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Sunday, 20 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 10:08am
Story Server: OpenShift, Containers, SUSE, IBM and Kubernetes/Heptio Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 10:06am
Story Linux Foundation: Upcoming Events and Hyperledger Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 10:04am
Story Programming: GCN, Python, Rust, RcppArmadillo Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 9:58am
Story Games: Lost in Sky: Violent Seed, Steam and PlayOnLinux 5.0 Alpha 2 Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 9:56am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 9:53am
Story Android: Android Q, Fossil and Deprecating 32-Bit Android Apps Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 9:52am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 9:01am
Story Inkscape 1.0 Open-Source Vector Graphics Editor Is Finally Coming After 15 Years Rianne Schestowitz 1 18/01/2019 - 8:56am
Story CNC milling with open source software Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2019 - 8:45am

Plasma ergonomics - Lessons in life

Filed under
KDE

The bugsy trends aren't unique to Plasma - this is the desktop all over. The agile thingie, the curse of quality and usability everywhere. Even looking at something like Windows, there are far more annoyances in Windows 8.1 than there were in Windows 7, and then a whole order of magnitude more still in Windows 10. These could be seemingly small things - and there sure ain't enough testing to begin with - but they can mean a world to the end user. And if Plasma wants to be top dog, it needs to do everything better than the competition. Today, I uncovered a fresh handful issues, and that's just a couple of extra months of rigorous usage. It will be interesting to see what happens a year or two down the road. Well, my Plasma journey continues. Stay tuned.

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Also: KDE Students Excel during Google Code-in 2018

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Games: GameHub, Eastshade, Unsung Warriors, Littlewood, Unity, DYSMANTLE, ECON - Elemental Connection, Godly Corp, Emerald Shores and Heroes Ravage

Filed under
Gaming
  • GameHub – An Unified Library To Put All Games Under One Roof

    GameHub is an unified gaming library that allows you to view, install, run and remove games on GNU/Linux operating system. It supports both native and non-native games from various sources including Steam, GOG, Humble Bundle, and Humble Trove etc. The non-native games are supported by Wine, Proton, DOSBox, ScummVM and RetroArch. It also allows you to add custom emulators and download bonus content and DLCs for GOG games. Simply put, Gamehub is a frontend for Steam/GoG/Humblebundle/Retroarch. It can use steam technologies like Proton to run windows gog games. GameHub is free, open source gaming platform written in Vala using GTK+3. If you’re looking for a way to manage all games under one roof, GameHub might be a good choice.

  • Eastshade Release Date for Linux and Windows Announced Along With a New Trailer

    First-person exploration games haven't really been done to a major degree - even though things like Perfect have aimed to give you a bit of that. In cases like that, you have a game that relies on virtual reality to relax the user and allow you to explore a very small world. However, what the world lacks in size, it makes up for in terms of interactivity - but it is still very small-scale. Eastshade sets out to do something similar, but in a purely first-person viewpoint without relying on VR and greatly expanding on the size of the game's world.

  • 2D action adventure 'Unsung Warriors' has an expanded Prologue along with a Kickstarter

    I took a look at the Prologue of Unsung Warriors back in October last year and it was pretty good! They've now expanded it, put it on Steam and they have a Kickstarter going for the full game.

  • Littlewood, an RPG with a difference needs funding on Kickstarter

    Most RPGs focus on defeating some sort of evildoer, however Littlewood takes place after a Dark Wizard has already been defeated and it's your job to put everything back together.

    Inspired by the likes of Animal Crossing, Dark Cloud and Runescape it seems to be heavily focusing on the more peaceful side of gaming. It will have mining, crafting, fishing, bug catching, farming, cooking and so on. However, one feature sounds especially interesting! After the Dark Wizard was defeated, their monsters were sealed away into Tarott Cards you can collect and battle people with which I love the sound of.

    Even more interesting, is that it's being made by developer Sean Young of SmashGames who made Kindergarten, Roguelands and Magicite which all support Linux. They're very clear about supporting Linux once again, so that's fantastic to see them continue.

  • Unity have updated their Terms of Service and they seem a lot more fair
  • An update on the situation with NVIDIA graphical distortions in some Unity games on Linux

    Recently, I highlighted an issue in multiple Unity games where the graphics were distorted on Linux with using an NVIDIA GPU and I offered some workarounds. I now have an update on the issue to share from both Unity and NVIDIA.

    Firstly, on the Unity side at least some of it was a confirmed bug in Unity's handling of OpenGL. The bug report that was opened as a result of my chats with Unity, has noted that it's now solved in Unity 2019 and the fix should also be landing in Unity 2018.3.2f1.

  • DYSMANTLE from 10tons is an open world action RPG where you can ruin everything

    10tons Ltd the team behind Crimsonland, Neon Chrome, Time Recoil, JYDGE, Tesla vs Lovecraft and more have revealed their next title, DYSMANTLE.

  • ECON - Elemental Connection, a pretty sweet puzzle game about making a mosaic

    ECON - Elemental Connection was quite a surprise, a puzzle game that can be played both offline and online that has you take it in turns to build a mosaic.

    Note: Key provided by the developer.

    For those who prefer their more relaxing experiences to other action-packaged options, ECON is a little gem. Honestly, it's nothing to look at and you could easily pass it up since even on Steam it doesn't have a single user review. However, it's actually a pretty good tile-matching puzzler.

  • Godly Corp is a really weird game that has you manage an office as something like Cthulhu

    I will give the developer TR8 Torus Studios points for being weird and unique here, with Godly Corp having you manage an office with a long tentacle.

  • Emerald Shores, a SNES-inspired platformer with minigames and more has Linux support

    For those after their next retro platformer, the SNES-inspired Emerald Shores is out on Steam with Linux support.

  • Heroes Ravage, a rather unique online action game will support Linux

    Yet another interesting crowdfunded game to take a look at today, we have Heroes Ravage an online action game that has you play as both heroes and villagers.

    Heroes Ravage is an all-out battle for loot, only this time there are no NPCs as everyone is a player. Everyone is trying to hold onto their collected valuables, with players acting as the villagers able to hide them and set up traps. It's a 4on4 battle, with four heroes facing off against four villagers and I will admit it does sound very unique.

Top 15 Best Git Clients for Linux

Filed under
Development
Software

As a Linux user, you need to update software source code frequently. You may use a command line to do the task. But, when you need to handle a large project, then it becomes lengthy and difficult also. On the other hand, it is also quite impossible to point out the entire branch structure using the command line.

Nowadays, all the mastermind Linux users are frequently using Git tools for the software controlling management and development. The tasks are very simple and quite easier with git client Linux. That is why we take the step to introduce you to some of the best git clients for Linux.

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Best Audio Editors For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

You’ve got a lot of choices when it comes to audio editors for Linux. No matter whether you are a professional music producer or just learning to create awesome music, the audio editors will always come in handy.

Well, for professional-grade usage, a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) is always recommended. However, not everyone needs all the functionalities, so you should know about some of the most simple audio editors as well.

In this article, we will talk about a couple of DAWs and basic audio editors which are available as free and open source solutions for Linux and (probably) for other operating systems.

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600 days of postmarketOS

Filed under
OS
Android

postmarketOS is aiming for a ten year life-cycle for smartphones, see the all new front page for a short introduction if you are new around here. Today we'll cover what happened during the second half of 2018. Many have been wondering where we've been and why it took us so long to write a real update post. Is the project dead already? Weren't phone calls almost working? What happened?
Development has been going on continuously, so we are not dead. Maybe a little undead though, like some of the old and forgotten phones we are trying to revive, because we have not really gotten any closer to the goal of getting telephony working or turning a phone into a daily driver. The Nexus 5, while booting mainline with accelerated graphics and connecting to the cellular modem all with a free software userspace, still does not have working audio. That is one example, other devices have different problems. However, we have not been sitting idle and doing nothing these past few months!

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Also: Google hands out roses to preferred Android MDM vendors

Essential System Tools: Krusader – KDE file manager

Filed under
KDE

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at Krusader, a free and open source graphical file manager. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

Krusader is an advanced, twin-panel (commander-style) file manager designed for KDE Plasma. Krusader also runs on other popular Linux desktop environments such as GNOME.

Besides comprehensive file management features, Krusader is almost completely customizable, fast, seamlessly handles archives, and offers a huge feature set.

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Deepin Linux 15.9 Released with Support for Touchscreen Gestures, Faster Updates

Filed under
Linux

Packed with all the updates that have been released through the official channels since Deepin 15.8, the Deepin 15.9 update is here to add support for multiple touchscreen gestures, including click, double click, long press to open the context menu, as well as slide up and down, an on-screen keyboard, and faster updates thanks to a new Smart Mirror Switch function.

The Deepin 15.9 release also brings some performance optimizations by making power management more efficient and convenient to laptop and desktop users alike. "Whether your computer is connected to power supply or not, you can easily change the monitor and computer suspend time for different scenarios," explained the devs in today's announcement.

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LG smart TVs running webOS can now be rooted

Filed under
OS
Linux

Our “smart life” tech can be a bit restrictive at times. If you want to get a bit more out of it you can sometimes find a way to “root” or “jailbreak”. Usually when talking about these things we tend to refer to smartphones, tablets, or even a set-top box. Well, now you can root LG Smart TVs running the WebOS Linux-based operating system.

WebOS, a OS that was originally developed by Palm in 2009, is an operating system that LG uses in its consumer electronics portofolio – such as Smart TVs, refrigerators, and projectors.

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10GbE Linux Networking Performance Between CentOS, Fedora, Clear Linux & Debian

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those curious how the 10 Gigabit Ethernet performance compares between current Linux distributions, here are some benchmarks we ramp up more 10GbE Linux/BSD/Windows benchmarks. This round of testing was done on two distinctly different servers while testing CentOS, Debian, Clear Linux, and Fedora.

This is the first of several upcoming 10GbE test comparisons. For those article we are testing some of the popular enterprise Linux distributions while follow-up articles will also be looking at some other distros as well as Windows Server and FreeBSD/DragonFlyBSD. CentOS 7, Debian 9.6, Clear Linux rolling, and Fedora Server 29 were the operating systems tested for this initial round.

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Zipping files on Linux: the many variations and how to use them

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Some of us have been zipping files on Unix and Linux systems for many decades — to save some disk space and package files together for archiving. Even so, there are some interesting variations on zipping that not all of us have tried. So, in this post, we’re going to look at standard zipping and unzipping as well as some other interesting zipping options.

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Testing openSUSE, Manjaro, Debian, Fedora, and Mint Linux distributions on my new laptop

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE

Due to the recent unfortunate demise of a couple of my computers I found myself in need of a new laptop on rather short notice. I found an Acer Aspire 5 on sale at about half price here in Switzerland, so I picked one up. I have been installing a number of Linux distributions on it, with mostly positive results.

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Programming: Go, JavaScript, Data Science Programming Languages and PyFilesystem

Filed under
Development
  • How To Learn Go Programming Language

    First appeared in November 2009, Go is a statically typed, compiled programming language designed at Google. You might have just heard about this programming language in the past couple of years but recently, Go has started to gain significant popularity in the coding world.

    Being light-weight, open source, and suited for today’s microservices architectures, Go is an amazing choice for a language. Also known as Google’s Golang, this language was developed by some of the brilliant minds from Google who created the C programming language. Today, it is one of the fastest growing languages and it’s absolutely a great time to start learning and working with GO.

  • Review: The 6 best JavaScript IDEs

    Back in the ancient days when Java Swing was new and exciting, I enjoyed using Eclipse for Java development, but soon moved on to other Java IDEs. Five-plus years ago, when I did some Android development with Eclipse, I found the experience OK, but poky. When I tried to use Eclipse Luna with JSDT for JavaScript development in 2014, it constantly displayed false-positive errors for valid code that passed JSHint.

  • A Complete List of The Best Data Science Programming Languages

    Data science is one of the fastest-growing fields in America. Organizations are employing data scientists at a rapid rate to help them analyze increasingly large and complex data volumes. The proliferation of big data and the need to make sense of it all has created a vortex where all of these things exist together. As a result, new techniques, technologies and theories are continually being developed to run advanced analysis, and they all require development and programming to ensure a path forward.

  • PyFilesystem is greater than or equal to Pathlib

    I was reading a post by Trey Hunner on why pathlib is great, where he makes the case that pathlib is a better choice than the standard library alternatives that preceded it. I wouldn't actually disagree with a word of it. He's entirely correct. You should probably be using pathlib were it fits.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • SuiteCRM Announce the Release of SuiteCRM 7.11
  • Open Source for Enterprise Trends in 2019

    We know that open source is well established as the place where software innovation happens. Today enterprises are looking at open source even more closely for pro-active, adaptive and innovative technologies to deliver better customer experience. As we move into 2019, we see open source technology further making its mark in some of the key trends we are already experiencing.

  • Open source search engines attract developers
  • Alibaba Acquires Open Source Firm Data Artisans for $130M
  • Apache Flink Advances Enterprise Apps Aspirations With Alibaba

    There are a lot of different types of tools that are needed to enable modern enterprise apps. The ability to process data streams in real-time is one such needed tool and it's what the open source Apache Flink project enables.

    Apache Flink is an open-source stream processing framework for distributed, high-performing, always-available and accurate data-streaming applications. The lead developer and commercial organization behind Flink has been data Artisans, which was created by the core developers behind Flink itself. Data Artisans and by extension Apache Flink are getting a major vote of confidence, thanks to Chinese internet giant Alibaba.

  • Google Summer of Code mentor projects sought
  • Genode To Focus On Making Sculpt OS Relevant & Appealing In 2019

    The Genode operating system framework based on a micro-kernel design and various original user-space components continues going strong a decade since its start. But it hasn't achieved too much appeal outside of its niche even when it began working on "Sculpt" as an operating system for general purposes use-cases and supporting common PC/laptop hardware. But they hope to change that in 2019.

    Genode has published their 2019 roadmap and for this year they want to make "Sculpt OS relevant and appealing for a broader community."

  • How Enterprise IT Pros Can Contribute to Open Source Projects

    Undoubtedly, your company uses open source software. But the powers that be might express reluctance when developers want to create or maintain projects on company time. Here is a roadmap to help you convince them otherwise—starting with an internal open source project office.

    Open source innovation has a methodology all its own, and it doesn’t follow traditional business processes. The big difference is that open source development is collaborative rather than competitive. This attitude may come naturally to IT people, but not to managers and rarely to people in the C-suite....

    To change the corporate attitude about permitting developers to be embedded in open source projects, you need to get other departments to see the benefits in their own terms.

    One way to handle this is by finding allies outside software development circles. For instance, human resources execs could be on your side if you can convince them that companies that support open source development are more attractive to prospective employees. A CFO who is motivated by financial cost savings can “do the numbers” for you to, for argument’s sake, demonstrate that investing in a developer who spends 20 hours weekly working on an open source project is still more cost effective than purchasing a not-quite-right IT application.

Security: Pentagon Work and Malware in Proprietary Software

Filed under
Security
  • Bellevue’s Polyverse brings on significant “strategic investors” as it raises $2M for its secure Linux product and courts the Pentagon

    Polymorphic Linux fools memory-based attack software, a growing type of attack that takes advantage of vulnerabilities in widely used software, as opposed to older methods of delivering malware onto a network through a compromised email attachment. It does this by “scrambling” some of the basic system information those in-memory attacks use to target Linux applications, creating a unique version of Linux by producing “individually unique binaries that are semantically equivalent,” according to Polyverse material.

    “If you’re running the same software the Russians have, you’re in trouble,” Gounares said. “They’re getting your copy of Linux, they are studying it, they are finding those flaws, and today those economics favor them” given how many machines they can access if they discover a zero-day flaw in something as widely used as Linux or Windows, he said.

  • Microsoft scores five-year $1.76bn contract with the Pentagon

    The $1.76bn (£1.57bn) deal was announced by the Pentagon as an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity arrangement - in other words, between now and the end of January 2024, Microsoft will offer what is needed, payable on a per task basis, across different cost centres.

  • Nine defendants charged in SEC [cracking] scheme that netted $4.1 million

    Two of the defendants, federal prosecutors in New Jersey said, breached SEC networks starting in May 2016 by subjecting them to hacks that included directory traversal, phishing attacks, and infecting computers with malware. From there, the defendants allegedly accessed EDGAR (the SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system) and stole nonpublic earnings reports that publicly traded companies had filed with the commission. The [intruders] then passed the confidential information to individuals who used it to trade in the narrow window between when the files were stolen and when the companies released the information to the public.

Moodle: The Moodle Users Association and the 101 on Moodle

Filed under
OSS
  • In 2019, Nothing Will Bolster Collaborative Open Source, User-Centered Design & Development In Learning Like The Moodle Users Association

    In LMS and learning technologies, there are few like the Moodle Users Association. Across the spectrum, developers and entrepreneurs keep looking for community engagement. When they do, the usual ideas come to mind. Surveys or social media interactions seem enough to call it a day. In some cases, large participants can influence the development roadmap and single-handedly affect the experience for everyone. Moodle offers all these avenues of interaction. But it also offers the MUA Process Development Cycle, a unique process of transparency and effectiveness that continues to polish and grow and audience. People with little more than a good idea and willingness for effort can make great impact.

  • The 101 on Moodle

    We have all sorts of management systems to help make our work and lives easier to, well, manage. While content management systems help us organise our blogs, portfolios and social media, learning management systems (LMS) get our virtual education filing system sorted in one nook of the Web. One can liken Moodle to a ‘virtual classroom without the germs and threat of detention’.

Linux Foundation: OpenMessaging and 2019 Events Schedule

Filed under
Linux
  • Yahoo Japan and EMQ X Join the OpenMessaging Project

    The OpenMessaging project welcomes Yahoo Japan and EMQ X as new members.

    We are excited to announce two new members to the OpenMessaging project: Yahoo Japan, one of the largest portal sites in Japan, and EMQ X, one of the most popular MQTT message middleware vendors. Yahoo Japan and EMQ X join Alibaba, JD.com, China Mobile Cloud, Qing Cloud, and other community members to form a standards community with 13 corporation members.

    OpenMessaging is a standards project for messaging and streaming technology. Messaging and Streaming products have been widely used in modern architecture and data processing, for decoupling, queuing, buffering, ordering, replicating, etc. But when data transfers across different messaging and streaming platforms, compatibility problems arise, which always means much additional work. The OpenMessaging community looks to eliminate these challenges through creating a global, cloud-oriented, vendor-neutral industry standard for distributed messaging.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces 2019 Events Schedule

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced its 2019 events schedule. Linux Foundation events are where the creators, maintainers and practitioners of the world’s most important open source projects meet. In 2018, Linux Foundation events attracted more than 32,000 developers, architects, community thought leaders, business executives and other industry professionals from more than 11,000 organizations across 113 countries. New events hosted by the Linux Foundation for 2019 include Cephalocon and gRPC Conf.

Get started with Cypht, an open source email client

Filed under
OSS

There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

Here's the fourth of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019.

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How did you get started with Linux?

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Wine 4.0 To Be Released In The Next Few Days

With yesterday's release of Wine 4.0-RC7, the regression/bug count is low enough and the situation looking good that the stable Wine 4.0.0 release should be tagged in the next few days. Wine 4.0-RC7 should be the final release candidate and the stable 4.0 release tagged and issued in a short period of time. Wine founder Alexandre Julliard who manages the releases commented today, "Things are looking good for 4.0, we've made quite a bit of progress on the regressions, thank you to everybody who helped! rc7 should be the last release candidate, please give it a good last check. If no last minute issues are found, I'll release final 4.0 in a couple of days, and lift code freeze :-)" Read more

Android Leftovers