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Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
  • Improve memset
    
    since the merge window is closing in and y'all are on a conference, I
    thought I should take another stab at it. It being something which Ingo,
    Linus and Peter have suggested in the past at least once.
    
  • An Improved Linux MEMSET Is Being Tackled For Possibly Better Performance

    Borislav Petkov has taken to improve the Linux kernel's memset function with it being an area previously criticzed by Linus Torvalds and other prominent developers.

    Petkov this week published his initial patch for better optimizing the memset function that is used for filling memory with a constant byte.

  • Kernel Address Space Isolation Still Baking To Limit Data Leaks From Foreshadow & Co

    In addition to the work being led by DigitalOcean on core scheduling to make Hyper Threading safer in light of security vulnerabilities, IBM and Oracle engineers continue working on Kernel Address Space Isolation to help prevent data leaks during attacks.

    Complementing the "Core Scheduling" work, Kernel Address Space Isolation was also talked about at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The address space isolation work for the kernel was RFC'ed a few months ago as a feature to prevent leaking sensitive data during attacks like L1 Terminal Fault and MDS. The focus on this Kernel ASI is for pairing with hypervisors like KVM as well as being a generic address space isolation framework.

  • The Linux Kernel Is Preparing To Enable 5-Level Paging By Default

    While Intel CPUs aren't shipping with 5-level paging support, they are expected to be soon and distribution kernels are preparing to enable the kernel's functionality for this feature to extend the addressable memory supported. With that, the mainline kernel is also looking at flipping on 5-level paging by default for its default kernel configuration.

    Intel's Linux developers have been working for several years on the 5-level paging support for increasing the virtual/physical address space for supporting large servers with vast amounts of RAM. The 5-level paging increases the virtual address space from 256 TiB to 128 PiB and the physical address space from 64 TiB to 4 PiB. Intel's 5-level paging works by extending the size of virtual addresses to 57 bits from 48 bits.

  • Interview with the Cloud Foundry Foundation CTO

    In this interview, Chip Childers, the CTO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation talks about some hot topics.

  • Research Shows Open Source Program Offices Improve Software Practices

    Using open source software is commonplace, with only a minority of companies preferring a proprietary-first software policy. Proponents of free and open source software (FOSS) have moved to the next phases of open source adoption, widening FOSS usage within the enterprise as well as gaining the “digital transformation” benefits associated with open source and cloud native best practices.

    Companies, as well as FOSS advocates, are determining the best ways to promote these business goals, while at the same time keeping alive the spirit and ethos of the non-commercial communities that have embodied the open source movement for years.

  • Linux Foundation Survey Proves Open-Source Offices Work Better

Releasing Slax 9.11.0

Filed under
Debian

New school year has started again and next version of Slax is here too Smile this time it is 9.11.0. This release includes all bug fixes and security updates from Debian 9.11 (code name Jessie), and adds a boot parameter to disable console blanking (console blanking is disabled by default).

You can get the newest version at the project's home page, there are options to purchase Slax on DVD or USB device, as well as links for free download.

Surprisingly for me we skipped 9.10, I am not sure why Smile

I also experimented with the newly released series of Debian 10 (code name Buster) and noticed several differences which need addressing, so Slax based on Debian 10 is in progress, but not ready yet. Considering my current workload and other circumstances, it will take some more time to get it ready, few weeks at least.

Read more

Also: Slax 9.11 Released While Re-Base To Debian 10 Is In Development

KDE Frameworks 5.62.0 and Reports From Akademy 2019 in Milan

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Frameworks 5.62.0

    KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page.

    This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62 Released With KWayland Additions & Other Improvements

    KDE Frameworks 5.62 is out today as the latest monthly update to this collection of KDE libraries complementing the Qt5 tool-kit offerings.

  • Back from Akademy 2019 in Milan

    The last week I was in Milan with my wife Aiswarya to attend Akademy 2019, the yearly event of the KDE community. Once again it was a great experience, with lots of interesting conferences and productive BoF sessions (“Birds of a Feather”, a common name for a project meeting during a conference).

    On Sunday, we presented our talk “GCompris in Kerala, part 2”. First, Aiswarya told some bits of Free-Software history in Kerala, gave examples of how GCompris is used there, and explained her work to localize the new version of GCompris in Malayalam (the language of this Indian state). Then I made a quick report of what happened in GCompris the last 2 years, and talked about the things to come for our next release.

  • Akademy was a blast!

    I attended my first ever Akademy! The event was held at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Milan, Italy this year. And the experience was splendid. During the 2 day conference, I had the opportunity to talk at the Student Showcase, where all of the SoC students presented their work to the community. There were about 8 students, and everyone gave a good briefing on their project.

    My project this summer was with Kdenlive, the open source non linear professional video editor. I proposed to revamp one of the frequently used tools in the editor, called the Titler tool, which is used to create title clips. Title clips are video clips that contain text and/or images that are composited or appended to your video (eg: subtitles). The problem with the titler tool as it is, is that it uses QGraphicsView to describe a title clip and QGraphicsView was deprecated since the release of Qt5. This obviously leads to problems - upstream bugs crawling affecting the functionality of the tool and an overall degradation in the ease of maintenance of the codebase. Moreover, adding new features to the existing code base was no easy task and therefore, a complete revamp was something in sights of the developer community in Kdenlive for a long time now. I proposed to rework on the backend for the period of GSoC replacing the use of XML with QML and use a new rendering backend with QQuickRenderControl, along with a new MLT module to handle the QML frames. I was able to cover most of the proposed work, I seek to continue working on it and finish evolving the titler tool.

Games: Kind Words, Dead Rising 4, Rise to Ruins and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Kind Words, a pretty sweet experience about sending and receiving anonymous letters

    Developer Popcannibal (Make Sail, Girls Like Robots) just released an updated version of the Humble Original Kind Words with Linux support. Originally released in July's Humble Monthly as an original game, Popcannibal did some tweaks and released it this week on Steam.

  • Dead Rising 4 | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    Dead Rising 4 running through Steam play.

  • Steam Play Proton 4.11-4 has been released into the wild

    Get ready for another weekend full of testing games, as Valve and CodeWeavers have put out a fresh official build of Steam Play Proton for your pleasure.

  • Village building sim with god powers Rise to Ruins to leave Early Access next month

    Developer Raymond Doerr has announced their village building sim Rise to Ruins will leave Early Access on October 14th.

    A game regular GamingOnLinux readers will most likely be familiar with, since I've written about it quite a few times when checking up on development. The progress on it and how it's grown has been astonishing. Coming from such a basic village builder into a highly engrossing mix of village building, god sim and tower defense all in one it's great. The current trailer is a little old but it gives you a reasonable idea:

  • Weekend Deals: grab DiRT Rally completely free to keep and more not to miss

    Just a quick one really on some excellent deals going on right now, including two games you can grab completely free to keep.

    On Steam you can currently pick up DiRT Rally with 100% off, so if you don't own it you can add it to your Steam Library and keep it forever. It's really challenging but also incredibly fun, give it a go! Additionally, the THE GREAT GEOMETRIC MULTIVERSE TOUR, an indie FPS is also 100% off on Steam. Both deals should end on Monday, 16th at 5PM UTC.

    Also a reminder about Deep Rock Galactic, it's fantastic in Steam Play and it's having a free weekend with a big sale.

Bison 3.4.2 released [stable]

Filed under
GNU

Bison 3.4.2 is a bug fix release of the 3.4 series.  It fixes a number of 
hard-to-find bugs, mostly discovered by fuzzing. 
In Bison 3.4 a particular focus was put on improving the diagnostics, which 
are now colored by default, and accurate with multibyte input.  Their format 
was also changed, and is now similar to GCC 9's diagnostics. 
Users of the default backend (yacc.c) can use the new %define variable 
api.header.include to avoid duplicating the content of the generated header 
in the generated parser.  There are two new examples installed, including a 
reentrant calculator which supports recursive calls to the parser and 
Flex-generated scanner. 
See below for more details. 
================================================================== 
Bison is a general-purpose parser generator that converts an annotated 
context-free grammar into a deterministic LR or generalized LR (GLR) parser 
employing LALR(1) parser tables.  Bison can also generate IELR(1) or 
canonical LR(1) parser tables.  Once you are proficient with Bison, you can 
use it to develop a wide range of language parsers, from those used in 
simple desk calculators to complex programming languages. 
Bison is upward compatible with Yacc: all properly-written Yacc grammars 
work with Bison with no change.  Anyone familiar with Yacc should be able to 
use Bison with little trouble.  You need to be fluent in C, C++ or Java 
programming in order to use Bison. 
Here is the GNU Bison home page: 
   https://gnu.org/software/bison/ 
================================================================== 
Here are the compressed sources: 
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bison/bison-3.4.2.tar.gz   (4.1MB) 
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bison/bison-3.4.2.tar.xz   (3.1MB) 
Here are the GPG detached signatures[*]: 
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bison/bison-3.4.2.tar.gz.sig 
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bison/bison-3.4.2.tar.xz.sig 
Use a mirror for higher download bandwidth: 
  https://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html 
[*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the 
.sig suffix) is intact.  First, be sure to download both the .sig file 
and the corresponding tarball.  Then, run a command like this: 
  gpg --verify bison-3.4.2.tar.gz.sig 
If that command fails because you don't have the required public key, 
then run this command to import it: 
  gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys 0DDCAA3278D5264E 
and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command. 
This release was bootstrapped with the following tools: 
  Autoconf 2.69 
  Automake 1.16.1 
  Flex 2.6.4 
  Gettext 0.19.8.1 
  Gnulib v0.1-2844-g03add7eb9 
================================================================== 
NEWS 
* Noteworthy changes in release 3.4.2 (2019-09-08) [stable]

** Bug fixes

  In some cases, when warnings are disabled, bison could emit tons of white
  spaces as diagnostics.

  When running out of memory, bison could crash (found by fuzzing).

  When defining twice the EOF token, bison would crash.

  New warnings from recent compilers have been addressed in the generated
  parsers (yacc.c, glr.c, glr.cc).

  When lone carriage-return characters appeared in the input file,
  diagnostics could hang forever.

* Noteworthy changes in release 3.4.1 (2019-05-22) [stable]

** Bug fixes

  Portability fixes.

* Noteworthy changes in release 3.4 (2019-05-19) [stable]

** Deprecated features

  The %pure-parser directive is deprecated in favor of '%define api.pure'
  since Bison 2.3b (2008-05-27), but no warning was issued; there is one
  now.  Note that since Bison 2.7 you are strongly encouraged to use
  '%define api.pure full' instead of '%define api.pure'.

** New features

*** Colored diagnostics

  As an experimental feature, diagnostics are now colored, controlled by the
  new options --color and --style.

  To use them, install the libtextstyle library before configuring Bison.
  It is available from

    https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/gettext/

  for instance

    https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/gettext/libtextstyle-0.8.tar.gz

  The option --color supports the following arguments:
    - always, yes: Enable colors.
    - never, no: Disable colors.
    - auto, tty (default): Enable colors if the output device is a tty.

  To customize the styles, create a CSS file similar to

    /* bison-bw.css */
    .warning   { }
    .error     { font-weight: 800; text-decoration: underline; }
    .note      { }

  then invoke bison with --style=bison-bw.css, or set the BISON_STYLE
  environment variable to "bison-bw.css".

*** Disabling output

  When given -fsyntax-only, the diagnostics are reported, but no output is
  generated.

  The name of this option is somewhat misleading as bison does more than
  just checking the syntax: every stage is run (including checking for
  conflicts for instance), except the generation of the output files.

*** Include the generated header (yacc.c)

  Before, when --defines is used, bison generated a header, and pasted an
  exact copy of it into the generated parser implementation file.  If the
  header name is not "y.tab.h", it is now #included instead of being
  duplicated.

  To use an '#include' even if the header name is "y.tab.h" (which is what
  happens with --yacc, or when using the Autotools' ylwrap), define
  api.header.include to the exact argument to pass to #include.  For
  instance:

    %define api.header.include {"parse.h"}

  or

    %define api.header.include {}

*** api.location.type is now supported in C (yacc.c, glr.c)

  The %define variable api.location.type defines the name of the type to use
  for locations.  When defined, Bison no longer defines YYLTYPE.

  This can be used in programs with several parsers to factor their
  definition of locations: let one of them generate them, and the others
  just use them.

** Changes

*** Graphviz output

  In conformance with the recommendations of the Graphviz team, if %require
  "3.4" (or better) is specified, the option --graph generates a *.gv file
  by default, instead of *.dot.

*** Diagnostics overhaul

  Column numbers were wrong with multibyte characters, which would also
  result in skewed diagnostics with carets.  Beside, because we were
  indenting the quoted source with a single space, lines with tab characters
  were incorrectly underlined.

  To address these issues, and to be clearer, Bison now issues diagnostics
  as GCC9 does.  For instance it used to display (there's a tab before the
  opening brace):

    foo.y:3.37-38: error: $2 of ‘expr’ has no declared type
     expr: expr '+' "number"        { $$ = $1 + $2; }
                                         ^~
  It now reports

    foo.y:3.37-38: error: $2 of ‘expr’ has no declared type
        3 | expr: expr '+' "number" { $$ = $1 + $2; }
          |                                     ^~

  Other constructs now also have better locations, resulting in more precise
  diagnostics.

*** Fix-it hints for %empty

  Running Bison with -Wempty-rules and --update will remove incorrect %empty
  annotations, and add the missing ones.

*** Generated reports

  The format of the reports (parse.output) was improved for readability.

*** Better support for --no-line.

  When --no-line is used, the generated files are now cleaner: no lines are
  generated instead of empty lines.  Together with using api.header.include,
  that should help people saving the generated files into version control
  systems get smaller diffs.

** Documentation

  A new example in C shows an simple infix calculator with a hand-written
  scanner (examples/c/calc).

  A new example in C shows a reentrant parser (capable of recursive calls)
  built with Flex and Bison (examples/c/reccalc).

  There is a new section about the history of Yaccs and Bison.

** Bug fixes

  A few obscure bugs were fixed, including the second oldest (known) bug in
  Bison: it was there when Bison was entered in the RCS version control
  system, in December 1987.  See the NEWS of Bison 3.3 for the previous
  oldest bug.

Read more

14 Essential Ubuntu Keyboard Shortcuts

Filed under
Ubuntu

You probably already know a stack of keyboard shortcuts already because general actions like copy (ctrl + c), paste (ctrl + v), and undo are the same across all operating systems and throughout most (if not all) software.

So in this post we focus solely on a set of Ubuntu keyboard shortcuts you might not know about, as well as those that you might, but always forget to use!

Read all the way to the end for a bonus tip on how to create custom keyboard shortcuts in Ubuntu for your favourite apps and CLI tools — and to download our newbie-friendly Ubuntu keyboard shortcuts cheat sheet!

Read more

Meet PineTime: A $25 Linux Smartwatch in Making

Filed under
News

After budget friendly Pine Tab, Pine Phone and Pine Notebook, PINE64 just revealed that it is working on a Linux based smartwatch called PineTime. It should cost around $25 when it is available.
Read more

European Commission improving the security of widely used open source software

Filed under
OSS
Security

Amongst the many benefits of free and open source software, include the economic advantages of code reuse and the sharing of programming costs. For public institutions however, there are more fundamental reasons for embracing the open source model: [...]

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Manjaro Linux 18.1.0 overview | #FREE OPERATING SYSTEM FOR EVERYONE

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Manjaro Linux 18.1.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 09/13/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Updating your firmware just got a lot easier, Chrome Canary shows signs of long-awaited features, why Krita went to Steam, and Tor's Bug Smash Fund is making headway.

  • The Story Behind our Daily Linux Podcast | Jupiter Extras 13

    Chris and Chz catch up on what's been going on and then share the story behind our new daily Linux podcast and the breakthrough it took to make it possible.

  • Armen Zambrano: A web performance issue

    Back in July and August, I was looking into a performance issue in Treeherder . Treeherder is a Django app running on Heroku with a MySql database via RDS. This post will cover some knowledge gained while investigating the performance issue and the solutions for it.

  • How to Make Your PC Faster? Easiest Software

    Those who are into the business of photography will most certainly have am image processing software application. When we talk about such applications we often come across names such as Adobe, Photoshop and so on. Gimp portable also belongs to this category and helps in giving shapes and sizes to images that have been clicked for various reasons. GIMP actually stands for GNU Image Manipulation Program and according to people who are in the photography line, it is one of the most powerful free image editors that are available in the market today. Many people believe that it may be a good alternative to Photoshop.

    It is versatile and unique because it has a number of interesting features. Apart from being used as a basic drawing program, it also could be used a very effective image editor. It can help edit digital photographs and make it to the level of professional photography. It is accommodating channels, masks, layers, special effects and filters. It makes editing quite easy.

    The good thing about this software application is that it is light and it does not unnecessarily burden your computer. You can rest assured that your system will not slow down. Hence, if you are planning to make your personal computer faster and more efficient, then this could be the obvious choice.

Intel Resurrecting FSGSBASE Support For Linux, SVT-HEVC 1.4.1 Released

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Resurrecting FSGSBASE Support For Linux To Help With Performance

    Going on for months had been work by Intel Linux developers on supporting the FSGSBASE instruction for helping Intel CPU performance going back to Ivybridge where this instruction set extension was first introduced. The FSGSBASE support was queued for the Linux 5.3 kernel but was reverted due to "serious bugs" in the implementation. Intel has now published a revised version of this support.

  • Intel's H.265 Encoder SVT-HEVC 1.4.1 Released With Optimizations & More

    While not quite as exciting as the big performance boost found with SVT-VP9 for AVX2 CPUs a few days ago, Intel's Scalable Video Technology team has released SVT-HEVC 1.4.1 as their newest feature release to this open-source H.265/HEVC video encoder.

    SVT-HEVC 1.4.1 now allows setting an arbitrary thread count for the program, there is a new tile group for better tile parallelism to help with performance, support for building both shared and static libraries, fixed motion vector out-of-bounds issues, and other fixes resolved.

Red Hat: Fedora 32 and IBM's LinuxOne

Filed under
Red Hat
  • MariaDB 10.4 + PHP 7.4 Slated For Fedora 32

    This shouldn't come as much surprise, but the upcoming Fedora 32 will offer the latest "L.A.M.P." stack components.

    The proposal has already been volleyed for including PHP 7.4 in Fedora 32. PHP 7.4 is due out in November as the latest annual update to PHP7. It's too late for Fedora 31 but the timing gives plenty of room to land PHP 7.4 in Fedora 32. Read about the new features and performance improvements with PHP 7.4.

  • IBM Storage syncs new DS8900F array to z15 mainframe launch

    Endpoint security is another new capability that IBM is adding with its Z, LinuxOne and DS8900F systems. Herzog described the new functionality as a "custom handshake" to ensure that the array and the Z system know they're talking to each other, rather than any spoofed system. 

Security: Vista 10 Woes, Linux FUD and More

Filed under
Security
  • Caution: KB4515384 is breaking audio on Windows 10

    If you’ve already installed KB4515384, and you want to try and fix the audio problem before you attempt the uninstall it, there is really only solution that you can try. Open the Control Panel sound settings.

    On the Playback tab, double-click your speakers to open their Properties. The properties window should have an ‘Enhancements’ tab though, it may be missing as in the case of the screenshot below. If the tab is there, go to it and enable all enhancements, and click Apply. Next, disable them all, and click Apply again.

  • Lilocked ransomware (Lilu) affects thousands of Linux-based servers [Ed: This is not about "Linux"; they're repeating ZDNet (tabloid) talking points from their anti-Linux trolls, whom CBS hired to attack Linux (the real issue here is malware being installed)]

    A ransomware strain named Lilocked or Lilu has been affecting thousands of Linux-based servers all over the world since mid-July and the attacks got intensified by the end of August, ZDNet reports.

  • From PowerShell to auditing: Expand your cybersecurity know-how at SANS London 2019 [Ed: PowerShell is used a lot by CRACKERS. Why does The Register associate NSA back-doored stuff with security? (clue/hint: money)]
  • DigitalOcean Continues Working On Linux Core Scheduling To Make HT/SMT Safer

    With Hyper Threading continuing to look increasingly unsafe in data centers / shared computing environments in light of all the speculative execution vulnerabilities exposed thus far particularly with L1TF and MDS having no SMT-secure mitigation, DigitalOcean continues working on their Linux kernel "core scheduling" patches so they can still make use of HT/SMT in a sane and safe manner.

    DigitalOcean's core scheduling work is their way to make Hyper Threading safe by ensuring that only trusted applications run concurrently on siblings of a core. Their scheduler also tries to be smart about not using SMT/HT in areas where it could degrade performance.

Games: Puzzle Agent, Steam Play Proton and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Gaming: Puzzle Agent

    Two lovely but short puzzle games: Puzzle Agent and Puzzle Agent II, follow agent Nelson Tethers in his quest to solve an obscure case in Scoggins, Minnesota: The erasers factory delivering to the White House stopped production – a dangerous situation for the US and the world. Tethers embarks on a wild journey.

  • Just some of the games coming to Linux in 2019, the September edition

    It's been quite a while since we had a listicle of interesting games gearing up for release on Linux in 2019, let's take a fresh look today.

    There's a huge amount coming and this list is by no means exhaustive (that would be impossible), plenty still to even be announced yet that I know of. This is just a nice and simple reminder on a few interesting titles you may have forgotten about or perhaps you might find something new.

  • Steam Play Proton 4.11-4 has been release into the wild

    Get ready for another weekend full of testing games, as Valve and CodeWeavers have put out a fresh official build of Steam Play Proton for your pleasure.

  • Proton 4.11-4 Released With Updated DXVK, Improved PS4 Controller Handling

    In time for any weekend gaming, Valve's team maintaining their Proton downstream of Wine for powering Steam Play to run Windows games on Linux has issued their v4.11-4 update.

    Proton 4.11-4 is another update to their Wine 4.11 derived branch. With Proton 4.11-4 comes integrated the new DXVK 1.3.4, D9VK 0.21-rc-p, and FAudio 19.09 as some prominent component updates.

TPC-71W next-generation Arm-Based Industrial Panel PC for IoT applications

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Advantech Industrial IoT Group, announced TPC-71W – the new generation of its industrial panel PCs aimed at machine automation and web-terminal applications. TPC-71W is a cost-efficient, Arm-based industrial panel PC that features a 7” true-flat display with P-CAP multi-touch control, high resolution and an NXP Arm Cortex -A9 i.MX 6 dual/quad-core processor to deliver high-performance computing. The system also features a serial port with a 120Ω termination resistor that supports the CAN 2.0B protocol and offers a programmable bit rate of up to 1 Mb/sec. Equipped with the Google Chromium embedded web browser and support for various operating systems, including Android, Linux Yocto, and Linux Ubuntu with QT GUI toolkits, TPC-71W allows system integrators to easily develop and deploy a wide range of industrial applications.

Read more

Also: Raspberry Pi CM3+ based EagleEye Smart Camera Works with OpenCV and LabVIEW NI Vision

Stallman Under Fire for Views on Epstein

Filed under
GNU
  • Famed MIT Scientist Defends Epstein: Victims Were ‘Entirely Willing’

    While MIT engages in damage control following revelations the university’s Media Lab accepted millions of dollars in funding from Jeffrey Epstein, a renowned computer scientist at the university has fanned the flames by apparently going out of his way to defend the accused sex trafficker — and child pornography in general.

    Richard Stallman has been hailed as one of the most influential computer scientists around today and honored with a slew of awards and honorary doctorates, but his eminence in the academic computer science community came into question Friday afternoon when purportedly leaked email excerpts showed him suggesting one of Epstein’s alleged victims was “entirely willing.”

  • Prominent computer scientist at MIT argues definition of rape in defending money from dead sex offender

    Richard Stallman, founder of Cambridge's Free Software Foundation and a visiting scientist at MIT, argues that Jeffrey Epstein's victims were likely "entirely willing" and to stop besmirching the good name of deceased MIT AI guru Marvin Minsky just because he might have "had sex with one of Epstein’s harem."

    Vice reports Stallman made his comments on an MIT mailing list on which he objected to a protest being planned for next week over MIT's ties to the convicted sex offender long after his conviction.

  • Free software icon Richard Stallman has some moronic thoughts about pedophilia

    The world of academia is in turmoil over the shock discovery that disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein funded several several prestigious science and technology research labs, including MIT’s Media Lab, long after his 2008 conviction for sex crimes involving children.

    For the late Epstein, his generous donations served to whitewash his tainted reputation. They were part of a well-sculpted PR effort that also included paid-for puff pieces in publications like Forbes and HuffPost, which emphasised his philanthropy, while conveniently ignoring his crimes.

  • Famed Computer Scientist Richard Stallman Described Epstein Victims As 'Entirely Willing'

    Richard Stallman, the computer scientist best known for his role in the free software movement, has joined the list of MIT men going out of their way to defend the university’s relationships with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

    Selam Jie Gano, an MIT alum, posted on Medium about an email thread in which Stallman argued that the late Marvin Minsky—an AI pioneer accused of assaulting one of Epstein's victims, Virginia Giuffre—had not actually assaulted anyone.

  • MIT Community Horrified by Famed Researcher’s Epstein Outburst

    Since the July arrest of Jeffrey Epstein on charges of sex trafficking, a number of huge names in the world of tech — from Bill Gates to Elon Musk — have attempted to defend or deny any inkling of a relationship with the financier.

    But one prominent computer scientist is seemingly going out of his way to insert himself into the scandal: MIT Visiting Scientist Richard Stallman.

    MIT accepted millions of dollars in funding from Epstein, prompting one student group to organize a protest calling for the resignation of any senior MIT administrators who knew about the donations.

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The [EndeavourOS] September release has arrived

The ISO contains: Linux kernel 5.2.14 Mesa 19.1.6 Systemd 243.0 Firefox 69 (Quantum) Arc-x-icons, a more complete and updated version than the Arc icon set used previously. The new EndeavourOS welcome launcher on both the live environment as on the installed system. It’s a one-click menu to the wiki for the basic system commands and setting up your hardware. Our Nvidia-installer is now installed by default which now also installs the dkms drivers. Gtop system monitor, a nice terminal-based system load monitor that launches from the panel. Read more

Debian May Need To Re-Evaluate Its Interest In "Init System Diversity"

Debian Project Leader Sam Hartman has shared his August 2019 notes where he outlines the frustrations and issues that have come up as a result of init system diversity with some developers still aiming to viably support systemd alternatives within Debian. Stemming from elogind being blocked from transitioning to testing and the lack of clarity into that, Hartman was pulled in to try to help mediate the matter and get to the bottom of the situation with a lack of cooperation between the elogind and systemd maintainers for Debian as well as the release team. Elogind is used by some distributions as an implementation of systemd's logind, well, outside of systemd as a standalone daemon. Elogind is one of the pieces to the puzzle for trying to maintain a modern, systemd-free Linux distribution. Read more

Best Essential Apps for Linux 2019

You might be a beginner looking to explore Linux and you are at a loss of what Apps you should essentially be using. So what are the best essential Apps for Linux? In this guide, we have put together a list of what we would consider as the most necessary applications that you should have in your Linux system to have a wholesome experience. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Void Linux, This Week in Linux and LINUX Unplugged