS4.

Plasma 5.17.4

Filed under
KDE

Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.17.4. Plasma 5.17 was released in October 2019 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.17.4 Desktop Environment Released with Nearly 50 Fixes, Update Now

Mozilla: Today's Firefox Release and Much More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • 71.0 Firefox Release

    Version 71.0, first offered to Release channel users on December 3, 2019

  • Firefox 71 Officially Released with Native MP3 Decoding on Linux, Windows & Mac

    Mozilla officially released today the Firefox 71 web browser for all supported platforms, including Linux, Windows, and macOS, a release that adds various improvements and new features.
    While we already took an early look at Firefox 71, which our readers could download since yesterday, Mozilla has published more details release notes that highlight a much-improved built-in password manager that can now recognize subdomains and automatically fill domain logins and provide breach alerts from Firefox Monitor for users with screen readers.

    Furthermore, the integrated Enhanced Tracking Protection, which was enabled by default in the Firefox 69 release, now offers users more information about the actions it takes by displaying notifications when Firefox blocks cryptominers, as well as a running tally of blocked trackers in the protection panel, which users can access by clicking the address bar shield.

  • Firefox 71 Available With New Kiosk Mode, New Certificate Viewer

    Today marks the last Mozilla Firefox feature update of 2019 with the release of Firefox 71.0.

    Firefox 71.0 introduces a --kiosk CLI switch for launching Firefox in a full-screen kiosk mode, a redesigned about:config area, a new certificate viewer, new server timing information is exposed via Firefox's Developer Tools, partial support for the Media Session API, native MP3 encoding is enabled for all desktop platforms, and various other developer enhancements.

  • Mozilla and Google remove Avast extensions from add-on stores

    A month ago I wrote about Avast browser extensions being essentially spyware. While this article only names Avast Online Security and AVG Online Security extensions, the browser extensions Avast SafePrice and AVG SafePrice show the same behavior: they upload detailed browsing profiles of their users to uib.ff.avast.com. The amount of data collected here exceeds by far what would be considered necessary or appropriate even for the security extensions, for the shopping helpers this functionality isn’t justifiable at all.

    [...]

    Spying on your users is clearly a violation of the terms that both Google and Mozilla make extension developers sign. So yesterday I reported these four extensions to Mozilla and Google. Quite surprisingly, as of today all of these extensions are no longer listed on either Mozilla Add-ons website or Chrome Web Store. That was a rather swift action!

    It remains to be seen how this will affect millions of existing extension users. At least Mozilla didn’t add Avast extensions to the blocklist yet, stating that they are still talking to Avast. So the extensions will remain active and keep spying on the users for now. As to Google, I don’t really know where I can see their blocklist, any hints?

  • Multilingual Gecko Status Update 2019

    Welcome to the fourth edition of Multilingual Gecko Status Update!

    In the previous update we covered the work which landed in Firefox 61-64.

    At the time, we were landing Fluent DOM Localization APIs, still adding mozIntl features, and we had close to 800 strings migrated to Fluent.

    I indicated that 2019 should be quieter, and in result I reduced the update frequency to just one this year.

  • Questions About .org

    Last month, the Internet Society (ISOC) announced plans to sell the Public Interest Registry (PIR) — the organization that manages all the dot org domain names in the world — to a private equity firm named Ethos. This caught the attention of Mozilla and other public benefit orgs.

    Many have called for the deal to be stopped. It’s not clear that this kind of sale is inherently bad. It is possible that with the right safeguards a private company could act as a good steward of the dot org ecosystem. However, it is clear that the stakes are high — and that anyone with the power to do so should urgently step in to slow things down and ask some hard questions.

    For example: Is this deal a good thing for orgs that use these domains? Is it structured to ensure that dot org will retain its unique character as a home for non-commercial organizations online? What accountability measures will be put in place?

    In a letter to ISOC, the EFF and others summarize why the stakes are high. Whoever runs the dot org registry has the power to: set (and raise) prices; define rights protection rules; and suspend or take down domains that are unlawful, a standard that varies widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It is critical that whoever runs the dot org registry is a reliable steward who can be held accountable for exercising these powers fairly and effectively.

  • Updates on Firefox Private Network

    We are continuing our beta testing of the Firefox Private Network extension that we released earlier this year. The extension hides your Firefox browsing activity and location. This prevents eavesdroppers on public Wi-Fi from spying on the actions you take online by masking your IP address and routing your traffic through our partner’s secure servers. It also protects you from internet service providers collecting or selling data on your browsing activity. And it hides your locations from websites and data collectors that profile you to target ads.

    There will be no changes for test pilots who have already started using the extension by logging in with their Firefox account. For those who are not yet using the extension, we invite you to join the Test Pilot program and try it out. When you sign up or log in with a Firefox account and become one of our beta testers, you’ll get 12 hours of protected browsing for free this month. We are continuing to explore the best way to deliver browser-level protection to our users and we welcome your feedback and input each step of the way.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Firefox Preview Beta reaches another milestone, with Enhanced Tracking Protection and several intuitive features for ease and convenience

    In June we made an announcement, that left us — just like many of our users — particularly excited: we introduced Firefox Preview, a publicly available test version of our upcoming best in class browser for Android that will be fueled by GeckoView. GeckoView is Mozilla’s own high-performance mobile browser engine, which enables us to deliver an even better, faster and more private Firefox to Android device owners. Hundreds of thousands of users have downloaded and tested Firefox Preview since it became available.

    Over the past 5 months we’ve been working diligently on improvements to the app. We’ve been listening closely to user feedback and are basing app development on users’ requests and needs; one very recent example is our support for extensions through the WebExtensions API. We will still continue to test Firefox Preview Beta and we’re expecting to launch as a final product in the first half of 2020. Today, we want to provide an update on our progress, and share some of the amazing new features we’ve added to Firefox Preview since the beta release of 1.0.

  • Marco Zehe: 12 years at Mozilla

    Today marks my 12th anniversary working for Mozilla. I started on December 3, 2007, as a contractor, and moved to a full employment 13 months later, in January 2009. So in January this year, I was employed there 10 years.

    I wrote about my work anniversary once before. Some things have changed since then, some have not. I am still working on Firefox accessibility, doing, unfortunately, less blogging than I used to (current series excepted), and am doing more engineering and less evangelism in general.

    To many, especially in Silicon Valley, it is strange, yes even bewildering, for someone to stay in one employment relationship for that long. However, if you look at people with disabilities, the number of long term employments is generally higher than with the rest of the population working in the same field. The answer is quite simple: Regardless of the U.S., Canada or Europe, finding employment as a person with a disability is much harder than if you’re not disabled. As a consequence, we tend to hang on to our jobs much longer, do less job hopping.

  • News from Firefox on Mobile, Private Network and Desktop

    As the year comes to a close, we look back at what we’ve accomplished. As recently noted in the press, this year may be the mark of our privacy-renaissance. We’ve built additional privacy protections in the browser which included blocking third party tracking cookies and cryptomining by default and created an easy-to-view report which shows the trackers that follow you and collect your online browsing habits and interests. To date, we’ve blocked more than 1 Trillion tracking requests that attempt to follow you around the web! Privacy has always been part of our DNA. We’ve always believed our role is and has always been to help give people more control over their online lives.

News About Servers (SUSE, Ubuntu, Red Hat and More)

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • What is Cloud Native?

    Cloud native is more than just a buzzword, though. It's an approach used by some of the largest organizations on the planet, including Walmart, Visa, JP Morgan Chase, China Mobile, Verizon and Target, among others. Cloud native is an approach that enable developers and organization to be more agile, providing workload portability and scalability.

  • What is Kata Containers and why should I care?

    Kata Containers can significantly improve the security and isolation of your container workloads. It combines the benefits of using a hypervisor, such as enhanced security, and container orchestration capabilities provided by Kubernetes.

    Together with Eric Erns from Intel, we have recently performed a webinar in which we presented the benefits of using Kata Containers in a Charmed Kubernetes environment. In this blog, we aim to highlight the key outcomes from this webinar.

  • An idiot's guide to Kubernetes, low-code developers, and other industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

  • A blueprint for OpenStack and bare metal

    The bare metal cloud is an abstraction layer for the pools of dedicated servers with different capabilities (processing, networking or storage) that can be provisioned and consumed with cloud-like ease and speed. It embraces the orchestration and automation of the cloud and applies them to bare metal workload use cases.

    The benefit to end users is that they get access to the direct hardware processing power of individual servers and are able to provision workloads without the overhead of the virtualization layer—providing the ability to provision environments in an Infrastructure-as-code methodology with separation of tenants and projects.

  • Software Development, Microservices & Container Management – Part III – Why Kubernetes? A Deep Dive into Kubernetes world

    Together with my colleague Bettina Bassermann and SUSE partners, we will be running a series of blogs and webinars from SUSE (Software Development, Microservices & Container Management, a SUSE webinar series on modern Application Development), and try to address the former questions and doubts about K8s and Cloud Native development and how it is not compromising quality and control.

  • Epic Performance with New Tuning Guide – SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on AMD EPYC* 7002 Series Processors

    EPYC is AMD’s flagship mainstream server microprocessors and supports 1-way and 2-way multiprocessing. The first generation was originally announced back in May 2017 and replaced the previous Opteron server family with the introduction of the Zen microarchitecture for the mainstream market.

  • Content Lifecycle Management in SUSE Manager

    Content Lifecycle management is managing how patches flows through your infra in a staged manner. In ideal infra, latest patches will always be applied on development servers. If everything is good there then those patches will be applied to QA servers and lastly to production servers. This enables sysadmins to catch issues if any and hence preventing patching of prod system which may create downtime of live environments.

    SUSE Manager gives you this control via content lifecycle. In this, you create custom channels in SUSE Manager for example dev, qa and prod. Then you register your systems to those channels according to their criticality. Now whenever channels gets the new patches it will be available to respective systems (registered to those channels) to install. So if you control channels you control the patch availability to systems.

    In content lifecycle management, suse manager enables you to push patches to channels manually. Like on first deploy all latest patches will be available to dev channels and hence dev systems. At this stage, if you run update commands (zypper up, yum update) they will show latest patches only on dev servers. QA and prod servers wont show any new patches.

  • The Early History of Usenet, Part VII: Usenet Growth and B-News

    For quite a while, it looked like my prediction — one to two articles per day — was overly optimistic. By summer, there were only four new sites: Reed College, University of Oklahoma (at least, I think that that's what uucp node uok is), vax135, another Bell Labs machine — and, cruciallyy, U.C. Berkeley, which had a uucp connection to Bell Labs Research and was on the ARPANET.

    In principle, even a slow rate of exponential growth can eventually take over the world. But that assumes that there are no "deaths" that will drive the growth rate negative. That isn't a reasaonable assumption, though. If nothing else, Jim Ellis, Tom Truscott, Steve Daniel, and I all planned to graduate. (We all succeeded in that goal.) If Usenet hadn't shown its worth to our successors by then, they'd have let it wither. For that matter, university faculty or Bell Labs management could have pulled the plug, too. Usenet could easily have died aborning. But the right person at Berkeley did the right thing.

    Mary Horton was then a PhD student there. (After she graduated, she joined Bell Labs; she and I were two of the primary people who brought TCP/IP to the Labs, where it was sometimes known as the "datagram heresy". The phone network was, of course, circuit-switched…) Known to her but unknown to us, there were two non-technical ARPANET mailing lists that would be of great interest to many potential Usenet users, HUMAN-NETS and SF-LOVERS. She set up a gateway that relayed these mailing lists into Usenet groups; these were at some point moved to the fa ("From ARPANET") hierarchy. (For a more detailed telling of this part of the story, see Ronda Hauben's writings.) With an actual traffic source, it was easy to sell folks on the benefits of Usenet. People would have preferred a real ARPANET connection but that was rarely feasible and never something that a student could set up: ARPANET connections were restricted to places that had research contracts with DARPA. The gateway at Berkeley was, eventually, bidirectional for both Usenet and email; this enabled Usenet-style communication between the networks.

New Software Releases and HowTos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Python Programming: Functional Programming Design Pattern, Widgets, Mu and Giving Tuesday 2019

Filed under
Development
  • Functional programming design pattern: Nested Iterators == Flattening

    This is pretty common in devops world. You might be looking at all repositories of in all github organizations. You might be looking at all keys in all AWS S3 buckets under a specific account. You might be looking at all tables owned by all schemas in a database.

    It's helpful -- for the moment -- to stay away from taller tree structures like the file system. Traversing the file system involves recursion, and the pattern is slightly different there. We'll get to it, but what made this clear to me was a "simpler" walk through a two-layer hierarchy.

    The nested for-statements aren't really ideal. We can't apply any itertools techniques here. We can't trivially change this to a multiprocessing.map().

  • Add scrollable regions with QScrollArea

    When you start building apps that display long documents, large amounts of data or large numbers of widgets, it can be difficult to arrange things within a fixed-size window. Resizing the window beyond the size of the screen isn't an option, and shrinking widgets to fit can make the information unreadable.

    To illustrate the problem below is a window in which we've created a large number of QLabel widgets. These widgets have the size Vertical Policy set to Preferred which automatically resizes the widgets down to fit the available space. The results are unreadable.

  • A Manga Book on CircuitPython and Mu

    Our paths had crossed via Twitter while the book was written and I was rather pleased to see the origin story for the name “Mu” got a mention since I shared it with Mitsuharu in a tweet. As you’ll read below (and in typical fashion for me), there are many layers to my reason for the choice of name.

  • Giving Tuesday 2019

    For the first time the PSF is participating in Giving Tuesday! This event is held annually the Tuesday after Thanksgiving - this year on December 3rd, 2019. The global celebration runs for 24 hours and begins at midnight local time.

elementary OS 5.1 Hera Released, This is What’s New

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This major update to elementary OS carries a wealth of changes and improvements, including native support for Flatpak, a faster App Centre store front, and many thoughtful refinements to the system’s bespoke UI.

A free update for existing elementary OS users, the Hera uplift also introduces Linux Kernel 5.0 courtesy of Ubuntu’s recent LTS hardware enablement stack update.

To learn more about what’s new in the elementary OS 5.1 release, and how to download it to try for yourself, keep reading!

elementary OS 5.1 Hera

The bulk of the changes being offered in the elementary OS 5.1 update aren’t strictly new as they’ve been iteratively pushed out via software updates to the elementary 5.0 Juno release.

But the sum total of those updates is enough to create a distinct, separate version number with new .iso images for folks to download. Think of it like an Ubuntu point release, in that sense.

Read more

Also: elementary OS 5.1 "Hera" Officially Released with Flatpak Support, New Greeter

Here’s An Early Look at the PinePhone Developer Edition (Video)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

If you have pre-ordered the PinePhone Brave Heart edition or are waiting for it to go on general sale early next year then the following video is a must watch.

In it, Pine64’s Lukasz Erecinski shows off his PinePhone developer edition, showing us the fit, form and build quality, and giving us a glimpse at what lays behind the back case, including some very tantalising pogo pins…

Read more

Also: [Librem 5] A Different Kind of Transparency

And in French: [Eelo/e/] Gaël Duval, l’adepte de Linux qui veut libérer les smartphones

Linux 5.5 Latest: XFS and Livepatching Work

Filed under
Linux
  • XFS For Linux 5.5 Brings Quite A Few Changes

    The XFS file-system is seeing a large number of changes for the in-development Linux 5.5 kernel.

    Darrick Wong characterized the changes for this release as having "changed quite a few things" and indeed the list is much longer than we are used to seeing out of a proven and mature file-system.

  • Linux 5.5 Livepatching Tracks The System State For Better Patch Handling/Compatibility

    With the Linux 5.5 livepatching support comes system state tracking in order to better handle different kernel live patches over time that could potentially clash with one another. Patches altering shadow variables and callbacks could lead to cases where live-patches cannot be reverted easily or not jive with future live-patches, but the system state tracking is designed to track those state changes so there is the ability to revert complex patches later on.

'GPU for Generation 2020' (With Some Linux Focus)

Filed under
Hardware
  • IMG A-Series: the GPU for generation 2020 - Imagination

    It’s no secret that every year brings a significant advancement for our GPUs – after all, they are one of the things that we’re best known for. However, this time things are a little bit different. Yes, we are today announcing a new GPU, but we’ll come right out and say it – this year we haven’t made a significant step forward. No… this time we’ve made an exceptional leap forward. Today, we are proud to introduce IMG A-Series. It’s not only a range of new cores, but it introduces a new GPU architecture too. The headline figure? A-Series is 2.5x faster (or 150%) for the same area and same power compared to our currently shipping PowerVR GPUs. Normally, a 20-25% uplift in performance on an annual basis would be welcomed making this nothing less than an exceptional leap over to current shipping hardware, such as the PowerVR Series9XM in the Oppo Reno Z. This increase means we are inherently more power efficient too, and for the same performance, we are now 60% lower power too.

  • Imagination Announces IMG A-Series To Deliver 2.5x Faster Performance Over Current PowerVR

    The IMG A-Series is being advertised as offering a 2.5x increased performance figure, 8x faster at AI processing, and 60% lower power than current-generation PowerVR hardware. Imagination refers to their new IMG A-Series as "The GPU of Everything." The A-Series IP will be available for hardware in 2020 and does support Vulkan 1.1 among other 3D standards.

  • Imagination Unveils IMG A-Series GPU Designed For Everything from IoT to Mobile and Server

    Imagination Technologies has just launched IMG A-Series GPU which they claim is “The GPU of Everything” and “The fastest GPU IP ever”.

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: MX Linux 19, Python Podcast, and Marcel's Funny Show

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • MX Linux 19 – Based on Debian 10 Buster and Uses Xfce 4.14 as Default Desktop Environment

    MX Linux 19 has been released and announced by MX Linux Dev team, this release brings a lot of major improvements and changes. The operating system based on Debian 10 buster, powered by linux kernel 4.19 and uses the lightweight Xfce 4.14 desktop environment. It even features a patched sudo, there is a bunch of great software installed, such as Firefox 69, Thunderbird 60.9, LibreOffice 6.1.5, VLC 3.0.8, GIMP 2.10.12, and more!

  • Podcast.__init__: Making Complex Software Fun And Flexible With Plugin Oriented Programming

    Starting a new project is always exciting because the scope is easy to understand and adding new features is fun and easy. As it grows, the rate of change slows down and the amount of communication necessary to introduce new engineers to the code increases along with the complexity. Thomas Hatch, CTO and creator of SaltStack, didn't want to accept that as an inevitable fact of software, so he created a new paradigm and a proof-of-concept framework to experiment with it. In this episode he shares his thoughts and findings on the topic of plugin oriented programming as a way to build and scale complex projects while keeping them fun and flexible.

  • Pikachu, FOSS Decade, .ORG vs Girl Scouts, Drake, and Perineum Sunning

    TIK TEK TOE, episode 007. Marcel and Evan discuss Ryan Reynold's continued redemption with Detective Pikachu, martial arts movies, VR arcades, whether a decade starts on a 0 or 1, what kind of decade FOSS has had, or is about to have had, the Internet Society and .ORG vs the Girl Scouts (our money is on the Girls Scouts), on-demand culture, Drake (yeah, that Drake), and perineum sunning.

    Once you're done listening, or right now for that matter, please (pretty please, even) make sure you share this podcast with your friends, family, neighbours, enemies . . . just share and recommend. Also, if you can spare a few extra keystrokes, be sure to leave us a comment and tell us how we're doing.

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