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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Preview of GhostBSD 4.0 Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 12:22pm
Story Linux Mint 16 - The most complete and easy to use operating system Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 12:13pm
Story AST DRM Display Driver Updated For Linux 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 4:03am
Story Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon and MATE screenshot preview Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 3:55am
Story Ubuntu Is Now Running on World's Fastest Supercomputer Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:15pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:11pm
Story SlateKit Base OS Released For The Nexus 7 Tablet Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:10pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:08pm
Story Slackware-Based Salix Openbox 14.1 Beta 1 Is Out and Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:07pm

Linux Kernel Denial of Service Vulnerability

Filed under
Linux
Security

Daniel McNeil has reported a vulnerability in the Linux Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Linux vs. Linux: The Battle for the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Many Linux advocates claim that Linux is now ready for primetime, stating that even the novice users can get around in Linux without too many headaches. The good news is that Linux seems to have reached a point where it can begin to compete with Microsoft Windows, to an extent. The open-source operating system offers a variety of free software that is equal to and possibly superior to some professional level software for the Windows platform.

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

Sin City Making Big Bucks and Big News

Filed under
Movies

Released April 1, seems Sin City is on the tips of movie goers' and tech heads' tongues everywhere these days. Noted for using mostly cgi on AMD64 machines for it's action scenes, movies goers and comic fans just love the realistic blood and gore entreated.

Samba, Soccer and Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Since the election of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazil has gradually become a beachhead for Open Source, and consequently a thorn in Microsoft's side. Amazed by Open Source potential, it could completely undermine Microsoft's monopoly, and it probably will.

Seven Deadly IT Mistakes

Filed under
Misc

Handling change is where many software horror stories emerge. Effective design and testing of processes is essential. Using the latest business process management tools makes this even easier because it allows the business process to be viewed and changes to be managed with confidence.

Spring Forward

Filed under
Misc

For those of us in the States, remember to set your clocks ahead an hour at 2:am or before you go to bed.

Pope's influence includes technology firsts

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Misc

While Pope John Paul II will largely be remembered for his influence on social issues ranging from euthanasia to AIDS, he also earned a place in history as the first pontiff to embrace computer technology.

Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican

Filed under
Obits

Pope John Paul II, the third longest-serving pontiff in history, has died at the age of 84.

Always-Connected, Tech Savvy -- and Happy?

Filed under
Misc

You see them everywhere. You might even be one: mobile warriors with a BlackBerry, pager and cell phone arranged in matching holsters around their waists. They're hip, happening, connected and more likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs.

Software agents give out Advice

Filed under
Software

Governments and big business like to indulge in media spin, and that means knowing what is being said about them. But finding out is becoming ever more difficult, with thousands of news outlets, websites and blogs to monitor.

Now a British company is about to launch a software program that can automatically gauge the tone of any electronic document.

CMS gives the public access to hospital care data

Filed under
Web

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services yesterday launched a Web site that lets the public compare hospitals based on their quality of care in treating certain medical conditions.

Flurry Of Patches From Unix Vendors For Telnet Flaw

Filed under
Security

Several distributors of the BSD version of the Telnet protocol have released patches for a critical bug that could cause system-hijack attacks. Advisories and patches have been issued by FreeBSD, MIT (Kerberos), Red Hat, and Sun among others.

A Motherboard Upgrade HOWTO

Filed under
Hardware
HowTos

Tips and directions for replacing your computer's motherboard--from deciding whether it's worth the hassle to tweaking the BIOS.

Red Hat Tops Its Records

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat on Thursday announced record revenue and profits for its fourth quarter and its 2005 fiscal year, which ended Feb. 28.

The Raleigh, N.C., company's total revenue for fiscal year 2005 jumped to $196.5 million, an increase of 58 percent from 2004. For the fourth quarter of 2005, the revenue was $57.5 million. This was a year-over-year increase of 56 percent and a third to fourth quarter leap of 13 percent.

Metallic glass: a drop of the hard stuff

Filed under
Sci/Tech

IN THE movie Terminator 2, the villain is a robot made of liquid metal. He morphs from human form to helicopter and back again with ease, moulds himself into any shape without breaking, and can even flow under doorways.

Now a similar-sounding futuristic material is about to turn up everywhere. It is called metallic glass.

Animal laughs no joke says expert

Filed under
Misc

Many animals may have their own forms of laughter, says a US researcher writing in the magazine Science.

Japanese Co. sells ghost detector

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The Japanese company that launched popular computer data storage units shaped like rubber ducks and sushi started selling a new product Friday - a ghost detector.

Former Microsoft employee sentenced two years

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A former Microsoft worker was sentenced Friday to two years in prison and ordered to pay $5 million in restitution after he admitted reselling software he stole from the company and using the money to pay off his mortgage, among other things.

Microsoft Acquires Linux

Filed under
Humor

REDMOND, Wash. - Mar. 31, 2005 -- Linus Torvalds, on behalf of all Linux users, has entered into a sales agreement with Microsoft valued at 1.4 billion US Dollars.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security Researchers Find Several Bugs in Nest Security Cameras

    Researchers Lilith Wyatt and Claudio Bozzato of Cisco Talos discovered the vulnerabilities and disclosed them publicly on August 19. The two found eight vulnerabilities that are based in the Nest implementation of the Weave protocol. The Weave protocol is designed specifically for communications among Internet of Things or IoT devices.

  • Better SSH Authentication with Keybase

    With an SSH CA model, you start by generating a single SSH key called the CA key. The public key is placed on each server and the server is configured to trust any key signed by the CA key. This CA key is then used to sign user keys with an expiration window. This means that signed user keys can only be used for a finite, preferably short, period of time before a new signature is needed. This transforms the key management problem into a user management problem: How do we ensure that only certain people are able to provision new signed SSH keys?

  • Texas ransomware attacks deliver wake-up call to cities [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The Texas Department of Information Resources has confirmed that 22 Texas entities, mostly local governments, have been hit by the ransomware attacks that took place late last week. The department pointed to a “single threat actor” as being responsible for the attacks, which did not impact any statewide systems.

  • Texas Ransomware Attack

    On Security Now, Steve Gibson talks about a huge ransomware attack. 23 cities in Texas were hit with a well-coordinated ransomware attack last Friday, August 16th.

  • CVE-2019-10071: Timing Attack in HMAC Verification in Apache Tapestry

    Apache Tapestry uses HMACs to verify the integrity of objects stored on the client side. This was added to address the Java deserialization vulnerability disclosed in CVE-2014-1972. In the fix for the previous vulnerability, the HMACs were compared by string comparison, which is known to be vulnerable to timing attacks.

GNOME Feeds is a Simple RSS Reader for Linux Desktops

Feedreader, Liferea, and Thunderbird are three of the most popular desktop RSS readers for Linux, but now there’s a new option on the scene. GNOME Feeds app is simple, no-frills desktop RSS reader for Linux systems. It doesn’t integrate or sync with a cloud-based service, like Feedly or Inoreader, but you can import a list of feeds via an .opml file. “Power” users of RSS feeds will likely find that GNOME Feeds a little too limited for their needs. But the lean feature set is, arguably, what will make this app appeal to more casual users. Read more

GNU Radio Launches 3.8.0.0, First Minor-Version Release In Six Years

The GNU Radio maintainers have announced the release of GNU Radio 3.8.0.0, the first minor-version release of the popular LimeSDR-compatible software defined radio (SDR) development toolkit in over six years. “It’s the first minor release version since more than six years, not without pride this community stands to face the brightest future SDR on general purpose hardware ever had,” the project’s maintainers announced this week. “What has not changed is the fact that GNU Radio is centred around a very simple truth: Let the developers hack on DSP. Software interfaces are for humans, not the other way around. And so, compared to the later 3.7 releases, nothing has fundamentally modified the way one develops signal processing systems with GNU Radio: You write blocks, and you combine blocks to be part of a larger signal processing flow graph.” Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Accelerating the journey to open hybrid cloud with Red Hat Modernization and Migration Solutions

    The integration of technology into all areas of a business (the "digital transformation" we hear so much about) is fundamentally changing how organizations operate as well as how they deliver value to customers. An example is Lockheed Martin, who opted to undergo an eight-week agile transformation labs residency to implement an open source architecture onboard the F-22 and simultaneously disentangle its web of embedded systems. But such transformation can also create new challenges, from additional competitive pressures to increased customer expectations. To help overcome these challenges, Red Hat is introducing a family of solutions to help optimize infrastructure, modernize applications and accelerate innovation while supporting customers in their journey to the open hybrid cloud. Red Hat Modernization and Migration Solutions are designed to help customers realize the benefits of open technologies and adopt containers, Kubernetes and hybrid cloud-ready platforms. The family of solutions offers a path for customers from restrictive, proprietary environments to more flexible and (often) less costly open source alternatives, in an iterative approach.

  • Let’s talk about Privacy by Design

    Privacy by Design or Privacy by Default (PbD) is not a new concept. However PbD received renewed attention when the GDPR added PbD as a legal requirement. PbD refers to the process of building in technical, organizational and security measures at the beginning stage of product development and throughout the product lifecycle. [...] One PbD tool we use to build in privacy to our development process is our Privacy Impact Assessment, also known as a PIA. The PIA is a process which assists developers at the early stages in identifying and mitigating privacy risks associated with the collection and use of personal data. The PIA tool begins with a self assessment that asks a lot of questions about the planned project or product. This initiates a process of review by individuals trained in privacy and security. The process is collaborative and creates an on-going dialogue about privacy with respect to the product, system or application at hand.

  • IBM Open Sources Its Workhorse Power Chip Architecture

    RISC-V now has formidable competition from an architecture with a long track record in servers and supercomputers.