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Friday, 21 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:01am
    lashayduva
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:56pm
    neilheaney
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:53pm
    jennipurne
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:50pm
    relativ7

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices/Embedded/Development Boards

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Aceinna launches open-source GNSS+IMU development kit for drones, robots

    MEMS-based sensing solutions company Acienna announces OpenIMU, a professionally supported, open-source GPS/GNSS-aided inertial navigation software stack for low-cost precise navigation applications.

    Integrating an inertial measurement unit (IMU)-based sensor network will greatly improve its navigation and self-location capabilities, Acienna said.

    It is aimed at developing autonomously guided vehicles for industrial applications, autonomous cars, factory or industrial robots, drones, remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) or any kind of smart machine that needs to move fast or slow, on land, in the air or in water.

  • Sensything Multi-Sensor Open Source Development Board

    Engineers, developers and hobbyists may be interested in the new multi sensor development board called Sensything. Offering an open source, high-resolution (24-bit), Wi-Fi and Bluetooth-enabled sensor interface platform that supports multiple sensor readings. “In most cases, it offers a single-board, single-platform solution for acquiring and logging multiple sensor readings that can be seen/sent through an Android app, an IoT or analytics platform, or over an ordinary USB connection.”

  • Compute module to debut faster i.MX8M Mini SoC

    Variscite unveiled a “DART-MX8M-Mini” module that runs on NXP’s new i.MX8M Mini SoC, a 14nm variant of the i.MX8M with one to four 2GHz Cortex-A53 cores and a 400MHz Cortex-M4, plus scaled down 1080p video via MIPI-DSI.

    [...] it will almost certainly run Linux, if not Android.

NYU applies open source Google AI to diagnose lung cancer

Filed under
Google
OSS

If recent research is any indication, artificial intelligence (AI) has a bright future in medicine. Nvidia developed an AI system that can generate synthetic scans of brain cancer. Google subsidiary DeepMind has demonstrated a machine learning algorithm that can recommend treatment for more than 50 eye diseases with 94 percent accuracy. And in newly published research, New York University (NYU) showed how AI might aid in lung cancer diagnosis.

A paper today published in the journal Nature Medicine (“Classification and mutation prediction from non-small cell lung cancer histopathology images using deep learning”) describes how a team of NYU researchers retrained Google’s Inception v3, an open source convolutional neural network architected for object identification, to detect certain forms of lung cancers with 97 percent accuracy.

Read more

Also: Google AI Tool Identifies a Tumor's Mutations From an Image

Games: Crazy Justice, Subset Games and Overwatch

Filed under
Gaming
  • An update on what's happening with Crazy Justice, the Battle Royale game from Black Riddles Studio

    It's been a rather turbulent time for Black Riddles Studio, with Crazy Justice [Official Site, Steam] originally being scheduled to release in Early Access in July. I contacted Fig to see if they knew what was going on, who got an answer from Black Riddles for me. First, let's sum up the situation for those not up to speed.

  • What Subset Games (FTL, Into the Breach) think of Valve's Steam Play

    Subset Games [Official Site] are a developer I was especially keen to speak to about Valve's Steam Play system, since Into the Breach is included as a white-listed game by Valve even though they're working on a Linux version.

    Into the Breach is an interesting turn-based strategy game about the remnants of human civilization being threatened by gigantic creatures breeding beneath the earth. They confirmed back in early August that Into the Breach's Linux version was in "active development", so I thought their viewpoint might be quite interesting given the situation.

    They first made it clear they are doing a Linux version, then their programmer Mathew expanded on it a bit.

  • Overwatch Players Using Linux Get Accidentally Banned

    Overwatch is definitely one of the best FPS games around. Even despite the fact that is has been out for over 2 years now, it remains highly popular due to its varied roster of characters and the team-based mechanics. While everything hasn’t been smooth sailing, the game has also largely avoided any major issues as it develops further.

    In a report via PCGamesN though, Linux users of the game had a nasty surprise after they found their Overwatch accounts had been permanently banned.

  • Blizzard Throws Permanent Bans For Overwatch Players Using Linux

    Well, this is quite an interesting situation the players of Overwatch have found themselves.

    It seems like Overwatch players who have been using the Linux operating system to play Blizzard’s hero shooter game have now been banned, like permanently.

    Just recently when bans took place, players found out that their choice of OS was the reason for such bans. There is a lot of unrest among the community as fans are not too happy with this situation, they have been pushed into.

    As you may know that Overwatch has been playable on Linux for quite some time now and fans have been using this opportunity to play using, Linux operating system.

Software: SMPlayer, FOSS and Peek

Filed under
Software
  • SMPlayer Makes It Easy to Stream Videos from Your PC to Android Phone

    The handy feature means you can watch video on your computer from your phone with minimal effort as no uploading, no downloading, and no subscriptions are required.

    All you need to stream is the latest version of SMPlayer (v15.6) on your Windows, Mac or Linux desktop, plus an Android phone (or tablet) with a compatible media player, like MX Player or VLC for Android, installed.

  • The best open source alternatives to your everyday apps

    There are many compelling reasons to use open source software, where the code behind an app is free for anyone to view or contribute to. There's the obvious benefit that it's free to use. It's arguably more secure (thanks to the many eyes on the source code). It's built solely for the benefit of users. And it may have ethical appeal over an app built by, say, a multinational corporation. This in mind, here are 10 of the best open source alternatives to the software we use on our computers every day.

  • peek – animated GIF screen recorder

    I’m always on the look out for small indispensable utilities that make the Linux experience even better. This week, I’m seeking to garnish support for peek. It’s an unpretentious utility written in Vala. The utility has no delusion of grandeur. But it has qualities that carves out its own niche in the open source world.

    Peek is designed to make short screencasts. It’s not a general purpose screencast application like OBS Studio. Instead, peek captures silent screencasts of part of the screen. Examples of its usage including demonstrating user interface features of software, or creating a visual bug report. The software supports recording in GIF, APNG, WebM and MP4 formats.

Free/Libre/Open Hardware: DevBoy Modular Open Source System and RISC-V

Filed under
Hardware
  • Learn To Code Games With The DevBoy Modular Open Source System

    Developer Nicolai Shlapunov has created a new modular open source system specifically created for learning how to program and develop games. The DevBoy has this week launched via Kickstarter with the aim of raising $100,000 over the next 30 days to make the jump into production. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the modular hardware kit can help you learn to dove games and allows you to configure different gaming systems depending on your needs. “Ever wanted to build your own game console? Robot remote control? May be an oscilloscope? DevBoy is what you need!”

  • RISC-V microconference accepted for Linux Plumbers Conference

    The open nature of the RISC-V ecosystem has allowed contributions from both academia and industry to lead to an unprecedented number of new hardware design proposals in a very short time span. Linux support is the key to enabling these new hardware options.

Programming: Ballerina Programming Language, D Language Front-End Is Trying Now To Get Into GCC 9

Filed under
Development
  • TNS Context: The CNCF Open Source Survey and the Ballerina Programming Language

    Today on The New Stack Context podcast, we talk with Chris Aniszczyk, co-founder of the TODO Group and Chief Technology Officer of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) about the results of our recent open source program management survey. We also talk about WS02‘s new cloud native programming language, Ballerina.

    Joining Context host TNS editorial director Libby Clark for this episode is TNS founder Alex Williams and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson.

  • The D Language Front-End Is Trying Now To Get Into GCC 9

    Going on for a while now have been D language front-end patches for GCC to allow this programming language to be supported by the GNU Compiler Collection. It's been a long battle getting to this state but it looks like it soon might be mainlined.

    Last June was the approval by the GCC Steering Committee to allow D support in GCC. While the committee approved of its addition, the D language front-end didn't end up getting merged in time for the GCC 8 stable release that took place earlier this year.

KDE: Krita and KGraphViewer

Filed under
KDE

You Think the Visual Studio Code binary you use is a Free Software? Think again.

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

I’m not a lawyer, I could be wrong or not accurate enough in my analysis (sorry!) but I’ll try nonetheless to give my understanding of the situation because the current state of licensing of Visual Studio Code tries to fool most users.

Microsoft uses here a simple but clever trick allowed by the license of the code source of Visual Studio Code: the MIT license, a permissive Free Software license.

Indeed, the MIT license is really straightforward. Do whatever you want with this software, keeps the original copyright and I’m not responsible of what could happen with this software. Ok. Except that, for the situation of Visual Studio Code, it only covers the source code, not the binary.

Unlike most of the GPL-based licenses for which both the source code and the binary built from this source code are covered by the terms of the license, using the MIT license authorizes Microsoft to make available the source code of the software, but do whatever they want with the binary of this software. And let’s be crystal-clear: 99,99% of the VSC users will never ever use directly the source code.

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Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish New Features

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu 18.10 which is codenamed as Cosmic Cuttlefish is around the corner, is planned to be released next month on 18th October 2018. You will be able to download this release from the official website as well upgrade manually from previous releases. This time there is no alpha or beta milestones rather testing weeks for releases.

Read<br />
more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Zinc Launches UK’s First Open Source Blockchain-Based Hiring Software

    London: Zinc, a UK based start-up, today launches its blockchain based hiring software, which promises to eliminate many of the inefficiencies associated with recruitment within the technology sector.  Available to the public from today, Zinc has been successfully tested in beta with customers including GoCardless and Booking.com.

  • Lumina Networks Expands Engineering Management to Drive Product Innovation and Open Source Leadership

    Open source networking leader Lumina Networks today announced the addition of three industry leaders to their engineering team.  Avinash Parwaney joins Lumina’s executive team as VP of Engineering. Parwaney is formerly from Cisco where he was Senior Director of Engineering. Prem Sankar Gopannan has joined Lumina as Director of Engineering and Iyappa Swaminathan has joined as Director of Technical Product Management.

    “I am pleased to welcome Avinash to lead the Lumina engineering team. He brings a wealth of real-world experience in large scale service provider networking,” said Andrew Coward, CEO of Lumina Networks. “Avinash will help Lumina accelerate our open source-based networking platforms and applications from proof of concept trials into production deployment. The addition of Prem and Iyappa to the team will further strengthen our ability to help lead the open source networking community, driving innovation and productization.”

  • EU antitrust ruling on Microsoft buy of GitHub due by October 19
  • which spare laptop?

    I'm in a perpetual state of downsizing and ridding my life (and my family's life) of things we don't need: sometimes old computers. My main (nearly my sole) machine is my work-provided Thinkpad T470s: a fantastic laptop that works so well I haven't had anything to write about it. However, I decided that it was worth keeping just one spare, for emergencies or other odd situations. I have two candidate machines in my possession.

    [...]

    Surprising myself perhaps more than anyone else, I've ended up opting for the Toshiba. The weight was the clincher. The CPU performance difference was too close to matter, and 3G RAM is sufficient for my spare laptop needs. Once I'd installed a spare SSD as the main storage device, day-to-day performance is very good. The resolution difference didn't turn out to be that important: it's still low enough that side-by-side text editor and browser feels crowded, so I end up using the same window management techniques as I would on the X61s.

    What do I use it for? I've taken it on a couple of trips or holidays which I wouldn't want to risk my work machine for. I wrote nearly all of liquorice on it in downtime on a holiday to Turkey whilst my daughter was having her afternoon nap. I'm touching up this blog post on it now!

Graphics: Mir, NVIDIA, WineConf

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Canonical Developers Now Preparing Mir 1.0 For Release With Wayland Support

    Mir 1.0 was talked about for release last year but at the last minute they reverted it to Mir 0.28. There is now a patch pending that is once again attempting the Mir 1.0 milestone.

    Mir 1.0 was pulled back previously after Canonical shifted away from its mobile/convergence effort as well as slashed some of the Mir resources involved. Since then Mir has continued to mature but with a focus on offering Wayland protocol compatibility and a platform still catering to Snaps and Ubuntu IoT use-cases.

    With the Wayland support within Mir squared away for the essentials, now it seems they are preparing for the Mir 1.0 banner.

  • NVIDIA Further Details Turing's Mesh Shaders, Supports OpenGL/Vulkan

    Later this week the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" GPUs begin shipping and one of the interesting additions with this new GPU architecture is support for mesh shaders.

    Mesh shaders are part of a new programmable geometric shading pipeline that allows the generation of compact "meshlet" meshes on-chip. Mesh shaders work with not only Microsoft Direct3D 12 but can also be setup with new OpenGL/Vulkan extensions.

  • All of the WineConf 2018 Videos Are Now Available

    Happening back at the end of June was WineConf 2018 in The Hague as the annual Wine developer conference. The remaining video recordings from that event are finally available.

Security: Updates, PAM HaveIBeenPwned Module, Alpine Linux and Wireshark

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • PAM HaveIBeenPwned module
  • Remote code exec found in Alpine Linux

    Users of Alpine Linux are advised to update their installations - especially those used for Docker production environments - after a researcher found a remotely exploitable bug in the distribution's package manager.

    Alpine Linux is popular with Docker users due to its small size and package repository.

    Crowdfunded bug bounty program BountyGraph co-founder Max Justicz managed to exploit Alpine .apk package files to create arbitrary files which could be turned into code execution.

  • What is Wireshark? What this essential troubleshooting tool does and how to use it

    Wireshark is the world's leading network traffic analyzer, and an essential tool for any security professional or systems administrator. This free software lets you analyze network traffic in real time, and is often the best tool for troubleshooting issues on your network.

    Common problems that Wireshark can help troubleshoot include dropped packets, latency issues, and malicious activity on your network. It lets you put your network traffic under a microscope, and provides tools to filter and drill down into that traffic, zooming in on the root cause of the problem. Administrators use it to identify faulty network appliances that are dropping packets, latency issues caused by machines routing traffic halfway around the world, and data exfiltration or even hacking attempts against your organization.

    [...]

    While Wireshark supports more than two thousand network protocols, many of them esoteric, uncommon, or old, the modern security professional will find analyzing IP packets to be of most immediate usefulness. The majority of the packets on your network are likely to be TCP, UDP, and ICMP.

    Given the large volume of traffic that crosses a typical business network, Wireshark's tools to help you filter that traffic are what make it especially useful. Capture filters will collect only the types of traffic you're interested in, and display filters will help you zoom in on the traffic you want to inspect. The network protocol analyzer provides search tools, including regular expressions and colored highlighting, to make it easy to find what you're looking for.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Intel and IBM in Linux and the Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

LLVM 7.0.0 is Ready

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • [llvm-dev] [7.0.0 Release] The final tag is in

    The final version of 7.0.0 has been tagged from the branch at r342370. It is identical to rc3 modulo release notes and docs changes.

  • LLVM 7.0 Is Ready For Release

    The LLVM/Clang 7.0 release had been running a bit behind schedule and warranted a third release candidate, but this week LLVM 7.0.0 is now ready to ship.

    Release manager Hans Wennborg announced minutes ago on the mailing list that the 7.0.0 release has been tagged in their source tree. This ends up being the same as last week's 7.0-RC3 except for release notes and documentation updates.

  • LLVM Developers Still Discussing SPIR-V Support Within Clang

    One of the features that didn't materialize for LLVM / Clang 7.0 is the SPIR-V support within the compiler toolchain.

    While there has been a SPIR-V / LLVM translator out-of-tree and various developers at different vendors have been discussing for months the prospects of adding SPIR-V intermediate representation support to LLVM/Clang, it has yet to materialize.

    The latest developer discussion is to have a roundtable talk on the SPIR-V integration at the 2018 LLVM Developers' Meeting. This year the LLVM Developers' Meeting is happening at the San Jose Convention Center from 17 to 18 October.

Valve Prepares Open-Source Moondust Repository

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

Back in June, Valve announced "Moondust" as a new VR technical demo to showcase their hardware efforts (primarily with the Knuckles EV2 VR controllers) and consists of some mini games. It looks like this tech demo might be soon open-sourced.

If you missed Valve's original announcement of Moondust, you can find it on SteamCommunity.com granted this tech demo is primarily aimed at VR-enabling game developers.

Read more

Games: Gift of Parthax, Galaxy Champions TV, Shovel Knight: King of Cards, BlockShip Wars, 0°N 0°W

Filed under
Gaming

The world’s biggest curl installations

Filed under
OSS
Web

curl is quite literally used everywhere. It is used by a huge number of applications and devices. But which applications, devices and users are the ones with the largest number of curl installations? I've tried to come up with a list...

I truly believe curl is one of the world's most widely used open source projects.

If you have comments, other suggestions or insights to help me polish this table or the numbers I present, please let me know!

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: WebVR, Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday, End of Buildbot, Themes and Workshops

  • Performance-Tuning a WebVR Game
    For the past couple of weeks, I have been working on a VR version of one of my favorite puzzle games, the Nonogram, also known as Picross or Griddlers. These are puzzles where you must figure out which cells in a grid are colored in by using column and row counts. I thought this would be perfect for a nice, relaxing VR game. I call it Lava Flow. [...] There is a weird glitch where the whole scene pauses when rebuilding the game board. I need to figure out what’s going on there. To help debug the problems, I need to see the frames per second inside of VR Immersive mode. The standard stats.js module that most three.js apps use actually works by overlaying a DOM element on top of the WebGL canvas. That’s fine most of the time but won’t work when we are in immersive mode. To address this, I created a little class called JStats which draws stats to a small square anchored to the top of the VR view. This way you can see it all the time inside of immersive mode, no matter what direction you are looking.
  • Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday, September 28th
    We are happy to let you know that Friday, September 28th, we are organizing Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Firefox Customize, Font UI, Tracking protection.
  • So long Buildbot, and thanks for all the fish
    Last week, without a lot of fanfare, we shut off the last of the Buildbot infrastructure here at Mozilla.
  • The future of themes is here!
    Themes have always been an integral part of the add-ons ecosystem and addons.mozilla.org (AMO). The current generation of themes – also known as lightweight themes and previously known as Personas (long story) – were introduced to AMO in 2009. There are now over 400 thousand of them available on AMO. Today we’re announcing the AMO launch of the next major step in the evolution of Firefox themes.
  • 8 tips for hosting your first participatory workshop
    “Why not give it a try?” Ricky, our senior user researcher said. “Design with people in my parents age without any design backgrounds? In-ter-est-ing……!” I couldn’t believe that he just threw such a crazy idea in our design planning meeting. Before we go through the whole story, let me give you more context about it. Mozilla Taipei UX team is currently working on a new product exploration for improving the online experience of people between the age of 55~65 in Taiwan. From 2 month, 4 rounds of in-depth interviews we conducted with 34 participants, we understood our target users holistically from their internet behaviors, unmet needs, to their lifestyles. After hosting a 2-day condense version of design sprint in Taipei office for generating brilliant product concepts (more stories, stay tuned :)), we were about to reach the stage of validation.

Android Leftovers

Control your data with Syncthing: An open source synchronization tool

These days, some of our most important possessions—from pictures and videos of family and friends to financial and medical documents—are data. And even as cloud storage services are booming, so there are concerns about privacy and lack of control over our personal data. From the PRISM surveillance program to Google letting app developers scan your personal emails, the news is full of reports that should give us all pause regarding the security of our personal information. Syncthing can help put your mind at ease. An open source peer-to-peer file synchronization tool that runs on Linux, Windows, Mac, Android, and others (sorry, no iOS), Syncthing uses its own protocol, called Block Exchange Protocol. In brief, Syncthing lets you synchronize your data across many devices without owning a server. Read more

Top 3 benefits of company open source programs

Many organizations, from Red Hat to internet-scale giants like Google and Facebook, have established open source programs (OSPO). The TODO Group, a network of open source program managers, recently performed the first annual survey of corporate open source programs, and it revealed some interesting findings on the actual benefits of open source programs. According to the survey, the top three benefits of managing an open source program are... Read more