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Wednesday, 26 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Some site news srlinuxx 2 01/11/2010 - 5:24pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE Full and Mini ISOS updated to 2010.11 Texstar 25/11/2010 - 2:16am
Blog entry KDE 4.5.4 now available for PCLinuxOS Texstar 02/12/2010 - 8:24pm
Blog entry gave it up srlinuxx 1 06/02/2011 - 12:14pm
Blog entry Best Hard Drives? srlinuxx 10 13/04/2011 - 6:00pm
Blog entry Damn you Kubuntu srlinuxx 1 25/01/2011 - 6:40pm
Blog entry Pandora FMS 3.2 has been released. geniususer 05/01/2011 - 5:54pm
Blog entry Printer Woes gfranken 5 19/01/2011 - 2:19am
Blog entry Happy Holidays srlinuxx 1 30/12/2010 - 5:33pm
Blog entry Enlightenment packages updated post beta 3 Texstar 27/12/2010 - 2:10am

Here’s the MATE Desktop Running on the PinePhone – Video

Filed under
Linux

Yes, you’re reading that right, it is apparently possible to put the MATE desktop environment on the PinePhone, and surprise, surprise, it runs very well, that if you can get used to the desktop experience on a small screen, of course.

Disappointed by other distributions available for the PinePhone, a YouTube user apparently managed to put the MATE desktop on the mobile device the pmbootstrap installer from postmarketOS, a GNU/Linux distribution designed for phones.

In the video below, you can see the MATE desktop in action on the PinePhone, running the Mozilla Firefox web browser and the Onboard on-screen keyboard.

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Meet CSI Linux: A Linux Distribution For Cyber Investigation And OSINT

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Linux

With the steady rise of cybercrimes, companies and government agencies are involving themselves more in setting up cyber investigation labs to tackle the crime happening over the Internet.

Software tools are like arms that play a significant role in the investigation process. Hence, Computer Forensics, Incident Response, and Competitive Intelligence professionals have developed a Cyber forensics focussed operating system called CSI Linux.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Word Embeddings Simplified

    Recently I have been dwelling with a lot of NLP problems and jargons. The more I read about it the more I find it intriguing and beautiful of how we humans try to transfer this knowledge of a language to machines.

    How much ever we try because of our laid back nature we try to use already existing knowledge or existing materials to be used to make machines understand a given language.

    But machines as we know it can only understand digits or lets be more precise binary(0s and 1s). When I first laid my hands on NLP this was my first question, how does a machine understand that something is a word or sentence or a character.

  • Coronavirus wreaking havoc in the tech industry, including FOSS

    At FOSS Linux, you may wonder why we are covering the coronavirus and how it relates to Linux and open-source software?

    Aside from the apparent effect of the slowdown in components required for Linux to run on,  the coronavirus outbreak directly impacts several products featured in FOSS Linux over the past year.

    Purism – the brains behind the Librem 5 phones powered by PureOS are the most directly affected by the outbreak, suffering production delays.
    Dell – the titanic computer manufacturer, has hinted at a possibility of interruption of supplies, which could affect the availability of the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition preloaded with Ubuntu 18.04.
    System76 – these creators of Pop_OS! 19.10 recently announced their foray into the world of laptop design and manufacturing.  The coronavirus could adversely affect this endeavor.
    Pine64 – maker of the Pinebook Pro, the affordable laptop which supports most, if not all, Linux distros featured on FOSS Linux also is under threat of production delays.

  • Announcing the release of Samza 1.3.1

    We have identified some issues with the previous release of Apache Samza 1.3.0.

  • Scientists develop open-source software to analyze economics of biofuels, bioproducts

    BioSTEAM is available online through the Python Package Index, at Pypi.org. A life cycle assessment (LCA) add-on to BioSTEAM to quantify the environmental impacts of biorefineries -- developed by CABBI Postdoctoral Researcher Rui Shi and the Guest Research Group -- is also set to be released in March 2020. To further increase availability of these tools, Guest's team is also designing a website with a graphical user interface where researchers can plug new parameters for a biorefinery simulation into existing configurations, and download results within minutes.

    BioSTEAM's creators drew on open-source software developed by other researchers, including a data bank with 20,000 chemicals and their thermodynamic properties.

  • Mirantis Joins Linux Foundation's LF Networking Community

    Mirantis, the open cloud company, today announced it has joined the Linux Foundation's LF Networking (LFN) community, which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open networking projects.

    LFN software and projects provide platforms and building blocks for Network Infrastructure and Services across Service Providers, Cloud Providers, Enterprises, Vendors, and System Integrators that enable rapid interoperability, deployment, and adoption. LF Networking supports the largest set of networking projects with the broadest community in the industry that collaborate on this opportunity.

  • Google Announces The 200 Open-Source Projects For GSoC 2020

    Google's Summer of Code initiative for getting students involved with open-source development during the summer months is now into its sixteenth year. This week Google announced the 200 open-source projects participating in GSoC 2020. 

    Among the 200 projects catching our eye this year are GraphicsFuzz, Blender, Debian, FFmpeg, Fedora, FreeBSD, Gentoo, GNOME, Godot Engine, KDE, Mozilla, Pitivi, The GNU Project, VideoLAN, and X.Org. The complete list of GSoC 2020 organizations can be found here. 

  • Myst (or, The Drawbacks to Success)

    After listening to the cultural dialog — or shouting match! — which has so long surrounded Myst, one’s first encounter with the actual artifact that spurred it all can be more than a little anticlimactic. Seen strictly as a computer game, Myst is… okay. Maybe even pretty good. It strikes this critic at least as far from the best or worst game of its year, much less of its decade, still less of all gaming history. Its imagery is well-composited and occasionally striking, its sound and music design equally apt. The sense of desolate, immersive beauty it all conveys can be strangely affecting, and it’s married to puzzle-design instincts that are reasonable and fair. Myst‘s reputation in some quarters as impossible, illogical, or essentially unplayable is unearned; apart from some pixel hunts and perhaps the one extended maze, there’s little to really complain about on that front. On the contrary: there’s a definite logic to its mechanical puzzles, and figuring out how its machinery works through trial and error and careful note-taking, then putting your deductions into practice, is genuinely rewarding, assuming you enjoy that sort of thing.

    At same time, though, there’s just not a whole lot of there there. Certainly there’s no deeper meaning to be found; Myst never tries to be about more than exploring a striking environment and solving intricate puzzles. “When we started, we wanted to make a [thematic] statement, but the project was so big and took so much effort that we didn’t have the energy or time to put much into that part of it,” admits Robyn Miller. “So, we decided to just make a neat world, a neat adventure, and say important things another time.” And indeed, a “neat world” and “neat adventure” are fine ways of describing Myst.

GNU/Linux on Laptops/Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • DStv Now working on Linux streaming problems

    MyBroadband readers have complained of problems when trying to stream DStv Now on Linux devices.

    Previously, users running Linux operating systems were able to watch DStv Now through a web browser such as Chrome or Firefox.

    However, since the beginning of 2020, these users have been unable to watch shows on the platform, likely due to a change in the Widevine DRM system.

    Similar problems with international streaming platforms have been reported this year, indicating that the issue could be a common DRM issue rather than individual platform changes.

  • A Tale of Four Laptops, or, How Lenovo’s Digital River Customer Support Sucks

    In September, I made a mistake… We needed new laptops for Dmitry and Agata, and after much deliberation, we decided upon Lenovo Yoga C940’s. These are very cool devices, with HDR screens, nice keyboard, built-in pen, two-in-one convertible — everything in short for the discerning Krita hacker.

    I accidentally ordered the S940 instead — two of them. These are very awful devices, without a pen, no touch-screen, don’t fold, don’t have HDR, don’t even have normal USB ports. Overpriced, under-powered — why the heck does Lenovo call these Ideapads yoga’s? I have no idea.

    Well, no problem, I thought. I’ll just return them and ordered the C940 instead. The C940’s arrived in time for our BlenderCon sprintlet, and were all what one expected them to be. And I filled in Lenovo’s web form to return the S940’s.

    [...]

    I’ve bought Yoga’s, Thinkpads and even Ideapads in great numbers in the past twenty years… But I think it’s time to make a change.

  • Mesa's RADV Vulkan Driver Adding Compatibility For Use With The AMD Radeon GPU Profiler

    To date the Mesa "RADV" Radeon Vulkan driver hasn't supported AMD's GPUOpen Radeon GPU Profiler but that is changing.

    With RADV being developed by the community -- principally by the likes of Valve, Red Hat, and Google -- this Mesa Vulkan driver hasn't supported all of the tooling AMD makes available under the GPUOpen umbrella and is tailored for their official AMD Linux/Windows Vulkan drivers. While AMDVLK and the Radeon Software for Linux driver have supported the company's Radeon GPU Profiler, RADV is now adding compatibility for this profiler.

  • Intel Compute Runtime Adds OCLOC Multi-Device Compilation

    Version 20.07.15711 of the Intel Compute Runtime was released this morning.

    The Intel Compute Runtime 20.07.15711 is what principally provides their modern OpenCL implementation for Broadwell graphics hardware and newer with current at OpenCL 2.1 for all generations from Broadwell through the yet-to-be-released Gen12 Tiger Lake.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/08

    After a week of hacking on different stuff and being in the background for Tumbleweed while Oliver took on the role of Release Manager, I am back with you. And we have released three snapshots this week (0214, 0218 and 0219). The gap between 0214 and 0218 was the integration of glibc 2.31. But of course, there was more happening this week. So here comes the list:

  • Fedora program update: 2020-08

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Development: Raspberry Pi, Python, Rust

Filed under
Development

         

  • Colour us bewildered

           

             

    A Russian-speaking friend over at Farnell pointed us at this video. Apparently it’s been made by Amperot.ru, a Russian Raspberry Pi Approved Reseller, who are running a t-shirt giveaway. We got our hands on a subtitled video, and…words fail me. Please turn the sound up before you start watching.

  •       

  • Automating Everything With Python: Reading Time: 3 Mins

    Python is a general language for beginners to get started with programming. Python is used for automation due to a built-in standard library and other tools within the Python ecosystem.

    Which can be useful for anyone besides just a system administrator to automate certain parts of their process to make work much efficient. From data wrangling to just gathering market research data.

    Due to this ease of picking up and the python ecosystem. Python is used as part of DevOps, Data Science, Marketing.

  • Python 3.7.5 : This python package can work with ArcGIS platform.
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxvi) stackoverflow python report
  • Anatomy of a generic function in Rust

    It can handle different input types and thus it's called a generic function. The generic data type is represented by the capital letter T in this example. T is an arbitrary placeholder. It could be have been another letter, X, Y or V, but when using T it can be easier to remeber that it refers to a "type".

    I don't usually write code but I do enjoy reading and here the syntax of the function definition can be daunting at first. Let's have a look at a simpler version.

today's howtos

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HowTos

2020 and the minority spreading hate and fake news

Filed under
OS

At the age of 12, as my computer knowledge was notably increasing, I remember I’ve eventually been chocked to read something totally wrong in a magazine. Someone wrote something that was factually false.

This made me realize that until this date, I used to think that everything that was written in a book or a magazine was true. Just because it was written.

I’m taking 10 minutes to write this post, because I’m regularly asked to justify myself by some people who are concerned about what they are reading about /e/ on a website that’s been around for a little more than 1 year. And I prefer spending my time on /e/ development instead of answering about this.

This website has found a mission to warn /e/ users about how bad I am, and how bad the /e/ project is. In short, that what we are doing is just evil, has no value, shouldn’t exist. And that, of course, people should never, ever, use /e/.

This little website is run by a tiny group of haters, who have started to be very active in /e/ discussion groups on Telegram during summer 2018. The kind of guys who shout loud, answer and argue with everyone who disagrees with their certitudes.Their excess and their systematically negative attitude lead us to ban them permanentely from our groups after several warnings.

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Can You Use FreeBSD for a Developer Machine in 2020?

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Advertisement
BSD

I’ve been considering moving my blog back to a FreeBSD web server. I’d hosted it that way for years and recently switched it to a Linux machine so I could make Octopress work properly. It uses some old, outdated Ruby gems, and it just seemed easier.

But with a new redesign coming and a new Hugo back-end, I’ll be bringing my hosting machine back to FreeBSD.

I recently read FreeBSD is an amazing operating system, which got me thinking:

Can FreeBSD be a viable desktop operating system for developers in 2020?

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Mozilla/WWW: TenFourFox, Markdown, DOM, Firefox Spying ("Glean") and Apple Monopoly

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • TenFourFox FPR20b1 available

    When using FPR20 you should notice ... absolutely nothing. Sites should just appear as they do; the only way you'd know anything changed in this version is if you pressed Command-I and looked at the Security tab to see that you're connected over TLS 1.3, the latest TLS security standard. In fact, the entirety of the debate was streamed over it, and to the best of my knowledge TenFourFox is the only browser that implements TLS 1.3 on Power Macs running Mac OS X. On regular Firefox your clue would be seeing occasional status messages about handshakes, but I've even disabled that for TenFourFox to avoid wholesale invalidating our langpacks which entirely lack those strings. Other than a couple trivial DOM updates I wrote up because they were easy, as before there are essentially no other changes other than the TLS enablement in this FPR to limit the regression range. If you find a site that does not work, verify first it does work in FPR19 or FPR18, because sites change more than we do, and see if setting security.tls.version.max to 3 (instead of 4) fixes it. You may need to restart the browser to make sure. If this does seem to reliably fix the problem, report it in the comments. A good test site is Google or Mozilla itself. The code we are using is largely the same as current Firefox's.

  • Moving to Markdown

    I'm writing this only for those who follows this blog via RSS feed and probably wonders why they had many notifications on their RSS reader. Sorry, this thing happen when upload a new version of my website. So, what's new on this new website? Not much, nothing changed visually... But everything changed under the hood!

  • Semantic markup, browsers, and identity in the DOM

    HTML was initially designed as a semantic markup language, with elements having semantics (meaning) describing general roles within a document. These semantic elements have been added to over time. Markup as it is used on the web is often criticized for not following the semantics, but rather being a soup of divs and spans, the most generic sorts of elements. The Web has also evolved over the last 25 years from a web of documents to a web where many of the most visited pages are really applications rather than documents. The HTML markup used on the Web is a representation of a tree structure, and the user interface of these web applications is often based on dynamic changes made through the DOM, which is what we call both the live representation of that tree structure and the API through which that representation is accessed.

    Browsers exist as tools for users to browse the Web; they strike a balance between showing the content as its author intended versus adapting that content to the device it is being displayed on and the preferences or needs of the user.

    Given the unreliable use of semantics on the Web, most of the ways browsers adapt content to the user rarely depend deeply on semantics, although some of them (such as reader mode) do have significant dependencies. However, browser adaptations of content or interventions that browsers make on behalf of the user very frequently depend on the persistent object identity in the DOM. That is, nodes in the DOM tree (such as sections of the page, or paragraphs) have an identity over the lifetime of the page, and many things that browsers do depend on that identity being consistent over time. For example, exposing the page to a screen reader, scroll anchoring, and I think some aspects of ad blocking all depend on the idea that there are elements in the web page that the browser understands the identity of over time.

  • Chris H-C: This Week in Glean: A Distributed Team Echoes Distributed Workflow

    I was recently struck by a realization that the position of our data org’s team members around the globe mimics the path that data flows through the Glean Ecosystem.

  • Apple May Soon Let You Set Third-Party Mail, Browser Apps as Default on iOS: Report

    Apple has always had its own apps set as defaults in cases like the music player and the browser, Apple Music and Safari respectively. But, this might change soon. Reportedly, Apple is considering allowing third party apps to be set as defaults on iOS. Apple is also debating whether to allow third-party music apps on the HomePod speaker, something would mean allowing users to stream music via Spotify, which is one of Apple Music's rivals. No decision has been made by the company as of now.

17 Cool Arduino Project Ideas for DIY Enthusiasts

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OSS

You are here: Home / List / 17 Cool Arduino Project Ideas for DIY Enthusiasts
17 Cool Arduino Project Ideas for DIY Enthusiasts
Last updated February 22, 2020 By Ankush Das Leave a Comment

Arduino is an open-source electronics platform that combines both open source software and hardware to let people make interactive projects with ease. You can get Arduino-compatible single board computers and use them to make something useful.

In addition to the hardware, you will also need to know the Arduino language to use the Arduino IDE to successfully create something.

You can code using the web editor or use the Arduino IDE offline. Nevertheless, you can always refer to the official resources available to learn about Arduino.

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After South Korea, Polish Government Increases Use Of Linux

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Linux

In addition to the recent full-scale shift to Linux by South Korea, the Polish state organization has also signed a three-year support contract with Linux Polska for its IT systems.

Poland’s social insurance company, ZUS (Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych), announced the agreement with Linux Polska to obtain 24×7 support for integrated Linux server virtualization.

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Programming: Golang, Perl, Python and the GCC Story

Filed under
Development
  • 9 Reasons You Should Use Golang Language

    Golang is the open-source programming language developed by Google in the year 2007. Several programming languages are present in the market with advantages and disadvantages. We cannot predict which language is better, it would take months to discuss. However, the most sensible thing that helps choose a better language is the one that suits a specific purpose more reliably than the others. Thus, Golang development will be most suitable for those who are willing to combine simplicity, concurrency, and safety of the code.

    Different programming languages are less memory efficient and are unable to communicate with the hardware. Therefore, Golang is one of the most preferred languages for developers that help build software. It is also the open-source and procedural language that is advantageous to deploy simple, effective, and reliable software. Go language aids the environment to adopt different patterns that are similar to dynamic languages.

    Go language has several advantages that are responsible to quicken the development process. Moreover, Golang is the language that makes the process of software development easy and simple for programmers. These days, Golang is gaining popularity amongst the developers as it has a plethora of advantages than the other programming languages. So, the use of Golang has been adopted by mobile app development companies.

  • Demonstrating PERL with Tic-Tac-Toe, Part 1

    PERL is a procedural programming language. A program written in PERL consists of a series of commands that are executed sequentially. With few exceptions, most commands alter the state of the computer’s memory in some way.

    Line 00 in the Tic-Tac-Toe program isn’t technically part of the PERL program and it can be omitted. It is called a shebang (the letter e is pronounced soft as it is in the word shell). The purpose of the shebang line is to tell the operating system what interpreter the remaining text should be processed with if one isn’t specified on the command line.

    Line 02 isn’t strictly necessary for this program either. It makes available an advanced command named state. The state command creates a variable that can retain its value after it has gone out of scope. I’m using it here as a way to avoid declaring a global variable. It is considered good practice in computer programming to avoid using global variables where possible because they allow for action at a distance. If you didn’t follow all of that, don’t worry about it. It’s not important at this point.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 048: Survivor and Palindrome Dates

    I tried two different approaches to the problem.

    The first one uses an array of living people and a variable $sword that stores the index of the person holding the sword. In each iteration of the loop, the next person is removed from the array, and the sword is passed to the next person.

    The “next person” has a special cyclic meaning: at the end of the array, the sword must return to the beginning. This is achieved by using the modulo operator %. Note that we use it twice, once to find the person to kill, and once to find the person to pass the sword to—and each case uses a different array size in the modulo operation, as killing a person changes the size of the array.

  • My Unexpected Dive into Open-Source Python

    I'm very happy to announce that I have joined Quansight as a front-end developer and designer! It was a happy coincidence how I joined- the intersection of my skills and the open source community's expanded vision.

    I met Ralf Gommers, the director of Quansight Labs, at the PyData Conference in New York City last year after giving a Lightning Talk. However, as cool and confident as this may sound, I sure didn't start off that way.

    At that point, it's been a few months since I graduated from a coding bootcamp. I was feeling down in the job-search funk. I hadn't even done much in Python, since my focus was in Javascript.

  • Reposurgeon defeats all monsters!

    On January 12th 2020, reposurgeon performed a successful conversion of its biggest repository ever – the entire history of the GNU Compiler Collection, 280K commits with a history stretching back through 1987. Not only were some parts CVS, the earliest portions predated CVS and had been stored in RCS.

    I waited this long to talk about it to give the dust time to settle on the conversion. But it’s been 5 weeks now and I’ve heard nary a peep from the GCC developers about any problems, so I think we can score this as reposurgeon’s biggest victory yet.

    The Go port really proved itself. Those 280K commits can be handled on the 128GB Great Beast with a load time of about two hours. I have to tell the Go garbage collector to be really aggressive – set GOGC=30 – but that’s exactly what GOGC is for.

Kdenlive: From Beginner to Advanced Video Editing

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

This is a different kind of video because it has a bit of Time Travel in it. In June 2019, I presented a talk at the SouthEast LinuxFest entitled “Kdenlive: From Beginner to Advanced Video Editing”. This was an interesting experience and the editing process took an excessive amount of time which I suppose is fitting for a video about video editing. In this video, you will learn some tips and tricks that I use for working in Kdenlive as well as some cool transitions like Matte Transitions. There was also a very useful Questions & Answers section at the end of the talk.

I actually learned some more things during the process of editing this video so there is always plenty to learn about this kind of software. If you would like more Kdenlive videos from me then please leave a comment below. I would be happy to make some specific tutorial videos, this is more of an overview and I think there’s plenty to show in tutorial form.

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Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: GNU/Linux and Python, Fresh Look at LMDE 4 Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Hopeful for HAMR | TechSNAP 423

    We explore the potential of heat-assisted magnetic recording and get excited about a possibly persistent L2ARC.

    Plus Jim's journeys with Clear Linux, and why Ubuntu 18.04.4 is a maintenance release worth talking about.

  • 2020-02-21 | Linux Headlines

    Red Hat OpenStack Platform reaches version 16, Google announces the mentors for this year’s Summer of Code, DigitalOcean secures new funding, the Raspberry Pi 4’s USB-C power problems get a fix, and the GTK Project unveils its new website.

  • Talk Python to Me: #252 What scientific computing can learn from CS

    Did you come into Python from a computational science side of things? Were you just looking for something better than Excel or Matlab and got pulled in by all the Python has to offer? 

    That's great! But following that path often means some of the more formal practices from software development weren't part of the journey. 

    On this episode, you'll meet Martin Héroux, who does data science in the context of academic research. He's here to share his best practices and lessons for data scientists of all sorts.

  • Matt Layman: Templates and Logic - Building SaaS #45

    In this episode, we added content to a template and talked about the N+1 query bug. I also worked tricky logic involving date handling.

    The first change was to update a course page to include a new icon for any course task that should be graded. After adding this, we hit an N+1 query bug, which is a performance bug that happens when code queries a database in a loop. We talked about why this happens and how to fix it.

    After finishing that issue, we switched gears and worked on a tricky logic bug. I need a daily view to fetch data and factor in the relative time shift between the selected day and today. We wrote an involved test to simulate the right conditions and then fixed the code to handle the date shift properly.

  • LMDE 4 Beta Debbie Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) 4 Debbie.

KVM and Xen Project: Commercial Exploitation and Unikraft Work

  • Cloud, Linux vendors cash in on KVM-based virtualization

    Vendors such as Red Hat, IBM, Canonical and Google rely on KVM-based virtualization technology for many of their virtualization products because it enables IT administrators to execute multiple OSes on the same hardware. As a result, it has become a staple in IT admins' virtual systems.

    KVM was first announced in October 2006 and was added to the mainline Linux kernel in February 2007, which means that if admins are running a Linux machine, they can run KVM out of the box.

    KVM is a Type 1 hypervisor, which means that each individual VM acts similar to a regular Linux process and allocates resources accordingly. Other Type 1 hypervisors include Citrix XenServer, Microsoft Hyper-V, Oracle VM Server for x86 and VMware ESXi.

  • Unikraft: Building Powerful Unikernels Has Never Been Easier!

    Two years ago, the Xen Project introduced Unikraft (http://unikraft.org) as an incubation project. Over the past two years, the Unikraft project has seen some great momentum. Since the last release, the community has grown about 20% and contributions have diversified a great deal. Contributions from outside the project founders (NEC) now make up 63% of all contributions, up from about 25% this time last year! In addition, a total of 56,739 lines were added since the last release (0.3).

    [...]

    Finally, the Unikraft team’s Simon Kuenzer recently gave a talk at FOSDEM titled “Unikraft: A Unikernel Toolkit”. Simon, a senior systems researcher at NEC Labs and the lead maintainer of Unikraft, spoke all about Unikraft and provided a comprehensive overview of the project, where it’s been and what’s in store.

Gopher: When Adversarial Interoperability Burrowed Under the Gatekeepers' Fortresses

Filed under
Web

In the early 1990s, personal computers did not arrive in an "Internet-ready" state. Before students could connect their systems to UMN's network, they needed to install basic networking software that allowed their computers to communicate over TCP/IP, as well as dial-up software for protocols like PPP or SLIP. Some computers needed network cards or modems, and their associated drivers.

That was just for starters. Once the students' systems were ready to connect to the Internet, they still needed the basic tools for accessing distant servers: FTP software, a Usenet reader, a terminal emulator, and an email client, all crammed onto a floppy disk (or two). The task of marshalling, distributing, and supporting these tools fell to the university's Microcomputer Center.

For the university, the need to get students these basic tools was a blessing and a curse. It was labor-intensive work, sure, but it also meant that the Microcomputer Center could ensure that the students' newly Internet-ready computers were also configured to access the campus network and its resources, saving the Microcomputer Center thousands of hours talking students through the configuration process. It also meant that the Microcomputer Center could act like a mini App Store, starting students out on their online journeys with a curated collection of up-to-date, reliable tools.

That's where Gopher comes in. While the campus mainframe administrators had plans to selectively connect their systems to the Internet through specialized software, the Microcomputer Center had different ideas. Years before the public had heard of the World Wide Web, the Gopher team sought to fill the same niche, by connecting disparate systems to the Internet and making them available to those with little-to-no technical expertise—with or without the cooperation of the systems they were connecting.

Gopher used text-based menus to navigate "Gopherspace" (all the world's public Gopher servers). The Microcomputer Center team created Gopher clients that ran on Macs, DOS, and in Unix-based terminals. The original Gopher servers were a motley assortment of used Macintosh IIci systems running A/UX, Apple's flavor of Unix. The team also had access to several NeXT workstations.

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Also: The Things Industries Launches Global Join Server for Secure LoRaWAN

IBM/Red Hat and POWER9/OpenBMC

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Network Automation: Why organizations shouldn’t wait to get started

    For many enterprises, we don’t need to sing the praises of IT automation - they already get it. They understand the value of automation, have invested in a platform and strategy, and have seen first-hand the benefits IT automation can deliver. However, unlike IT automation, according to a new report from Forrester Research 1, network automation is still new territory for many organizations.

    The report, "Jump-Start Your Network Automation," found that 56% of global infrastructure technology decision makers have implemented/are implementing or are expanding/upgrading their implementation of automation software, while another 19% plan to implement it over the next 12 months. But those same organizations that are embracing IT automation haven’t necessarily been able to take that same initiative when it comes to automating their networks.

    Even if they know it will be beneficial to them, the report found that organizations often struggle with even the most basic questions around automating their networks.

  • Using a story’s theme to inform the filmmaking: Farming for the Future

    The future of farming belongs to us all. At least that’s the message I got from researching Red Hat’s most recent Open Source Stories documentary, Farming for the Future. As a self-proclaimed city boy, I was intrigued by my assignment as director of the short documentary, but also felt like the subject matter was worlds away. If it did, in fact, belong to all of us how would we convey this to a general audience? How could we use the film’s theme to inform how we might approach the filmmaking to enhance the storytelling?

  • Raptor Rolls Out New OpenBMC Firmware With Featureful Web GUI For System Management

    While web-based GUIs for system management on server platforms with BMCs is far from anything new, Raptor Computing Systems with their libre POWER9 systems does now have a full-functioning web-based solution for their OpenBMC-powered systems and still being fully open-source.

    As part of Raptor Computing Systems' POWER9 desktops and servers being fully open-source down to the firmware/microcode and board designs, Raptor has used OpenBMC for the baseboard management controllers but has lacked a full-featured web-based system management solution on the likes of the Talos II and Blackbird systems up until now.

  • Introduction to open data sets and the importance of metadata

    More data is becoming freely available through initiatives such as institutions and research publications requiring that data sets be freely available along with the publications that refer to them. For example, Nature magazine instituted a policy for authors to declare how the data behind their published research can be accessed by interested readers.

    To make it easier for tools to find out what’s in a data set, authors, researchers, and suppliers of data sets are being encouraged to add metadata to their data sets. There are various forms for metadata that data sets use. For example, the US Government data.gov site uses the standard DCAT-US Schema v1.1 whereas the Google Dataset Search tool relies mostly on schema.org tagging. However, many data sets have no metadata at all. That’s why you won’t find all open data sets through search, and you need to go to known portals and explore if portals exist in the region, city, or topic of your interest. If you are deeply curious about metadata, you can see the alignment between DCAT and schema.org in the DCAT specification dated February 2020. The data sets themselves come in various forms for download, such as CSV, JSON, GeoJSON, and .zip. Sometimes data sets can be accessed through APIs.

    Another way that data sets are becoming available is through government initiatives to make data available. In the US, data.gov has more than 250,000 data sets available for developers to use. A similar initiative in India, data.gov.in, has more than 350,000 resources available.

    Companies like IBM sometimes provide access to data, like weather data, or give tips on how to process freely available data. For example, an introduction to NOAA weather data for JFK Airport is used to train the open source Model Asset eXchange Weather Forecaster (you can see the model artifacts on GitHub).

    When developing a prototype or training a model during a hackathon, it’s great to have access to relevant data to make your solution more convincing. There are many public data sets available to get you started. I’ll go over some of the ways to find them and provide access considerations. Note that some of the data sets might require some pre-processing before they can be used, for example, to handle missing data, but for a hackathon, they are often good enough.

  • Red Hat Helps Omnitracs Redefine Logistics And Transportation Software

    Fleet management technology provider Omnitracs, LLC, has delivered its Omnitracs One platform on the foundation of Red Hat OpenShift.

    Using the enterprise Kubernetes platform along with Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform, Omnitracs One is a cloud-native offering and provides an enhanced user experience with a clear path towards future innovations. With Red Hat’s guidance, Omnitracs said it was able to embrace a shift from on-premises development technologies to cloud-native services, improving overall operations and creating a more collaborative development process culture.

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