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Wednesday, 29 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GhostBSD 20.01 Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 3 27/01/2020 - 6:56pm
Story 5 Popular Free and Open Source Retail POS Software Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 6:24pm
Story How SUSE builds its Enterprise Linux distribution – PART 1 Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 6:14pm
Story Ubuntu 20.04 LTS “Focal Fossa” Release Date And Upcoming Features Rianne Schestowitz 2 27/01/2020 - 6:10pm
Story Stable Kernels: Linux 5.4.15 Rianne Schestowitz 1 27/01/2020 - 6:07pm
Story Linux 5.5 SSD RAID 0/1/5/6/10 Benchmarks Of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 6:05pm
Story Stress Testing Your Linux System Just Got Easier Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 6:01pm
Story scrcpy Now Available In Debian Testing / Sid And Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 5:57pm
Story A big AppStream status update Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 5:55pm
Story Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat report 12 Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2020 - 5:53pm

Graphics: Digital Restrictions (DRM) in Weston/Wayland, DXVK, Valve, NVIDIA, Mesa and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Weston 8.0 Released With DRM HDCP Support, EGL Partial Updates, Headless OpenGL

    Highlights of Weston 8.0 include better DRM hardware planes support, HDCP content protection in conjunction with the DRM kernel driver back-end, headless OpenGL support, EGL_KHR_partial_update support for allowing partial screen updates for better efficiency with drivers supporting this EGL extension, the direct display extension, a memory optimization, and various other changes.

  • DXVK 1.5.2 Released With Many Game Fixes

    Coming a few weeks past DXVK 1.5.1 is now version 1.5.2 and it brings with it quite a number of improvements.

    First of all, DXVK 1.5.2 now targets the Vulkan 1.1 graphics API (not to be confused with Vulkan 1.2 that was just released). In requiring Vulkan 1.1, the graphics driver requirements are slightly elevated but still not bad at all as late 2017 Mesa drivers and newer are fine and the NVIDIA 390 series or newer. Nearly all Linux gamers should be set with their current drivers unless running quite an outdated distribution.

  • Valve's ACO Shader Compiler Back-End For Radeon Vulkan Is Now In Good Shape For GCN 1.0

    As last minute material for Mesa 20.0 is making Valve's "ACO" AMD compiler back-end for the RADV Vulkan driver in better shape for GFX6/GCN1.0 graphics hardware.

    Enabling RADV ACO, which was mainlined in Mesa 19.3, can shorten Vulkan shader compiler times and help with overall gaming performance. The results have been compelling and initially was focused on the very recent AMD Radeon graphics cards.

  • NVIDIA Contributes Much Less To The Linux Kernel Than Intel Or AMD

    Yesterday I put together some statistics on the AMD vs. Intel contributions to the upstream Linux kernel during the 2010s, but a request coming in off that was how do NVIDIA's contributions compare. Here is a look at the NVIDIA contributions to the Linux kernel over the past decade.

    Obviously NVIDIA's contributions are much less given they are primarily focused on a proprietary graphics driver stack compared to Intel and AMD with their Direct Rendering Manager drivers within the Linux kernel. But NVIDIA does contribute to the Linux kernel: they ultimately upstream their Tegra SoC support and other bits where it makes business sense. While they do not contribute much right now to open-source desktop graphics, they do contribute more to Nouveau where it concerns the Tegra graphics.

  • Nsight Graphics 2020.1 Released With Profiling For Vulkan+OpenGL Interop

    NVIDIA on Thursday introduced Nsight Graphics 2020.1 that to its profiling support can now handle OpenGL + Vulkan interoperability for games/applications making use of both APIs. While not many game engines / apps are yet using the likes of OpenGL 4.6 ARB_gl_spirv, Nsight is ready.

    Beyond profiling support for Vulkan+OpenGL interop, there are other profiling improvements, the Nsight Aftermath SDK is added for generating GPU mini-dumps with DirectX 12 software, and support for new Vulkan extensions. On the Vulkan side is now shader clock support, SPIR-V 1.4, and shader subgroup extended types.

  • Mesa 20.0 Now Defaults To The New Intel Gallium3D Driver For Faster OpenGL

    After missing their original target of transitioning to Intel Gallium3D by default for Mesa 19.3 as the preferred OpenGL Linux driver on Intel graphics hardware, this milestone has now been reached for Mesa 20.0!

    We've known that the revised Intel goal was Mesa 20.0 but that change-over was looking less likely especially with Mesa 20.0 entering feature freeze next week, but just in time the default change-over from i965 to Iris Gallium3D has happened.

  • Intel's OpenSWR Rasterizer Starts Seeing Tessellation Support

    OpenSWR is Intel's software rasterizer driver developed within Mesa as an alternative to Gallium3D's LLVMpipe and the slow Softpipe. OpenSWR is designed for delivering good CPU-based OpenGL graphics performance designed for visualization software running on workstations to HPC clusters. Like LLVMpipe, OpenSWR employs LLVM for some of its CPU optimizations.

  • AMD Ryzen 4000 Mobile Series "Renoir" Graphics No Longer Experimental With Linux 5.5

    While the Linux 5.5 kernel is expected to be released as soon as this Sunday, a last minute change to the AMDGPU DRM driver makes the Renoir graphics no longer treated as experimental. With that, there is open-source support out-of-the-box rather than being hidden behind a kernel module flag.

    AMD has been working on the Renoir support for Linux going back to the end of last summer. Renoir was sent in for the Linux 5.4 kernel but initially treated as "experimental" support while now at the end of the Linux 5.5 cycle it's no longer treated as experimental.

  • Disable Nvidia GPU on the Thinkpad T490

    I wrote about installing Linux on the Lenovo ThinkPad T490 last month and one of the biggest challenges was getting graphics working properly. The T490 comes with an option where you can get a discrete Nvidia MX250 GPU and it packs plenty of power in a small footprint.

Teaching Robotics with ROS on Ubuntu at SRU

Filed under
Ubuntu

This week, as part of my work on the Ubuntu Robotics team, I headed up to Slippery Rock University in northwestern PA to meet with Dr. Sam Thangiah and to introduce students to the Robot Operating System (ROS). New semester, lots of new opportunities for learning!

We started with a really simple robot environment. Check out this build! This Raspberry Pi runs an Ubuntu 18.04 image which gives it all the built-in LTS security advantages. It’s mounted on piece of plexiglass with two motors and a motor controller board from the PiHut. We worked through about 75 lines of sample python code which hooked the RPi.GPIO library to control the general purpose I/O pins, and we created an abstract Motor class. This got our two-wheeled robot up and running…running right off the table. Oops.

Read more

Patriot OS Provides Revolutionary Computing Convenience

Filed under
OS
Reviews

Peach OSI's Patriot OS is a "peach" of a Linux distro for any user skill level. It is a great choice for Linux newcomers. It is an even better choice for Linux vets who want something a little different.

The only thing about this distro that quickly wore thin for me was the Fireworks sound that plays as the system starts. That is easy to turn off, however. Go to Settings -> Session ->Startup -> Application Autostart. Uncheck the box next to Autostart Patriot System Sounds.

The ample inventory of background images is filled with patriotic scenes. Adding other images is a bit more involved.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KDE Connect Website SoK 2020 Week 2

    Today marks the end of my second week of Season of KDE. This week had been great for me, I came in contact with many teams in KDE and got to work with many new people who are quite helpful and encouraging. Variety of changes came on the website which are linked above with links to commits.

    The Website can be viewed here.

    You can check out my proposal here. The repository that has the KDE Jekyll themed site is here.

    This week started off by discussion on the Web Telegram chat on how the website behaved weird on devices with large screen and how some users and even my mentor Carl Schwan felt it a bit weird. So I went onto make the website more important. I decided to try the website out on all types of screen provided by the developer tools in Firefox and Chrome and also checked for Portrait and Landscape modes of all those devices. I can assure you that the website looks as it is intended on all these devices. So it should work fine on relatable devices. All this work was done with CSS. Below are images of the website on large screen and the developer tools.

  • GhostBSD 20.01 overview | A simple, elegant desktop BSD Operating System.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of GhostBSD 20.01 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Freexian's report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Arduino Education Unveils Four New STEAM Kits for Pupils and Students
  • Intel and Softbank Beware. Open Source Is Coming to the Chip Business

    After revolutionizing software, the open-source movement is threatening to do same to the chip industry.

    Big technology companies have begun dabbling with RISC-V, which replaces proprietary know-how in a key part of the chip design process with a free standard that anyone can use. While it’s early days, this could create a new crop of processors that compete with Intel Corp. products and whittle away at the licensing business of Arm Holdings Plc.

    In December, about 2,000 people packed into a Silicon Valley conference to learn about RISC-V, a new set of instructions that control how software communicates with semiconductors. In just a few years, RISC-V has grown from a college teaching tool into an open-source standard being explored by industry giants including Google, Samsung Electronics Co., Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., Qualcomm Inc. and Nvidia Corp.

    “Most of the major companies are putting substantial efforts into RISC-V,” said Krste Asanovic, a computer scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was part of the team that developed the standard. He’s co-founder of SiFive Inc., a startup that sells chip designs based on RISC-V (pronounced “risk five”).

  • The App Store is down

    Midday on Friday it appeared that Apple’s App Store, a critical piece of the digital and mobile economies, struggled with uptime issues. Apple’s own status page indicated that the application vendor was having an “ongoing” issue that affected “some users.”

  • Apple pushes back against EU common charger, warns of innovation risks

    iPhone maker Apple on Thursday pushed back against EU lawmakers’ call for a common charger, warning the move could hamper innovation, create a mountain of electronic waste and irk consumers.

  • The Debogonisation of 2a10::/12

    We are getting ready to start allocating from 2a10::/12, a new block of IPv6 addresses. In this process we did a couple of 'pre-flight' checks to check the usability of address space in this /12 block.

  • Microsoft previews Visual Studio update with added Linux love, many new features [Ed: Microsoft Tim perpetuates the myth that Microsoft has Linux "love" by pushing proprietary software/malware into it]
  • Telegram Update Adds New Poll Options, Message Scheduling

    Telegram 1.9.7 for Windows, macOS and Linux builds on the changes introduced in the previous stable release by adding a crop of interesting new options to its interactive ‘polls’ feature.

    Didn’t know you could create polls in Telegram? Well, yup, you can — but only in groups and channels (which makes sense: a poll with only recipient isn’t really a poll).

    With the latest Telegram desktop release three new kinds of polls are available:

    Visible votes (as the name might tell you) now lets users see who voted for which option in a given poll. Previously, all Telegram polls were anonymous (and that option is, apparently, still available).

Server: Caddy, Jekyll, Containers and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
  • How I moved from Nginx to Caddy

    Let me show you how complex an Nginx configuration can get for something as simple as serving two static websites with sane TLS configuration. If we have a look on the tls.conf, there are many things I would expect from a webserver to be default in the year 2020. First there are the ssl_protocols, second there are the ssl_ciphers and ssl_ecdh_curve, third there is ssl_stapling. I expect all of these to be enabled on default and neither Nginx nor Apache do this with standard settings.

  • Tempus Fugit, or moving from hubpress to Jekyll

    When I opened my blog, I realised I hadn’t updated the underlying hubpress code in quite a while. A long while. So long, in fact, that I couldn’t update hubpress anymore, because, much to my distress, the hubpress project had been archived by its author in the meantime. It had been archived months ago, and because I had not written a blog in over a year, I hadn’t even noticed.

    I think it’s safe to say I do not have a lucky hand in picking new open source projects to build my own stuff upon. But that’s part of the risk of running new tech sometimes, right?

  • Navigating Docker for Windows versions

    Windows though has a couple of gotchas, the behavior of docker on windows can vastly vary depending on which binary and/or configuration you use.

    Containers on windows are dependent on the server version of the Host. For example, your server 2016 (1607) containers can only be executed on a server 2016 host. Currently there are 2 popular base versions that docker supports, Server 2016, and 2019. Gitlab-runner only supports server 2019, so we will go with that.

  • Here’s How To Tackle K8’s Security Challenge…
  • Two New Open Source Projects for Kubernetes Security by Octarine
  • Octarine Adds 2 Open Source Projects to Secure Kubernetes

    Octarine announced today it has launched two open source projects intended to enhance Kubernetes security.

    The first project is kube-scan, a workload and assessment tool that scans Kubernetes configurations and settings to identify and rank potential vulnerabilities in applications in minutes. The second project is a Kubernetes Common Configuration Scoring System (KCCSS), a framework for rating security risks involving misconfigurations.

    Julian Sobrier, head of product for Octarine, said the projects are extensions of the namesake cybersecurity framework the company created based on a service mesh for Kubernetes clusters. The Octarine service mesh not only segments network and application traffic all the way up through Layer 7 running on Kubernetes clusters, but it also acts as an inspection engine that employs machine learning algorithms to identify anomalous traffic, Sobrier says.

  • Octarine Open Sources New Security Scanning Tools

    To enhance Kubernetes security, Octarine has released two new open source security scanning tools.

    The first tool is called Kubernetes Common Configuration Scoring System (KCCSS). It is said to be a new framework for rating security risks associated with misconfigurations. Kube-scan, the second open-sourced tool, is a workload and assessment tool to scan Kubernetes configurations and settings to identify and rank potential vulnerabilities in applications within minutes.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Remi Collet: PHP version 7.2.27, 7.3.14 and 7.4.2

    RPMs of PHP version 7.4.2 are available in remi-php74 repository for Fedora ≥ 29 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 7 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPMs of PHP version 7.3.14 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30-31 and remi-php73 repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPMs of PHP version 7.2.27 are available in remi repository for Fedora 29 and remi-php72 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Remi Collet: PHP version 7.2 required

    So, now, some noarch packages in the remi repository require 7.2 as the minimal required version.

    foo requires php(language) >= 7.2
    Despite the remi repository still provides the PHP 5.6, 7.0 and 7.1, and even if I still plan to maintain these versions for some time (backporting some security patches, when some other repositories just planned to drop them), this doesn't suite the main goal of my repository: provide the latest versions of PHP and promote their adoption by developers and users.

  • Smalltalk-Inspired Pharo 8.0 Released

    Pharo is based on thus general concepts of Smalltalk. Thuss it is strongly object-oriented and everything in the Pharo language is an object. The language is dynamically typed; inheritance is simple; memory management is automatic via a garbage collector and its syntax is very simple and small.

    There's an enthusiastic collection of developers using Pharo, and the developers make regular commits and provide almost daily bug fixes. The language has a number of ways to interface with C, and there are Java and JavaScript libraries.

    The first change of note in Pharo 8 is the move to 64-bit as the recommended version for Windows - it already was the main version for Unix and OSX. Iceberg, the git client for Pharo, has also been improved in this release, with better management of projects and repositories management, improved merging, and faster loading and comparison for projects with big packages.

  • HackSpace’s 25 ways to use a Raspberry Pi

    The latest issue of HackSpace magazine is out today, and it features a rather recognisable piece of tech on the front cover.

  • Delete Files with Java 8

    A friend asked me to help him with the following in Bash -- delete all files but a whitelisted and use mix / max depth for directory traversal. It's probably possible in Bash with some crazy find, grep, etc one-liner.

  • Asynchronous Tasks in Ansible

    Most users know Ansible well for its ability to perform configuration management as well as orchestrate complex software deployment. However, Ansible also has a reasonable arsenal of features that lend themselves to operational tasks. There are modules that can handle simple tasks such as creating user accounts and restarting daemons. But more than just modules, some core features of Ansible make it a great tool for any systems administrator.

    [...]

    You might think that Ansible will eventually timeout on long-running jobs. You would be correct in the default case. However, with a little configuration, you can still have Ansible take care of these tasks for you! Ansible offers the ability to asynchronously execute tasks. You have the option of configuring Ansible check back on a regular interval or you can even have Ansible “fire and forget” if you so choose. This can help you get around pesky ssh timeouts among other things!

    What is especially great about the asynchronous task feature is that it is really easy to use! There are only two flags affiliated with the feature. The -B flag is used to set our task timeout value. We pass a number of seconds with the flag.

  • 'Thousands Of Tools Have Come & Gone, But Ansible & Bash Have Stood The Test Of Time'
  • Container debugging minihint

    What’s in my container?

  • Bdale Garbee: Digital Photo Creation Dates

    I thought briefly about hacking Piwigo to use the GPS time stamps, but quickly realized that wouldn't actually solve the problem, since they're in UTC and the pictures from our phone cameras were all using local time. There's probably a solution lurking there somewhere, but just fixing up the times in the photo files that were wrong seemed like an easier path forward.

    A Google search or two later, and I found jhead, which fortunately was already packaged for Debian. It makes changing Exif timestamps of an on-disk Jpeg image file really easy. Highly recommended!

    Compounding my problem was that my wife had already spent many hours tagging her photos in the Piwigo web GUI, so it really seemed necessary to fix the images "in place" on the Piwigo server. The first problem with that is that as you upload photos to the server, they are assigned unique filenames on disk based on the upload date and time plus a random hash, and the original filename becomes just an element of metadata in the Piwigo database. Piwigo scans the Exif data at image import time and stuffs the database with a number of useful values from there, including the image creation time that is fundamental to aligning images taken by different cameras on a timeline.

    [...]

    At this point, all the files on disk were updated, as a little quick checking with exif and exiv2 at the command line confirmed. But my second problem was figuring out how to get Piwigo to notice and incorporate the changes. That turned out to be easier than I thought! Using the admin interface to go into the photos batch manager, I was able to select all the photos in the folder we upload raw pictures from Karen's camera to that were taken in the relevant date range (which I expressed as taken:2019-12-14..2021), then selected all photos in the resulting set, and performed action "synchronize metadata". All the selected image files were rescanned, the database got updated...

The 20 Best Mate Themes for Linux System in 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is the most popular open-source UNIX like an operating system. It is well known because of its lightweight. Unlike other OS, it can be used in a wide range of hardware devices that include PCs, laptops, netbooks, mobile, tablet, video game consoles, servers, and even in supercomputers. Mate is a desktop environment that comes with extensive features, while all the primary metaphors of Linux distribution remain the same. It comes with a lot of Linux compatible applications and can be considered as the continuation of the GENOME 2 project. It has already replaced the traditional GNOME shell. There are several powerful mate themes available out there that can help you to make your Mate desktop more clean, modern, and eye-catching as well.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

SUSE/OpenSUSE Reports on YaST and Tumbleweed Development

Filed under
SUSE
  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 92

    Until now, the Partitioner landing screen has been useful to have a big picture of the devices in your system and as a shortcut to jump directly to the device page just with a double click over it. But, do you know what? From yast-storage-ng 4.2.74 on you can work directly with devices from that screen similar as you already do in the more specific pages, through the contextual actions added below the devices list. That means, for example, no more jumps to Hard Disks just to add a new partition nor resize an existing one.

    [...]

    We got some bug reports about how installation progress reporting works and while we were touching it, we also added a few smaller improvements to the code.

    The first change is that nowadays installing from multiple discs almost never happens but still there was always a “Medium 1” column which did not make much sense. So we removed the column and if there is a multi-media source, it will be appended to the name if needed.

    The second visible change is a new Unicode character ⌛ (hourglass) during the initial phase of RPM installation until the remaining time can be estimated.

    The third change is that now the maximum time is always capped at 2 hours, so even if there are multiple sources and some of them took more then two hours, it always show just “>2:00:00” and even in total it is capped, so it can no longer show something like “>6:00:00”.

    The fourth one is that now you can read the release notes without disturbances. Previously you would get switched to the package log tab after each package finished its installation. Now it will redraw only when you go back from the release notes screen.

    The fifth one is a fix for showing the remaining packages, where it is shown only for the active source and not for all. So now it shows remaining packages for all repositories.

    And last but not least we do a bunch of refactoring, code quality improvements and also adding automatic unit tests to reduce regressions in the future.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/04

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    During week #4, we have released five snapshots. And this, despite having discarded two snapshots for QA issues. openQA saved our users from crashing chromium inside a KDE/Wayland session for example. The five snapshots released were 0116, 0117, 0118, 0121 and 0122.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (git and python-apt), Oracle (openslp), Red Hat (chromium-browser and ghostscript), SUSE (samba, slurm, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (clamav, gnutls28, and python-apt).

  • Why Networking Monitoring Tools are Important and How to Pick One?

    In today’s world, a business has to have a strong online presence to build a brand and to stay connected with the target demographic. To achieve that, it’s critical that your online network is protected against common cyber-attacks and hacking attempts so that there is minimal downtime. Network monitoring allows you to bolster your business network and also to make the most of your resources.

  • There are no root causes

    At the if statement, the CPU uses past measurements to make a prediction about which branch might be taken, and it then begins to execute that path, even though ‘x > y’ has not been executed or completed yet! At this point x or y may not have even finished being computed yet!

    Let’s assume for now our branch predictor thinks that ‘x > y’ is false, so we’ll start to execute the “return false” or any other content in that branch.

    Now the instructions ahead catch up, and we resolve “did we really predict correctly?”. If we did, great! We have been able to advance the program state asynchronously even without knowing the answer until we get there.

    If not, ohh nooo. We have to unwind what we were doing, clear some of the pipeline and try to do the correct branch.

    Of course this has an impact on timing of the program. Some people found you could write a program to manipulate this predictor and using specific addresses and content, they could use these timing variations to “access memory” they are not allowed to by letting the specualative executor contribute to code they are not allowed to access before the unroll occurs. They could time this, and retrieve the memory contents from areas they are not allowed to access, breaking isolation.

    [...]

    Our computers are still asynchronous, and contain many out-of-order parts. It’s hard to believe we have “found” every method of exploiting this. Indeed in the last year many more ways to bypass hardware isolation due to our systems async nature have been found.

Fedora: CoreOS Lab, phpMyAdmin, Eclipse, twa and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Devconf.cz 2020 Fedora CoreOS Lab

    Fedora CoreOS is a container focused operating system, coupled with automatic updates, to enable the next wave of cloud native infrastructure. Fedora CoreOS is built for many platforms, each of them delivered as a pre-built disk image. In every environment where Fedora CoreOS is deployed the initial boot starts with roughly the same disk image. In cloud environments these are cloud images that were made specifically for that cloud. For bare metal environments the coreos-installer can be used, which performs a bit for bit copy of the disk image with some convenience factors added.

    If the delivered artifact is a disk image how can it be customized? The answer to that is Ignition.

    Fedora CoreOS uses Ignition to provision a node in an automated fashion. Ignition config files are written in JSON and typically not user friendly. For that reason Fedora CoreOS offers the Fedora CoreOS Config Transpiler (also known as FCCT) that will create Ignition configs from a more user friendly format. Additionally we offer the ignition-validate sub-utility that can be used to verify Ignition config and catch issues before launching a machine.

  • Remi Collet: phpMyAdmin version 5

    RPM of the new major version of phpMyAdmin are available in remi repository for Fedora and for Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS...).

  • Eclipse 2019-12 Now Available From Flathub

    If you don't already know, Flatpak is the new way to build and distribute desktop applications for Linux. You can use Flathub to gain access to a growing collection of Flatpak applications, including Eclipse IDE. You just need to follow the setup instructions for your Linux distribution.

  • Fedora 31 : The twa web auditor tool.

    This tool comes with a good intro: A tiny web auditor with strong opinions.
    The tool named twa takes one domain at a time and use these dependencies: bash 4, curl, dig, jq, and nc, along with the POSIX system.

  • Tales from Google CodeIn’19

    As you may know, Google CodeIn (GCI) is a global, online contest introducing teenagers to the world of open source development. With a wide variety of bite-sized tasks, it’s easy for beginners to jump in and get started no matter what skills they have.

  • Git Forge requirements

    This document lays out a problem statement, requirements, and constraints according to the Open Decision Framework. The aim is to arrive at a transparent decision about the future of a git forge for the communities that represent the platforms that the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team manages. Those communities are the CentOS and Fedora platforms and also include the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) platform from a tooling and integration perspective. This document is the first in a series of documents capturing the conversation about the problems we face and driving the conversation to implement the decisions captured.

MIG and Astra Linux start selling new, secure tablet with Russian operating system

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Gadgets

Russian companies Mobile Inform Group (MIG) and Astra Linux have started selling the new MIG T10 x86 tablet powered by the Astra Linux OS, an operating system of domestic origin, reports Cnews.ru. The device is resistant to a wide range of temperatures.

The device corresponds to all the security standards of the Russian security services and the military. It is powered by the tetra-core Intel Appololake N3450 2.2 GHz processor and has a 11,700 mAh battery. The price of the tablet with the pre-installed Astra Linux OS starts from RUB 105,118.

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Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Which cloud strategy is right for your business in 2020?

    At Red Hat, we’re constantly receiving useful industry insights from our customers when speaking to them about their current priorities and issues. Our recent Global Customer Tech Outlook study revealed that many organisations don’t know what cloud strategy to put in place, with 17% stating that this was something they were still working on. A further 12% had not yet developed any plans at all for their cloud strategy in 2020.

  • Editing, debugging, and GitHub in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

    In a previous article, I showed how to get Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.0 (CRW) up and running with a workspace available for use. This time, we will go through the edit-debug-push (to GitHub) cycle. This walk-through will simulate a real-life development effort.

    To start, you’ll need to fork a GitHub repository. The Quote Of The Day repo contains a microservice written in Go that we’ll use for this article. Don’t worry if you’ve never worked with Go. This is a simple program and we’ll only change one line of code.

    After you fork the repo, make note of (or copy) your fork’s URL. We’ll be using that information in a moment.

  • Apache Camel K development inside Eclipse Che: Iteration 1

    The Eclipse Che 7.6.0 release provides a new stack for Apache Camel K integration development. This release is the first iteration to give a preview of what is possible. If you like what you see, shout it out, and more will surely come.

    This article details how to test this release on a local instance deployed on minikube. The difference with a hosted instance is that we avoid the prerequisites involving Camel K installation in the cluster and specific rights for the user.

  • OpenShift 4.3: Spoofing a User

    Imagine you’re a cluster administrator managing a huge number of users. A user reaches out to you with a problem: “My console is broken.” There’s seemingly an infinite number of possible explanations for why this user can’t access the console. However, you can’t see their system and they have difficulty explaining what the console is doing. The Red Hat OpenShift team recently met with a university customer whose admins frequently run into this scenario. Luckily, OpenShift 4.3’s web console UI addresses this exact problem. New to 4.3, we’ve introduced the ability to spoof users and groups.

  • IBM partners with will.i.am's AI startup at Davos

    will.i.am's tech company, I.AM+, and IBM have created a global partnership to ensure enterprise-level security for customer data as artificial intelligence (AI) adoption pushes further into the mainstream.

    Human-like conversational experiences are at the forefront of I.AM's Omega AI platform, and speed and security are priorities for its worldwide customers, according to the company.

  • Istio 1.4 improves user experience and simplifies managing clusters

    At the end of 2019, Istio announced its fourth consecutive quarterly release for the year, Istio 1.4. The release focuses on improving user experience and making it simpler for operators to manage their clusters. Added features and improvements include the new Istio operator, v1beta1 authorization policy, automatic mutual Transport Layer Security (TLS) support, and updates to istioctl, as shown in the following graphic:

    Timeline from Istio 1.1 to 1.4

    The following sections describe the highlights, and give you opportunities to walk through some examples. To learn the details about Istio 1.4, see the community release notes and the Istio documentation. As of today, the 1.4 release has three patch releases – 1.4.1, 1.4.2 and 1.4.3. These patches include bug fixes, improvements, and security updates. Also, check out Dan Berg’s 6-minute presentation video from serviceMeshCon: Dramatic UX Improvement and Analytics-driven Canary Deployment with Istio (1118-RM06-06.mp4), which gives a quick recap of the Istio 1.4 release.

  • Open Innovation Stories: Tamar Eilam and how Istio become a microservices rallying point

    With microservices, the name says it all. These bite-size software services have fundamentally changed the way software is developed by breaking large applications into smaller pieces. However, with that sometimes comes complexity. This is where Istio, a services mesh for tying together microservices and applications, helps.

    Istio can be traced back to the early 2010s. Before then, software development and IT operations were separate workstreams that could drag on for 18 months for a single project. But around 2010, they became intertwined, marking the beginning of the DevOps movement. This disconnect between workstreams was a challenge that Tamar Eilam, an IBM Fellow of Cloud and DevOps with IBM Research, was familiar with, and she watched this and another fast-growing industry trend—migration to the cloud—with great interest.

    “That As-a-Service model provided an opportunity to learn much quicker what your users want because you’re observing what they’re doing,” Tamar says. “And you continue to evolve your service, not every six months, but on a daily basis.”

    Tamar joined IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., in 2000, following a Ph.D. program in computer science at Technion in her native Israel. She hadn’t been in her job for long before she began to notice a vexing problem: a widening communications gap between developers and operators. Developers didn’t always understand operational concerns, while operators often had a blind spot when it came to applications.

    To break down these barriers, Tamar devised a language she called “patterns of expertise,” a unifying set of best practices that allowed for more efficient management of applications. It gave rise to a suite of IBM computing processes, and in 2014, she was named an IBM Fellow, the highest honor for the company’s scientists and engineers.

  • How to protect your data, applications, cryptography and OS – 100% of the time

    Businesses looking to maximise the security, reliability, efficiency and performance of their essential, mission-critical applications are recognising the mainframe as a robust platform for a variety of workload types.

    With Ubuntu on IBM Z and LinuxONE, enhanced security features, pervasive encryption and cryptographic support are leveraged by any workload that must stand up to the most stringent compliance and regulatory standards and certifications.

Events: LibreOffice, FOSDEM, GNOME and openSUSE

Filed under
OSS

  • Collabora supports Free Software Winter Camp 2020 in Eskişehir, Turkey

    Twenty one students have been selected to take part in the LibreOffice Development Workshop at the Anadolu University, EskiÅŸehir, Turkey. It is held from Jan 25 to Jan 28 as a part of the Free Software Winter Camp 2020.

  • FOSDEM 2020

    In less than 10 days, Collabora will be in Brussels to take part in this year's edition of FOSDEM, a two-day event organised by volunteers to promote the widespread use of free and open source software. Taking place at the ULB Solbosch Campus on February 1 & 2, FOSDEM is widely recognized as the best and biggest conference of its kind in Europe.

    Collaborans will be giving 12 talks over the weekend, on topics including KernelCI's new home, the latest on Zink (OpenGL on Vulkan), OpenXR & Monado, PipeWire in the automotive industry, JPEG2000, and GStreamer on the Magic Leap One.

    You'll be able to hear them speak in the main track, as well as 6 different devrooms: Containers, Game Development, Graphics, Open Media, Testing & Automation, and Embedded, Mobile & Automotive. See below are the details for each presentation.

  • Molly de Blanc: Friends of GNOME Update January 2020

    We spent the end of 2019 at home and on vacation, preparing us for the excitement that 2020 is bringing.

    In January we’ll be at Sustain Summit 2020 in Brussels, Belgium. Shortly afterwards, you will be able to find us at FOSDEM on February 1-2!

    Saturday 12:00 (La Fontaine): Molly de Blanc will be speaking on ethics and IoT.
    saturday 14:00 (UA2.220): Neil McGovern will be debating on whether the 4 Freedoms and OSD are outdated and no longer relevant in 2020.
    Saturday 15:00 (UA2.220): Molly will be debating on the question of should licenses be designed to advance general social goals.

    On Saturday, February 1, we will be having GNOME Beers at Bonnefooi starting at 19:30. It is located at Rue des Pierres 8, 10000 Brussels.

  • Winner Announced for 2020 Conference Logo Competition

    The winner of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference logo competition is Kukuh Syafaat from Indonesia.

    Kukuh’s “Fresh Community Spirit” was the winning design and was one of 10 designs submitted during the competition. “Mystery Box” will be sent to Kukuh for the winning design.

    In 2020, openSUSE and LibreOffice wil have a shared conference from October 13 – 16 in Nuremberg, Germany.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Odoo in a root-less container

    The main workstation running Fedora 31 now, devoid of any trace of python2, I had to either spin up a virtual machine (which I happily did in the past using qemu and kvm [no libvirt or GNOME Boxes]) or get the hands dirty on containers this time to develop on Odoo [1] version 10 which depends on python2. Faced with the challenge^Wopprotunity, I started to learn to use containers.

    Never tried to use docker, even though I am familiar with its technology and at times I wanted to try and have hands on experience on the technology. Fast forward, podman and buildah came along with the possibility to run root-less containers and they’re available in Fedora.

  • 3 handy command-line internet speed tests

    Speedtest is an old favorite. It's implemented in Python, packaged in Apt, and also available with pip. You can use it as a command-line tool or within a Python script.

  • Python Program to Convert Octal Number to Decimal and vice-versa

    The octal numeral system, or oct for short, is the base-8 number system and uses the digits 0 to 7. The main characteristic of an Octal Numbering System is that there are only 8 distinct counting digits from 0 to 7 with each digit having a weight or value of just 8 starting from the least significant bit (LSB).

    In the decimal number system, each digit represents the different power of 10 making them base-10 number system.

  • Using SQLAlchemy with Flask and PostgreSQL

    Databases are a crucial part of modern applications since they store the data used to power them. Generally, we use the Structured Query Language (SQL) to perform queries on the database and manipulate the data inside of it. Though initially done via dedicated SQL tools, we've quickly moved to using SQL from within applications to perform queries.

    Naturally, as time passed, Object Relational Mappers (ORMs) came to be - which enable us to safely, easily and conveniently connect to our database programmatically without needing to actually run queries to manipulate the data.

    One such ORM is SQLAlchemy. In this post, we will delve deeper into ORMs and specifically SQLAlchemy, then use it to build a database-driven web application using the Flask framework.

  • Python Program To Reverse a Sentence
  • How to pad/fill a string by a variable in Python using f-strings

    I often find myself Googling for this. Always a little bit embarrassed that I can't remember the incantation (syntax).

  • Add Styles To Templates - Building SaaS #42

    In this episode, I added a CSS framework, Tailwind CSS. After working through some issues with the log out feature, we started to style the base template of the site.

    To stay true to my “make the minimum possible thing that will work,” I added Tailwind CSS from a CDN, content delivery network.

  • Refund policy for Attendees and Financial Aid recipients traveling to PyCon internationally

    International travel to the United States has become a greater risk for many in our community. In light of current conditions, PyCon would like to highlight the support we provide for international travelers. If you are travelling internationally to PyCon, take note of the following information. Financial Aid applicants should take note of additional information specific to that process in the second section.

  • Create a project to track total sales at different locations with the Python program

    In the previous posts, we have gone through a project which will receive the user input and commit those data into the earning table. This program has been further modified to include the plotting of a bar chart to indicate the total sales of various inventories in various locations.

    This project has been uploaded to this site, you can download the source code of this project for free through this link. If you like this project, don’t forget to award me with stars on the same project page or share the project page with friends!

  • Python Program to Convert Binary Number to Decimal and Vice-Versa

    A binary number is a number expressed in the base-2 numeral system or binary numeral system, which uses only two symbols 0 and 1.

    The decimal numeral system is the standard system for denoting integer and non-integer numbers.

    All decimal numbers can be converted to equivalent binary values and vice versa for example, the binary equivalent of “2” is “10” to explore more visit binary to decimal converter.

    In this article, we will create python programs for converting a binary number into decimal and vice versa

  • Using MySQL’s LOAD DATA with Django

    While attempting to improve performance of bulk inserting data into MySQL database my coworker came across the LOAD DATA SQL statement. It allows you to read data from a text file (in a comma separated variable-like format) and quickly insert it into a table. There’s two variations of it, a local remote version. We did not experiment with the local version since we were connecting to a remote MySQL server and did not have access to the database’s local disk.

  • Cleanly removing a Django app (with models)

    While pruning features from our product it was necessary to fully remove some Django apps that had models in them. If the code is just removed than the tables (and some other references) will be left in the database.

  • Rename Files in Python: A Guide with Examples using os.rename()

    In this post, we are going to work with Python 3 to rename files. Specifically, we will use the Python module os to rename a file and rename multiple files.

    First, we will rename a single file in 4 easy steps. After that, we will learn how to rename multiple files using Python 3. To be able to change the name of multiple files using Python can come in handy. For example, if we have a bunch of data files (e.g., .csv files) with long, or strange names, we may want to rename them to make working with them easier later in our projects (e.g., when loading the CSV files into a Pandas dataframe).

Radeon RX 5600 XT With New vBIOS Offering Better Linux Performance Following Fix

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week AMD launched the Radeon RX 5600 XT and as shown in our Linux launch-day review it offers nice performance up against the GTX 1660 and RTX 2060 graphics cards on Linux with various OpenGL and Vulkan games. Complicating the launch was the last-minute change to the video BIOS to offer better performance, but unfortunately that led to an issue with the Linux driver as well as confusing the public due to the change at launch and some board vendors already shipping the new vBIOS release while others are not yet. Fortunately, a Linux solution is forthcoming and in our tests it is working out and offering better performance.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 RC is out

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 is just around the corner. The team is publishing today the last milestone for current release cycle. OMLx 4.1 RC release is mostly bug fixing and update packages. Read more

Proprietary Software and Security Leftovers

  • FilelistCreator is a directory printer for Windows, macOS and Linux

    Many people organize their data into folders to quickly find what they want. The Windows operating system comes with default folders for images, videos, and downloads for example that many users of Windows use. Windows does not really provide good easily accessible options to compare the contents of two folders; this is especially the case if root folders contain hundreds of even thousands of files and folders.

  • Ragnarok Ransomware Targets Citrix ADC, Disables Windows Defender

    A new ransomware called Ragnarok has been detected being used in targeted attacks against unpatched Citrix ADC servers vulnerable to the CVE-2019-19781 exploit. Last week, FireEye released a report about new attacks exploiting the now patched Citrix ADC vulnerability to install the new Ragnarok Ransomware on vulnerable networks. When attackers can compromise a Citrix ADC device, various scripts would be downloaded and executed that scan for Windows computers vulnerable to the EternalBlue vulnerability. If detected, the scripts would attempt to exploit the Windows devices, and if successful, inject a DLL that downloads and installs the Ragnarok ransomware onto the exploited device.

  • The Risks and Potential Impacts Associated with Open Source [Ed: DevOps site gives a platform to Black Duck -- a Microsoft-connected FUD arm against FOSS]
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (iperf3, openjpeg2, and tomcat7), Mageia (ansible, c3p0, fontforge, glpi, gthumb, libbsd, libmediainfo, libmp4v2, libqb, libsass, mbedtls, opencontainers-runc, php, python-pip, python-reportlab, python3, samba, sysstat, tomcat, virtualbox, and webkit2), openSUSE (java-11-openjdk, libredwg, and sarg), Oracle (sqlite), Red Hat (libarchive, nss, and openjpeg2), Scientific Linux (sqlite), SUSE (nodejs6), and Ubuntu (cyrus-sasl2, linux, linux-aws, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-oem, mysql-5.7, mysql-8.0, tcpdump, and tomcat8).

  • Hacker Releases 500,000 IoT Credentials

    One of the biggest issues that IoT has is keeping everything secure. Putting devices online is a double-edged sword: it allows benevolent useful services to connect to it, but it can also allow malicious agents to harvest data from it. This was proven a few days ago when a list of 500,000 IoT credentials made their way onto the Internet. The list was posted on a hacker forum for anyone to see and use.

  • Apple is attending a meeting in Washington on Monday as a Board Member of the CARIN Alliance on Health Record Sharing

    The CARIN Alliance is meeting with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on Monday, January 27, 2020 at 3:00 pm ET in Washington, D.C., and representatives from Apple and Microsoft will be attending via phone. Apple is an official CARIN Alliance Board Member and what transpires on Monday could affect Apple's work positively regarding their Health Record-Sharing Platform beyond their current work with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • Big tech CEOs are learning the art of the filibuster

    But it’s clear that as prevailing sentiment about big tech companies has darkened, tech CEOs see increasingly little value in having meaningful public conversations. Instead, they grit their teeth through every question, treating every encounter as something in between a legal deposition and a hostage negotiation.

    We saw this in 2018, when the New Yorker profiled Mark Zuckerberg. We saw it again last year, when Jack Dorsey went on a podcast tour. At some point this year Tim Cook will probably give a zero-calorie interview to someone, and if it’s a slow-enough news day I’ll write this column for a fourth time.

Red Hat vs. SUSE vs. Canonical Contributions To The Mainline Linux Kernel Over The 2010s

After last week looking at the AMD/Intel/NVIDIA contributions to the mainline Linux kernel over the past number of years, there were reader requests for seeing how some of the top distributions compare namely Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. These graphs today are looking at the contributions by SUSE, Red Hat, and Canonical to the mainline Linux kernel. Keep in mind this is the Git commits made from using the respective corporate domains for each organization. Read more

Linux on AMD: Audio Issue Tackled and AMD Zen 3 CPU Support

  • AMD Prepares Fix To Address Clicking Issue With Audio Playback On Raven APUs

    Unfortunately it wasn't a trouble-free experience at launch but with time Raven Ridge APUs have been getting cleaned up on Linux for a pleasant experience, thanks in part to the Google Chromebook play that has also seen these newer AMD APUs seeing HDCP content protection support and PSP / TEE trusted execution functionality. The latest overdue improvement on the AMD Raven APU front is a fix for a pesky issue during audio playback. If playing audio streams immediately one after another, clicking noises can be heard. That is in the process of being resolved thanks to a new kernel patch.

  • AMD ZEN 3 CPU Added To Official Linux Kernel With ‘Family 19H’ Indicating Launch Of Next-Gen Processors With Higher IPC Gains?

    AMD’s ZEN 3 Architecture, the next-gen evolution of the company’s powerful CPUs, is now officially a part of the Linux Family. Spotted inside the Linux Kernel are direct references to the AMD’s Zen 3 CPU microcode. Given the recent developments about the as-yet-unannounced AMD Architecture that succeeds ZEN 2, it is quite likely the company could release the new CPUs based on ZEN 3 in the coming months. And, if the leaked benchmarks and test scores are to be believed, AMD has truly pushed its processors and managed to achieve a substantial leap in processor power with lesser power draw. After giving a tough competition to Intel last year, AMD appears to be readying a new lineup of CPUs that are based on the company’s latest Architecture, the ZEN 3. Based on the 7nm Fabrication Node, the Zen 3 is the 3rd iteration of the ZEN microarchitecture, which is built using the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) lithography process.

  • AMD Zen 3 CPU Support Added To Linux Kernel As We Get Closer To Official Announcement

    It looks like we are getting more closer to the launch of AMD's Zen 3 CPUs as microcode for the upcoming lineup has been added to the Linux Kernel, as spotted by Komachi. The AMD Zen 3 line of processors are aimed to hit in the coming quarters and it looks like they are going to be a bigger upgrade than we have anticipated as many leaks and official representatives have stated. [...] However, this means that in the upcoming months, AMD is definitely bringing us more news as also stated by AMD's CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, in the 'The Bring Up' interview where she states that Zen 3 architecture is doing really well, they are excited about it and that she looks forward to talking more about it later in 2020.