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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DragonFly 3.8, coming soon Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:52pm
Story Linux for Lettuce Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:48pm
Story RhinoLINUX Lite Xfce Edition 7.0 Is Based on Xubuntu 13.10 and Linux Mint 16 Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:46pm
Story Enlightenment: EFL and Elementary 1.10 release plan Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:42pm
Story TRY FIRA SANS, A FREE FONT FAMILY COMMISSIONED BY MOZILLA Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:35pm
Story LightDM 1.11.2 Released for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:27pm
Story Swiss open source resource site now bilingual Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:21pm
Story Apple Thunderbolt Driver Might Be Added To Linux Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:09pm
Story Porteus Kiosk Edition Is an Operating System Based on Slackware and Firefox Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 5:04pm
Story Mesa Is At 1.4 Million Lines Of Code Rianne Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 4:58pm

Is your laptop a pain in the neck?

Filed under
Hardware

Statistical information on injuries related to notebook computer use is scarce, but doctors report a steady stream of new patients who've overdone it on the machines.

Nvidia starts working on SLI 2

Filed under
Hardware

Even if ATI Crossfire defeats SLI, Nvidia has some secret horses for a new race. It is working on something that we know as SLI 2.

Andromeda galaxy larger than thought

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The Andromeda galaxy just got bigger -- three times bigger, astronomers said on Monday.

Computer show opens in Taiwan

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The world's second-largest annual computer show, Computex, opened Tuesday in Taiwan, with organizers expecting the highest number of buyers and visitors in the exhibition's 25-year history.

Japan state bans 'Grand Theft Auto' sales

Filed under
Gaming

A state in Japan has decided to ban a U.S. video game from being sold or rented to minors, after officials deemed it harmful and capable of inciting violence.

KDE 3.4.1 Release Announcement

Filed under
KDE

It's official. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.4.1, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Dual-Core Duel: AMD Beats Intel

Filed under
Hardware

First look: Two processors in one Athlon chip give performance extra oomph. You now have a choice of dual-core processors; and based on PC World tests, the winner is clearly AMD's new Athlon 64 X2.

Professor predicts open source revolution

Filed under
OSS

What began as a keynote panel on the evolving world of open source quickly escalated into a debate on the future of open source licensing when a professor of law and legal history at Columbia University took center stage.

ATI's MultiVPU solution, don't get caught in the crossfire?

Filed under
Hardware

ATI's MultiVPU solution dubbed the Crossfire will see its official debut tomorrow, but has it been worth the wait and how does it compare to NVIDIA's?

Next Debian Linux release imminent

Filed under
Linux

Developers of the Debian GNU/Linux distribution are frantically squashing software bugs in an effort to get version 3.1 out by the scheduled 6 June release date.

Big-business technologists talk up Linux

Filed under
Linux

Several IT executives at the LinuxWorld Summit last week reinforced the idea that Linux now has the technical brawn and industry support to accommodate the most demanding business applications in environments such as finance, airline reservations and stock trading.

kde 3.4.1 on mirrors

Filed under
KDE

Although not officially announced as of yet, the sources for kde 3.4.1 hit mirrors this morning. Tagged a week ago, they are now available for public consumption.

Antenna betrays high-tech cheats

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Three Greek youths were arrested on Saturday for conspiring to cheat in a university entrance exam using a wireless camera hidden in a pen, police said.

AMD in dual-core processor move

Filed under
Hardware

Tomorrow, AMD will launch its first processors operating with “two brains” for desktop PCs, five days after its bigger rival Intel unveiled its own dual-core line-up.

guinness beersicle

here is a little something for your memorial day. i think most other beers probably don’t have enough body to make this trick worthwhile.

Link.

Microsoft: The end of 'my' is nigh

Filed under
Microsoft

Ending a longstanding tradition, Microsoft Corp. plans to stop using the word "my" as the default prefix for such folders as "My Documents," "My Music," "My Pictures" and others along those lines. Starting in the next Windows version, due out next year, folders will be known simply as "Documents," "Music," and so on.

Many Unaware of Browser-Security Link

Filed under
Web

Many American online computer users are unaware that choice of browser affects Internet security, and few switch browsers even when they know the risk, a Norwegian study said Monday.

Who Cares?! ...Out of the Mouths of Babes

Filed under
Linux
OSS

It is the classic struggle between David and Goliath. Between a monopoly vs. an idealistic rag-tag group of geniuses, business owners and stay-at-home Moms. I care in the stead of those who do not. I care because there are people who don’t know they are being taken advantage of. I care because a young girl needs me to. Struggling to educate, I care, to make others aware of another option and the threat to their future ability to choose.

Sweden's parliament passes law against file sharing

Filed under
Web

Swedish parliament passed a law banning the free exchange of material protected by copyright over the Internet. The law also gives holders of copyrights a legal basis to file for damages. The retail price of a 5GB blank DVD will now probably rise from the current 10 krones to 30.

Doctor sells surgery exam answers on eBay

Filed under
Web

Doctors who fail the American Board of Surgery written exam are no longer allowed to review their tests privately after one man wrote down the answers to dozens of questions and offered them for sale on the Internet.

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More in Tux Machines

Apache: Self Assessment and Security

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces Annual Report for 2019 Fiscal Year

    The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the availability of the annual report for its 2019 fiscal year, which ended 30 April 2019.

  • Open Source at the ASF: A Year in Numbers

    332 active projects, 71 million lines of code changed, 7,000+ committers… The Apache Software Foundation has published its annual report for fiscal 2019. The hub of a sprawling, influential open source community, the ASF remains in rude good health, despite challenges this year including the need for “an outsized amount of effort” dealing with trademark infringements, and “some in the tech industry trying to exploit the goodwill earned by the larger Open Source community.” [...] The ASF names 10 “platinum” sponsors: AWS, Cloudera, Comcast, Facebook, Google, LeaseWeb, Microsoft, the Pineapple Fund, Tencent Cloud, and Verizon Media

  • Apache Software Foundation Is Worth $20 Billion

    Yes, Apache is worth $20 billion by its own valuation of the software it offers for free. But what price can you realistically put on open source code? If you only know the name Apache in connection with the web server then you are missing out on some interesting software. The Apache Software Foundation ASF, grew out of the Apache HTTP Server project in 1999 with the aim of furthering open source software. It provides a licence, the Apache licence, a decentralized governance and requires projects to be licensed to the ASF so that it can protect the intellectual property rights.

  • Apache Security Advisories Red Flag Wrong Versions in Patching Gaffe

    Researchers have pinpointed errors in two dozen Apache Struts security advisories, which warn users of vulnerabilities in the popular open-source web app development framework. They say that the security advisories listed incorrect versions impacted by the vulnerabilities. The concern from this research is that security administrators in companies using the actual impacted versions would incorrectly think that their versions weren’t affected – and would thus refrain from applying patches, said researchers with Synopsys who made the discovery, Thursday. “The real question here from this research is whether there remain unpatched versions of the newly disclosed versions in production scenarios,” Tim Mackey, principal security strategist for the Cybersecurity Research Center at Synopsys, told Threatpost. “In all cases, the Struts community had already issued patches for the vulnerabilities so the patches exist, it’s just a question of applying them.”

Google and Android Code

  • Google releases source code for I/O 2019 app with Android Q gesture nav, dark theme

    The Google I/O companion app for Android often takes advantage of the latest design stylings and OS features. It demoed Android Q’s gesture navigation and dark theme this year, with the company today releasing the I/O 2019 source code.

  • Introducing Coil, an open-source Android image loading library backed by Kotlin Coroutines

    Yesterday, Colin White, a Senior Android Engineer at Instacart, introduced Coroutine Image Loader (Coil). It is a fast, lightweight, and modern image loading library for Android backed by Kotlin.

  • Google open-sources Live Transcribe’s speech engine

    Google today open-sourced the speech engine that powers its Android speech recognition transcription tool Live Transcribe. The company hopes doing so will let any developer deliver captions for long-form conversations. The source code is available now on GitHub. Google released Live Transcribe in February. The tool uses machine learning algorithms to turn audio into real-time captions. Unlike Android’s upcoming Live Caption feature, Live Transcribe is a full-screen experience, uses your smartphone’s microphone (or an external microphone), and relies on the Google Cloud Speech API. Live Transcribe can caption real-time spoken words in over 70 languages and dialects. You can also type back into it — Live Transcribe is really a communication tool. The other main difference: Live Transcribe is available on 1.8 billion Android devices. (When Live Caption arrives later this year, it will only work on select Android Q devices.)

FOSS in Crypto: Bots, Audius, and "Crypto Code Commits Remain Near All-Time Highs"

  • Best Free and Open-Source Crypto Trading Bots, Rated and Reviewed

    Crypto trading bots have become an increasingly popular tool for experienced bitcoin traders who want to deploy automated bitcoin trading strategies. As a result, there are now over a dozen trading bots (with ranging subscription prices) that digital currency traders can use. Fortunately, for traders who want to test out algorithmic trading before committing funds toward a specific bot, there are several free trading bots from which to choose. Here’s an introduction to the most popular free, open-source bitcoin trading bots available in 2019.

  • Blockchain Music Streaming Startup Unveils Source Code, Incentives

    Audius, a blockchain startup that aims to disrupt the music streaming industry, has uploaded its public beta version.

  • Blockchain music-streaming service Audius gears up for public beta

    A new streaming service with its sights set on making the middlemen of the music biz obsolete is inching closer toward its goal of disrupting the Spotifys and SoundClouds of the world. After a year of development, and armed with $5 million in investment capital from VC firms General Catalyst, Lightspeed, and Pantera Capital, blockchain startup Audius is finally ready to show the world what it's been working on.

  • Crypto Code Commits Remain Near All-Time Highs, Despite Price Declines

    The least committed contributors were the first to leave as cryptocurrency market caps went south. That’s the main finding from Electric Capital’s second “Developer Report,” which was published Monday. The report analyzes code activity in all the open-source repositories in crypto and follows the venture capital firm’s first such report from March. While there’s a sense that protocols and projects have been losing code contributors, the majority of developers that left crypto during the market correction in the first half of 2019 (77 percent of them) were the least committed contributors to the least promising projects.

Sharing/Collaboration/Open Data/Open Access

  • 3D printing organs may soon be a reality via a new open-source technique – Future Blink

    Bioengineers at Rice University created entangled cardiovascular networks similar to the body's natural passageways.

  • Global reinsurance experts urge investment in open-source risk models

    Strategic management experts say greater collaboration between the insurance industry and state policy makers, including investment in open-source risk models, could improve society's ability to recover from disasters linked to climate change.

  • Flume Kicks Off Open Source FlumeSounds Project

    Australian #1 bad boy of EDM Flume made a surprise project announcement FlumeSounds yesterday. He uploaded a near 8-minute video of samples to all his socials for fans and creators to manipulate.

  • Flume announces open-source sample series for producers

    Hot off the release of his new EP, 'Quits', Australian producer Flume has revealed Flume Sounds, an open-source audio loop series for producers.

  • First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

    Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research. The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients. “The database has the potential to improve treatment for up to half a million people suffering from spinal cord injuries worldwide, and also enhance research in other areas of health, science and rehabilitation,” said Randy Goebel, associate vice-president of research at the U of A.

  • Nationwide project provides free science materials to meet California’s new standards

    While California students began taking a new statewide science test this past spring, school districts were still struggling to get teaching materials aligned to the state’s new science standards into classrooms. A new nationwide effort is trying to speed up that process by offering free, open source science materials to teachers and schools. In 2017, philanthropists, state leaders and curriculum writers formed OpenSciEd to get materials to teachers implementing the Next Generation Science Standards, new academic standards that emphasize hands-on projects and integrate several scientific disciplines. California adopted the new standards in 2013 and this past spring began administering a new state science test. But it wasn’t until last November that the State Board of Education approved a list of recommended textbooks and materials aligned to the new standards for kindergarten through 8th grade.