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Tuesday, 15 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 64-bit Texstar 19/11/2010 - 4:01pm
Blog entry GNOME 2.32.1 desktop updated for PCLinuxOS Texstar 19/11/2010 - 3:22am
Blog entry Gstreamer Conference 2010 Videos and Slides uploaded raseel 16/11/2010 - 4:43am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos gnome 2010.11 Texstar 13/11/2010 - 2:32am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS Enlightenment (E-17) Desktop updated. Texstar 13/11/2010 - 2:29am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos kde 2010.10 Texstar 06/11/2010 - 3:46am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos lxde 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:35pm
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos phoenix xfce 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:32pm
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos zen mini 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:29pm
Blog entry Distribution Release - pclinuxos enlightenment 2010.11 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:22pm

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Lubuntu 19.10 overview, Linux Headlines, Noodlings and More

  • Lubuntu 19.10 overview | Full-featured lightweight Operating System

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Lubuntu 19.10 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Linux Headlines 25

    Facebook takes aim at Google's machine learning dominance, Ubuntu calls for testing of its Chromium snap package, Tails wants feedback on its upcoming 4.0 release, Puppet goes public with a beta of Project Nebula, and Microsoft re-issues yet another product under a permissive license.

  • Nathan Wolf: Noodlings | Symphony, Power Tools and Storage

    I took my kids to the symphony this past Sunday. It was hugely beneficial to have the kids experience a symphonic performance. It made for a pretty decent lesson about the benefits of working together. When the orchestral members were warming up before they begin the performance there is a cacophony of sounds and although individually, the instruments sound nice, together it sounds like a mess. When the performance started and the conductor did his conducting, keeping everyone on pace and on the “same sheet of music” as it were, you could listen and imagine the story of events in the mind’s eye. Everything from serious and intense melodies to whimsical light hearted tones. Although my kids could only manage to sit through an hour of the performance, there were lots of lessons to be extracted about the benefits of working together.

    How this can be applied to the Linux community is as such. When we work together, in harmony with one another, we can make for some amazing results. Whether it is the latest Ubuntu MATE, the newest release of Plasma or helping someone through a tech question, by working together in a kind and respectful tone we can achieve great things. I am of the belief that all Linux is good Linux and by making any one aspect better, we make it all better, regardless of the flavor of Linux or desktop you choose.

  • Ghost, Meat, or Block? | User Error 76

    Our first computers, the future of food, and ethical sources of funds.

    Plus the spooky reason that Popey unfollowed Joe.

Events: Conferences, FOSDEM Community Devroom and Mozilla's "Developer Roadshow"

Filed under
OSS
  • Molly de Blanc: Conferences

    I conducted this very scientific Twitter poll and out of 52 respondants, only 23% agreed with me. Some people who disagreed with me pointed out specifically what they think is lacking: more regional events, more in specific countries, and more “generic” FLOSS events.

    Many projects have a conference, and then there are “generic” conferences, like FOSDEM, LibrePlanet, LinuxConfAU, and FOSSAsia. Some are more corporate (OSCON), while others more community focused (e.g. SeaGL).

    [...]

    So far in 2019, I went to: FOSDEM, CopyLeft Conf, LibrePlanet, FOSS North, Linux Fest Northwest, OSCON, FrOSCon, GUADEC, and GitLab Commit. I’m going to All Things Open next week. In November I have COSCon scheduled. I’m skipping SeaGL this year. I am not planning on attending 36C3 unless my talk is accepted. I canceled my trip to DebConf19. I did not go to Camp this year. I also had a board meeting in NY, an upcoming one in Berlin, and a Debian meeting in the other Cambridge. I’m skipping LAS and likely going to SFSCon for GNOME.

    So 9 so far this year, and somewhere between 1-4 more, depending on some details.

    There are also conferences that don’t happen every year, like HOPE and CubaConf. There are some that I haven’t been to yet, like PyCon, and more regional events like Ohio Linux Fest, SCALE, and FOSSCon in Philadelphia.

    I think I travel too much, and plenty of people travel more than I do. This is one of the reasons why we have too many events: the same people are traveling so much.

  • Ismael Olea: Next conferences

    At WMES 2019 I will lead a Wikidata workshop about adding historical heritage data, basically repeating the one at esLibre.

    At LAS 2019 I plan to attend to the Flatpak workshops and to call for a BoF for people involved in opensource conference organizations to share experiences and reuse tools.

    Lots of thanks for the Wikimedia España association and GNOME Foundation for their travel sponsorship. Without their help I could not attend both.

  • FOSDEM Community Devroom 2020 CFP open

    We are happy to let everyone know that the Community DevRoom will be held this year at the FOSDEM Conference. FOSDEM is the premier free and open source software event in Europe, taking place in Brussels from 1-2 February 2020 at the Université libre de Bruxelles.

  • The Mozilla Developer Roadshow Talks: Firefox, WebAssembly, CSS, WebXR and More

    The Mozilla Developer Roadshow program launched in 2017. Our mission: Bring expert speakers and technology updates to local communities through free events and partnerships. These interactive meetup-style events help developers find resources and activities relevant to their day-to-day productivity and professional skill development.

Games: SanAndreasUnity, Legend of Keepers, X-Plane

Filed under
Gaming
  • The GTA: San Andreas remake in Unity has a new release out

    SanAndreasUnity, an open source remake of the game engine for GTA: San Andreas that aims to be cross-platform has a new release out, with better Linux support included.

  • Tactical dungeon management game Legend of Keepers has a free prologue out

    Goblinz Studio are currently development Legend of Keepers, a tactical dungeon management game where you're the bad guys. It now has a free prologue available to test on Linux.

    From what they said, it's a mix between a "Roguelite and a Dungeon Management" game. Blending two different game phases together, where you first setup a defensive force for your dungeon and then wait for the heroes to come along and see if you manage to mount a successful barrier. A bit like "a reversed dungeon crawler", as they say anyway.

  • X-Plane 11.50 Flight Simulator Bringing Vulkan Support

    For years we have been looking forward to the realistic X-Plane flight simulator rendered by Vulkan as an alternative to their long-standing OpenGL render and with X-Plane 11.50 that is finally being made a reality.

    X-Plane has long offered great support for Linux on-par with their Windows and macOS support. X-Plane's OpenGL renderer has been showing its age for a while and now the developers at Laminar Research have confirmed their Vulkan (and Apple Metal) renderer support is coming with X-Plane 11.50.

Hubert Figuiere on Flatpak and Flathub, GLib 2.63.1 Coming Soon

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Getting a stack trace out of a Flatpak

    So, the flatpak application you use just crashed

    How do you report it? If you file a bug just saying it crashed, the developers will probably ask for some stack trace. On Fedora 30, for example, abrt (the crash reporting system) doesn't provide any useful information. Let's see if we can extract that information.

    We are gonna have to use the terminal to use some command line tools. Flatpak has a tool flatpak-coredumpctl to use the core dump in the flatpak sandbox. The core dump is an image of the program memory when it crashed that will contain a lot about the crash. But by default the tool will not be able to provide much useful info. There is some initial setup need to be able to have a better output.

    First you must make sure that you have the right Debug package for the right version of the Flatpak runtime. Well, actually, for the corresponding SDK.

  • Music, Flathub and Qt

    I quickly realised that trying these apps on my Dell XPS 13 was really an adventure, mostly because of HiDPI (the high DPI screen that the PS 13 has). Lot of the applications found on Fedora, by default, don't support high DPI and a thus quasi impossible to use out of the box. Some of it is fixable easily, some of it with a bit more effort and some, we need to try harder.

    Almost all the apps I have tried used Qt. With Qt5 the fix is easy, albeit not necessarily user friendly. Just set the QT_AUTO_SCREEN_SCALE_FACTOR environment variable to 1 as specified in Qt HiDPI support documentation. There is also an API to set the attribute on the QCoreApplication object. There must be a good reason why this opt-in and not opt-out.

    [...]

    In the end, I have Hydrogen available on Flathub, the three others in queue for Flathub, and all have had patches submitted (with Muse3 and Rosegarden already merged upstream).

  • g_warning_once() in GLib 2.63.1

    GLib 2.63.1 will be released in the next few weeks, and will contain a fun new API to slightly simplify emitting a warning once, and then shutting up to avoid emitting loads of log spam.

FreeBSD 12.1-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA256

The first RC build of the 12.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.1-RC1 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 i386 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.1-RC1 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.1-RC1 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 RPI2
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 PANDABOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.1/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.1" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-BETA3 includes:

o A NULL pointer dereference that could lead to a system crash had been
  fixed.

o A fix to correctly implement pmap_page_is_mapped() on arm64 and riscv.

o A fix to tun(4) and tap(4) when destroying interfaces had been added.

o A fix to krping to notify sleeping threads of device removal had been
  added.

o Several updates to mlx5core, mlx5en(4), and mlx5ib(4).

o Several fixes in libusb(3) and xhci(4) have been added.

o Several SCTP and TCP fixes have been added.

A list of changes since 12.0-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.1
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.1R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.1-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.1-RC1/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0c2caa354f54dcc8e
  ap-south-1 region: ami-011f6d0b22b4179ae
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0e633b1e66b94dc5e
  eu-west-2 region: ami-06f77908c8875b5ce
  eu-west-1 region: ami-07d5b3d4ffa682d66
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0a0d9969831c99d3f
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-092398d1a41a67f27
  sa-east-1 region: ami-023dd6db41165f441
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0cf9fd10259cf4eb2
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0e255d1bb4a1f76f4
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0404212cff3236606
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0fea81c67debcba8b
  eu-central-1 region: ami-08e32f4e90fd250f4
  us-east-1 region: ami-0e6e401d0ffebd916
  us-east-2 region: ami-0d094195cae5bf901
  us-west-1 region: ami-04c1e10d06064e68d
  us-west-2 region: ami-02d0010139a9a494e

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-022e4644320e82ac1
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0e421a1864d53d226
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0bffb1c264a4b8d09
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0f596a538918dc9c8
  eu-west-1 region: ami-063c017d8b9086b55
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0b34ed283d7dd41ae
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0071602b3e78a8de0
  sa-east-1 region: ami-07986820662819e67
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0d9ee49739059957b
  ap-east-1 region: ami-00ae1e2b897eb6230
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0018127ce245410e0
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-02fa0380052cd268f
  eu-central-1 region: ami-01836dc7a9f273243
  us-east-1 region: ami-0018654c0af06d99d
  us-east-2 region: ami-06a4203b93836b927
  us-west-1 region: ami-09c5010072b44bd96
  us-west-2 region: ami-063fae5c2ec327807

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.1-RC1
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.1-RC1

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

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Hands-on video of the Librem 5 Linux phone shows improvements, but there is a lot of work left to do

Filed under
Linux

The Librem 5 is coming soon, and while we know the details of the Linux phone’s internals, there are still several unknowns surrounding the handset. However, a hands-on video from The Linux Gamer posted earlier today showed an early build of the Librem 5. There’s a lot going for the Linux phone, but there are several mountains still to be climbed before the device should be considered consumer-ready.

First, the positives: the phone looks well-built, and some internal components can be repaired by end-users (e.g., the battery). The phone is rather thick for a modern smartphone, but the added height is needed to house all the boards needed for the hardware kill switches and to allow for replaceable components. The 1440x720 display, which created some controversy when announced, also looks good in the video. Considering its size and resolution, it likely won’t look nearly as crisp as flagship displays in person, but if the hands-on video is anything to go by, it’s a perfectly usable display.

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today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • How to Manage Your Running Processes with XFCE’s Task Manager
  • Anaconda debugging and testing – part 1.
  • Configure Touchpad Settings Using gsettings Commandline Utility
  • Stack Abuse: Autoencoders for Image Reconstruction in Python and Keras

    Nowadays, we have huge amounts of data in almost every application we use - listening to music on Spotify, browsing friend's images on Instagram, or maybe watching an new trailer on YouTube. There is always data being transmitted from the servers to you.

    This wouldn't be a problem for a single user. But imagine handling thousands, if not millions, of requests with large data at the same time. These streams of data have to be reduced somehow in order for us to be physically able to provide them to users - this is where data compression kicks in.

    There're lots of compression techniques, and they vary in their usage and compatibility. For example some compression techniques only work on audio files, like the famous MPEG-2 Audio Layer III (MP3) codec.

  • PyCharm: Webinar Preview: “Debugging During Testing” tutorial step for React+TS+TDD

    I often speak about “visual debugging” and “visual testing”, meaning, how IDEs can help put these intermediate concepts within reach using a visual UI.

    For testing, sometimes our code has problems that require investigation with a debugger. For React, that usually means a trip to the browser to set a breakpoint and use the Chrome developer tools. In Debugging During Testing With NodeJS we show how the IDE’s debugger, combined with TDD, can make this investigation far more productive. In the next step we show how to do so using Chrome as the execution environment.

  • Python hacking

    Python‘s had this handy logging module since July 2003.

Plasma Mobile Progress

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma Mobile: weekly update: part 1

    At Akademy Bhushan and Marco presented Plasma Nano shell to the community. Earlier this week the changes to use plasma-nano as a base shell package landed in plasma-phone-components. The shell includes an updated look for the app launcher and several of the shell interactions, including adding and removing widgets and changing the wallpaper.

  • Plasma Mobile: weekly update: part 2

    Marco Martin made several changes in the shell to improve the overall user experience.

    The application grid was updated to show application names in single line and with a smaller font size.

Cast To TV v11 GNOME Chromecast Extension Adds Remote Widget Playlist, GNOME Shell 3.34 Support

Filed under
GNOME

Cast to TV, a GNOME Shell extension to cast media (with optional transcoding) to Chromecast and other devices over the local network, was updated to version 11 yesterday. This release brings support for the latest GNOME 3.34, a file queue (playlist) for the remote widget, NVENC hardware acceleration support, and more.

Cast to TV is a GNOME Shell extension to cast videos, music and pictures to Chromecast or other devices over a local network. It supports video transcoding on the fly (for videos that can't directly play on the device), customizable subtitles, it can show a music visualizer while casting music, and much more. For controlling the device, the Gnome Shell extensions adds a new button on the top panel with playback controls.

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Where do all the censored developers go?

Filed under
OSS

Being censored by an organization that claims to be promoting Free as in Speech is no small feat. It raises an interesting question: where do I go from here?

The answer has been right under my nose all along: the Uncensored Speakers Toastmasters Club in Dublin.

Uncensored Speakers meets on the second and fourth Friday of each month at The Central Hotel (Open Street Map).

Most Toastmasters groups have some community guidelines against overtly political or religious speeches or use of profane language. Uncensored Speakers claims to be different: a speaker may well choose to say what they really think about Brexit, choosing from some of the most colourful words that the English language has brought us.

Tonight's meeting is an exception: there will be a Table Topics and Humorous Speech contest, I've been invited to join the judging panel.

Censorship credentials

Let's look at how the Free Software censorship scandal has evolved.

In 2017 the Fellowship elected me as their representative to the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE).

FSFE had just banked that huge €150,000 bequest. In fact, €50k had been withheld by the lawyer pending confirmation that FSFE doesn't lose their charitable status while the other €100k had reached the bank account. FSFE decided to appoint all their staff as voting members of the association, remove the elections from the constitution, put the €100k in reserve to underwrite future obligations to staff and then the two most senior staff, the president, Matthias Kirschner and the executive director, Jonas Oberg, went on extended periods of paternity leave.

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System Cleaner BleachBit 2.3 Switches To GTK+ 3, Includes Much Faster File Scanning

Filed under
Software

BleachBit, a system cleaner (and more) for Linux and Windows, was updated to version 2.3 beta recently, receiving some major changes. The new version was upgraded from GTK+ 2 to GTK+ 3, file scanning should be much faster, and there's also a new dark mode, among other changes.

BleachBit is a free and open source tool to clean up your computer to free up disk space, with some privacy features on top. It can remove the web cache, cookies, URL history, temporary files and log files of popular web browsers like Firefox, Google Chrome / Chromium, Opera, Safari, etc., remove the cache, recently used and temporary files for many popular applications, remove unused localization (language) files, and much more. The tool may also be used to shred files to prevent data recovery, and wipe free disk space to hide previously deleted files.

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Tails 4.0 Anonymous OS Release Candidate Out Now with Tor Browser 9.0, Linux 5.3

Filed under
OS
Security

Powered by the latest Linux 5.3.2 kernel, Tails 4.0 Release Candidate is packed with up-to-date technologies to better protect your privacy when surfing the Internet. It comes with the latest alpha version of the upcoming TOR Browser 9.0 anonymous web browser based on Firefox 68.1.0 ESR, as well as the newest Tor 0.4.1.6 release.

Tails 4.0 Release Candidate also updates Electrum to version 3.3.8, which is fully compatible with the current Bitcoin network, and improves the usability of the Tails Greeter by making it easier to select languages, simplifying the list of keyboard layouts, fixing the Formats setting, and preventing additional settings from being applied when clicking on the Cancel or Back buttons.

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Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Modern continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipeline for traditional provisioning: Your questions answered (Part 2)

    During a recent webinar titled, “Modern continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipeline for traditional provisioning,” we received a lot of interest and many questions regarding the topic. Some of the questions were coming in at a very rapid rate and we were not able to address them all. As a followup to our webinar, we have decided to put the answers to those questions into this blog post. The questions are listed below. This is part two in a series, check out our first blog post here.

    The demo in the webinar showed a combination of CloudForms/Ansible Tower to accomplish lifecycle provisioning. Is CloudForms an alternative or must it be used together with Ansible? Can you elaborate on the integration?

  • Tagging resources for IT and business alignment

    Traditional IT management based on fixed resources stopped making sense with the cloud, an unlimited pool of resources that can be accessed from any point in the world. Companies are moving from a CAPEX intensive environment to a new OPEX based cloud. With the new consumption model that favours the cloud, the weight shifts from asset lifecycle management to resource governance. This generates additional requirements for forecasting and budgeting. But the question is still "are we spending our money well?"

    The question is not so simple to answer because comparisons are difficult. The first reaction many organizations have is to believe that lower costs are better costs, but in many cases that is basically wrong.

    For instance, it is easy to reduce costs by purchasing a storage service that is cheaper than the one you are using now. However, that change may be associated with a decrease in performance; can your application support it or would you be losing customers - and revenue - in the process? The same thing can happen if you reduce expenses at the cost of limiting the application availability and not investing enough in load balancers, databases or application workers.

    In order to align business, resources and costs you need to take several steps; in this post we will outline some best practices we have been gathering about the topic.

  • Red Hat: We’re a neutral broker

    Red Hat claims to be a neutral broker that will pave the way for organisations to run the same container application platform across different public cloud services and in a hybrid cloud environment.

    This comes at a time when major public cloud suppliers are all trying to differentiate themselves through platform services – for example, with their own implementations of the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration platform.

    Speaking to Computer Weekly on the sidelines of Red Hat Forum in Singapore, Damien Wong, vice-president and general manager for Asian growth and emerging markets at Red Hat, said the company’s OpenShift platform will let enterprises run containerised applications on the same platform, regardless of cloud deployment model or underlying cloud infrastructure service.

  • [Older] How Red Hat is pioneering a serverless movement

    The old-school "one server/one function" concept has prevailed for veritable decades in the technology realm, whereby a single server stands duty to perform authentication, file, print, web, messaging, and other services.

    That's the past. The future is moving towards a serverless model whereby functions (e.g. applications) are more important than actual server implementations.

Upcoming change will make Linux gaming a reality on Chromebooks

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Linux on Chrome OS, a.ka. Crostini has primarily focused on creating a viable path for developers to adopt Chromebooks as a primary device. The addition of GPU support did a lot to advance that goal but there’s still a large group of Linux users that could benefit from Crostini if this latest update has anything to do about it. That group is gamers.

Now, I know that we’re all excited about Stadia launching next month. If rumors are correct, it could change the face of gaming as we know it. Still, there are a lot of games out there that live in the PC environment that will never see the grand stage that is Stadia. Personally, I am a huge fan of Source games that run on the Steam network and since I don’t own a PC anymore, my only option to jump into a Day of Defeat GunGame match has been to use the old school Crouton method on a Chromebook. All-in-all, most of my Steam games run quite well using the “hacky” Linux method but I would love to be able to install Steam via Crostini and play my games natively.

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Conky is a highly customizable system monitor for Linux

Filed under
Linux

A couple of months ago, we introduced you to a Windows program called Sidebar Diagnostics; this time, we are going to take a look at a similar program for Linux.

Conky must be a familiar name if you have been using Linux for a while. It is a fork of a now defunct app called Torsmo.

While it is a fork in the technical sense, it is more advanced than Torsmo. If you're running Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, etc, you can just run the following command in a Terminal

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Qt Creator 4.10.1 released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.10.1 !

In this release we fixed debugging with the tools from Xcode 11, and a bad crash in the application output pane, as well as some less serious issues. Find a more detailed overview in our change log.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux security hole: Much sudo about nothing

There's a lot of hubbub out there now about a security hole in the Unix/Linux family's sudo command. Sudo is the command, which enables normal users to run commands as if they were the root user, aka the system administrator. While this sudo security vulnerability is a real problem and needs patching, it's not nearly as bad as some people make it out to be. At first glance the problem looks like a bad one. With it, a user who is allowed to use sudo to run commands as any other user, except root, can still use it to run root commands. For this to happen, several things must be set up just wrong. First the sudo user group must give a user the right to use sudo but doesn't give the privilege of using it to run root commands. That can happen when you want a user to have the right to run specific commands that they wouldn't normally be able to use. Next, sudo must be configured to allow a user to run commands as an arbitrary user via the ALL keyword in a Runas specification. Read more

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Enters Final Freeze Ahead of October 17th Release

As of October 10th, the Ubuntu 19.10 release is officially in Final Freeze, the last step of its development stage, which means that only release critical bugs affecting the ISO images or the installers will be accepted in the archives. Release Candidate images are also now available for testing to ensure an uneventful and smooth release. "We will shut down cronjobs and spin some RC images late Friday or early Saturday once the archive and proposed-migration have settled a bit, and we expect everyone with a vested interest in a flavour (or two) and a few spare hours here and there to get to testing to make sure we have another uneventful release next week," said Adam Conrad. Read more

KDE neon 5.17

KDE neon 5.17 is out. You can upgrade your existing KDE neon User Edition install or install fresh from an ISO image or run the Docker image. Featuring Plasma 5.17 it is packed full of new features according to OMG Ubuntu. Read more

Games: The Universim, POSTAL 4: No Regerts, RPCS3, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Games Archive and X-Plane

  • City building god sim 'The Universim' will now let you launch rockets with satellites into orbit

    The Universim is slowly turning into a city building god game truly worth playing, with the Sky High update now available expanding the game into planetary orbit. Being able to actually launch things into space is a stepping stone towards visiting other planets. Currently, the Cosmodrome will allow you to send up Defence Satellites that will enable ground to air defences for your Defence Towers. So now you have a reasonable chance to take down meteors and other threats from space.

  • POSTAL 4: No Regerts released into Early Access, Linux version likely in future

    Running With Scissors are back, with a surprise release of POSTAL 4: No Regerts on Steam and a Linux version is looking likely in future. Naturally, someone posted on Steam to ask about the possibility of Linux support. This is something that happens a lot but here it's a bit different. RWS already supported Linux with multiple previous Postal releases.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is coming along quickly with their August progress report up

    Delayed as usual due to the progress reports being done by contributors, the team working on the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 have another post up to show off more incredible progress. To start with, they have again changed how they list what games are playable and not with the removal of games that won't work due to servers being shut down. They said even if RPCS3 becomes 100% complete, they wouldn't work unless someone accurately emulated and hosted servers for them. With that in mind, they also did a lot of testing of games that previously only went in-game to see how many are now properly playable. Thanks to all the testing, the Playable category has jumped up to 1,426 titles!

  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition arrives on Linux on November 5th

    Feral Interactive have finally confirmed the Linux release date for Shadow of the Tomb Raider after announcing it for Linux back in November last year. They've said today it will officially release as "Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition" on November 5th! Looking around at dates, technically this is the earliest we've seen any of the newer Tomb Raider series arrive on Linux. The first Tomb Raider came to Linux in 2016 after an original 2013 release, with Rise of the Tomb Raider arriving on Linux 2018 after an original 2016 release and we get the final game in the reboot trilogy next month!

  • The Internet Archive website has added another 2,500 MS-DOS games

    Another point scored for game preservation. The Internet Archive have added another 2,500 MS-DOS games you can play right in your browser. In their official announcement, they said that while they've added a few more to their collection here and there this is the biggest yet and it ranges from "tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago".

  • 2,500 More MS-DOS Games Playable at the Archive

    Another few thousand DOS Games are playable at the Internet Archive! Since our initial announcement in 2015, we’ve added occasional new games here and there to the collection, but this will be our biggest update yet, ranging from tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago.

  • Vulkan support is not far away now for the flight sim X-Plane 11, physics & flight model updates coming

    X-Plane 11, the detailed flight simulator is finally closing in on an update that will bring in Vulkan support as detailed in a new developer blog post.