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Wednesday, 13 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Future of Linux on Laptops

Filed under
Linux

The good news for all Linux advocates is HP's recent announcement to support Ubuntu Linux on selected models of its notebook computers. HP said it will not offer Linux based notebooks in the United States, I have to wonder if anyone from Redmond, Washington had any input towards HP's decision.

LinuxWorld: Savings, Stability Make Strong Business Case

Filed under
Linux

As several hundred of the Linux and open-source faithful gather for the two-day LinuxWorld Summit here, the message that Linux has not only come to Wall Street but has been embraced by it is resounding loud and clear.

CIA overseeing 3-day war game on Internet

Filed under
Web

The CIA is conducting a war game this week to simulate an unprecedented, Sept. 11-like electronic assault against the United States.

Next Gen Firefox In Beta Tests

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla moves to make sure IE7 has no chance of closing the gap. Fans of Firefox have reason to be jubilant today. The next generation of the phenomenally popular browser has entered beta testing.

Teen hacker goes too far

Filed under
Security

A TEEN who tried to bump up his grades to an A by hacking into his school’s computer system, accidentally revealed his cunning plan to officials.

Phishing flaw catches Xbox 360 site

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Microsoft has patched a potentially dangerous flaw on its www.xbox360.com website after security experts warned the software giant of a cross-site scripting vulnerability which could be exploited by hackers to launch phishing attacks.

GNU guru asks PC makers to free their drivers

Filed under
Linux

Richard Stallman, one of the main forces behind the GNU/Linux operating system and the free software movement, is in Taiwan fighting on a new front -- to get the island's PC makers to release source code for their drivers.

New handheld puzzle games fun, addictive

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

What's great about puzzle games is that there's no real commitment and no story line. But beware of the addictive nature of handheld puzzle games that you can take anywhere -- it's easy to jump in, but getting back out is another story. Here's a look at two of the latest:

Actors Strike Over Video Game Voices

Filed under
Gaming

A button worn by picketing actors at last week's E3 video games trade show suggested they might pull the plug if they don't get a bigger share of the industry's huge profits. It read "Game Over."

Homeland Security budget boosts cybersecurity

Filed under
Security

Information security could get greater focus now that the House budget bill calls for creating a high-level cybersecurity position at the Homeland Security Department.

Quake leaps into next generation

Filed under
Gaming

One of the top sci-fi shooters, Quake, is getting a new lease of life as a next-generation console game. It was one of the titles announced for Microsoft's Xbox 360 during last week's E3 games expo in Los Angeles. The date has not been set for the release of Quake 4 yet, which is also being made for the PC.

KDE 3.4.1 is Coming Your Way

Filed under
KDE
-s

KDE 3.4.1 is on it's way. It was tagged on May 23 and your favorite distro's developers are toiling away to make a version available for your desktop. It should be released to the general public in less than a week and perhaps your distro will release their version at the approximate same time. Besides starting on the 4.0 branch of kde, developers have been working hard on improving their stable branch. What's new this release?

Telecoms giant loses staff data

Filed under
Security

MCI is the latest US corporate facing a potential identity theft problem with its employees’ personal data.

PS3 is not a game machine

Filed under
Gaming

Exec portrays the console as a home media and entertainment supercomputer, says that gaming will be only one of its many functions.

Lara Croft gets a breast reduction

Filed under
Gaming

Videogame idol Lara Croft has been given a smaller bust as part of a makeover gaming company Eidos hopes revives the once-hot tomb-raiding heroine.

The Internet goes Greek

Filed under
Web

Starting July 4 for the first time Greeks be able to name their Internet sites with letters from the Greek alphabet.

Voyager At Edge Of Solar System

Filed under
Sci/Tech

After a storied, 28-year odyssey, NASA's venerable Voyager 1 spacecraft appears to have reached the edge of the solar system. This is an historic step in Voyager's race. We have a totally new region of space to explore, and it's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

n/a

M$ seeks protection from spyware firms

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft wants the Senate to rewrite anti-spyware legislation in order to protect companies that provide spyware removal utilities.

Xbox 360 vs. PlayStation 3: A Technical Comparison

Filed under
Hardware

From a pure processing standpoint, the PS3 appears to beat the Xbox 360, but a final determination will have to wait on actual hardware tests. The PS3 has a few other advantages, but Xbox 360, however, drops the bomb on the PS3 in a few categories as well.

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Bill Wear, Developer Advocate for MAAS: foo.c

I remember my first foo. It was September, 1974, on a PDP-11/40, in the second-floor lab at the local community college. It was an amazing experience for a fourteen-year-old, admitted at 12 to audit night classes because his dad was a part-time instructor and full-time polymath. I should warn you, I’m not the genius in the room. I maintained a B average in math and electrical engineering, but A+ averages in English, languages, programming, and organic chemistry (yeah, about that….). The genius was my Dad, the math wizard, the US Navy CIC Officer. More on him in a later blog — he’s relevant to what MAAS does in a big way. Okay, so I’m more of a language (and logic) guy. But isn’t code where math meets language and logic? Research Unix Fifth edition UNIX had just been licensed to educational institutions at no cost, and since this college was situated squarely in the middle of the military-industrial complex, scoring a Hulking Giant was easy. Finding good code to run it? That was another issue, until Bell Labs offered up a freebie. It was amazing! Getting the computer to do things on its own — via ASM and FORTRAN — was not new to me. What was new was the simplicity of the whole thing. Mathematically, UNIX and C were incredibly complex, incorporating all kinds of network theory and topology and numerical methods that (frankly) haven’t always been my favorite cup of tea. I’m not even sure if Computer Science was a thing yet. But the amazing part? Here was an OS which took all that complexity and translated it to simple logic: everything is a file; small is beautiful; do one thing well. Didn’t matter that it was cranky and buggy and sometimes dumped your perfectly-okay program in the bit bucket. It was a thrill to be able to do something without having to obsess over the math underneath. Read more Also: How to upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 Daily Builds from Ubuntu 19.10

Intel is Openwashing With 'OpenVINO'

Desktop GNU/Linux: Ubuntu 20.04, Slackware Live Plasma5 edition ISO and Latest ZDNet Clickbait