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Wednesday, 15 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos zen mini 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:29pm
Blog entry Distribution Release - pclinuxos enlightenment 2010.11 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:22pm
Blog entry Some site news srlinuxx 2 01/11/2010 - 5:24pm
Blog entry Malware Warning (resolved) srlinuxx 3 24/10/2010 - 10:51am
Blog entry Upgrade Ubuntu to latest version – using shell dhavalthakar 13/10/2010 - 3:06am
Blog entry How to install libreoffice in Ubuntu using PPA gg234 07/10/2010 - 6:27am
Blog entry Linux conundrums lately srlinuxx 30/09/2010 - 5:03pm
Blog entry under the weather srlinuxx 3 30/09/2010 - 5:20pm
Blog entry Texas Mint Tea, anyone? revdjenk 24/09/2010 - 8:56pm
Blog entry Debian-Main Locus(t) Error revdjenk 24/09/2010 - 8:27pm

Programming/Development: Julia 0.7 and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • Julia 0.7 arrives but let's call it 1.0: Data science code language hits milestone on birthday

    Julia, the open-source programming language with a taste for science, turned 1.0 on Thursday, six years after its public debut in 2012. The occasion was presented on YouTube, live from JuliaCon 2018 in London.

    Created by Jeff Bezanson, Stefan Karpinski, Viral Shah, and Alan Edelman, the language was designed to excel at data science, machine learning, and scientific computing.

    That's a niche – a rather substantial one these days – also served by Python and R, among other languages. However, the Julia aspires to be better, undaunted by being ranked 50 on Tiobe's programming language popularity index for August 2018. For what it's worth, Python presently sits at number 4 while R comes in at 18.

  • Julia 1.0 Programming Language Released

    Julia, the LLVM-based, speed-focused, dynamic and optional typing, full-featured programming language focused on numerical computing has reached the version 1.0 milestone.

    The Julia language has been in the works for nearly a decade while now the 1.0 milestone has been reached. Julia remains committed to its key focus areas for the language. With Julia 1.0 the developers are committing to language API stability.

  • Rust's Low-Level Graphics Abstraction Layer Is Showing A Lot Of Potential

    The Rust programming language's "GFX-RS" initiative that is backed by Mozilla continues working on exposing a universal "Vulkan-like" graphics API within Rust that in turn would have back-ends for Vulkan, OpenGL, Metal, and Direct3D 11/12 in order to reach all major platforms. Early benchmark results are quite promising for GFX-RS.

Budgie Desktop, KDE and GNOME

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • Summertime Solus | The Roundup #7

    For those that missed our announcements of last week’s Hackfest, you can watch it via the video embedded below. Most of this roundup will cover the work that has been done since the last roundup (in the specific sections in this blog) as well as the Hackfest, so if you don’t want to sit through the 10 hours of content, feel free to just keep reading.

  • Solus Linux & Its Budgie Desktop Seeing Summer 2018 Improvements

    The Solus Project has shared some of the work they've been engaged in this summer with their Linux distribution as well as their GTK3-based Budgie Desktop Environment.

  • Community Data Analytics Are Going to Akademy

    If you are interested in community data analytics, you will have several opportunities to discuss them during Akademy.

    Firstly, there will be my talk titled Bringing Community Data Analysis Back to KDE (why the hell did I use "Analysis" there... I only used "Analytics" everywhere so far, odd). It will happen on Saturday at 15:30 in room IE7. The slot is a bit small for the topic, but I'll try my best to create interest. Indeed you can catch me around talks to chat about it, and...

    Secondly, there will be a BoF "Discussing Community Data Analytics" on Monday at 10:30 in room 127. We hope to see people coming up with interesting questions to explore or willing to lend a hand in those explorations. See you there!

  • The birth of a new runtime

    Runtimes are a core part of the flatpak design. They are a way to make bundling feasible, while still fully isolating from the host system. Application authors can bundle the libraries specific to the application, but don’t have to care about the lowlevel dependencies that are uninteresting (yet important) for the application.

    Many people think of runtimes primarily as a way to avoid duplication (and thus bloat). However, they play two other important roles. First of all they allow an independent stream of updates for core libraries, so even dead apps get fixes. And secondly, they allow the work of the bundling to be shared between all application authors.

    [...]

    This runtime has the same name, and its content is very similar, but it is really a complete re-implementation. It is based on a new build system called BuildStream, which is much nicer and a great fit for flatpak. So, no more Yocto, no more buildbake, no multi-layer builds!

    Additionally, it has an entire group of people working on it, including support from Codethink. Its already using gitlab, with automatic builds, CI, etc, etc. There is also a new release model (year.month) with a well-defined support time. Also, all the packages are much newer!

    Gnome is also looking at using this as the basics for its releases, its CI system and eventually the Gnome runtime.

Red Hat and Fedora: OpenShift, Finance, and Improving Fedora's App Backend

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Red Hat

Intel IWD Wireless Daemon v0.6 Released

Filed under
Linux

Out today is a new version of IWD, the Intel-developed wireless daemon for Linux systems. IWD v0.6 is the latest version which is actually a quick follow-up release to address bugs from IWD v0.5 issued this morning.

IWD 0.5 added support for using agents with EAP-GTC methods, improved support for "known networks" management, support for Simultaneous Authentication of Equals, now exposes supported modes of operation, and can support D-Bus auto-activation via systemd.

Read more

Kernel, LF and Graphics: New Features, Hyperledger Global Forum, RadeonSI Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux 4.19 Certainly Is Going To Be A Big Kernel

    At the end of July I outlined some of the changes queued for Linux 4.19 while since then several more notable additions have become aligned for this next kernel cycle following the one week delay of Linux 4.18.

    Linux 4.18 should be out this weekend, which itself is bringing many changes, and in turn will mark the opening of the two week long merge window for 4.19.

  • Linux Live Kernel Patching Is On The Way For 64-bit ARM

    It's been a while since having any advancements to report on the live kernel patching front for being able to deploy primarily Linux kernel security fixes without having to reboot the system. There is some new progress on that front to report on now and that is the 64-bit ARM (ARM64/AArch64) support getting squared away.

  • Linux EDAC Support For AMD's Great Horned Owl

    The latest Linux kernel patch is for supporting ECC error detection via the Error Detection And Correction (EDAC) code with AMD's Great Horned Owl.

    Great Horned Owl is the codename for Family 17h Model 11h hardware, which is what launched back in February as the Ryzen Embedded V1000 series chips.

  • Linux Kernel Expectations For AMD Threadripper 2

    If you have already pre-ordered your AMD Threadripper 2990WX processor or just planning to be an early customer of that high-end desktop processor or the Threadripper 2950X, you may be wondering about Linux requirements from these new high-end AMD CPU offerings. Here's the gist of the Linux support state of AMD Zen+ CPUs for those wanting to get ready for Threadripper 2.

    There's still a few days to go until the global embargo expires for sharing Threadripper 2990WX/2950X performance benchmarks and reviews, at which time you'll be able to see my full Linux analysis of these new processors with plenty of tests... But for today we're just talking in general terms about Linux support requirements.

  • Keynote Sneak Peek for Hyperledger Global Forum – See Who’s Speaking

    Attend Hyperledger Global Forum to see real uses of distributed ledger technologies for business and to learn how these innovative technologies run live in production networks across the globe today. Hyperledger Global Forum will cut through the hype and focus on adoption. Attendees will see first-hand how the largest organizations in the world go beyond experimentation to lead blockchain production applications with measurable impact. Make your plans now to attend the premier blockchain event of 2018.

  • More OpenGL Extensions For RadeonSI Are The Latest In A Flurry Of Interesting Activity

    Marek Olšák has continued his busy work on the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver by implementing more extensions and adjusting various limits/constants to match the behavior of their proprietary driver.

    In the past few days Marek has fleshed out the EQAA GL extensions, ASTC compression for Gallium drivers, and yesterday was EXT_gpu_shader4 support for vintage/legacy OpenGL 2 applications.

  • Intel SSD 660p: 512GB Of NVMe Storage For $99 USD

Security: Crowdfense, Windows, Linux, Black Hat 2018 and More

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Security

Games: New Titles, Unigine, SDL2 and DXVK

Filed under
Gaming
  • The developer of Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus has posted about possible issues with the Linux release

    Yesterday, the developer posted on Steam about how they've noticed other developers having issues with Linux/Mac versions of their games.

  • Planetary god sim 'The Universim' has a new trailer ahead of Early Access later this month

    As far as we know, it will have same-day Linux support as it already has Linux builds available. When we spoke to the developer back in April, they did confirm then the Steam release will include the Linux build too.

  • The Linux version of Forsaken Remastered is now available on GOG

    Awesome news for those waiting on it, as GOG now have the Linux build of Forsaken Remastered from Nightdive Studios with porting help from Ryan "Icculus" Gordon.

  • Language learning game Lingotopia to release on August 16th with Linux support

    If you fancy learning a new language, Lingotopia [Official Site] might make it less of a chore as this adventure game has you play as a little girl shipwrecked on the shores of a strange island. You don't speak the language and so you must decipher what everyone's saying by gradually learning more words.

  • Graveyard Keeper releases August 15th, should include Linux support

    Despite the SteamOS icon (meaning Linux support) no longer showing on Steam, tinyBuild confirmed to us today via email that the plan is to still have a Linux version of Graveyard Keeper [Official Site] at launch. They said they're still testing the builds, which is probably why Linux wasn't included during the alpha testing period.

  • Unigine 2.7.2 Brings Improved Particle System, Better Multi-Channel Rendering

    Unigine, the beautiful and Linux-friendly engine for games as well as VR and industrial training/simulation applications, has outed their latest engine update.

    Unigine 2.7.2 is the newest release of this commercial game and professional graphics engine. While it may not seem like a big release given the version number, there are a fair amount of improvements to enjoy with this latest release.

  • SDL2 Gets Better Support For Xbox / PS4 / Nintendo Switch Pro Controllers

    Sam Lantinga of Valve has contributed better support for some popular game controllers to the SDL2 library.

    Within the latest SDL2 development code, HIDAPI joystick drivers have been added to this library for providing more consistent support for the Xbox, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo Switch Pro controllers. HIDAPI is a multi-platform library for HID devices on Windows/Linux/macOS and now this unified code is used across platforms.

  • Direct3D 9 Support Proposed For DXVK

    DXVK has been doing great with its Direct3D 11 support mapped to Vulkan and running a variety of games at performant speeds under Wine while now patches have emerged that would add Direct3D 9 support too.

    This Direct3D 9 for DXVK proposal isn't to be confused with the separate VK9 initiative that is working on Direct3D 9 support mapped to Vulkan albeit still in the fairly early stages.

Mozilla: MDN Changelog, Servo and VR

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • MDN Changelog for July 2018: CDN tests, Goodbye Zones, and BCD

    We moved MDN Web Docs to a CDN in April 2018, and saw a 16% improvement in page load times. We shipped with 5 minute expiration times for MDN pages, so that the CDN will request a fresh copy after a short time. MDN is a wiki, and we can’t predict when a page will change. 300 seconds was a compromise between some caching for our most popular pages, and how long an author would need to wait for a changed page to be published to all visitors. 80% of visitors are getting an uncached page.

  • GSoC wrap-up - Splitting Servo's script crate

    The solution introduces a TypeHolder trait which contains associated types, and makes many structures in the script crate generic over this new trait. This allows the generic structs to refer to the new trait’s associated types, while the actual concrete types can be extracted into a separate crate. Testing shows significant improvement in memory consumption (25% lower) and build time (27% faster).

  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 15

    This week is mainly about bug fixing and getting some new features to launch.

TensorFlow Pi Port Is Strategic Move in Edge Analytics Game

Filed under
OSS

The recent port of TensorFlow to the Raspberry Pi is the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers.
Creative Commons Zero

Google’s recent announcement that it had ported its open source TensorFlow machine intelligence (ML) library for neural networking to the Raspberry Pi was the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers. The competition is a part of a wider battle with Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, and others to bring cloud analytics to the edge in IoT networks to reduce latency, increase reliability, and improve security.

Thanks to a collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, the latest TensorFlow 1.9 release can now be installed on Raspberry Pi 2 or 3 SBCs from pre-built binaries using Python’s pip package system. Raspbian 9 users can install it with two simple commands.

Integrating TensorFlow models into an embedded project offers further challenges. Yet, as Google has shown with its AIY Projects kits for the Raspberry Pi, you can add a bit of ML smarts in Raspberry Pi based robots, vision systems, and other embedded gear without a huge learning curve.

Read more

‘Podcasts’ is a new podcast app for Linux

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Software

A new app makes it easy to follow, fave and listen to your favourite podcasts on the Linux desktop.

It’s called ‘Podcasts’ and — no prizes for guessing — it’s a podcast client for the Linux desktop, designed for the GNOME desktop specifically.

Podcasts lets you subscribe to shows, browse through them, and listen to the latest episodes all from inside the app, with no external MP3 or OGG downloads necessary.

Read more

OTTO: A Pi Based Open Source Music Production Box

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Hardware

Want an open source portable synth workstation that won’t break the bank? Check out OTTO. [Topisani] started OTTO as a clone of the well-known Teenage Engineering OP-1. However, soon [Topisani] decided to branch away from simply cloning the OP-1 — instead, they’re taking a lot of inspiration from it in terms of form factor, but the UI will eventually be quite different.

Read more

A quick guide to switching from Windows to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Windows is hands down the most popular Operating System in the world. Being the most popular however doesn’t necessarily mean it is the best. Windows can be so nagging sometimes, especially with updates. Don’t get me started on the whole malware issue. It is the most targetted Operating System and that makes sense due to its shear scale of numbers. Also, not many people are fans of the one-size-fits-all that Windows is using on its consumer-grade system.

That said, if you are unhappy with your Windows experience, you could invest in a Mac or sell a kidney and get yourself their usually overpriced hardware to run their Operating System MacOS. But since you already have decent hardware with you, the world of Linux could very well be your next destination.

Read more

Also: How to Install Linux Mint 19 Tara? | The Complete Installation Guide

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source Kaa IoT middleware to take on enterprise IoT

    To benefit from IoT, businesses need a way to network, manage and secure all of their connected devices. While there are proprietary IoT middleware platforms available to do this for the home and heavy industries like manufacturing, the Kaa IoT platform is one of the few open source options on the market today that is business-ready.

  • bzip.org changes hands

    The bzip2 compression algorithm has been slowly falling out of favor, but is still used heavily across the net. A search for "bzip2 source" returns bzip.org as the first three results. But it would seem that the owner of this domain has let it go, and it is now parked and running ads. So we no longer have an official home for bzip2.

  • Three Capabilities Banks Need to Work On While Adopting Open Source

    As banks are now willing to experiment and adopt new age technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain, the next big step of its digital disruption has to do with open source banking.

    With the adoption of open source, banks are likely to open their APIs and share customer data with third-party players to develop innovative products and offer customized real-time bespoke services to customers.

    Industry experts consider it to be the best time to embrace open banking as customer buying patterns are changing.

    In a previous interaction with Entrepreneur India, Rajeev Ahuja, Executive Director, RBL Bank accredited this change to “the emergence of nontraditional competition such as fintech startups, growing domination of technologies like blockchain, artificial intelligences, machine learning, etc and lastly, the initiatives taken by the Reserve Bank Of India to regulated the payments banks, peer to peer lending platforms, linking of Aadhar, and e-kyc.”

  • Free and open-source software con returns to International House

    FOSSCon, a free and open-source software conference, will be held Aug. 25 at the International House Philadelphia. Lectures and workshops will teach participants about free software and new ways to use it.

    Unlike most software, which is only available under restrictive licensing, free and open-source software is available under licenses that let people distribute, run and modify the software for their own purposes. It includes well-known projects like the Firefox browser or the Linux kernel. Those who talk about “free software” emphasize the way copyright law restricts users’ freedom, while those who talk about “open source” emphasize the economic and technical benefits of shared development.

    However, most of the scheduled events are far from philosophical, focusing on technical subjects like the use of domain name systems or the filesystem ZFS. The speakers range from professional programmers to enthusiasts. Most famous on the list is Eric S. Raymond, one of the thinkers behind “open source,” who will speak about the history of the C programming language and what might replace it. Of particular local interest is a talk by Eric O’Callaghan, a systems administrator at Thomas Jefferson University, on how to use public data from Indego Bike Share.

Devices: Tizen, OpenZWave, and Ibase

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • Samsung Galaxy Watch, Running Tizen, is Launched

    Today, as expected, Samsung have launched a new smartwatch, the Samsung Galaxy Watch, yes, the name change is real (previously it has been known as the Gear S4). At the Samsung Unpacked event, we were given the Note 9 and the Galaxy Watch. The big headline for us is the watch will not be running Wear OS, as speculated once upon a time, but the Galaxy Watch will be running Tizen 4.0.

    We will have two models to choose from: 46mm available in silver and a 42mm black and rose gold versions. Samsung have realised that “one size does not fit all” and some might find a smaller watch face appealing.

  • Building a better thermostat with Home Assistant

    Next, I needed to look at software to use my hardware acquisitions as a thermostat. While all my devices were Z-Wave, and OpenZWave provides both C++ and Python interfaces I could use to access and control my devices, it was a bit too low-level for my taste.

    Instead, I decided to use the Home Assistant project, for a few reasons. First, I know a bunch of people who use it, hack on it, or both. Second, while all my current devices are Z-Wave, Home Assistant will let me branch out to use other kinds of devices if I want. Home Assistant supports a ton of different devices and services—you can look at the component list to see them all. For Z-Wave support, it leverages OpenZWave and provides a higher level interface that is a bit easier to deal with. Home Assistant is written in Python 3, which is very convenient for me since I do most of my programming in Python. It also has an active community that has been responsive and helpful.

    I installed Home Assistant on one of my servers and proceeded to configure its interface with my devices. There is a lot of detailed information available on setting up Home Assistant—you can refer to the official documentation for a starting point. For specific Z-Wave instructions, see the Z-Wave section in the Home Assistant docs.

    After setting up Home Assistant, I had a single web interface and API for controlling my new power switches and displaying data from the MultiSensor. But, I still didn't have a thermostat—just a pretty interface (that I could use remotely) for manually turning the AC on or off.

  • IP65 protected panel PCs feature Apollo Lake or Core-U chips

    Ibase announced three open-frame panel PCs with Linux support. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC run on the Pentium N4200 while the 21-inch OFP-2101-PC offers a choice of 7th Gen Core-U CPUs.

    Ibase, which last year launched an SE-102-N signage player, has now returned with a pair of fanless, open-frame touch-panel PCs that similarly run Linux 4.x or Windows 10 on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC ship with a quad-core, 1.1/2.5GHz Pentium N4200 with 6W TDP.

Mozilla Development and News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox DevEdition 62 Beta 18 Testday, August 17th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, August 17th, we are organizing Firefox 62 DevEdition Beta 18 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on Activity Stream, React Animation Inspector and Toolbars & Window Controls features. We will also have fixed bugs verification and unconfirmed bugs triage ongoing.

  • How to DoH-only with Firefox

    Firefox supports DNS-over-HTTPS (aka DoH) since version 62.

    You can instruct your Firefox to only use DoH and never fall-back and try the native resolver; the mode we call trr-only. Without any other ability to resolve host names, this is a little tricky so this guide is here to help you. (This situation might improve in the future.)

    In trr-only mode, nobody on your local network nor on your ISP can snoop on your name resolves. The SNI part of HTTPS connections are still clear text though, so eavesdroppers on path can still figure out which hosts you connect to.

    [...]

    network.trr.uri - set this to the URI of the DoH server you want to use. This should be a server you trust and want to hand over your name resolves to. The Cloudflare one we've previously used in DoH tests with Firefox is https://mozilla.cloudflare-dns.com/dns-query.

  • #5 State of Mozilla Support: 2018 Mid-year Update – Part 5

    We are happy to share with you the final post of the series, which started with two external research report analyses, moved on to sharing updates and plans for support forums, social support, and localization, and now is about to conclude with our strategic summary.

  • Rep of the Month – July 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Lívia Takács, our Rep of the Month for July 2018!

    Livia is a UI developer and visual designer from Hungary and has been part of the Reps program for a bit more than a year. In that time she organized a lot of events with different communities (like LibreOffice) and also workshops.

  • Updated Firefox 61.0.2 includes Bug Fixes and Automatic Recovery feature for Windows

    The latest update to Firefox 61.0.2 adds support for automatic restoring of Firefox session after Windows is restarted. Presently this feature is not available by default for majority of users but will possibly be enabled gradually in the coming few weeks.

  • Make your Firefox browser a privacy superpower with these extensions

    Privacy is important for everyone, but often in different ways. That’s part of why Firefox Extensions are so powerful. Starting with a browser like Firefox, that’s built for privacy out of the box, you can use extensions to customize your browser to suit your personal privacy needs.

  • The Video Wars of 2027

    This post imagines a dystopian future for web video, if we continue to rely on patented codecs to transmit media files. What if one company had a perpetual monopoly on those patents? How could it limit our access to media and culture? The premise of this cautionary tale is grounded in fact. However, the future scenario is fiction, and the entities and events portrayed are not intended to represent real people, companies, or events.

    [...]

    In 1998, the U.S. Congress passed the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. This new law extended copyrights on corporate works to the author’s lifetime plus 95 years. The effort was driven by the Walt Disney Company, to protect its lucrative retail franchise around the animated character Mickey Mouse. Without this extension, Mickey would have entered the public domain, meaning anyone could create new cartoons and merchandise without fear of being sued by Disney. When the extension passed, it gave Disney another 20 years to profit from Mickey. The news sparked outrage from lawyers and academics at the time, but it was a dull and complex topic that most people didn’t understand or care about.

    In 2020, Disney again lobbied to extend the law, so its copyright would last for 10,000 years. Its monopoly on our culture was complete. No art, music, video, or story would pass into the public domain for millennia. All copyrighted ideas would remain the private property of corporations. The quiet strangulation of our collective creativity had begun.

ClickUp – An Awesome Project Management and Productivity App

Filed under
Software

ClickUp is a productivity platform that provides a fundamentally new way to work. More than just task management – ClickUp offers notes, reminders, goals, calendar, scheduling, and even an inbox. Fully customizable, ClickUp works for every type of team, so all teams can use the same app to plan, organize, and collaborate.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

The Amiga community remains one of the most passionate and inventive we have ever seen, even now, decades after Commodore’s demise. A couple of weeks back, we featured just a few recent projects that were designed to breathe new life into aging Amiga systems, or at the very least ensure they remain repairable for the foreseeable future. Our article explaining how to build a cheap Amiga emulator using a Raspberry Pi was immensely popular as well. Today, however, we stumbled across a video that encapsulates the ingenuity of many of the more technical folks in the Amiga community. What it shows is an Amiga 3000UX, equipped with a Voodoo 3 card and BigFoot Networks Killer NIC M1, running some software – including Quake – on the Killer NIC’s on-board Power PC processor. Read more

New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4
    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion. Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

'Foreshadow' Coverage

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