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Friday, 27 Nov 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

ATI Drivers: Ubuntu vs. Windows

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: NVIDIA's Linux and Windows drivers perform about the same and in some instances the Linux binary driver even running faster, but as we have been sharing now for many months the Linux fglrx driver is handicapped for performance. Has things since improved for ATI?

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 9 - Sound & Multimedia

Filed under
KDE

The Sound & Multimedia section covers four basic areas of the KDE multimedia system that are important to your daily use of KDE from a multimedia perspective. As much as we may or may not realize it, we rely on a lot of multimedia interaction with our computers every day. Be it music, video or something else, it's all very important to us and without it, our experience wouldn't be the same. So lets look at each of the four subsections in this section and how each one is important to your daily user experience.

Firefox extension lets you remove elements from Web pages

Filed under
Moz/FF

Linux.com: Are you irritated by huge graphical ads smack in the middle of an article? Or maybe you don't want to waste bandwidth viewing the dozens of images in a review, or user icons in forum boards? You can remove them for good with a single click by using Firefox's RIP extension, which zaps anything out of a Web page, permanently.

Why Microsoft Will Not Sue Linux Patent Violators

Filed under
Microsoft

OSWeekly: Every place you look, someone is going on and on about how Microsoft is planning to litigate everyone who has violated their patents. Well, today I‘m going to explain why I don't believe Microsoft will even bother with it, what they ought to do if they were smart and why we have nothing to worry about.

Small Builders Feel The Software Love

Filed under
Linux

CRN: Custom systems builders may not get the same amount of attention and other perks that name-brand OEMs get from software vendors like Microsoft and Novell. But those vendors say they recognize the importance of systems builders and are taking steps to recruit and retain them.

Macintosh…Help me understand why

Filed under
Mac
Ubuntu

ZDNet: I can feel them…the flames…they’re coming. But I have to ask this question again (yes, I’ve asked one very much like it before) in light of recent events. The recent events, of course, involve the release of a particular Linux distribution with a funny African sort of name and, maybe more significantly, the first tier-one vendor’s adoption of said funny-sounding distro as an OS choice.

GPLv3 threatens Microsoft-Novell pact?

Filed under
SUSE

ZDNet: While much of what was (officially) released is known, Novell did express concerns that the final version of the General Public License (GPLv3) -- which slipped its March 2007 deadline -- could see Microsoft halting the distribution of SUSE Linux, which would impact financially on Novell.

HIG Hunting Season in its 3rd Week

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: Are you fed up with cryptic error messages you don't understand? Then get involved! This week's target of the HIG Hunting Season is warnings and error messages.

Make Wine and PulseAudio get along

Filed under
HowTos

Thursday Night: I got a Joost invite the other day, and I tried to get the client program working with Wine, the Linux implementation of the Win32 API. Sadly, it was a no-go; I couldn’t get it to work without skipping. However, it’s not all lost.

Red Hat advises caution over patents

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Red Hat's Mark Webbink is not the sort of person to issue threats. He's somewhat unusual in that he's a legal counsel who uses clear, concise prose when he speaks. Like all those in the profession, he does speak carefully but thankfully his speech is free of obfuscation.

Game Emulation In Linux

Filed under
Gaming

techgage.com: A common complaint about Linux is that there is a general lack of games. When emulation is brought into the picture though, it opens up a huge world of gaming possibilities. In this article, we will be looking into what emulation is, installing a gamepad and taking a look at a selection of emulators for different consoles.

Desktop search tools for GNU/Linux: the competition hots up (part one)

Filed under
Software

Free Software Magazine: I sometimes think that search tools are like my local bus: none comes along for ages and then three turn up in quick succession. For quite some time Beagle and Kat have been meeting the needs of users like you and me who fill up their hard drives with the results of our internet meanderings and because we have been remiss in keeping those drives well organized we eventually have to use search tools to find that PDF or HTML article we spent an eternity looking for.

Video's Missing Metadata

Filed under
Software

Linux App Finder: Where is the metadata standard for video? MP3's have ID3. Images have EXIF, IPTC, and more. If commercial video is ever to take off as an electronically distributed format it's necessary. Without it video players can't identify what's available. That may not seem important if you are sitting in front of a computer and reading a filename, but for other devices and 10' UI's it's a big problem.

Novell document dump makes it look like a scandal

Filed under
SUSE

Dana Blankenhorn: The Washington game of dumping incriminating documents late on a Friday is well-known. When someone does it, suspicions are raised. Now Novell has done just that.

A Look Ahead at Thunderbird 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

CyberNetNews: I noticed today that the Mozilla Thunderbird wiki page had been updated with some of their plans for version 3. There isn’t much information provided, but there are two things they mention that I’m really excited to see in the next release.

Microsoft's Ballmer and Aussie Defence ink cosy new agreement

Filed under
Microsoft

iTWire: It appears that Linux and FOSS are two concepts that have yet to penetrate the conciousness of the inner sanctums of key Australian Government agencies. Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer last week met with the Australian Department of Defence, to sign a joint agreement reaffirming the "strong relationship" between the two organisations.

Also: Can Google and Linux Topple Microsoft?

GIMP 2.2.15 Released

Filed under
GIMP

Version 2.2.15 of the GNU Image Manipulation Program is a bug-fix release in the stable 2.2 series. This is the stable branch of GIMP and only bug-fixes were applied.

Linux Crashes on 38th Lap at Indy 500

sportsnetwork.com: Roberto Moreno is out of the race after crashing on lap 38.

GPUs & Beryl: What is Needed?

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: We thought it was already clear what graphics processors and drivers work and don't work with Linux desktop eye candy such as Beryl and Compiz, but it seems based upon the number of e-mails we have been receiving along with messages in community bulletin boards that the line isn't so clear after all.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Awk, LLVM Clang and Qt

  • Why Every Linux User Needs To Learn Awk - YouTube

    Awk is one of those tools that every linux user has on their system but they probably only use it for fairly simple tasks, so today I thought I'd explain not only what awk but why you should use it and compare it some other Linux utils like sed.

  • Arm Neoverse N2 Support Added To The LLVM Clang 12 Compiler - Phoronix

    In September Arm began adding Neoverse N2 support to the open-source compilers initially with GCC and now the support has been merged into LLVM Clang 12 as well. The Neoverse N2 "Perseus" core was outlined in September as a follow-on design to the successful Neoverse N1. The N2 aims to provide 40% more performance over the N1 for single-threaded performance. The N2 is intended for use from the cloud to enterprise networking devices to edge computing.

  • Qt 6.0 RC and timelines for 6.1 and 6.2

    Hi all, First of all, I wanted to thank everybody for the hard work towards getting Qt 6.0 out of the door. We now have a first RC out, so we’re definitely getting very close to the 6.0.0 release. With that and the fact that we now have a 6.0 branch, it’s also time to start looking a bit ahead towards 6.1 and 6.2. We have long discussed, that the timing of our feature releases to be just before summer and Christmas vacation is a bit unfortunate, as we have little slack for delays without going into the vacation period. Especially the releases in December have sometimes been difficult in that respect. So we’d like to push the schedule a bit and move the minor releases towards a Spring/Autumn schedule. A somewhat shorter release cycle directly after 6.0 is probably a good idea anyway, as we will probably still need to do changes/fixes that don’t quite fit with our policy for patch level releases. So the idea is to shorten the release cycle for Qt 6.1 a bit and focus mainly on bug fixing and stability for that release. We’d aim for a feature freeze by the end of January, and a final Qt 6.1.0 release end of April. 6.2 would then also happen a bit earlier, with a feature freeze in June and a release end of September. Content wise, I believe we’ll start seeing more and more of the add-ons from Qt 5 being supported over the next 6-9 months, and I believe that with Qt 6.2 we will have brought most modules that we supported in Qt 5.15 over to Qt 6. Cheers, Lars

  • Qt 6.1, Qt 6.2 Expected To Come Sooner With Tightened Release Cycles - Phoronix

    Qt 6.0 is releasing in December and The Qt Company is already drafting plans for the release cycles of Qt 6.1 and Qt 6.2 LTS next year. Normally Qt is on a six-month release cadence but next year's Qt 6.1/6.2 releases will likely be tightened up both to address a long-standing gripe of the current timing that often puts new releases around summer holidays and the Thanksgiving~Christmas holiday season. To try to move off those May and November~December release windows, they are looking at tightening up the cycles for Qt 6.1 and Qt 6.2, with the latter being the first long-term support release of the Qt6 series. Lars Knoll is proposing that Qt 6.1 be shipped by the end of April which would put the feature freeze already at the end of January. But for Qt 6.1 the emphasis anyhow will likely be on bug fixing and stability improvements after all the changes in Qt 6.0, so a tightened up Qt 6.1 release makes sense.

Q4OS 4.2 Gemini, testing

An update to the Q4OS 4 Gemini testing branch is immediately available for download as 64bit live media. The new 4.2 release is based on Debian 11 Bullseye and features Plasma desktop environment by default. New visual Plasma themes have been added, they are now available in system settings utility. Debian Bullseye packages has been received in their latest version, Q4OS specific packages has been updated as well. New version of Trinity desktop 14.0.10 is ready for installation using the Desktop profiler tool. Feel free to download live media for 64bit computers from the dedicated Testing releases site. Q4OS 4 Gemini will be in development until Debian Bullseye becomes stable, and it will be supported at least five years from the official release date. Read more

Security: Patches, Diffoscope, Netfilter, and Intel Defects

  • Security updates for Friday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (go, libxml2, postgresql, and wireshark-cli), Debian (drupal7 and lxml), Fedora (drupal7, java-1.8.0-openjdk-aarch32, libxml2, pacemaker, slurm, and swtpm), openSUSE (c-ares, ceph, chromium, dash, firefox, go1.14, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kernel, krb5, perl-DBI, podman, postgresql10, postgresql12, rclone, slurm, ucode-intel, wireshark, wpa_supplicant, and xen), SUSE (ceph, firefox, kernel, LibVNCServer, and python), and Ubuntu (freerdp, poppler, and xdg-utils).

  • diffoscope 162 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 162.

  • Netfilter virtual workshop 2020 summary

    Once a year folks interested in Netfilter technologies gather together to discuss past, ongoing and future works. The Netfilter Workshop is an opportunity to share and discuss new ideas, the state of the project, bring people together to work & hack and to put faces to people who otherwise are just email names. This is an event that has been happening since at least 2001, so we are talking about a genuine community thing here. It was decided there would be an online format, split in 3 short meetings, once per week on Fridays. I was unable to attend the first session on 2020-11-06 due to scheduling conflict, but I made it to the sessions on 2020-11-13 and 2020-11-20. I would say the sessions were joined by about 8 to 10 people, depending on the day. This post is a summary with some notes on what happened in this edition, with no special order. Pablo did the classical review of all the changes and updates that happened in all the Netfilter project software components since last workshop. I was unable to watch this presentation, so I have nothing special to comment. However, I’ve been following the development of the project very closely, and there are several interesting things going on, some of them commented below. Florian Westphal brought to the table status on some open/pending work for mptcp option matching, systemd integration and finally interfacing from nft with cgroupv2. I was unable to participate in the talk for the first two items, so I cannot comment a lot more. On the cgroupv2 side, several options were evaluated to how to match them, identification methods, the hierarchical tree that cgroups present, etc. We will have to wait a bit more to see how the final implementation looks like. Also, Florian presented his concerns on conntrack hash collisions. There are no real-world known issues at the moment, but there is an old paper that suggests we should keep and eye on this and introduce improvements to prevent future DoS attack vectors. Florian mentioned these attacks are not practical at the moment, but who knows in a few years. He wants to explore introducing RB trees for conntrack. It will probably be a rbtree structure of hash tables in order to keep supporting parallel insertions. He was encouraged by others to go ahead and play/explore with this.

  • The Peculiar State Of CPU Security Mitigation Performance On Intel Tiger Lake - Phoronix

    One area not talked about much for Intel's latest Tiger Lake processors are hardened CPU security mitigations against the various speculative execution vulnerabilities to date. What's peculiar about Tiger Lake though is now if disabling the configurable mitigations it can actually result in worse performance than the default mitigated state. At least that's what we are seeing so far with the Core i7 1165G7 on Ubuntu 20.10 Linux is the opposite of what we have been seeing on prior generations of hardware. [...] On each of these Dell XPS notebooks were clean installs of Ubuntu 20.10 with security / stable release updates of the time and on their default Linux 5.8 kernel. The out-of-the-box / default mitigation performance was tested on each notebook followed by re-testing the same laptop and software stack after booting with mitigations=off. Here is the geometric mean of all the results before digging into the individual data points, but as you can see mitigations=off was of noticeably help to the older Kaby Lake R and Whiskey Lake processors, previous-generation Ice Lake was of some help but less given more hardware mitigations, and now with Tiger Lake the tables have turned where disabling the mitigations actually hurt the performance.

today's howtos

  • How To Enable Timestamp In Bash History In Linux - OSTechNix

    How do you know the time at which the command was executed? Easy! This guide explains how to enable timestamp in Bash history in Linux.

  • How to install Mattermost Chat on Ubuntu 20.04 - RoseHosting

    Step-by-step process on how to install Mattermost Chat on Ubuntu 20.04. Follow this simple and easy guide.

  • How To Install Rust on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Rust on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Rust, commonly known as Rust-Lang, is a system programming language that is developed by Mozilla and backed by LLVM. Rust is known for preventing program crashes, memory leaks, and data races before it is compiled into binary, thus creating a highly-productive and stable programming environment This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Rust programming language on CentOS 8.

  • How to Remove ‘Show Applications’ Icon From the Dock in Ubuntu 20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    This is a beginner’s guide shows how to remove the ‘Show Applications’ app menu icon from the dock in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How to Install OpenNMS Network Monitoring Tool in CentOS 8

    OpenNMS is a free and open-source network monitoring and network management platform used for managing enterprise networks around the world. It is based on Java and is designed to manage thousands of devices from a central location. It has the ability to discover and monitor the services or nodes automatically in your network.

  • How to play Dark Souls III on Linux

    Dark Souls III is an action RPG video game developed by FromSoftware and published by Bandai Namco. It is the fourth game in the Souls series and the final game in the Souls trilogy. Here’s how to get the game working on Linux.

  • Openstack RDO && KVM Hypervisor: Install KDE Plasma on SparkyLinux GameOver 08/11 2020

    At the time of writing KDE Plasma install on any SparkyLinux 2020.09 might be committed via GDM3 installation right after KDE Plasma ( the last one via tasksel or CLI ) due to after system reboot GDM seems to be the only one DM on Sparky detecting previously installed KDE.

  • How to install VLC on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install VLC Media Player on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to play Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin on Linux

    Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin is an action RPG video game developed by FromSoftware and published by Bandai Namco. In the game, the player’s character becomes Undead, cursed never to die, and becomes a hollow zombie creature with no memories or purpose.

  • Create your own Linux ecosystem with Nextcloud, DavX5 and KDE Connect