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Tuesday, 25 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Review: Bodhi Linux 5.0.0 Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2018 - 9:11am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2018 - 9:09am
Story 5 ways to play old-school games on a Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2018 - 8:57am
Story Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch” Roy Schestowitz 1 24/09/2018 - 6:50am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2018 - 2:39am
Story Microsoft Flaws and Windows Back Doors (Coordinated with NSA) Show Their Cost/Toll Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2018 - 10:59pm
Story Red Hat Downgrades and Lowered Targets Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2018 - 10:06pm
Story OpenShot Video Editor Released 2.4.3 – Here’s What’s New arindam1989 2 23/09/2018 - 9:29pm
Story Games: SC Controller, PlayOnLinux, OpenRA, Galaxy in Turmoil Roy Schestowitz 1 23/09/2018 - 9:23pm
Story The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2018 - 9:15pm

Linux Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA, Mesa, and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Preparing A Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.20~5.0

    Intel open-source developers have already sent in multiple pull requests of feature work to DRM-Next that in turn will be pulled into the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel merge window and they have one final batch of feature changes on the way.

    The cut-off is quickly approaching for new feature work slated for this next kernel cycle (Linux 4.20, or renamed to Linux 5.0 if Linus Torvalds sticks to his usual versioning preference) and Intel has announced a batch of changes ready for testing ahead of issuing it as a pull request to DRM-Next.

  • NVIDIA Sends Out DRM Display Patches For Tegra's Xavier SoC

    Going back to the beginning of the year NVIDIA developers have been contributing "Tegra194" enablement to the upstream Linux kernel. They've now moved on to contributing T194 support to the Tegra Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for display support on this SoC that's better known as Xavier.

    The Tegra194 / Xavier is NVIDIA's latest SoC with the eight Carmel ARMv8 cores and Volta-based GPU. The NVIDIA Xavier Developer Kits have begun shipping and now with all of the other necessary hardware enablement bits upstream or on their way to mainline, the latest patches being published are for the display support with the Tegra DRM driver.

  • More Linux Tests & Driver Observations With The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    Here are some additional notes to complement my GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux review from yesterday now that I've had more time with this card and a working Linux driver.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Is Coming This Week With Dozens Of Fixes

    As the first stable point release to the newly-christened Mesa 18.2, the Mesa 18.2.1 release is going to be a big one.

    The release candidate to Mesa 18.2.1 was issued on Wednesday and has nearly 60 patches over the recent 18.2.0 stable release. This includes Vulkan header updates for v1.1.84 and many RADV / ANV Vulkan driver fixes ranging from CTS issues to hangs to other fixes.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Released With A Number Of Fixes For The Vulkan Drivers

    Mesa 18.2.1 is out this morning as the first stable point release to the recently introduced Mesa 18.2 series. Mesa 18.2.1 marks the point at which it should be relatively safe for stable-minded users to switch over to this quarterly release stream.

    Given it's the first point release after a very active development cycle, there are a lot of fixes: around five dozen changes are making up today's release coming two weeks after v18.2.0.

  • AMD Adds A Seemingly New Polaris ID To Their Linux Driver

    It looks like another re-branded AMD Polaris graphics card might be on the way given the latest AMDGPU Linux kernel patch.

    Either there's a new AMD Radeon "Polaris" graphics card coming, some new modem for OEMs, or just very tardy maintenance in adding the necessary PCI ID for an existing Polaris graphics card revision... But two years after Polaris RX 400 cards first debuted (and a year and a half since the RX 500 series), there is now a new Polaris PCI ID being added to the AMD Linux graphics driver.

Mir Release 1.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • IoT Graphics: Mir Release 1.0

    The Mir team is pleased to announce the milestone release of Mir 1.0.0. This is the first major release targeted at IoT device makers and enthusiasts looking to build the next-generation of graphical solutions.

  • Mir 1.0 Released For "Next-Generation of Graphical Solutions"

    As we were expecting over the last few days, the long-awaited release of Mir 1.0 is now available. It's certainly a different beast now than when "Mir 1.0" was talked about in the past now that it's focused on providing Wayland support.

Games: Trash Squad, Steam Censorship, Streets of Rogue, Conarium, Citra, RPCS3, Feudal Alloy

Filed under
Gaming
  • 2D shooter with a few RPG elements 'Trash Squad' has been released for Linux

    Time to take out the trash as the 2D shooter with RPG elements Trash Squad [Steam] is now available on Linux. The idea of it actually sounds quite amusing and it looks like it could be reasonably good.

    While it released for Windows back in January this year, only yesterday was Linux support made available. There's no official announcement just yet, but everything seems in place.

  • Valve to begin moderating game forums on Steam next week

    Starting on Tuesday, September 25th Valve will be actively moderating all game forums on Steam unless a developer opts to not have Valve do so.

    So from then onwards if someone reports a post on a Steam forum, let's say for Streets of Rogue, it will then go into a queue for Valve's own moderation team to look over. They will then remove it if it violates their community guidelines.

  • The excellent rogue-lite 'Streets of Rogue' now actually has an ending

    Streets of Rogue, easily one of the top Early Access games going right now actually has an ending and it sounds quite amusing.

  • Lovecraftian horror 'Conarium' now has a Linux version on GOG

    Think you're brave? Lovecraftian horror Conarium from Zoetrope Interactive and Iceberg Interactive can now be picked up for Linux on GOG. Powered by Unreal Engine 4, it first arrived on Linux back in February this year and it only arrived on GOG around 2 days ago.

  • Nintendo 3DS emulator 'Citra' sounds like it's coming along rather nicely

    For those who like to use their PC to emulate other platforms, the Citra [Official Site, GitHub] emulator for the Nintendo 3DS just put out a progress report and it's very promising.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator 'RPCS3' is coming along nicely with some major improvements

    More glorious news for emulation today with the latest RPCS3 [Official Site] (a PlayStation 3 emulator) giving an update on their progress and it's damn fine too.

  • Action RPG 'Feudal Alloy' with fish-controlled medieval robots delayed until next year

    Writing a rather short email to us today, Attu Games have announced their rather interesting Action RPG Feudal Alloy is now going to release next year. To be clear, this isn't a delay in the Linux version, the entire game is delayed.

    No reason was given, literally all that was said was this "Feudal Alloy, a fish-controlled medieval-robots metroidvania, is delayed until January 2019". I'm not fussed personally, when I tested the build they provided us with some time ago I was rather impressed. So taking some extra time to make it as great as they can is fine.

Ubuntu-based elementary OS 5.0 'Juno' Beta 2 Linux distro now available

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Why don’t more desktop computer users use Linux? Well, software compatibility aside, there is fear of change and the unknown. For a user to switch from Windows, it must be a fairly simple affair. For years, just installing a Linux-based operating system was a daunting task. These days, it can be faster and easier than installing Windows 10 -- depending on distro, of course.

For beginners, once installed, their chosen Linux distro should be easy to use with an intuitive desktop environment. I'm a big fan of GNOME, but understandably, not all folks like it -- especially Linux novices. One particular Linux-based desktop operating system has been focusing on accessibility to all -- elementary OS. This distro is polished and aims to be easy to use for both experts and beginners alike. Today, version 5.0 of the OS -- called "Juno" -- reaches Beta 2. Impressively, there have been over 200 fixes implemented since Beta 1.

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NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Shows Very Strong Compute Performance Potential

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Besides the new GeForce RTX 2080 series being attractive for developers wanting to make use of new technologies like RTX/ray-tracing, mesh shaders, and DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling), CUDA and OpenCL benchmarking so far on the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is yielding impressive performance -- even outside of the obvious AI / deep learning potential workloads with the Turing tensor cores. Here are some benchmarks looking at the OpenCL/CUDA performance on the high-end Maxwell, Pascal, and Turing cards as well as an AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 for reference. System power consumption, performance-per-Watt, and performance-per-dollar metrics also round out this latest Ubuntu Linux GPU compute comparison.

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Deepin Linux: As Gorgeous As It Is User-Friendly

Filed under
Linux

Deepin Linux. You may not have heard much about this distribution, and the fact that it’s often left out of the conversation is a shame. Why? Because Deepin Linux is as beautiful as it is user-friendly. This distribution has plenty of “wow” factor and very little disappointment.

For the longest time, Deepin Linux was based on Ubuntu. But with the release of 15.7, that all changed. Now, Deepin’s foundation is Debian, but the desktop is still that beautiful Deepin Desktop. And when I say it’s beautiful, it truly is one of the most gorgeous desktop environments you’ll find on any operating system. That desktop uses a custom-built QT5 toolkit, which runs as smoothly and with as much polish as any I’ve ever used. Along with that desktop, comes a few task-specific apps, built with the same toolkit, so the experience is consistent and integrated.

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Reply to Rick Moen on DNG

Filed under
Development
Linux
OSS

Ah, deliciously vague language. Useful to, in time, get uncooperative maintainers thrown off the project to be replaced by more cooperative, on-message maintainers. Remember that technical merit or quality is not the goal of the author of the Contributor Covenant on which this CoC is directly based.

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Vilnius: “Open source improves our public services”

Filed under
OSS

The city of Vilnius, Lithuania’s capital and with over half a million inhabitants the country’s largest city, is increasingly using open source software. The most recent example is WordPress: in July the city unveiled its new portal built on this content management system. “Open source enables us to improve our public services and empowers us to share our solutions and data,” says Dalius Kazlauskas, senior project manager at Vilnius’ E-City department.

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IssueHunt: A New Bounty Hunting Platform for Open Source Software

Filed under
News

IssueHunt is a new bounty hunting platform for open source software that aims to bridge the gap between open source projects and open source developers.
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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 178

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 178.

  • WinWorld – A Large Collection Of Defunct OSs, Software And Games

    The other day, I was testing Dosbox which is used to run MS-DOS games and programs in Linux. While searching for some classic programs like Turbo C++, I stumbled upon a website named WinWorld. I went through a few links in this site and quite surprised. WinWorld has a plenty of good-old and classic OSs, software, applications, development tools, games and a lot of other miscellaneous utilities which are abandoned by the developers a long time ago. It is an online museum run by community members, volunteers and is dedicated to the preservation and sharing of vintage, abandoned, and pre-release software.

    WinWorld was started back in 2003 and its founder claims that the idea to start this site inspired by Yahoo briefcases. The primary purpose of this site is to preserve and share old software. Over the years, many people volunteered to improve this site in numerous ways and the collection of old software in WinWorld has grown exponentially. The entire WinWorld library is free, open and available to everyone.

  • How to Encrypt USB Drive on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
  • The excellent 2D action RPG 'CrossCode' is now officially out

    CrossCode from Radical Fish Games is a rather great 2D action RPG and today it was officially released across multiple stores.

    It's a fun idea, having you play as a character who is actually in an MMO set in the far future, where your avatar has a physical form. It's 2018 after all, we have films like Ready Player One that follow a guy running around in VR…

    Inspired by some of the classic JRPGs, CrossCode has a lot of familiar RPG elements and anyone who has played an action-RPG will feel right at home. I've been waiting so long for this to be finished and it's absolutely worth the wait.

  • Transhuman Design has removed the Linux version of BUTCHER due to issues in favour of Steam Play

    It seems Transhuman Design have removed the Linux version of BUTCHER after users reported issues, opting instead to ask Steam to add it as an approved Steam Play title.

    [...]

    After digging into the Steam forum, I came across this forum topic started in August, where four users mentioned trouble starting the game. That doesn't seem like a lot of people to make such a big decision, but it's understandable that with a tiny team and little time they're trying to make it so Linux gamers still have a good experience. Probably a good case for Valve to allow people to have a choice between native and Steam Play's Proton.

  • Tumbleweed Gets New Versions of KDE Plasma, Applications

    A total of four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were delivered to users of the rolling release this past week and the snapshot brought new versions of KDE Plasma and KDE Applications.

    The most recent snapshot 20180917 updated three packages. The GNOME package dconf-editor was updated to 3.30.0. Users of the ext2 filesystem will notice the utility package e2fsprogs 1.44.4 will fix the debugs ncheck command to work for files with multiple hard links; the updated package also has new debugfs commands for dumping xattr blocks and i_blocks array. Another GNOME package was updated with the iagno 3.30.0 package for the game reversi, which shows that GNOME 3.30 packages are starting to be integrated into Tumbleweed snapshots.

    Another three packages were updated in the 20180916 snapshot. The GNU Project debugger, gdb 8.2, added several patches and support access to new POWER8 registers. A fix was made for a GNU Compiler Collection 8.1 warning with the perl-DBD-mysql 4.047 updated, which also added options needed for public key based security. The other package that was updated in the snapshot was perl-Glib 1.327.

  • Slim signage player features Radeon E8860 GPU and six HDMI ports

    Ibase’s high-end “SI-626” signage player runs Windows or Linux on 7th or 6th Gen Intel Core CPUs with Radeon E8860 graphics, and offers 6x HDMI 1.4b ports, EDID remote management, and a 30mm profile.

    Ibase’s new SI-626 digital signage and video wall player combines high-end functionality with a slim 30mm height — 1.5mm thinner than its AMD Ryzen V1000 based SI-324 player. Like the SI-324, the SI-626 features hardware based EDID remote management with software setting mode to prevent display issues due to cable disconnection or display identification failures.

  • 15 Best “Lite” Android Go Apps To Save Battery And Storage In 2018
  • Hide your real name in Open Source

    If you’re thinking about contributing to Open Source, please take a moment to think of the negative impact it could have on your career…

  • Thermal Microconference Accepted into 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference

    As the energy density of computer systems has increased, thermal issues have become an increasingly hot topic across the spectrum from hand-held systems to internet datacenters. Because the need for thermal management is relatively new, there is a wide variety of hardware and firmware mechanisms, to say nothing of a wide variety of independently developed software to interact with these mechanisms. This in turn results in complex and almost-duplicate code to manage and control thermal excursions. This microconference will therefore look to see if it is possible to consolidate or at least to better align the Linux kernel’s thermal subsystems.

    This microconference will therefore discuss better handling of low ambient temperatures, userspace thermal control, improvements to thermal zone mode, better support for indirect (virtual) temperature measurement, sensor hierarchy, scheduler interactions with thermal management, and improvements to idle injection as a way to cool a core.

  • Debian: DSA-4298-1: hylafax security update

Databases and Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • NoSQL Books

    One of the most basic choices to make when developing an application is whether to use a SQL or NoSQL database to store the data. “NoSQL” simply means non-relational and not SQL. It’s sometimes referred to as unstructured storage.

    Like any type of database, NoSQL systems are used for storing and retrieving data. But NoSQL systems store and manage data in ways that allow for high operational speed and great flexibility which is extremely useful for big data databases and cloud databases.

  • Canonical Announces Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Mozilla to Discuss the Future of Advertising at ICDPPC, Newegg Attacked, MetaCase Launches MetaEdit+ 5.5 and MariaDB Acquires Clustrix

    MariaDB has acquired Clustrix, the "pioneer in distributed database technology". According to the press release, this acquisition gives "MariaDB's open source database the scalability and high-availability that rivals or exceeds Oracle and Amazon while foregoing the need for expensive computing platforms or high licensing fees."

  • Python 3.7 beginner's cheat sheet

    The Python programming language is known for its large community and diverse extension menu, but much is packed into the language itself. This cheat sheet rounds up a few built-in pieces to get new Python programmers started.

  • 8 Python packages that will simplify your life with Django

    Django developers, we're devoting this month's Python column to packages that will help you. These are our favorite Django libraries for saving time, cutting down on boilerplate code, and generally simplifying our lives. We've got six packages for Django apps and two for Django's REST Framework, and we're not kidding when we say these packages show up in almost every project we work on.

    But first, see our tips for making the Django Admin more secure and an article on 5 favorite open source Django packages.

California’s First Open Source Election System: Maybe not!

Filed under
OSS

OSI Affiliate Member, California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO), has expressed concerns that a recent announcement by Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk (Dean Logan) and the State of California's Secretary of State (Alex Padilla) was not accurate in their descriptions of a newly certified elections tally system, "Voting System For All People" (VSAP), as using "open source technology."

Both the Los Angeles County and California Secretary of State announcements stated the elections system was, "the first publicly-owned, open-source election tally system certified under the California voting systems standards" [emphasis added].

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Mozilla: WebVR, Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday, End of Buildbot, Themes and Workshops

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Performance-Tuning a WebVR Game

    For the past couple of weeks, I have been working on a VR version of one of my favorite puzzle games, the Nonogram, also known as Picross or Griddlers. These are puzzles where you must figure out which cells in a grid are colored in by using column and row counts. I thought this would be perfect for a nice, relaxing VR game. I call it Lava Flow.

    [...]

    There is a weird glitch where the whole scene pauses when rebuilding the game board. I need to figure out what’s going on there. To help debug the problems, I need to see the frames per second inside of VR Immersive mode. The standard stats.js module that most three.js apps use actually works by overlaying a DOM element on top of the WebGL canvas. That’s fine most of the time but won’t work when we are in immersive mode.

    To address this, I created a little class called JStats which draws stats to a small square anchored to the top of the VR view. This way you can see it all the time inside of immersive mode, no matter what direction you are looking.

  • Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday, September 28th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, September 28th, we are organizing Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Firefox Customize, Font UI, Tracking protection.

  • So long Buildbot, and thanks for all the fish

    Last week, without a lot of fanfare, we shut off the last of the Buildbot infrastructure here at Mozilla.

  • The future of themes is here!

    Themes have always been an integral part of the add-ons ecosystem and addons.mozilla.org (AMO). The current generation of themes – also known as lightweight themes and previously known as Personas (long story) – were introduced to AMO in 2009. There are now over 400 thousand of them available on AMO. Today we’re announcing the AMO launch of the next major step in the evolution of Firefox themes.

  • 8 tips for hosting your first participatory workshop

    “Why not give it a try?” Ricky, our senior user researcher said.
    “Design with people in my parents age without any design backgrounds? In-ter-est-ing……!” I couldn’t believe that he just threw such a crazy idea in our design planning meeting.

    Before we go through the whole story, let me give you more context about it. Mozilla Taipei UX team is currently working on a new product exploration for improving the online experience of people between the age of 55~65 in Taiwan. From 2 month, 4 rounds of in-depth interviews we conducted with 34 participants, we understood our target users holistically from their internet behaviors, unmet needs, to their lifestyles. After hosting a 2-day condense version of design sprint in Taipei office for generating brilliant product concepts (more stories, stay tuned Smile), we were about to reach the stage of validation.

Control your data with Syncthing: An open source synchronization tool

Filed under
OSS

These days, some of our most important possessions—from pictures and videos of family and friends to financial and medical documents—are data. And even as cloud storage services are booming, so there are concerns about privacy and lack of control over our personal data. From the PRISM surveillance program to Google letting app developers scan your personal emails, the news is full of reports that should give us all pause regarding the security of our personal information.

Syncthing can help put your mind at ease. An open source peer-to-peer file synchronization tool that runs on Linux, Windows, Mac, Android, and others (sorry, no iOS), Syncthing uses its own protocol, called Block Exchange Protocol. In brief, Syncthing lets you synchronize your data across many devices without owning a server.

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Top 3 benefits of company open source programs

Filed under
OSS

Many organizations, from Red Hat to internet-scale giants like Google and Facebook, have established open source programs (OSPO). The TODO Group, a network of open source program managers, recently performed the first annual survey of corporate open source programs, and it revealed some interesting findings on the actual benefits of open source programs. According to the survey, the top three benefits of managing an open source program are...

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Solus 3 ISO Refresh Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are proud to announce the availability of Solus 3.9999, our ISO refresh of Solus 3. This refresh enables support for a variety of new hardware released since Solus 3, introduces an updated set of default applications and theming, as well as enables users to immediately take advantage of new Solus infrastructure.

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What’s New in PeppermintOS 9

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

PeppermintOS 9 is the latest release of Ubuntu-based distribution featuring a desktop environment mashup of Xfce and LXDE components. The latest release nearly completes a process begun several upgrades ago, using more Xfce elements and fewer LXDE components.

Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Peppermint OS 9 is using the Linux 4.15 kernel and supports both 32-bit and 64-bit hardware architectures. Highlights of this release include a new default system theme based on the popular Arc GTK+ theme, support for both Snap and Flatpak universal binary packages via GNOME Software, which will now be displayed in the main menu.

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More in Tux Machines

Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust
    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.
  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux
    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs. The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.
  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing
    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available. For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]
    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon. Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry. But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.
  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting
    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.
  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later
    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:
  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks
    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research. At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions. Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.
  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update
    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."
  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid
    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.
  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More
    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality. The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.
  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0
    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter. Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.

Money and Press for FOSS FUD firms