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Thursday, 14 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Bringing $100 laptops to developing world

Filed under
Hardware

In rural Cambodian villages with no electricity, nighttime darkness is pierced by the glow from laptop computers that children bring home from school.

The kids belong to three schools that Nicholas Negroponte of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has equipped with inexpensive notebook computers.

"When the kids bring them home and open them up, it's the brightest light source in the home."

MADSHRIMPS Piotke's CeBIT Review

Filed under
Hardware
Humor

lol Piotke's review of Cebit is a little different than most all the others', in that his is a visual tour consisting solely of pictures. Not the same boring ole hardware for Piotke, no. He had a better time than most I would say!

Another One for Our Side

Filed under
Linux

Ardan Peddell, director of The Emerald Hill Group, which manages pubs in a trendy part of Singapore, had long been enticed by Linux's appeal. But he only started implementing the technology about three months ago-when a Linux expert came knocking at his door for a job. That hastened Emerald's adoption of Linux.

Microsoft's PUMA to prevent theft of audio data

Filed under
Microsoft

At the end of April at the WinHEC 2005 developers´ conference Microsoft intends to furnish further details on the copy protection functions of the successor to Windows XP Longhorn, which is planned for 2006.

Microsoft Monopoly Will Wane, Experts Say

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft's Explorer browser is already losing market share. It recently fell below the 90 percent mark because of competition from such rivals as the Firefox open-source browser. The Massachusetts Institute of Techology's Thomas Malone said he wouldn't predict how much Microsoft's dominance might fall.

Don't dump your stocks in the software giant, experts warn.

News Close to [my] Home

Filed under
Misc

Dude, You're Going To Hell!

Seems Dell has fired some Somali Muslims because their prayer schedule clashed with the production schedule. If the workers forge ahead with their plans to sue, "that path might lead to an unpleasant surprise for the workers. In a similar case last year,

Hot kNew Stuff

Filed under
KDE

ca asked why this interview with Josef Spillner wasn't on some of the biggie news sites, so I thought I'd share it on my teny tiny one.

"There has been some recent buzz around KDE's Get Hot New Stuff framework. As the first in a series looking into KDE technologies, KDE Dot News interviewed author Josef Spillner to find out what all this "stuff" was about... read on for the interview. You may also be interested in recent blog entries about KNewStuff: Kate, desktop backgrounds, Quanta, KNewStuffSecure, its user interface design and the HotStuff server setup."

Motherboard supports P4 and AMD64

Filed under
Hardware

Here at CeBIT 2005, you see innovation galore, but at the ECS stand they have something truly special that stands out as being one of the hottest products of the show. HEXUS brings you the ECS PF88, the first mainboard to support both Intel P4 AND AMD Athlon 64 processors.

NCsoft secures partial victory in Marvel lawsuit

Filed under
Gaming
Legal

In a ruling handed down Wednesday, the federal judge presiding over the lawsuit Marvel Enterprises brought against game publisher NCsoft has severely limited the overall scope of the suit.

Amazon settles shareholder suit

Filed under
Legal

Amazon.com will pay $27.5 million to settle a class-action shareholder lawsuit that alleged the company made false or misleading statements about its financial health over a three-year period during which its stock fell to less than half its value.

Full Story.

Microsoft's Sun server fetish revealed

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

Shocking pictures leaked by a careless Microsoft blogger reveal a love that dare not speak its name. The photos from the Redmond campus are, in fact, so raunchy and audacious that a special Register editorial meeting was held to discuss whether or not they should even be discussed in an open forum. In the end, we decided to go ahead with the photos. It seemed like the right thing to do.

Judge Sides with Apple in Lawsuit over Product Leaks

Filed under
Mac
Legal

A California court ruled Friday that an online journalist's ISP must reveal the identities of the reporter's confidential sources to attorneys from Apple Computer Inc., rejecting a request for an order to protect the confidentiality of the sources and other unpublished information.

What's particularly ominous for journalists of all stripes, be they print or online, freelance or associated with a media outlet, is how the court has overlooked the importance of protecting journalists' sources in such a relatively trivial matter as an Apple product launch, Cohn said.

KDE user's look at Gnome-2.10

Filed under
Reviews

I guess it's no secret that I'm a KDE user. But every once in a while I like to login to others to see what's new. As such, this will be a newbie's look at gnome.

M$ to Pay $60 million Settlement

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft will pay Burst.com, a developer of software for streaming audio and video over the Internet, $60 million to settle a patent infringement and antitrust lawsuit, the world's largest software maker said on Friday.

Nvidia releases Version: 1.0-7167

Filed under
Software

New nvidia drivers folks.

Release Highlights:

Support for GeForce 6200 with TurboCache™ GPUs

Improved OpenGL workstation performance.

Added support for XRandR rotation; see

Appendix W in the text README.

Director of the SSI at M$ Speaks

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Jason Matusow, the Director of the Shared Source Initiative at Microsoft shares his views and interpretations of Open Source licenses and what they mean to M$ in terms of development.

n/a

GDC Choice Awards

Filed under
Gaming
Half-Life 2 tops GDC Choice Awards


Best Game:
Half-Life 2 (Valve Software/Vivendi Universal Games)

New Studio:
Crytek (Far Cry)

Writing:
Half-Life 2 (Valve Software/Vivendi Universal Games)

Linux Advisory Watch - March 11, 2005

Filed under
Security

This week, advisories were released for clamav, kernel, squid, kppp, helixplayer, tzdata, libtool, firefox, ipsec-tools, dmraid, gaim, libexif, gimp, yum, grip, libXpm, xv, ImageMagick, Hashcash, mlterm, dcoidlng, curl, gftp, cyrus-imapd, unixODBC, and mc. The distributors include Conectiva, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mandrake, Red Hat, and SuSE.

Full Details.

What if patents applied to literature?

Filed under
Legal

I'd like to compare software with another field whose work is also principally protected by copyright - literature. Perhaps the comparison seems odd to you, but I assure you that software developers are just as involved with their programs as any author is with his next novel. The creative process is just as difficult, and the protection offered by copyright is just as strong. The law certainly sees no difference between an artful sonnet and a carefully crafted subroutine.

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Canonical Enhances the Reliability of Its Kubernetes for IoT, Multi-Cloud & Edge

MicroK8s is an upstream Kubernetes deployment certified by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and developed entirely by Canonical to run offline on your workstation or edge device for all your development, prototyping, and testing needs. MicroK8s is delivered as a snap, which makes it possible to run all Kubernetes services natively and comes bundled with all the libraries and binaries required. The latest MicroK8s 1.16 release adds high-availability clustering by integrating enterprise SQL database through Canonical's in-house built Dqlite distributed SQL engine to enable rapid deployment of highly standardized small K8s clusters. Dqlite is designed to reduce memory footprint of the cluster in MicroK8s by embedding the database inside Kubernetes itself. Read more

Zombieload V2 TAA Performance Impact Benchmarks On Cascade Lake

While this week we have posted a number of benchmarks on the JCC Erratum and its CPU microcode workaround that introduces new possible performance hits, also being announced this week as part of Intel's security disclosures was "Zombieload Variant Two" as the TSX Async Abort vulnerability that received same-day Linux kernel mitigations. I've been benchmarking the TAA mitigations to the Linux kernel since the moment they hit the public Git tree and here are those initial benchmark results on an Intel Cascade Lake server. Read more

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  • Digging for license information with FOSSology

    For a number of years FOSSology was distributed and maintained by HP, until it became an LF project in 2015. It is easier for companies to collaborate on software in a project at an organization like the LF, he said, it makes for a safer harbor for competitors to work together—in Germany, at least. He works for Siemens AG, which is a rather large Germany company. Breaking up archive files into their constituent files—some of which may need to be unpacked themselves—then scanning the individual source and other files for their licenses is the basic task of FOSSology. It has a powerful license scanner, he said. Its web-based interface can then give an overview of the contents—which licenses apply to various parts of the tree, for example—and allow users to drill down into the file hierarchy to the individual files to see their copyrights and license-relevant text. When looking at the file, FOSSology highlights that license-relevant text and shows a comparison with the reference text of the license it has determined for the file. Determining the license that applies to a file is challenging, however. Files have a wide variety of license-relevant text in them, some of which is ambiguous. It depends on the kind of source code you are working with, but the scanner is unable to decide on a license for up to 30% of files it sees, so it is up to a human reviewer to tag the right license. It is then important to also track what reviewers decide on files in the FOSSology database. The Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) format is used to describe various things in a package, including licensing information. FOSSology can both import and export SPDX information, which allows exchanging information between two FOSSology users to share analysis work. FOSSology is one of a few tools that can consume SPDX information; it can be used to review what another party has concluded about the licensing of a code base. In addition, when a package gets updated, the previous analysis can be used as a starting point; the new dependencies and other changes can be incorporated into that rather than starting from scratch. [...] Huber handed the microphone back to Jaeger to wrap up the presentation. He said that FOSSology participated in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for 2019; the project had three GSoC participants working on various projects. FOSSology has been working on integrating with three different open-source projects as well. Software Heritage is a repository of published software, while ClearlyDefined is a repository of metadata about published software. In both cases, FOSSology has plans to interact with them via their REST APIs. The third project is not as well known, he said. Atarashi takes a new approach in scanning for licenses. Instead of using regular expressions and rules, it uses text statistics and information-retrieval techniques. Another initiative that the project has undertaken is FOSSology Slides, which is a site for gathering slides that can be used to talk and teach about FOSSology. They are all licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 (as are the slides [PDF] from the OSS EU talk). They can be used as is, or adapted for other uses; he encouraged anyone to contribute their FOSSology slides as well. One nice outcome of that is that some Japanese FOSSology users translated slides from FOSSology Slides to that language and contributed them back, Jaeger said. Other translations would be welcome for those who want to contribute to the project but are not software developers. A FOSSology user in the audience pointed out that the tool is only able to analyze the code it is given, so package dependencies have to be figured out separately. Jaeger agreed, noting that FOSSology is focused on understanding the licenses in the code it is given; there are other tools that can help figure out what the dependencies are and there are no plans to add that to FOSSology. He suggested the OSS Review Toolkit (ORT) as one possibility.