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Friday, 15 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Programming: LibreOffice Teaches C++, IBM Explores Clang for C/C++, Python Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Google's Chrome OS "Wilco" Driver Working Towards Mainline Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

For years now Google has been designing their own embedded controller (EC) for use within Chromebooks / Chrome OS devices.

But after about five years of the "ChromeOS EC" (cros_ec), there is a new embedded controller they have been working on. Coming soon to the mainline Linux tree will be the kernel support for a new ChromeOS "Wilco" Embedded Controller.

Wilco is Google's new embedded controller wired up over an eSPI bus. The new driver doesn't yield much to get excited about, however, but great that Google continues working on their own ECs and they are backed by open-source firmware and first-rate Linux support given their Chrome OS usage.

Read more

Also: Better Bluetooth sound quality on Linux

Removing Profanity from the Source Tree

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds recently stepped away from kernel development temporarily in order to think about how to be less harsh with developers in certain situations. Simultaneous with his departure was a patch introducing a new Code of Conduct into the kernel source tree. The effects of this are beginning to be felt.

Jarkko Sakkinen recently posted a patch to change a kernel comment containing the word "fuck" to use the word "hug" instead. So the code comment, "Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds fucked it up" would become "Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds hugged it up".

Steven Rostedt replied to this, saying that the code in question had changed so much that the original comment was out of date, and it should just be removed entirely. He said, "that will be an accurate change with or without CoC."

Jonathan Corbet remarked, "I'd much rather see either deletion or a rewrite over bleeping out words that somebody might not like." And Jiri Kosina agreed, saying, "turning comments into something that often doesn't make sense to anybody at all is hardly productive."

Sergey Senozhatsky pointed out that Linus was the author of the original self-deprecating comment. He asked, "Linus has made a comment, in his own words, about his own code. Why would anyone be offended by this?"

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Nautilus Exif, PDF And Audio Metadata Tag Columns Extension For Ubuntu

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

These metadata tags added by the Nautilus Columns extension are not only useful for a quickly look at some particular audio, pdf or image information from the Nautilus list view, but also to sort some files by a particular metadata tag column to easily identify the files you're looking for.

Nautilus Columns is currently maintained by Spanish blogger Atareao, and it only supports English, Spanish and Galician languages.

Judging from the extension code, it's also supposed to support some video formats as well, but no information was shown for such files on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop, so it probably needs some fixes in this area. Audio, PDF and Exif metadata was displayed with no issues on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop.

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Games: Million to One Hero, Barotrauma, JUMPGRID and Pygame

Filed under
Gaming
  • Fun platformer 'Million to One Hero' where you can make your own adventures is releasing soon

    Million to One Hero from Spanish developer Over the Top Games seems like a very promising platformer and they've announced the release is this month.

    We previously highlighted the game earlier this month, at that time they did not have a release date available. They've since announced that it's going to be available on Linux right at release, which will be on February 27th.

  • Barotrauma, a co-op submarine adventure set on Jupiter's moon Europa is promising, has a demo

    For those after a more sci-fi take on the co-op submarine adventure, Barotrauma seems like it could be quite fun.

    Currently in a closed-beta before an Early Access release on Steam, you can actually grab an earlier version direct from their website here. They're not taking on any more for the closed-beta, so the demo should still give a small glimpse into what's possible.

  • JUMPGRID is a fantastic 2D dodge-em-up that will give your fingers a workout

    Did you enjoy Super Hexagon? JUMPGRID is a brand new dodge-em-up with simple and addictive gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

  • Moving the player object in Pygame

    In the last chapter we have created the animation effect for the player object and in this chapter, we will move the player object in the x-axis. We will leave the wall and boundary collision detection mechanism to the next chapter. In the last chapter we have already linked up the keyboard events with the game manager class and in this chapter, we only need a slight modification to move the player across the scene when the left or the right arrow key has been pressed. One of the problems with the pygame event module is that we need to activate the repeated event detection process by our-self with this single line of code before the module can send the repeated keypress event (which means when someone is holding the same key on the keyboard) to us.

KDE Plasma 5.15 released

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KDE
  • KDE releases a new version of the Plasma desktop environment

    Say hello to Plasma 5.15, the newest version of KDE's acclaimed desktop environment.

    This February release of KDE Plasma comes with a wide range of new features and improvements. The main focus of developers has been stamping out all minor problems and papercuts of the desktop, aiming to make Plasma smoother and easier to use.

    Plasma's configuration interfaces have been redesigned, expanded and clarified to cover more user cases and make it simpler to adapt Plasma to everybody's needs. Plasma has also improved the integration of non-native applications, so Firefox, for example, can now optionally use native KDE open/save dialogs. Likewise, GTK and GNOME apps now respect the global scale factor used by high-DPI screens.

  • KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Six months in development, the KDE Plasma 5.15 desktop environment comes with a lot of changes to make your Plasma experience more enjoyable. These include various refinements to the configuration interfaces, new options for complex network configurations, redesigned icons, improved integration with third-party technologies and apps, and a much-improved Discover package manager.

    "For the first production release of 2019, the Plasma team has embraced KDE's Usability & Productivity goal and has been working on hunting down and removing all the papercuts that slow you down," reads today's announcement. "With this in mind, we teamed up with the VDG (Visual Design Group) contributors to get feedback on all the annoying problems in our software, and fixed them to ensure an intuitive and consistent workflow for your daily use."

  • KDE Plasma 5.15 Released With Wayland Improvements, Fixes To "Annoying Problems"

    The KDE community is out with their first big update to the Plasma desktop for 2019.

    Plasma 5.15 is a big update for KDE and among the many changes include:

    - Many Wayland improvements. There is support for more Wayland protocols, support for Wayland virtual desktops, and touch drag-and-drop support.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Action News 92

    A week of nasty security flaws, and a lack of patches... For some of us. Raspberry Pi opens a physical store, our thoughts on the new LibreOffice interface, and the new round of nasty flaws hitting all versions of Android.

    Plus new disk encryption coming to Linux, Intel releases their open source encoder for future video on the web, and more.

  • 2018 Open Source Yearbook: Download the PDF

    The 2018 Open Source Yearbook is the 4th annual community-contributed collection of the past year's top open source projects, people, tools, and stories.

    Submit the form below to download the free PDF to read the complete collection.

  • Community Member Monday: Khaled Hosny

    With LibreOffice 6.2 now available, we return to our regular chats with LibreOffice community members! Today we’re talking to Khaled Hosny, who is working on the software’s font handling and user interface…

Server: Kiwi TCMS, Kubernetes Operators, OpenFabrics Alliance and Linux Watch Command

Filed under
Server
  • Kiwi TCMS 6.5.3

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.5.3! This is a security, improvement and bug-fix update that includes new versions of Django, includes several database migrations and fixes several bugs. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org!

  • How to explain Kubernetes Operators in plain English
  • The State of High-Performance Fabrics: A Chat with the OpenFabrics Alliance

    The global high-performance computing (HPC) market is growing and its applications are constantly evolving. These systems rely on networks, often referred to as fabrics, to link servers together forming the communications backbone of modern HPC systems. These fabrics need to be high speed and highly scalable to efficiently run advanced computing applications. Often, there is also a requirement that the software that runs these fabrics be open source. It turns out that this description of high-performance fabrics is increasingly applicable to environments outside classical HPC, even as HPC continues to serve as the bellwether for the future of commercial and enterprise computing. Fortunately, the mission of the OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) has recently been updated to include accelerating the development of advanced fabrics and importantly to further their adoption in fields beyond traditional HPC.

  • Linux Watch Command

Laptops/Desktops: Chromebooks, MX Linux 18.1 and West of Loathing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Programming/Development: Measure, LLVM/Clang, HHVM and Android Development Courses

Filed under
Development
  • 6 lessons we learned building Measure, a contributor relationship management system

    At its core, Measure is, for lack of a better term, a contributor relationship management system. Measure consists of easy-to-understand widgets that can be arbitrarily displayed to build dashboards. It allows you to visualize and understand how people, both as individuals and as organizations, are interacting with open source projects on GitHub. It produces metrics that focus not only on code but also on contributors.

  • Asm-goto Support Added To LLVM, Helping Out Clang'ing Kernel Efforts

    LLVM has merged its support finally for supporting "asm goto" with this inline Assembly support needed for building the Linux x86/x86_64 kernel. 

    The LLVM asm-goto support was merged over the weekend while patches are pending against Clang to add the necessary bits to the C/C++ compiler front-end. 

    This satisfies a eight year old bug / feature request for handling "asm goto" by LLVM. This addition is notable since it's now one less barrier for being able to build the mainline Linux kernel off a vanilla LLVM/Clang compiler on x86_64 as an alternative to GCC. Unfortunately, some items still need to be addressed in reaching this mainline support goal.

  • Facebook Releases HHVM 4.0 With PHP No Longer Supported

    HHVM, formerly known as the HipHop Virtual Machine and what was born at Facebook as a higher-performance PHP implementation only to shift focus to running their own PHP-derived Hack programming language, has reached version 4.0 as it officially no longer supports PHP. 

    HHVM 4.0 doesn't drop support for executing PHP scripts entirely, which will likely happen in their next release when dropping the PHP tag. But in this release already they have removed functionality from PHP arrays that are not present in Hack arrays, deprecation of references, and dropping functions that inspect or alter the caller frame.

  • HHVM 4.0.0
  • 12 Best Android Development Courses

Security: Windows, Microsoft, Kubernetes and GNU/Linux

Filed under
Security
  • Hackers Are Using Windows .EXE File To Infect MacOS
  • Protecting the Logical Security of a Network Environment

    Microsoft Has Made Home Users More Vulnerable by Removing Local Security Policy Editor

    For years, Microsoft Windows provided two key methods for implementing logical security: Local Security Policy Editor (Group Policy Editor in the server environment) and the Advanced Firewall. Unfortunately, Microsoft has now removed the Local Security Policy Editor from Windows 10 Home edition. Microsoft provides it only in the Professional edition, which is a huge security mistake.

  • Runc and CVE-2019-5736

    This morning a container escape vulnerability in runc was announced. We wanted to provide some guidance to Kubernetes users to ensure everyone is safe and secure.

  • Reasonably secure Linux

    Put a lock on your door and they get in through a window. Lock the window and they’ll just smash it. Put bars on the windows and they pick your door lock. Deadbolt the door and they will trick their way in pretending to be the gas man. An analogy, how quaint!
    Computer security can, at times, feel like an arms race between global superpowers. Yet at least with the Linux kernel and open source everything’s out in the open. Indeed, there’s an entire world of developers whose livelihoods depend on the FOSS ecosystem being secured.

  • Meaningful 2fa on modern linux

    So there are a few parts here. AD is for intents and purposes an LDAP server. The
    is also an LDAP server, that syncs to AD. We don’t care if that’s 389-ds, freeipa or vendor solution. The results are basically the same.

    Now the linux auth stack is, and will always use pam for the authentication, and nsswitch for user id lookups. Today, we assume that most people run sssd, but pam modules for different options are possible.

    There are a stack of possible options, and they all have various flaws.

Top 10 Free Linux Painting Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is a particularly strong platform for professionals that work within the graphic design and graphic arts industry. With low cost hardware, quality open source software, and an ounce of talent, artists can produce professional-looking computer graphics.

Designers make use of graphic design software programs. The most common software used in the graphic design industry is Abobe Creative Suite which consists of Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Unfortunately, Adobe Creative Suite is proprietary software, and released only for the Windows and Mac OS X operating systems. It is also very expensive software. Fortunately, there is a good range of open source software to download without charge for the Linux platform which makes it possible to do remarkable graphics work.

The purpose of this article is to identify the finest open source painting software available for Linux. Paint software is designed to imitate closely traditional painting mediums and effects. Typically, this type of software works best with a graphic tablet. Graphic tablets with an accompanying pen offer a much more precise, natural, and comfortable input method than a mouse, and are ideally suited for drawing, painting, and photo editing.

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Events: LCA and FOSDEM

Filed under
OSS
  • linux.conf.au 2019

    Along with a number of other Canonical staff I recently attended linux.conf.au 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand. I consider this the major Australia/New Zealand yearly conference that covers general open source development. This year the theme of the conference was "Linux of Things" and many of the talks had an IoT connection.

    One of the premium swag items was a Raspberry Pi Zero. It is unfortunate that this is not a supported Ubuntu Core device (CPU a generation too old) as this would have been a great opportunity to show an Ubuntu Core device in action. I did prepare a lightning talk showing some Ubuntu Core development on a Raspberry Pi 3, but this sadly didn't make the cut.

  • Video: Speeding up Programs with OpenACC in GCC

    In this video from FOSDEM’19, Thomas Schwinge from Mentor presents: Speeding up Programs with OpenACC in GCC.

  • Tobias Mueller: Speaking at FOSDEM 2019 in Belgium, Brussels

    This year I spoke at FOSDEM again. It became sort of a tradition to visit Brussels in winter and although I was tempted to break with the tradition, I came again.

    [......

    I had two talks at this year’s FOSDEM, both in the Security track. One on my work with Ludovico on protecting against rogue USB devices and another one on tracking users with core Internet protocols.

8 Best Linux Console File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Linux console file managers can be very helpful in a day to day tasks, when managing files on a local machine or when connected to a remote one. The visual console representation of the directory helps quickly perform file/folder operations and save us some time.

Read Also: 30 Best GUI and CLI File Managers for Linux

In this article, we are going to review some of the most frequently used Linux console file managers and their features and benefits.

Read more

Testers Wanted: Android App for Tux Machines Site

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Site News

APK icon

Diaspora logo Mastodon logo Pleroma logo

Tux Machines is turning 15 this summer and as we noted over the weekend, many people now access the site using mobile devices, for which the site provides a subpar experience due to legacy. RSS feeds are therefore recommended. There's our RSS feed for news, RSS feed for Tux Machines Blogs and another for Techrights, where I write my original articles.

Most readers, however, do not use RSS feeds. Consider the 700 followers of our Twitter account, the 2,365 followers of our Diaspora account, 1,080 followers of our Mastodon account, and 63 followers of our Pleroma account (so about 4,000 in total). Those are dependent on third parties (we do not self-host these platforms). Even if "apps" are used for access to these social media platforms/sites, the links would lead to Tux Machines Web pages, which don't render particularly well on small screens (phones). So we've made this simple "app" for the site, but we're still testing it. If anyone out there can try it on an Android device and report back to us, we'll appreciate it greatly and use the feedback to improve it.

Screenshot Tux Machines app

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop to Improve Multi-Screen Support, System Settings Pages

Filed under
KDE

Renowned KDE developer Nate Graham published another weekly report on the new features and improvements he and his team worked on for upcoming versions of the KDE Plasma desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications and KDE Frameworks software suites. The good news is that the issue is already fixed in KDE Plasma 5.15.

First and foremost, the developer reveals the fact that a KDE Plasma 5.14.5.1 bugfix release will be available this week to address a critical issue in the latest KDE Plasma 5.14.5 desktop environment which prevents users from updating their system via the Plasma Discover package manager.

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Two graphical tools for manipulating PDFs on the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

With the way I talk and write about PDFs and tools for working with them, some people think I'm in love with the format. I'm not, for a variety of reasons I won't go into here.

I won't go so far as saying PDFs are a necessary evil in my personal and professional life—rather they're a necessary not-so-good. Often I have to use PDFs, even though there are better alternatives for delivering documents.

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Android Leftovers

Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB NVMe Linux SSD Benchmarks

Announced at the end of January was the Samsung 970 EVO Plus as the first consumer-grade solid-state drive with 96-layer 3D NAND memory. The Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs are now shipping and in this review are the first Linux benchmarks of these new SSDs in the form of the Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB MZ-V7S500B/AM compared to several other SSDs on Linux. The Samsung 970 EVO Plus uses the same Phoenix controller as in their existing SSDs but the big upgrade with the EVO Plus is the shift to the 96-layer 3D NAND memory. Available now through Internet retailers are the 250GB / 500GB / 1TB versions of the 970 EVO Plus at a new low of just $130 USD for the 500GB model or $250 USD for the 1TB version. A 2GB model is expected to ship this spring. Read more

elementary 5 "Juno"

In the spring of 2014 (nearly five years ago), I was preparing a regular presentation I give most years—where I look at the bad side (and the good side) of the greater Linux world. As I had done in years prior, I was preparing a graph showing the market share of various Linux distributions changing over time. But, this year, something was different. In the span of less than two years, a tiny little Linux distro came out of nowhere to become one of the most watched and talked about systems available. In the blink of an eye, it went from nothing to passing several grand-daddies of Linux flavors that had been around for decades. This was elementary. Needless to say, it caught my attention. Read more

Audiophile Linux Promises Aural Nirvana

Linux isn’t just for developers. I know that might come as a surprise for you, but the types of users that work with the open source platform are as varied as the available distributions. Take yours truly for example. Although I once studied programming, I am not a developer. The creating I do with Linux is with words, sounds, and visuals. I write books, I record audio, and a create digital images and video. And even though I don’t choose to work with distributions geared toward those specific tasks, they do exist. I also listen to a lot of music. I tend to listen to most of my music via vinyl. But sometimes I want to listen to music not available in my format of choice. That’s when I turn to digital music. Read more