Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 20 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Announcing extrepo

Filed under
Debian

While there is a tool to enable package signatures in Debian packages, the dpkg tool does not enforce the existence of such signatures, and therefore it is possible for an attacker to replace the (signed) .deb file with an unsigned variant, bypassing the whole signature.

In an effort to remedy this whole situation, I looked at creating extrepo, a package that would download repository metadata from a special-purpose repository, verify the signatures placed on that metadata, and if everything matches, enable the repository by creating the necessary apt configuration files.

This should allow users to enable external repository "foo" by running extrepo enable foo, rather than downloading a script from foo's website and executing it as root -- or other similarly insecure options.

Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

Filed under
Debian

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" consists of over two months of updates release through the official software repositories. It includes a total of 115 security updates and bug fixes, offering the community the most up-to-date install mediums for the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series.

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" ISO images are now available to download (see download links below) for all supported architectures, including 32-bit (i386), 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), Armel, ARMhf, MIPS, MIPSel (MIPS Little Endian), MIPS64el (MIPS 64-bit Little Endian), PPC64el (PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian), and s390x (IBM System z).

Read more

Zink Benchmarks - Mesa OpenGL Running Over Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the upcoming Mesa 19.3 release one of the big new features is the "Zink" driver that provides a Mesa OpenGL implementation over Vulkan. This in theory allows for a generic OpenGL driver running over Vulkan hardware drivers, but there is a lot of work ahead before it's really a viable option.

Zink is one of the OpenGL-over-Vulkan options to date that in the future could make it so hardware vendors don't need to maintain OpenGL drivers for future hardware generations but instead could just focus on Vulkan and leave it to these generic implementations. However, a lot of work is needed before it's really to that state in being able to replace existing hardware OpenGL drivers.

With Mesa 19.3, Zink only fully supports OpenGL 2.1. Support for OpenGL 3.x/4.x and OpenGL ES 3.0 is still a work-in-progress likely taking at least a few months to get there if not longer. When trying to launch even the Steam client with Zink, Steam was simply crashing.

Read more

Compact Ryzen V1000 system starts at $689 with pre-loaded Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Simply NUC’s compact “Sequoia” computer features a quad-core Ryzen Embedded V1000, 0 to 60°C support, and an 8-32V input. It starts at $689 with 4GB DDR4, a 128GB SSD, 2x mini-DP++, 3x USB, 2x GbE, 2x COM, and pre-installed Ubuntu.

Simply NUC, which distributes Intel NUC systems such as the recent, Apollo Lake based NUC 8 Rugged, has launched its first AMD-powered computer with a semi-rugged embedded system built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000. Aimed at edge analytics, electronic kiosks, digital signage, POS, robotics, and industrial computers, the Sequoia is available for pre-order, with shipments due in January.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Monitoring Bandwidth On Linux: Top 5 Tools in 2019

    Don’t we all wish our networks had infinite bandwidth? The reality is, however, that it is often a severely limited resource. Add to that the fact that bandwidth over-utilization can have huge impacts on network performance and we have a recipe for disaster.

    The solution: set up some bandwidth monitoring system. A lot of them are available. Most of them run on Windows, though, and if your OS of choice it Linux, your options are slightly more limited. You still have plenty of options, however, and we’re about to introduce the best tools for bandwidth monitoring on Linux.

    We’ll begin by introducing bandwidth monitoring and explain what it is. Next, we’ll cover the ins and outs of the Simple Network Management Protocol, or SNMP, one of the most-used monitoring technology. Our next order of business will be to have a look a Linux as an operating system but, more specifically, as a platform for monitoring tools. And finally, we’ll briefly review some of the best tools for bandwidth monitoring on Linux and describe their best features.

  • Bangle.js — A Hackable Smartwatch Powered By Google’s TensorFlow

    The world of smartwatches is ruled mostly by the likes of Apple Watch and WearOS-based devices. But we have seen a few attempts from the open-source community, including PineTime and AsteroidOS. Now, the tech world has got something new to play with — an open-source hackable smartwatch called Bangle.js.

    It’s co-developed by NearForm Research and Espruino, which showcased its latest offering to the attendees of the NodeConf 2019. Until now, the two companies provided digital badges at the conference.

  • Can Google’s New Open Source Tool Make Kubernetes Less Painful?

    Google has pushed Skaffold – a command line tool that automates Kubernetes development workflow – out to the developer community, saying the tool is now generally available after 5,000 commits from nearly 150 contributors to the project.

    Kubernetes – the de facto container orchestration standard – has become the linchpin of much cloud-native computing, sitting underneath swathes of cloud-based tools to manage how applications run across a wide range computing environments.

  • Molly de Blanc: Rebellion

    We spend a lot of time focusing on the epic side of free software and user freedom: joys come from providing encrypted communication options to journalists and political dissidents; losses are when IoT devices are used to victimize and abuse.

    I think a lot about the little ways technology interacts with our lives, the threats to or successes for user freedom we encounter in regular situations that anyone can find themselves able to understand: sexting with a secure app, sharing DRM-free piece of media, or having your communications listened to by a “home assistant.”

    When I was writing a talk about ethics and IoT, I was looking for these small examples of the threats posed by smart doorbells. False arrests and racial profiling, deals with law enforcement to monitor neighborhoods, the digital panopticon — these are big deals. I remembered something I read about kids giving their neighbor a pair of slippers for Christmas. This sort of anonymous gift giving becomes impossible when your front door is constantly being monitored. People laughed when I shared this idea with them — that we’re really losing something by giving up the opportunity to anonymously leave presents.

    We are also giving up what my roommate calls “benign acts of rebellion.” From one perspective, making it harder for teenagers to sneak out at night is a good thing. Keeping better tabs on your kids and where they are is a safety issue. Being able to monitor what they do on their computer can prevent descent into objectively bad communities and behavior patterns, but it can also prevent someone from participating in the cultural coming of age narratives that help define who we are as a society and give us points of connection across generations.

  • FOSSA Wins CNBC Upstart 100 Award [Ed: FOSSA can be a misleading name. They merely deal with data about FOSS but are themselves not FOSS but proprietary software.]

    FOSSA, the open source management company, today announced that it has been selected for the prestigious Upstart 100 List, CNBC's annual list of 100 top startups to watch. The Upstart 100 is an exclusive collection of companies that are building brands, raising money and creating jobs on their path to becoming tomorrow's household names. CNBC's selection committee chose FOSSA from more than 600 nominees, scored across eight equally weighted quantitative metrics, including scalability, sales growth and workforce diversity.

  • Fugue Fregot is now open sourced to enhance the experience working with the Rego policy language

    Rego is part of the Open Policy Agent (OPA) policy engine, which Fugue adopted this year as its policy as code implementation for cloud security and compliance.

    Developed as an alternative to Open Policy Agent’s (OPA) built-in interpreter, Fregot provides error handling that is easy to understand and manage with step-by-step debugging.

  • Chrome, Edge, Safari hacked at elite Chinese hacking contest
  • The Relationship Between Open Source Software and Standard Setting

    Standards and open source development are both processes widely adopted in the ICT industry to develop innovative technologies and drive their adoption in the market. Innovators and policy makers assume that a closer collaboration between standards and open source software development would be mutually beneficial. The interaction between the two is however not yet fully understood, especially with regard to how the intellectual property regimes applied by these organisations influence their ability and motivation to cooperate. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the interaction between standard development organisations (SDOs) and open source software (OSS) communities. The analysis is based on 20 case studies, a survey of stakeholders involved in SDOs and OSS communities, an expert workshop, and a comprehensive review of the literature. In the analysis, we differentiate according to the governance of SDOs and OSS communities, but also considering the involved stakeholders and subject matter. We discuss the preconditions, forms and impacts of collaboration, before we eventually focus on the complementarity of the different Intellectual Property Right (IPR) regimes. Finally, we derive policy recommendations addressing SDOs, OSS communities and policy makers.

Programming: OpenBSD, FreddieMeter, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • [Older] Linux Systems Performance

    Systems performance is an effective discipline for performance analysis and tuning, and can help you find performance wins for your applications and the kernel. However, most of us are not performance or kernel engineers, and have limited time to study this topic. This talk summarizes the topic for everyone, touring six important areas of Linux systems performance: observability tools, methodologies, benchmarking, profiling, tracing, and tuning. Included are recipes for Linux performance analysis and tuning (using vmstat, mpstat, iostat, etc), overviews of complex areas including profiling (perf_events) and tracing (Ftrace, bcc/BPF, and bpftrace/BPF), and much advice about what is and isn't important to learn. This talk is aimed at everyone: developers, operations, sysadmins, etc, and in any environment running Linux, bare metal or the cloud.

  • Martin Pieuchot: The Unknown Plan

    Since I attend OpenBSD hackathons, I hear stories about how crazy are the ports hackathons. So I try my best to look like a porter in order to experience this craziness. I must admit p2k19 was awesome but the craziness of port hackathons is still an enigma to me.

  • Google's AI-powered FreddieMeter can tell if you sing like Queen's frontman

    While Freddie may have sadly bitten the dust, his fame lives on, so much so that Google's Creative Lab has cooked up the FreddieMeter.

    The show must go on! It's an AI-powered thingy which uses its smarts to figure out if one's singing voice has a pitch, melody and timbre to match that of Mercury's champion vocals.

  • What is Python? Powerful, intuitive programming

    Why the Python programming language shines for data science, machine learning, systems automation, web and API development, and more.

  • Ian Ozsvald: Training Courses for 2020 Q1 – Successful Data Science Projects & Software Engineering for Data Scientists
  • The simplest explanation of Decorators in Python

    Before starting about decorators, first, understand that functions in python have below three properties.

  • Basic Data Types in Python 3: Booleans

    Welcome back to our ongoing series of blog posts on basic data types in Python 3! Last time, we explored the functionality of strings. Today, we dive in to another key data type - booleans. Booleans (and "boolean logic") are an important concept in programming, representing the concept of "true" and "false".

    If you're learning Python, you might also want to check out TwilioQuest 3. You'll learn about basic data types like the boolean, and much more about Python programming.

    Ready to learn how to use booleans in Python 3? Let's get started!

Arch Conf 2019 Report

Filed under
GNU
Linux

During the 5th and 6th of October, 21 team members attended the very first internal Arch Conf. We spent 2 days at Native Instruments in Berlin having workshops, discussions and hack sessions together. We even managed to get into, and escape, an escape room!

It was a great and productive weekend which we hope will continue in the next years. Hopefully we will be able to expand on this in the future and include more community members and users.

There is a report available for the workshops and discussions from the conference!

Read more

Testing Slax 10.2 beta1

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Changes include disabling apparmor, which was preventing some programs from starting properly (eg. man), and fixing chromium by installing chromium-sandbox package. Also added was dummy 'sudo' command (so you can copy&paste sudo commands from internet and it will work as long as you are signed in as root).

I will be happy if you let me know problems you encounter, either by email, or using slax-users google group, or by commenting to this blog post.

Read more

GCC: OpenMP / OpenACC and Static Analysis Framework

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • The GCC 10 Compiler Lands OpenMP / OpenACC Offloading To AMD Radeon GPUs

    A few days ago I wrote about the OpenMP / OpenACC offloading patches for Radeon "GCN" GPUs being posted and seeking inclusion in the GCC 10 compiler that will be released in a few months. Those patches were successfully merged meaning this next annual update to the GNU Compiler Collection will feature initial OpenMP/OpenACC code offloading support to supported AMD GPU targets.

    After GCC 9 only had the initial AMD Radeon GCN target in place, GCC 10 in early 2020 will feature the initial offloading support using the modern OpenMP and OpenACC APIs, thanks to the merges this week. The libgomp port and associated bits for the AMD GCN back-end have landed thanks to the work done by Code Sourcery under contract with AMD.

  • RFC: Add a static analysis framework to GCC
    This patch kit introduces a static analysis pass for GCC that can diagnose
    various kinds of problems in C code at compile-time (e.g. double-free,
    use-after-free, etc).
    
    The analyzer runs as an IPA pass on the gimple SSA representation.
    It associates state machines with data, with transitions at certain
    statements and edges.  It finds "interesting" interprocedural paths
    through the user's code, in which bogus state transitions happen.
    
    For example, given:
    
       free (ptr);
       free (ptr);
    
    at the first call, "ptr" transitions to the "freed" state, and
    at the second call the analyzer complains, since "ptr" is already in
    the "freed" state (unless "ptr" is NULL, in which case it stays in
    the NULL state for both calls).
    
    Specific state machines include:
    - a checker for malloc/free, for detecting double-free, resource leaks,
      use-after-free, etc (sm-malloc.cc), and
    - a checker for stdio's FILE stream API (sm-file.cc)
    
    There are also two state-machine-based checkers that are just
    proof-of-concept at this stage:
    - a checker for tracking exposure of sensitive data (e.g.
      writing passwords to log files aka CWE-532), and
    - a checker for tracking "taint", where data potentially under an
      attacker's control is used without sanitization for things like
      array indices (CWE-129).
    
    There's a separation between the state machines and the analysis
    engine, so it ought to be relatively easy to add new warnings.
    
    For any given diagnostic emitted by a state machine, the analysis engine
    generates the simplest feasible interprocedural path of control flow for
    triggering the diagnostic.
    
  • GCC Might Finally Have A Static Analysis Framework Thanks To Red Hat

    Clang's static analyzer has become quite popular with developers for C/C++ static analysis of code while now the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) might finally see a mainline option thanks to Red Hat.

    Red Hat's David Malcolm has proposed a set of 49 patches that appear to be fairly robust and the most we have seen out of GCC static analysis capabilities to date.

Reports From KDE Development and Lakademy 2019

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • This week in KDE: touchy and scrolly and GTK-ey and iconey

    There are some neat things to report and I think you will enjoy them! In particular, I think folks are really going to like the improvements to GNOME/GTK app integration and two sets of touch- and scrolling-related improvements to Okular and the Kickoff Application Launcher, detailed below:

  • KDE Plasma 5.18 Bringing Better GTK/GNOME App Integration

    Aside from tightening the GNOME/GTK integration with KDE, this week there has also been some Okular improvements, better touch support for the Kickoff Application Launcher, deleting files within the Dolphin file manager now uses a separate worker thread for the I/O, Spectacle can now integrate with OBS Studio as a new screen recording option, and other enhancements.

  • Lakademy 2019

    I’m now writing this post in the last hours of the Lakademy 2019 (and my first one). It was really good to be “formally” introduced to the community and it’s people, and to be in this environment of people wanting to collaborate to something as incredible as KDE. Althought I wanted to contribute more to other projects, I did some changes and fixes in the rocs, wrote my Season of KDE project and got some tasks that can help with the future of rocs.

Debian Moves Closer To Voting On Proposals Over Init System Diversity

Filed under
Debian

Following the decision by Debian Project Leader Sam Hartman to seek a general resolution over init system diversity and just how much Debian developers care about supporting systemd alternatives, the general resolution vote is moving closer.

The text is now laid out over three proposals drafted by Sam Hartman in weighing the importance of systemd / init system diversity by Debian developers.

The three choices include affirming init diversity, focusing on systemd but supporting the exploration of alternatives, and focusing on systemd for the init system and other facilities.

Read more

Also: Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

Lots of Microsoft Openwashing This Past Week

Filed under
Microsoft

Open source radio system delivers emergency alerts and music to the Yukon and beyond

Filed under
OSS

"Radio Rob" Hopkins lives in Tagish, Yukon, 120km south of the capital city, Whitehorse. It is here that he created Open Broadcaster, an open source system that enables small rural market radio stations to manage their operations and volunteers.

Having lived in the Yukon for 35 years, back when there was no phone or internet, Rob got into communications to set up a low-power FM (LPFM) station for the community. He wanted to make it easier to manage stations, so he made a pitch to the Yukon government for seed money to develop an application to use the internet to run a radio station and deliver the last mile through FM radio.

Read more

PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: System76, Pinebook and "The Linux Defender"

3 emerging open source projects to keep an eye on

The exciting thing about open source is that nobody needs permission to try something new. That's a formula that allows new ideas to emerge all the time. Here are three open source projects that are still in their early stages but show real promise. This Linux is utterly unapologetic in catering to technology hobbyists, enthusiasts, and power users. It's for the amateurs, in that best and most original sense of the word—those who love what they do. Awesome. So isn't Endeavour the perfect name? If what you want is to roll your sleeves up and level up while still enjoying a gentle start and a friendly community, this could be a great way to go about it. Read more

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Email – Week 5

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of single-board computers. Last week’s blog looked at whether the RPI4 cuts the mustard as a desktop web browser. It does although with a few reservations. This week’s blog focuses on another absolutely essential desktop activity. Managing your email. My email requirements are very simple. I use Gmail for my personal email. It offers ample storage, threads, rich text features, useful keyboard shortcuts, and more. It gives me access to my email whatever device and platform I’m using. For the RPI4 to replace my desktop, I need quick and easy access to Gmail. Read more