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Events: SUSECON, Richard Stallman in Montana, ELC Shows in San Diego and Lyon

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • SUSECON: The Best Open Source Conference Value in the World!
  • Richard Stallman to speak at MSU-Bozeman
  • 2019 Linux Foundation events include ELC shows in San Diego and Lyon

    The Linux Foundation announced its 2019 schedule of events, including new events about Ceph and gRPC. The Embedded Linux Conference will co-locate with the Open Source Summit in San Diego on Aug. 21-23.

    Now’s the time to schedule your plans for Linux events, most of which occur under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. The LF has revealed its 2019 calendar for conferences, including two new events: Cephalocon, which will explore the world of the Ceph storage standard and gRPC Conf, which covers gPRC Remote Procedure Call technology. In 2018, Linux Foundation events attracted more than 32,000 attendees from more than 11,000 organizations across 113 countries. The LF expects 35,000 participants in 2019.

Security: Oracle Blobs, Microsoft Fragmentation and Ripple

Filed under
Security
  • Oracle Patches 284 Vulnerabilities in January Critical Patch Update

    Oracle released its first Critical Patch Update for 2019 on Jan. 15, providing patches for 284 vulnerabilities.

    The January 2019 CPU addresses security vulnerabilities found across the Oracle software portfolio, including ones affecting database, middleware, Java, PeopleSoft, Siebel and E-Business Suite applications. Thirty-three of the vulnerabilities are identified as being critical with a Common Vulnerabilities Scoring System (CVSS) score of 9.0 or higher. CVSS is a standardized method for helping organizations understand the impact and severity of software vulnerabilities.

  • Microsoft Rolls Out New Updates for Different Versions of Windows 10, Includes Small Bug Fixes

    Just a week ago, Microsoft released its Patch Tuesday updates for all the supported versions of Windows 10. And now, the company has come up with new updates for Windows 10 versions 1709, 1803, and 1703. The cumulative updates released by the company do not include any security patches but has quite a few changes that have been rolled out. Here are the updates that Microsoft has rolled for the three versions of Windows 10.

  • Only XRP Private Keys That Used Software From Before August 2015 Are Vulnerable

    Ripple (XRP) software libraries published before August 2015 potentially rendered private keys which signed multiple transactions vulnerable, Ripple announced in a statement released on Jan 16.

    Recent research jointly conducted by the DFINITY Foundation and the University of California revealed that a portion of Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH) and Ripple addresses are vulnerable.

    As is known among cryptographers, the security of Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithms (ECDAs) employed by the aforementioned cryptocurrencies is highly dependent on random data, which are known as nonces. The research further explains:

Steam Play and More From Valve for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Valve put out a new Steam beta client, plenty of Linux fixes and no more Steam Play zero-byte downloads

    Valve have put out their second beta update to the Steam client this year and this is actually a rather nice one.

    Firstly, the big annoyance of Steam Play titles always having a zero-byte download when you first load the Steam client has been solved. It will still do it once but when you update them again now, it won't happen again (confirmed that myself). While in reality it was a really minor issue, it was damn annoying so it's great to see it fixed.

    On top of that, Steam now supports ipv6 for "connections to download servers", DPI and screen size changes bugs were fixed, a new force quit option in the normal Steam Overlay if a game is frozen but the overlay still works that will be handy.

  • Steam Client Beta Updated With Many Linux Fixes, Vulkan Caching Updates

    Valve has just released their biggest Steam client beta update of the year so far for Linux gamers.

Programming: gVisor/Go, Rust, and Python

Filed under
Development
  • gVisor: Building and Battle Testing a Userspace OS in Go

    Adin Scannell talks about gVisor - a container runtime that implements the Linux kernel API in userspace using Go. He talks about the architectural challenges associated with userspace kernels, the positive and negative experiences with Go as an implementation language, and finally, how to ensure API coverage and compatibility.

  • Rust bindings for GStreamerGL: Memoirs

    Rust is a great programming language but the community around it’s just amazing. Those are the ingredients for the craft of useful software tools, just like Servo, an experimental browser engine designed for tasks isolation and high parallelization.

    Both projects, Rust and Servo, are funded by ">">Mozilla.

    Thanks to Mozilla and Igalia I have the opportunity to work on Servo, adding it HTML5 multimedia features.

    First, with the help of Fernando Jiménez, we finished what my colleague Philippe Normand and Sebastian Dröge (one of my programming heroes) started: a media player in Rust designed to be integrated in Servo. This media player lives in its own crate: servo/media along with the WebAudio engine. A crate, in Rust jargon, is like a library. This crate is (very ad-hocly) designed to be multimedia framework agnostic, but the only backend right now is for GStreamer. Later we integrated it into Servo adding an initial support for audio and video tags.

    Currently, servo/media passes, through a IPC channel, the array with the whole frame to render in Servo. This implies, at least, one copy of the frame in memory, and we would like to avoid it.

    For painting and compositing the web content, Servo uses WebRender, a crate designed to use the GPU intensively. Thus, if instead of raw frame data we pass OpenGL textures to WebRender the performance could be enhanced notoriously.

  • proc-macro-rules
  • Analyzing Robinhood trade history

Server: OpenShift or Kubernetes, Ansible or Puppet, ML PaaS and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

Filed under
Server
  • Leveraging OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance tests (part 3)

    This is the third of a series of three articles based on a session I held at EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange. In the first article, I presented the rationale and approach for leveraging Red Hat OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance testing, and I gave an overview of the setup. In the second article, we looked at building an observability stack. In this third part, we will see how the execution of the performance tests can be automated and related metrics gathered.

  • Ansible vs. Puppet: Declarative DevOps tools square off

    DevOps aims to drive collaboration between development and operations teams, but software quality drives DevOps adoption more than any other factor. As this comparison of Ansible vs. Puppet shows, software quality dramatically influences DevOps tools.

    Software quality tends to be an organizational goal or a staff function, not the dominion of a dedicated group with broad responsibility to implement its decisions. Effective software quality efforts involve everyone from development to production users to ensure real value.

  • An Introduction to the Machine Learning Platform as a Service

    Machine-Learning-Platform-as-a-Service (ML PaaS) is one of the fastest growing services in the public cloud. It delivers efficient lifecycle management of machine learning models.

    At a high level, there are three phases involved in training and deploying a machine learning model. These phases remain the same from classic ML models to advanced models built using sophisticated neural network architecture.

  • SUSE Partners with Intel and SAP to Accelerate IT Transformation with Persistent Memory in the Data Center

    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications is the FIRST enterprise Linux optimized for Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory with SAP HANA® workloads.

Graphics: GeForce GPUs in Ubuntu, Intel Control Panel For Linux Systems, Mesa 19.0 Deprecates GNU Autotools Build System In Favor Of Meson

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Generations of GeForce GPUs in Ubuntu

    If you are running an Ubuntu system with an older GPU and are curious about upgrading but unsure if it is worth it, Phoronix has a great review for you. Whether you are gaming with OpenGL and Vulkan, or curious about the changes in OpenCL/CUDA compute performance they have you covered. They even delve into the power efficiency numbers so you can spec out the operating costs of a large deployment, if you happen to have the budget to consider buying RTX 2060's in bulk.

  • Intel To Eventually Explore Offering A Graphics Control Panel For Linux Systems

    Intel's Linux graphics driver stack has never offered its own vendor-specific driver control panel GUI like is common among all major graphics vendors on Windows, but instead they've opted for the command-line experience and making use of common interfaces with what's offered by the different desktop environments for resolution handling, multi-monitor setup, etc. But moving forward they may end up bringing a new graphics driver control panel to Linux.

  • Mesa 19.0 Deprecates GNU Autotools Build System In Favor Of Meson

    Last month was a proposed patch that would have killed the Autotools build system within Mesa. Developers have decided for the upcoming Mesa 19.0 release not to eliminate this GNU Autotools support but rather to mark it as deprecated and require an extra flag in order to make use of it.

    Hitting Mesa Git master today was the patch deprecating Autotools support within Mesa in favor of the Meson build system. It hasn't been determined when the Autotools scripts will be removed themselves, but for now if wanting to enable the support you need to pass --enable-autotools to acknowledge the fact that it's been deprecated.

An Absence of Strategy?

Filed under
GNU
OSS

I keep starting articles but not finishing them. However, after responding to some correspondence recently, where I got into a minor rant about a particular topic, I thought about starting this article and more or less airing the rant for a wider audience. I don’t intend to be negative here, so even if this sounds like me having a moan about how things are, I really do want to see positive and constructive things happen to remedy what I see as deficiencies in the way people go about promoting and supporting Free Software.
The original topic of the correspondence was my brother’s article about submitting “apps” to F-Droid, the Free Software application repository for Android, which somehow got misattributed to me in the FSFE newsletter. As anyone who knows both of us can imagine, it is not particularly unusual that people mix us up, but it does still surprise me how people can be fluid about other people’s names and assume that two people with the same family name are the same person.
Eventually, the correction was made, for which I am grateful, and it must be said that I do also appreciate the effort that goes into writing the newsletter. Having previously had the task of doing some of the Fellowship interviews, I know that such things require more work than people might think, largely go either unnoticed or unremarked, and as a participant in the process it can be easy to wonder afterwards if it was worth the bother. I do actually follow the FSFE Planet and the discussion mailing list, so I’d like to think that I keep up with what other people do, but the newsletter must have some value to those who don’t want to follow a range of channels.

Read more

Software: Bash, Entangle and Notepad++

Filed under
Software
  • Bash Shell Utility Reaches 5.0 Milestone

    As we look forward to the release of Linux Kernel 5.0 in the coming weeks, we can enjoy another venerable open source technology reaching the 5.0 milestone: the Bash shell utility. The GNU Project has launched the public version 5.0 of GNU/Linux’s default command language interpreter. Bash 5.0 adds new shell variables and other features and also repairs several major bugs.

    New shell variables in Bash 5.0 include BASH_ARGV0, which “expands to $0 and sets $0 on assignment,” says the project. The EPOCHSECONDS variable expands to the time in seconds since the Unix epoch, and EPOCHREALTIME does the same, but with microsecond granularity.

    New features include a “history -d” built-in function that can remove ranges of history entries and understands negative arguments as offsets from the end of the history list. There is also a new option called “localvar_inherit” that allows local variables to inherit the value of a variable with the same name at the nearest preceding scope.

  • Announce: Entangle “Sodium“ release 2.0 – an app for tethered camera control & capture

    I am pleased to announce a new release 2.0 of Entangle is available for download from the usual location...

  • Entangle 2.0 Released For Taking Control Of Your DSLR Camera From A Linux PC

    Entangle is the long-standing open-source software that allows you to control DSLR cameras from Linux. With various Nikon and Canon DSLRs, among others, it's possible to view a live preview, automatically download images, and snap pictures all over the USB connection to the camera. 

    It's been a while since last hearing of Entangle but today marks the Entangle 2.0 "Sodium" release.

  • Notepad++ Snap App Review

    Notepad++ is a lightweight and popular programmer's text editor, originally developed for MS Windows Operating System, and now available on Snap Store for Linux users.

    The program is developed using C++, hence, the name Notepad++. Its official website claims to save more CO2 emission by utilizing fewer resources and CPU. Nonetheless, Notepad++ comes equipped with many useful features like syntax highlighting, buffer restoring, automatic code indentation, etc.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MuseScore 3.0.1 Released with Redesigned New Score Wizard

    Free Scorewriter MuseScore released version 3.0.1 yesterday with some improvements and numerous bug-fixes.

    MuseScore 3.0.1 redesigned New Score Wizard for easy searching templates, better score previews, and accessibility improvements for blind users. The new release also features better import of 2.X scores, better automatic placement of hairpins and dynamics, and reworked Mixer UI.

  • MuseScore 3.0.1 Release

    Today we are pleased to release MuseScore 3.0.1. This is the first in what we intend to be a regular series of updates to MuseScore 3, the ground-breaking version of the world’s most popular music notation software.

  • Microsoft Updates Skype for Windows and Linux with Blurred Background Feature
  • Fedora 29-20190115 updated Live isos released
  • What Are Various Debian Installation Discs

    Ever got confused by the amount of disc made available for downloading on Debian servers? Worry not, if this is your approach looking around the Internet for an explanation why and what are those various discs for installing Debian on your beloved computer, you are at the right place. I'll try to be quick and concise so you can get on with Debian installation within 2 minutes read Smile

  • Arm Posts Initial Ares CPU Tuning Support For GCC, Helps SPEC Performance By ~1%

    Arm continues plumbing the open-source GNU compiler toolchain support for their next-generation "Ares" high-performance server/HPC core. 

    Back in November they presented the initial Ares compiler patches for GCC. Those patches presented Ares as an ARMv8-based design that has statistical profiling, dot product, and FP16 extensions by default. We've also seen other Ares toolchain patches by Arm developers like the recent GNU Assembler support.

  • ANAVI Thermometer open source temp and humidity sensor board

    Anavi Technology has this month launched a new product via the Crowd Supply in the form of the ANAVI Thermometer, an ESP8266-powered, open source, wireless dev board equipped with temperature and humidity sensors. The Anavi Thermometer Development board is fully compatible with the Arduino IDE, PlatformIO, and Home Assistant via the MQTT messaging protocol. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the open source dev board and its features.

    The development team behind the ANAVI Thermometer explain more about its hardware and specifications:

Servers: MAAS, Kubernetes, Chef and OpenStack

Filed under
Server
  • MAAS 2.5 : Growing the ecosystem and support for KVM micro-clouds

    Our latest release makes for a very exciting point in the MAAS evolution. As datacenter (DC) infrastructure grows at unparalleled scale fueled by new applications and services such as connected autonomous cars, augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) and IoT, the need for automated bare metal provisioning has never been more important. Multi-access edge computing and the ongoing shift to 5G will continue to drive cloud architectures ranging from small clusters deployed at actual radio towers all the way to thousands of nodes running in core data centres.

    The agility and speed of discovering, allocating and also repurposing bare-metal servers will be crucial to new services and an automated physical infrastructure lifecycle management. MAAS 2.5 brings new capabilities and improvements to how this can be achieved in a repeatable and reliable way.

  • Container Storage Interface (CSI) for Kubernetes GA

    The Kubernetes implementation of the Container Storage Interface (CSI) has been promoted to GA in the Kubernetes v1.13 release. Support for CSI was introduced as alpha in Kubernetes v1.9 release, and promoted to beta in the Kubernetes v1.10 release.

    The GA milestone indicates that Kubernetes users may depend on the feature and its API without fear of backwards incompatible changes in future causing regressions. GA features are protected by the Kubernetes deprecation policy.

  • Happy Birthday, Chef!

    With Chef, you can automate the way your infrastructure is configured, deployed, and managed. When you’re operating with a single machine, configuration management can be fairly simple. But what happens when your organization scales up? That’s where Chef comes in and saves the day — and a whole lot more.

    Chef ensures your configurations are standardized and continuously enforced in every environment and at any scale. It allows your infrastructure configurations to be testable, portable, and auditable, saving your organization time and monetary resources. You could say Chef is a superhero with all the saving it does.

  • Community collaboration makes for some great OpenStack solutions

    If you follow the evolution of OpenStack, you know how it’s finding its way into all sorts of workloads, from high-level research to car manufacturing to all-new 5G networks. Organizations are using it for everything from the mundane to the sublime and sharing what they’re learning with the OpenStack community.

    Some of the examples offered up at the recent OpenStack Summit Berlin showed that OpenStack is a full-fledged part of the IT mainstream, which means there are a wealth of ideas out there for your own implementation.

Khronos Group and Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Khronos Exploring New Industry Standard For Heterogeneous Communications

    From VR to autonomous vehicles to edge computing, The Khronos Group continues working on new industry standards for today's expanding compute landscape. Today the organization announced they are soliciting industry feedback and creating an exploratory group for a new, open industry standard around High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC).

  • Broadcom's V3D Gallium Driver Picks Up New Features Ahead Of Mesa 19.0

    Lead VC4/V3D driver developer Eric Anholt of Broadcom has landed a batch of improvements to the next-generation V3D driver in Mesa 19.0.

    The latest round of work that was merged on Monday evening include SSBO / atomic counters support, support for the ARB_framebuffer_no_attachments OpenGL extension, support for more compute shader intrinsics, and other items.

  • AMDGPU Changes Begin Queueing Ahead Of Linux 5.1 Kernel Cycle

    The drm-next-5.1-wip branch has been created by open-source AMD developers as they begin vetting the changes they plan to submit to DRM-Next for inclusion in the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle when it kicks off around the start of March.

    With it just being over one week since the Linux 5.0 merge window ended and with this branch having just been setup the other day, there are just over 100 changes so far in this proving grounds for Linux 5.1 AMDGPU though nothing really dramatic.

Programming: Flask, Agile, Rust and Python

Filed under
Development
  • How to build an API for a machine learning model in 5 minutes using Flask

    As a data scientist consultant, I want to make impact with my machine learning models. However, this is easier said than done. When starting a new project, it starts with playing around with the data in a Jupyter notebook. Once you’ve got a full understanding of what data you’re dealing with and have aligned with the client on what steps to take, one of the outcomes can be to create a predictive model.

    You get excited and go back to your notebook to make the best model possible. The model and the results are presented and everyone is happy. The client wants to run the model in their infrastructure to test if they can really create the expected impact. Also, when people can use the model, you get the input necessary to improve it step by step. But how can we quickly do this, given that the client has some complicated infrastructure that you might not be familiar with?

  • What is Small Scale Scrum?

    Agile is fast becoming a mainstream way industries act, behave, and work as they look to improve efficiency, minimize costs, and empower staff. Most software developers naturally think, act, and work this way, and alignment towards agile software methodologies has gathered pace in recent years.

    VersionOne’s 2018 State of Agile report shows that scrum and its variants remain the most popular implementation of agile. This is in part due to changes made to the Scrum Guide’s wording in recent years that make it more amenable to non-software industries.

  • This Week in Rust 269
  • Async IO in Python: A Complete Walkthrough

    Async IO is a concurrent programming design that has received dedicated support in Python, evolving rapidly from Python 3.4 through 3.7, and probably beyond.

    You may be thinking with dread, “Concurrency, parallelism, threading, multiprocessing. That’s a lot to grasp already. Where does async IO fit in?”

    This tutorial is built to help you answer that question, giving you a firmer grasp of Python’s approach to async IO.

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds and More

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #194

    Here’s what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday January 6 and Saturday January 12 2019...

  • ES File Explorer Has A Hidden Web Server; Data Of 500 Million Users At Risk
  • The Evil-Twin Framework: A tool for testing WiFi security

    The increasing number of devices that connect over-the-air to the internet over-the-air and the wide availability of WiFi access points provide many opportunities for attackers to exploit users. By tricking users to connect to rogue access points, hackers gain full control over the users' network connection, which allows them to sniff and alter traffic, redirect users to malicious sites, and launch other attacks over the network..

    To protect users and teach them to avoid risky online behaviors, security auditors and researchers must evaluate users' security practices and understand the reasons they connect to WiFi access points without being confident they are safe. There are a significant number of tools that can conduct WiFi audits, but no single tool can test the many different attack scenarios and none of the tools integrate well with one another.

    The Evil-Twin Framework (ETF) aims to fix these problems in the WiFi auditing process by enabling auditors to examine multiple scenarios and integrate multiple tools. This article describes the framework and its functionalities, then provides some examples to show how it can be used.

  • KDE Plasma5 – Jan ’19 release for Slackware

    Here is your monthly refresh for the best Desktop Environment you will find for Linux. I just uploaded “KDE-5_19.01” to the ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

    It looks like Slackware is not going to be blessed with Plasma5 any time soon, so I will no longer put an artificial limitation on the dependencies I think are required for a solid Plasma5 desktop experience. If Pat ever decides that Plasma5 has a place in the Slackware distro, he will have to make a judgement call on what KDE functionality can stay and what needs to go.

MongoDB "open-source" Server Side Public License rejected

Filed under
OSS

MongoDB is open-source document NoSQL database with a problem. While very popular, cloud companies, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), IBM Cloud, Scalegrid, and ObjectRocket has profited from it by offering it as a service while MongoDB Inc. hasn't been able to monetize it to the same degree. MongoDB's answer? Relicense the program under its new Server Side Public License (SSPL). Open-source powerhouse Red Hat's reaction? Drop MongoDB from Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.

Red Hat's Technical and Community Outreach Program Manager Tom Callaway explained, in a note stating MongoDB is being removed from Fedora Linux, that "It is the belief of Fedora that the SSPL is intentionally crafted to be aggressively discriminatory towards a specific class of users." Debian Linux had already dropped MongoDB from its distribution.

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BSD: Trident 18.12 and LLVM/Clang Development

Filed under
BSD
  • Trident 18.12-RELEASE Available

    This version is based off the 18.12-stable branch of TrueOS (FreeBSD 13-CURRENT), using the new TrueOS distribution framework with several add-ons by Project Trident itself. The packages with this release were created from the TrueOS ports tree as-of January 7th. We are planning to release regular updates to packages every week or two depending on the state of the ports tree at any given time. In this release, both the Chromium and Iridium browsers have also been fixed and function normally again.

    18.12-RELEASE has been a long time in development, and we wish to say a bit “Thank You!” to everybody who has been helping test out the pre-release versions, find issues, submit fixes both to us and to upstream FreeBSD/TrueOS, and in general being a wonderful and supportive community! We look forward to continuing to work with all of you in making Project Trident amazing!

  • Google Is Hiring More LLVM/Clang Developers

    Android and Chrome are among their software now shipping in production that relies upon LLVM Clang rather than GCC or other alternatives, among other Google software projects. LLVM/Clang is also used by various internal projects at Google. Over the years Google developers have contributed back many improvements to upstream LLVM ranging from their Lanai processor back-end to security improvements to other language tooling on LLVM to performance optimizations.

  • LLVM 9.0 Is Now Open For Development, Releasing In Late 2019

    The code for the upcoming LLVM 8.0 release (Clang 8.0 included) is now branched and the release candidate process will begin shortly. That means LLVM 9.0 is now open for development on its master branch.

    Developers behind this compiler stack are planning to get out of the official LLVM 8.0.0 release by the end of February. The first release candidate is imminent and one or two more can be expected in February based upon how the testing proceeds.

Mozilla's Work on a New Browsers Called "Fenix"

Filed under
Android
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla Fenix: New Android browser's intriguing details start to surface

    The new non-Firefox browser for Android is apparently targeted at younger people, with Mozilla developers on GitHub tagging the description, 'Fenix is not your parents' Android browser'.

    Fenix mockups found by Mozilla contributor Sören Hentzschel and Ghacks suggest the makers of Fenix are turning the Firefox Android browser on its head, currently toying with the idea of putting the URL bar and home button down at the bottom of user interface.

    News of Fenix as a possible replacement surfaced in the middle of 2018 after someone spotted the new Mozilla mobile project on GitHub. Activity on the project has picked up in recent months.

  • Firefox Fenix for Android mockups

    Mozilla is working on a new web browser for Android to replace the currently available Firefox for Android mobile browser.

    Firefox users who use the browser on Android may have noticed that development slowed down in recent time. Updates are still released regularly but they address issues such as slowdowns, crashes, or security issues for the most part.

    The core reason for that is that Mozilla's working on Fenix, a new mobile browser for Android. Fenix is based on Android Components and GeckoView. In other words, Fenix will be powered by built-in components on Android and Mozilla's GeckoView.

  • Keep Smart Assistants from Spying on You with Alias, Security Advisory for Old scp Clients, Major Metasploit Framework Release, Mozilla Working on a New Browser for Android and VirtualBox 6.0.2 Is Out

    Mozilla is working on a new Android browser called Fenix. According to ZDNet, this "new non-Firefox browser for Android is apparently targeted at younger people, with Mozilla developers on GitHub tagging the description, 'Fenix is not your parents' Android browser'." In addition, mockups suggest that Fenix developers are "currently toying with the idea of putting the URL bar and home button down at the bottom of user interface."

CTL Announces $300 Rugged Chromebook Tablet for the Education Market

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Chromebook Tablet (seriously though, why can’t get rid of the “book” in that title?) education revolution is here. Acer started it, ASUS got in on it, and now CTL is getting in the game. Here’s the skinny.

You’d be forgiven if your first thought was “…who is CTL?,” because honestly, they’re not as well known as some of the other companies that are active in the Chrome OS market. Still, they make some fantastic Chromebooks and Chromeboxes (see, we don’t say “Chromebook Desktop,” so why aren’t they called Chrometabs?) designed to be more robust than the average Chrome OS device.

Read more

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Android Leftovers