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Sunday, 17 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB NVMe Linux SSD Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:26pm
Story elementary 5 "Juno" Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:21pm
Story Audiophile Linux Promises Aural Nirvana Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:17pm
Story First Look: Tuxedo InfinityCube Linux Desktop PC With Intel Core-i7 8700 Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:14pm
Story Redcore Linux Gives Gentoo a Nice Facelift Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:12pm
Story GNU/Linux Distributions Deconstructed, GNU/Linux Distros on Old Chromebooks Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:08pm
Story Stable kernels 4.20.10, 4.19.23, 4.14.101 and 4.9.158 Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:07pm
Story Stable kernels 4.20.9, 4.19.22, 4.14.100 and 4.9.157 Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 6:01pm
Story Games: Forgiveness, Littlewood, Steam Play and More Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 5:59pm
Story postmarketOS – A Linux Distribution for Mobile Devices Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2019 - 10:46am

Stallman's New Talk About "Free Software and Your Freedom"; GNU Health and Red Hat Dump MongoDB Over Relicensing

Filed under
GNU
Red Hat
OSS

Audiocasts: LINUX Unplugged 288, mintCast 302 and 5 Linux Mint Issues For Windows Users

Filed under
Interviews
  • We're Gonna Need a Bigger Repo | LINUX Unplugged 288

    The hype around a new security flaw hits new levels. Fedora has a bunch of news, and we discover what's new in the latest Plasma release.

    Plus we fall down the openSUSE rabbit hole when Ell updates us on her desktop challenge.

    Special Guests: Alan Pope, Brent Gervais, Daniel Fore, Ell Marquez, Martin Wimpress, and Neal Gompa.

  • mintCast 302 – New Users, Start Here
  • 5 Linux Mint Issues For Windows Users

    5 Linux Mint Issues For Windows Users. Any Windows user considering the switch to Linux Mint would be wise to consider the following points before taking the leap into a new Linux distribution. Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to have you join us! But there are issues to consider before switching from Windows over to Linux Mint.

Security: Massive Data Dump, VFEmail, Docker, Latest Updates and Antivirus Software as Risk

Filed under
Security

Programming: Python 3, Theia and More

Filed under
Development

Mozilla: ARCore and Arkit, Rust, Socorro and Free Speech

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • ARCore and Arkit, What is under the hood: SLAM (Part 2)

    In our last blog post (part 1), we took a look at how algorithms detect keypoints in camera images. These form the basis of our world tracking and environment recognition. But for Mixed Reality, that alone is not enough. We have to be able to calculate the 3d position in the real world. It is often calculated by the spatial distance between itself and multiple keypoints. This is often called Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). And this is what is responsible for all the world tracking we see in ARCore/ARKit.

  • This Week in Rust 273
  • Socorro: January 2019 happenings

    Socorro is the crash ingestion pipeline for Mozilla's products like Firefox. When Firefox crashes, the crash reporter collects data about the crash, generates a crash report, and submits that report to Socorro. Socorro saves the crash report, processes it, and provides an interface for aggregating, searching, and looking at crash reports.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Mozilla Foundation fellow weighs in on flawed EU Terrorist Content regulation

    As we’ve noted previously, the EU’s proposed Terrorist Content regulation would seriously undermine internet health in Europe, by forcing companies to aggressively suppress user speech with limited due process and user rights safeguards. Yet equally concerning is the fact that this proposal is likely to achieve little in terms of reducing the actual terrorism threat or the phenomenon of radicalisation in Europe. Here, Mozilla Foundation Tech Policy fellow and community security expert Stefania Koskova* unpacks why, and proposes an alternative approach for EU lawmakers.

    With the proposed Terrorist Content regulation, the EU has the opportunity to set a global standard in how to effectively address what is a pressing public policy concern. To be successful, harmful and illegal content policies must carefully and meaningfully balance the objectives of national security, internet-enabled economic growth and human rights. Content policies addressing national security threats should reflect how internet content relates to ‘offline’ harm and should provide sufficient guidance on how to comprehensively and responsibly reduce it in parallel with other interventions. Unfortunately, the Commission’s proposal falls well short in this regard.

Red Hat: Gluster/Ceph, OpenShift, Red Hat Virtualization 4.3 Beta

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Open Outlook: Storage and the Power of the Stack

    The storage landscape has changed considerably over the past few years. We’ve seen the advent of Linux containers as a popular development tool, necessitating new forms of container-native storage solutions. Storage has evolved into software-defined storage (SDS) solutions that can provide consistent storage across on-premise, public and hybrid cloud environments. Hyperconverged infrastructure has emerged as a viable means of supporting both compute and storage.

    Indeed, storage has evolved since Red Hat acquired Gluster and InkTank (Ceph) in 2011 and 2014, respectively. At the time of those acquisitions, Red Hat was looking at the individual power behind both solutions, and how that power could be harnessed to make open source the de facto choice for organizations looking to dip their toes into SDS. In reality, we were laying the groundwork for the software-defined present we find ourselves in today. We were creating the building blocks for an integrated portfolio of solutions with storage as an important part of the puzzle.

  • OpenShift Protects against Nasty Container Exploit

    Red Hat OpenShift has been using Linux process-to-file type enforcement with multi-category security in its container orchestration platform for 8 years. SELinux has been set to enforcing in OpenShift since 2011. Red Hat Openshift Online is a publicly accessible hosted service that thousands of developers log into everyday to launch code as containers. Red Hat OpenShift Online had SELinux turned on from the beginning. How about the version of OpenShift you are running inside of your datacenter? That’s right: Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform has had SELinux turned on by default. And we don’t just mean it’s turned on; we mean it is configured to protect you out of the box against real world threats.

    I’m afraid I don’t know of another Kubernetes-based container orchestration platform that has used this protection method for this long. Unlike other Kubernetes distributions, Red Hat has bridged the gap between Linux and the container orchestration platform on top, enabling Red Hat OpenShift to track and address security issues across the stack, not just in one layer. And we’re able to do this by default, from day one.

  • Red Hat Virtualization 4.3 Beta is available now

    Virtualization is a cornerstone of the data center, providing a platform which organizations can use to more rapidly deploy new servers for applications, or to more confidently host existing applications which are critical to keeping the business operational. A virtualization platform should be a reliable and hardworking stalwart, ready to take on more work when needed.

  • Introducing a New Way to Try Red Hat OpenShift Online Pro

    Red Hat OpenShift Online hosting has been available since 2011, and to date, well over 4 million applications have been launched on OpenShift Online. This service has been available in two tiers: the free Starter plan and the paid Pro plan. Both services offered the same OpenShift experience, with the Starter plan geared toward developers who want to experiment and learn on the platform, and the Pro plan geared toward professional application development and hosting.

    We’re excited to announce that as of today, we’re offering a 30 day free trial of the Red Hat OpenShift Online Pro plan. The trial automatically converts to a fully supported, paying account after the 30 days to prevent any interruptions in service. This offering provides the full professional experience, allowing customers to utilize the full public cloud hosted power of OpenShift Online.

Events: FOSDEM, Red Hat at MWC19 Barcelona 2019, openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19)

Filed under
OSS
  • Jonathan Dowland: My first FOSDEM

    FOSDEM 2019 was my first FOSDEM. My work reason to attend was to meet many of my new team-mates from the Red Hat OpenJDK team, as well as people from the wider OpenJDK community, and learn a bit about what people are up to. I spent most of the first day entirely in the Free Java room, which was consistently over-full. On Monday I attended an OpenJDK Committer's meeting hosted by Oracle (despite not — yet — being an OpenJDK source contributor… soon!)

    A sides from work and Java, I thought this would be a great opportunity to catch up with various friends from the Debian community. I didn't do quite as well as I hoped! By coincidence, I sat on a train next to Ben Hutchings On Friday, I tried to meet up with Steve McIntyre and others (I spotted at least Neil Williams and half a dozen others) for dinner, but alas the restaurant had (literally) nothing on the menu for vegetarians, so I waved and said hello for a mere 5 minutes before moving on.

  • At MWC19 Barcelona 2019, the future is open!

    From open platforms, to open collaboration, to open innovation, more telecommunications service providers (SPs) are looking to open to deliver more services faster, to meet customer expectations, beat out competitors, and excel in the digital era. In a few short days, MWC Barcelona will be underway in Barcelona, giving the industry an opportunity to coalesce and take on new challenges together.

  • First Phase for openSUSE Conference Talks Begins

    openSUSE is pleased to announce the first phase for accepting talks for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) has begun.

    A total of 80 talks were submitted during the call for papers, which began in late fall and ended Feb. 4. In total, there were 42 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 19 short talks and seven lighting talks submitted.

    The review team rated all the submitted abstracts and selected 22 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 13 short talks and five lighting talks.

Month of KDE Applications Snaps

Filed under
KDE

Snaps is a fancy new package format for Linux which allows applications to be shipped which run on pretty much any Linux distro. This nicely solves one of the headaches with shipping software for Linux, that you have to package it a dozen times using a dozen different methods to get anyone to be able to install it.

The format and host for Snaps is made using Ubuntu and developed by KDE patron Canonical.

We have been working on building Snaps from the KDE neon builders for some time and they’re now at a quality where we can move them into the stable channel. (Snap software gets hosted in channels depending on the risk you want to take, others being candidate, beta and edge.)

Read more

Also: What's new in KDE Plasma 5.15

Streama – Create Your Own Personal “Netflix” in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

Streama is a free self hosted media streaming server running on Java, that you can install on your Linux distribution. Its features are similar to those of Kodi and Plex and it is simply a matter of personal choice which one you would like to use.

Read more

Mozilla: Tails 3.12, Better Testing of Firefox and Complaint About Facebook

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Tails 3.12.1 is out

    This release is an emergency release to fix a critical security vulnerability in Firefox.

    It also fixes other security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

  • Mozilla to use machine learning to find code bugs before they ship

    In a bid to cut the number of coding errors made in its Firefox browser, Mozilla is deploying Clever-Commit, a machine-learning-driven coding assistant developed in conjunction with game developer Ubisoft.

    Clever-Commit analyzes code changes as developers commit them to the Firefox codebase. It compares them to all the code it has seen before to see if they look similar to code that the system knows to be buggy. If the assistant thinks that a commit looks suspicious, it warns the developer. Presuming its analysis is correct, it means that the bug can be fixed before it gets committed into the source repository. Clever-Commit can even suggest fixes for the bugs that it finds. Initially, Mozilla plans to use Clever-Commit during code reviews, and in time this will expand to other phases of development, too. It works with all three of the languages that Mozilla uses for Firefox: C++, JavaScript, and Rust.

    The tool builds on work by Ubisoft La Forge, Ubisoft's research lab. Last year, Ubisoft presented the Commit-Assistant, based on research called CLEVER, a system for finding bugs and suggesting fixes. That system found some 60-70 percent of buggy commits, though it also had a false positive rate of 30 percent. Even though this false positive rate is quite high, users of this system nonetheless felt that it was worthwhile, thanks to the time saved when it did correctly identify a bug.

  • Facebook Answers Mozilla’s Call to Deliver Open Ad API Ahead of EU Election

    After calls for increased transparency and accountability from Mozilla and partners in civil society, Facebook announced it would open its Ad Archive API next month. While the details are still limited, this is an important first step to increase transparency of political advertising and help prevent abuse during upcoming elections.

    Facebook’s commitment to make the API publicly available could provide researchers, journalists and other organizations the data necessary to build tools that give people a behind the scenes look at how and why political advertisers target them. It is now important that Facebook follows through on these statements and delivers an open API that gives the public the access it deserves.

    The decision by Facebook comes after months of engagement by the Mozilla Corporation through industry working groups and government initiatives and most recently, an advocacy campaign led by the Mozilla Foundation.

    This week, the Mozilla Foundation was joined by a coalition of technologists, human rights defenders, academics, journalists demanding Facebook take action and deliver on the commitments made to put users first and deliver increased transparency.

    “In the short term, Facebook needs to be vigilant about promoting transparency ahead of and during the EU Parliamentary elections,” said Ashley Boyd, Mozilla’s VP of Advocacy. “Their action — or inaction — can affect elections across more than two dozen countries. In the long term, Facebook needs to sincerely assess the role its technology and policies can play in spreading disinformation and eroding privacy.”

Security: Dirty FUD, Microsoft Holes, USB Cables as a Risk

Filed under
Security

Programming: Arduino, Ansible, Scrum, GCC vs. Clang, Lots of Python and Qt 5.13 Alpha Released

Filed under
Development
  • snekde — an IDE for snek development

    I had hoped to create a stand-alone development environment on the Arduino, but I've run out of room. The current snek image uses 32606 bytes of flash (out of 32768) and 1980 bytes of RAM (out of 2048). I can probably squeeze a few more bytes out, but making enough room for a text editor seems like a stretch.

    As a back-up plan, I've written a host-side application that communicates with the Arduino over the serial port.

  • 3 new ways to contribute code to Ansible

    Here are the three ways that have me excited for would-be contributors to the Ansible community.

  • Introducing the Small Scale Scrum framework

    Scrum is a leading candidate for the implementation of Small Scale Agile for many reasons, including its popularity, developers’ preferences, high success rates for scrum adoption and project deliveries, and strong principles and values including focus, courage, openness, commitment, and respect.

    Small Scale Scrum can be best described as “a people-first framework defined by and for small teams (a maximum of three people) and supporting planning, developing, and delivering production-quality software solutions.” The proposed framework centers around the concept of team members occupying multiple roles on any project.

    Small Scale Scrum is valuable due to its strong support for the small, distributed teams found in organizations all over the world. Small teams need new ways to meet customers’ continuously growing expectations for rapid delivery and high quality, and Small Scale Scrum’s guidelines and principles help address this challenge.

  • GCC 8/9 vs. LLVM Clang 7/8 Compiler Performance On AArch64

    With Clang 8.0 due out by month's end and GCC 9 due for release not long after that point, this week we've been running a number of GCC and Clang compiler benchmarks on Phoronix. At the start of the month was the large Linux x86_64 GCC vs. Clang compiler benchmarks on twelve different Intel/AMD systems while last week was also a look at the POWER9 compiler performance on the Raptor Talos II. In this article we are checking out these open-source compilers' performance on 64-bit ARM (AArch64) using an Ampere eMAG 32-core server.

  • How Clear Linux Optimizes Python For Greater Performance

    Clear Linux's leading performance isn't limited to just C/C++ applications but also scripting languages like PHP, R, and Python have seen great speed-ups too. In a new blog post, one of Intel's developers outlines some of their performance tweaks to Python for delivering greater performance.

    Last April, Victor Rodriguez Bahena of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center and longtime Clear Linux developer began shedding more light on their "magic" performance work for the distribution's out-of-the-box performance. Finally this week the second post in that series is out as he details the optimizations made to their Python implementation.

  • Boosting Python* from profile-guided to platform-specific optimizations
  • Full integration to Salesforce with Red Hat Integration (Part 2)
  • Coding in Python 04 - Setting up Variables
  • Testing isn't everything, but it's important
  • Python, For The love of It - part 3 (What I Built With It)
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #355 (Feb. 12, 2019)
  • Qt 5.13 Alpha Released With WebAssembly Preview, Qt Lottie Technical Preview

    The Qt Company has announced the alpha release of the forthcoming Qt 5.13 tool-kit.

    Qt 5.13 is slated for release in May and is another Qt5 feature release ahead of the transition to Qt6 planned for late 2020.

  • Qt 5.13 Alpha Released

    I am happy to inform that Qt 5.13 Alpha is released today. You can download Qt 5.13 Alpha via online installer (both source and prebuild binary packages). Source packages are also available for commercial users in the Qt Account portal and in the download.qt.io for open-source users.

    Qt 5.13 New Features page contains information about most important changes coming with the release. Please remember creating the list is still in progress so something important can still be missing. List should be completed by Beta1.

    Target is to release Beta1 within coming weeks, when API reviews are concluded. And as with previous releases we will release regular beta n releases until we are ready for RC. Target for Beta1 is 26.2.2019, see whole schedule from Qt 5.13 wiki.

Graphics: VK9, NVIDIA, AMD and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • VK9 Project Stalls As Developer Leaves To Pursue Other Interests

    While VK9 was the first open-source project to pursue mapping Direct3D over Vulkan, at least for now the project has halted.

    It's been almost three years that Christopher Schaefer has been near single-handedly working on this project to get Direct3D 9 running over the Vulkan graphics API. While he's been successful in getting code samples and other bits running from D3D9 over Vulkan, he's decided to throw in the towel at least for the time being.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0 Officially Released

    Since the start of December the NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0 update has been available in the company's early access program while now this SDK with the NVENC/NVDEC APIs has rolled out as stable.

    The NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0 brings some big changes particularly around the Turing GPU support with faster decode, support for higher image quality encoding on H.264/H.265, efficiency enhancements, better CUDA interoperability, and other new capabilities enabled for NVIDIA's latest graphics processors.

  • AMD_DEBUG Can Now Be Used In Place Of R600_DEBUG For RadeonSI Options

    When setting various debug options for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver -- like enabling its NIR back-end among many other options -- that has traditionally been done through the R600_DEBUG= environment variable. But that variable name makes little sense these days since RadeonSI doesn't even support the now-vintage R600 GPUs. Thankfully, AMD_DEBUG= is now a supported alternative.

    Marek Olšák added the support on Tuesday so the AMD_DEBUG environment variable for RadeonSI can now be used as an alternative to R600_DEBUG -- using that environment variable is still supported to keep any scripts, etc, working.

  • mesa 19.0.0-rc3

    Hi List,

    Mesa 19.0-rc3 is now available.

    Due to a bug I discovered in the script that scrapes for stable nominations
    (after uploading the tarball) there is basically nothing in the -rc3 release. As
    a result I'm planning to make a -rc4 tomorrow. You can see the staging/19.0
    branch to see the additional patches present.

    Dylan

  • Mesa 19.0-RC3 Released But It's A Dud

    The latest weekly release candidate of Mesa 19.0 is now available for testing, but it's a very petite release due to failing to include all of the latest back-ported patches intended for this release.

  • RadeonSI Picks Up Primitive Culling With Async Compute For Performance Wins

    Prolific open-source AMD Linux driver developer Marek Olšák has sent out his latest big patch series in the name of performance. His new set of 26 patches provide primitive culling with asynchronous compute and at least for workstation workloads yields a big performance uplift.

    The 26 patches allow for using async compute to do primitive culling before the vertex shader process. This work ends up yielding performance improvements for workloads that do a lot of geometry that ends up being invisible. This code is stable and passing nearly all conformance tests while working from GCN 1.1 through Radeon VII.

Games: Arcade Spirits, Rocket League, Ancient Warfare 3 and Tannenberg

Filed under
Gaming

Linux on DeX: Turn Your Samsung into a Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When was the last time you heard of a computer-type experience on a mobile phone? Ubuntu Edge? If you haven’t heard about it yet, Samsung is masterminding housing the power of a whole computer on a mobile phone with Linux on DeX.

Linux on DeX offers you a portable development environment by enabling you to cast a Linux development environment onto a desktop environment complete with a keyboard, mouse, and monitor anywhere, anytime.

It requires a Galaxy Note9 or Galaxy Tab S4 running the Linux on DeX app and you can connect your device to a monitor, a keyboard, and a mouse for the full desktop experience.

Read more

Odroid-N2 SBC has hexa-core Amlogic S922X and $63 to $79 price

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

Hardkernel announced an “Odroid-N2” SBC with a Cortex-A73 and -A53 based Amlogic S922X SoC plus 2-4GB DDR4, 4x USB 3.0, HDMI 2.1, an audio DAC, and a 40-pin header.

Hardkernel unveiled its open-spec, Ubuntu-ready Odroid-N1 SBC a year ago with a Rockchip RK3399 SoC. Since it was scheduled for June shipment, we included it our reader survey of 116 hacker boards. Yet, just before we published the results, including a #16 ranking for the N1, Hardkernel announced it was shelving the board due to sourcing problems and switching to a similar new board with an unnamed new SoC. The Odroid-N2 would also switch to DDR4 RAM from the previously announced DDR3, which was in short supply.

Read more

24 Excellent GNOME Extensions (Updated)

Filed under
GNOME

Freedom of choice is a central plank of open source software, and it’s very relevant when choosing and configuring a desktop environment. One of Linux’s best features is its modularity.

Extensibility relates to the ability to customize a desktop environment to an individual’s preferences and tastes. This flexibility is offered by themes, extensions, and applets.

GNOME ships with a System Settings tool which isn’t as diverse as some of its peers. There’s still useful options such as a simple way to enable remote access and file sharing. If you’re serious about customizing GNOME, you’ll need the GNOME Tweaks utility. It’s not an official GNOME app, but it offers some advanced tinkering. But when it comes to micro-configuring the GNOME desktop to your preference, Tweaks still leaves us asking for more. Fortunately, there’s an awesome range of extensions that provide additional functionality.

Here’s our recommended GNOME shell extensions. Most of the extensions are not officially supported by GNOME. But they all take the desktop to the next level, either by adding useful functionality, improving your workflow, or simply offering a touch of panache to the desktop. All the extensions all compatible with the latest release of GNOME. Naturally there’s only open source goodness on offer.

The extensions are best installed from the gnome-shell extensions website. Some extensions are installed by default with Linux distributions.

Read more

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