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Sunday, 17 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla: Root Certificate Store, Rust and WebAssembly Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 10:44am
Story Programming: Conda-Forge, Meson Quest, PyLadies Auction at PyCon 2019 and More Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 10:42am
Story Graphics: Intel's OpenGL Mesa Driver, DRM and More Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 10:34am
Story Dating is a free software issue Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 10:24am
Story Latte – Excellent KDE Dock based on Plasma Frameworks Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 10:19am
Story today's howto Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 9:53am
Story Games: Ethan Lee, "We. The Revolution" and Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 9:39am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 9:29am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 1:20am
Story RadeonSI Primitive Culling Yields Mixed Benchmark Results Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 1:10am

Sitting in the Linux Cockpit

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

If you haven't tried the relatively new Linux Cockpit, you might be surprised by all it can do. It's a user-friendly web-based console that provides some very easy ways to administer Linux systems — through the web. You can monitor system resources, add or remove accounts, monitor system usage, shut down the system and perform quite a few other tasks — all through a very accessible web connection. It's also very easy to set up and use.

While many Linux sysadmins spend most of their time on the command line, access to a remote system using a tool like PuTTY doesn't always provide the most useful command output. Linux Cockpit provides graphs and easy-to-use forms for viewing performance measures and making changes to your systems.

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New Ports Bring Linux to Arm Laptops, Android to the Pi

Filed under
Android
Linux

Like life itself, software wants to be free. In our increasingly open source era, software can more easily disperse into new ecosystems. From open source hackers fearlessly planting the Linux flag on the Sony Playstation back in the aughts to standard Linux apps appearing on Chromebooks and on Android-based Galaxy smartphones (Samsung’s DeX), Linux continues to break down barriers.

The latest Linux-related ports include an AArch64-Laptops project that enables owners of Windows-equipped Arm laptops and tablets to load Ubuntu. There’s also a Kickstarter project to develop a Raspberry Pi friendly version of Google’s low-end Android 9 Pi Go stack. Even Windows is spreading its wings. A third-party project has released a WoA installer that enables a full Windows 10 image to run on the Pi.

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Ways To Contribute Back To Linux Community

Filed under
Linux

So you've been a part of the huge collaborative Linux community and have learned or benefited a lot from them. And now you hear about contributing back some love to the community through various means: developing software, maintaining, documenting, sharing, etc Maybe you are stuck figuring out at which to choose right now. Or have no idea at all where to start.

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New Tabbed Layout Coming On LibreOffice v6.2

Filed under
Linux

LibreOffice, the most popular open source office suite program is set to feature a new look and feel in the coming v6.2 release, called the tabbed layout. As of now, the current stable version is in v6.1.4 and its default look currently mimics the traditional menu-based GUI and some toolbars.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Blog: Building a Kubernetes Edge (Ingress) Control Plane for Envoy v2

    Kubernetes has become the de facto runtime for container-based microservice applications, but this orchestration framework alone does not provide all of the infrastructure necessary for running a distributed system. Microservices typically communicate through Layer 7 protocols such as HTTP, gRPC, or WebSockets, and therefore having the ability to make routing decisions, manipulate protocol metadata, and observe at this layer is vital. However, traditional load balancers and edge proxies have predominantly focused on L3/4 traffic. This is where the Envoy Proxy comes into play.

    Envoy proxy was designed as a universal data plane from the ground-up by the Lyft Engineering team for today’s distributed, L7-centric world, with broad support for L7 protocols, a real-time API for managing its configuration, first-class observability, and high performance within a small memory footprint. However, Envoy’s vast feature set and flexibility of operation also makes its configuration highly complicated – this is evident from looking at its rich but verbose control plane syntax.

    With the open source Ambassador API Gateway, we wanted to tackle the challenge of creating a new control plane that focuses on the use case of deploying Envoy as an forward-facing edge proxy within a Kubernetes cluster, in a way that is idiomatic to Kubernetes operators. In this article, we’ll walk through two major iterations of the Ambassador design, and how we integrated Ambassador with Kubernetes.

  • RIP Dr Peuto, Zilog and Sun's bright SPARC

    The 16-bit Z8000 was the big brother of the 8-bit Z80, used in the first wave of low cost microcomputers like the Spectrum and TRS80, but had a starring role in its own right. As a 16-bit CPU it powered several Unix systems, including Commodore, Olivetti and Onyx, as well as Zilog's own System 8000 machines.

    Astonishingly, the ambitious project began in early 1976, long before the personal workstation was a market.

  • Reading the Output of a Weather Station Using Software Defined Radio

    A while back, Dave ordered a weather station. His research pointed to the Ambient Weather WS-2000 as the best bang for the buck as far as accuracy (after it's calibrated, which is a time consuming and exacting process that I suspect most weather station owners don't bother with). It comes with a "console", a little 7" display that sits indoors and reads the radio signal from the outside station as well as a second thermometer inside, then displays all the current weather data. It also uses wi-fi to report the data upstream to Ambient and, optionally, to a weather site such as Wunderground. (Which we did for a while, but now Wunderground is closing off their public API, so why give them data if they're not going to make it easy to share it?)

  • Tiny module runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini

    F&S unveiled a 40 x 35mm “PicoCore MX8MM” module that runs Linux on an up to quad-A53, 1.8GHz i.MX8 Mini with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC plus WiFi/BT, a GbE controller, PCIe, and optional -40 to 85°C support.

    F&S Elektronik Systeme pre-announced a tiny PicoCore MX8MM compute module featuring NXP’s new i.MX8 Mini — an i.MX8M variant with lower video resolution, but a faster clock rate. In September, Variscite announced a slightly larger (55 x 30mm) DART-MX8M-Mini COM with the Mini SoC, and Boundary Devices recently revealed details on a Nitrogen8M-Mini SBC. None of these boards appear to have shipped in volume.

Games: 6 Months With GNU/Linux, CS:GO Danger Zone Fixes and Wraithslayer

Filed under
Gaming

Debian: Mint Debian Edition Cindy, Reproducible Builds and Markus Koschany's Free Software Activities in January 2019

Filed under
Debian

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • What Return of the Jedi taught me about open leadership

    No matter where you are in an organization, you can benefit from observing others and learning from them. We can all learn lessons from someone else.

    I like to look for leadership lessons wherever I go. Sometimes I learn a few tips on public speaking by watching a skilled presenter. Or I'll learn how to improve my meeting management style by reflecting on meetings that go well.

  • Is your enterprise’s open source strategy risky?

    Accurately evaluating this risk means developing a thorough understanding of an open source solution’s licensing terms, the health of its ecosystem, and the business models of the commercial organisations attached to the solution.

  • Best web browser: Chrome, Edge, Firefox, and Opera go head-to-head

    Let’s take a look at the four major browsers (including Edge) to see how they stack up in early 2019. You might be surprised to find that our favorite overall this year is Opera. Read on to find out why.

  • Tabbed Toolbar waste vertical space

    With default settings the standard toolbar need 110 px vertical space (menubar + 2 toolbar height), tabbed toolbar need 100 px and Groupedbar compact 72 px. So the default toolbare need most vertical space.

  • “FreeBSD Mastery: Jails” first draft complete
  • openrsync imported into the tree

    openrsync, a clean-room implementation of rsync, is being developed by Kristaps Dzonsons as part of the rpki-client(1) project [featured in an earlier article]. openrsync(1) has been imported into the tree (as "rsync") by Sebastian Benoit (benno@):

  • FSFE Newsletter - February 2019

    This month's Newsletter is introducing our new expert policy brochure "Public Money? Public Code" and reflecting the importance of source code availability for trust and securitys...

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Drupal 6 - Security Support Continued

    Believe it or not, I just upgraded my old Drupal 6 instances serving e.g. my blog [1] to Drupal 6 LTS v6.49.

    Thanks a lot to Elliot Christenson for continuing Drupal 6 security support.

  • EU's New 'Open By Default' Rules For Data Generated By Public Funding Subverted At The Last Minute

    In December last year, the European Parliament proposed a version of the text that would require researchers in receipt of public funding to publish their data for anyone to re-use. However, some companies and academics were unhappy with this "open by default" approach. They issued a statement calling for research data to be "as open as possible, as closed as necessary", which would include some carve-outs.

    According to Science|Business, that view has prevailed in the final text, which is not yet publicly available. It is now apparently permissible for companies and academics to invoke "confidentiality" and "legitimate commercial interests" as reasons for not releasing publicly-funded data. Clearly, that's a huge loophole that could easily be abused by organizations to hoard results. If companies and academic institutions aren't willing to share the fruits of their research as open data, there's a very simple solution: don't take public money. Sadly, that fair and simple approach seems not to be a part of the otherwise welcome revised PSI Directive.

Events: FOSDEM, LF Events and Upcoming Red Hat Summit Keynotes

Filed under
OSS
  • CIB visiting FOSDEM 2019

    A new edition of FOSDEM (Free and Open source Software Developers‘ European Meeting) just ended. Our CIB LibreOffice team this year was represented by Thorsten Behrens, Michael Stahl and Marina Latini.

    The event is held annually during the first weekend of February, at the „Université Libre de Bruxelles„. For our team, attending FOSDEM means to be involved in a full week of meetings and collateral events related to LibreOffice and other open source communities.

  • Cloud Foundry Building the Future

    Whether you’re a contributor or committer building the platform, or you’re using the platform to attain your business goals, Cloud Foundry North America Summit is where developers, operators, CIOs and other IT professionals go to share best practices and innovate together.

  • Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit

    The Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit brings together the world’s leading core kernel developers to discuss the state of the existing kernel and plan the next development cycle. This is an invite-only event.

    Linux Kernel Summit technical tracks are offered at Linux Plumbers Conference 2019 and are open to all LPC attendees. More information, including how to register, will be available in the coming months.

  • Announcing the first round of Red Hat Summit keynotes

    For the past 14 years, Red Hat Summit has delivered inspirational, educational and actionable content, industry-shaping news, and innovative practices from customers and partners from around the world and across industries. As we prepare for Red Hat Summit 2019, we wanted to share some of the exciting keynotes you can expect from our main stage.

    Attendees will hear keynotes on the future of enterprise technology from several Red Hat leaders including: Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO; Paul Cormier, president of Products and Technologies; DeLisa Alexander, executive vice president and chief people officer; Chris Wright, vice president and chief technology officer; and Stefanie Chiras, vice president and general manager, Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Engaging the openSUSE community

Filed under
SUSE

And that the openSUSE community should have a better ‘Marketing strategy’ (for the lack of a better term) to make the Contributor Journey a smoother experience. To try to get the roadblocks out of the way for the people that want to be informed or be involved. It is an area where I could see myself contributing to in the future.

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Essential System Tools: QJournalctl – Graphical User Interface for systemd’s journalctl

Filed under
Software

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QJournalctl, a Qt-based Graphical User Interface for systemd’s journalctl command. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

For many years system and kernel logs were handled by a utility called syslogd. Most Linux-based operating systems have since moved to systemd, which has a journal. It’s a giant log file for the whole system. Various software and services write their log entries into systemd’s journalctl. To view the output, there’s the command-line journalctl utility.

journalctl is a systemd utility. If your system doesn’t use systemd, you’ll have little interest in this utility. But given most popular Linux distros have adopted systemd, it’s likely you’ll need journalctl at one stage or another. It’s common sense to understand the system you’re running, and this utility will help you in this process.

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Also: BleachBit 2.1 Beta

14 Practical Examples of rsync Command in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Wondering how to use rsync command? This article lists some of the essential usages of the rsync command in Linux.
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14 Practical Examples of rsync Command in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Wondering how to use rsync command? This article lists some of the essential usages of the rsync command in Linux.
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No, you can't take open-source code back

Filed under
OSS

Some people are still unclear about what it means or what happens once they've published their program under an open-source license. In the most recent example, mikeeusa, the author of an obscure game called GPC-Slots 2, claimed he was rescinding the program's GPLv2 license from some people and "from anyone who adds a 'Code of Conduct' anywhere near my code (to 'fight sexism'.)."

While this specific case doesn't really matter -- the text-based casino game hasn't been updated in over a decade and appears to have no players -- the issue of whether one can block users from using code once it's been placed under the GPLv2 bothered enough people that it's been one of the hottest stories on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) for over a week.

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GCC 8/9 vs. LLVM Clang 7/8 Compiler Performance On AArch64

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With Clang 8.0 due out by month's end and GCC 9 due for release not long after that point, this week we've been running a number of GCC and Clang compiler benchmarks on Phoronix. At the start of the month was the large Linux x86_64 GCC vs. Clang compiler benchmarks on twelve different Intel/AMD systems while last week was also a look at the POWER9 compiler performance on the Raptor Talos II. In this article we are checking out these open-source compilers' performance on 64-bit ARM (AArch64) using an Ampere eMAG 32-core server.

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Android Leftovers

Python 2.7.16 release candidate 1 available

A release candidate for the upcoming 2.7.16 bug fix release is now available for download. Read more

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