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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 20 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open Source email solution ownCloud Mail is coming! Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 5:41pm
Story Nuage Networks Adds SDN Support to Oracle OpenStack Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 5:26pm
Story LibreOffice's superlow defect rate puts proprietary software to shame Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 5:06pm
Forum topic Forum funny? raymondillo14 2 26/09/2014 - 12:22pm
Story A Norsified Linux for Windows and OS X wobblers Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 11:05am
Blog entry Windows-Shocked Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 10:26am
Story APIcon UK: Open Source Fuels the API Economy Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 10:18am
Story Open source proponents in Trivandrum celebrate Software Freedom Day Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 10:01am
Story Xubuntu 14.10 Beta 2 Turns Pink to Celebrate the Unicorn – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 9:51am
Story Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 Beta 2 Is Out, Features GNOME 3.12 – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 9:05am

Why we wont be talking about Open Source in the future

Filed under
OSS

This bifurcation of Open Source from all other software was a very familiar behavior—it is the same one that ten years ago insisted that the Internet and related technologies were discrete from IT and the datacenter. A ha! As I am fond of saying, there is little new in the world, all things old are new again.

Mandrake Founder to Sue Mandriva over Pink Slip

Filed under
Interviews
MDV

Mandriva executive Gael Duval today confirmed rumors that he was laid off from the company he co-founded, along with a number of other Mandriva employees. Duval told NewsForge that he is going to bring suit against Mandriva for "abusive layoff." He also plans on working on new oss os Ulteo.

Tips for putting Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
HowTos

It's a lot easier to make the leap from Windows to GNU/Linux on a desktop machine (or even a server) than it is a laptop. Laptop computers are far more likely to contain unsupported unique or proprietary hardware than desktop machines, so laptop computers in general can be difficult to get your favorite free software operating system onto. Confused as to what distro you should use, or what computer you should buy? Here are some tips to make your decisions easier.

Why you should try Epiphany as your default browser with GNOME 2.14

Filed under
Software

In the GNOME philosophy, we want applications that do their job, only their job, and we want those to do it perfectly. Epiphany's job is to browse the web. Only browsing the web. But browsing the web in a GNOME fashioned way.

Also: Celebrating the release of GNOME 2.14!

Integrating Open Source Apps Into the Server Room

Filed under
OSS

Much fuss has been made about open source software, particularly its influence on back-end server environments. Some organizations are deciding that open source is the right option for them. To best determine whether some or all of your server infrastructure is a good candidate for open source solutions, consider several criteria.

The mystery of the missing mail merge

Cast your minds back, if you will, to OpenOffice.org 1.4 or so. Back in those days, I taught people to do mail merges with the Address Autopilot. There was another approach, too: it was a nice little mail merge tool that let you select your starting document, your data source, and the fields to insert. But where is it now?

Dapper delay looks likely after online meeting

Filed under
Ubuntu

Developers, users and interested parties met online last night to discuss Ubuntu Dapper Drake's possible six-week delay, proposed by Mark Shuttleworth last week. The large group had mixed feelings, but on the whole seemed to be in agreement with Shuttleworth.

Akademy 2006 is in Dublin this September

Filed under
KDE

The yearly KDE World Summit, Akademy, has found a home for 2006 on the emerald isle. This year, the multi-day event for contributors to the leading Free Desktop will be held from September 23nd to 30th 2006 in beautiful Dublin, capital city of Ireland.

Five reasons why you should never use PostgreSQL -- ever

Filed under
Software

While PostgreSQL's adoption rate continues to accelerate, some folks wonder why that rate isn't even steeper given its impressive array of features. One can speculate that many of the reasons for not considering its adoption tend to be based on either outdated or misinformed sources.

Mourning Time for Linux As A Business?

Filed under
Linux

Do recent events point to a downward spiral for Linux as a business or is it just business as usual? Looking at key recent events gives one pause and food for thought. Consider...

KDE Human Computer Interaction Working Group Formed

Filed under
KDE

In order to facilitate current inter- and extra- community communication and innovation there is need for a Human Computer Interaction working group (short name "HCI working group") within KDE made up of core accessibility, usability, internationalization and artist community members.

Interview: Men of Mono

Filed under
Interviews

In issue 78 of Linux Format, on the shelves now, we have an interview with Edd Dumbill and Niel Bornstein - two prominent Mono coders who've written a book on the open source .NET implementation. Here's a few of the questions we asked, along with their answers:

Sony Confirms PS3 Delay, Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Ken Kutaragi, president of Sony Computer Entertainment, took center stage and delivered the big news: PlayStation 3 will not release until November 2006, but with Linux preinstalled.

Savage 2 Beta Linux Port Called into Question

Filed under
Gaming

"I don't believe we will have a full beta process for the Linux version. We will go through the entire play balancing and bug fixing problems with the Windows version" first, developers state.

But: Savage 2: A Tortured Soul to Feature Native Linux Client Support at Launch

ADSL Home Network With SuSE 10

Filed under
HowTos

At home, I have an ADSL connection with a single public IP (fixed IP, even if it's served through DHCP). What I wanted was to be able to connect my old laptop to the Internet using the existing SuSE box. Since I want to make it as simple as possible, I won't use a supplementary hub. My shopping list is very minimalistic.

Preventing DDOS attacks

Filed under
HowTos

DDOS, or Distributed Denial of Service is an advanced version of DOS(Denial of Service) attack. Like DOS, DDOS also tries to deny important services running on a server by broadcasting packets to the destination server in a way that the Destination server cannot handle it.

First look: Fedora Core 5

Filed under
Reviews

The Fedora distribution is one of the most widely used GNU/Linux distributions. Fedora Core 5 (FC5) is slated for release next week. Like earlier Fedora releases, it includes both recent versions of desktop programs and maturing software that has yet to be included in most other distributions.

Running scripts after a reboot for non-root users

Filed under
HowTos

In the past we've discussed adding new init scripts to a Debian GNU/Linux system so that programs or daemons can be started when a machine is rebooted. That works very well if you're root, but for non-root users it isn't an option.

Massachusetts' Open Source Transition Angers Disabled Workers

Filed under
OSS

In the hot debate over open source software in Massachusetts government, some disabled people feel they've been left out in the cold.

New OASIS committee to push ODF

Filed under
OSS

International standards body OASIS Tuesday announced the formation of the ODF Adoption Committee, a body with one mission: to promote widespread use of the OASIS Standard OpenDocument Format.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

  • Why Red Hat supports standards and open source

    Red Hat may be synonymous with open source and the developer community, but the company also actively participates within industry standards processes. For example, it is working closely with the operator-led Common NFVi Telco Taskforce (CNTT), which was initiated in the LFN open source community but has now been embraced by the GSMA, as an attempt to harmonise on the many varied NFV infrastructure solutions and architectures. Furthermore, Red Hat supports the move for greater alignment in NFV software platform domain.

  • Overview of Node-RED 1.0 Release

    Low-code, visual-based programming environments are opening doors for new types of application developers. At the same time, new event-driven architectures are making such environments more responsive. Node-RED, a visual flow-based programming tool, is one such environment attuned to these new development styles. After years of refinement, the open source Node-RED recently hit maturity with a 1.0 release. I chatted with Nicholas O’Leary of IBM, who has pioneered the development of Node-RED. In this article, we’ll discover what this new release encompasses. We’ll also peek into the history of Node-RED, look into some fascinating IoT use cases and estimate the future Node-RED roadmap.

  • Girls Who Code wins IBM's first $50K Open Source Community Grant

    Girls Who Code were the winners of the first $50,000 IBM Open Source Community Grant. Girls Who Code is a nonprofit organization working to increase the number of women working in computer science. Girls Who Code helps girls to learn more about computer science through after-school classes and summer courses. Along with the advancement of IT knowledge, women also gain confidence in their capabilities.

  • IBM launches grant to promote diversity in the open source community

    Announced at this week's All Things Open conference in Raleigh, NC, the grant -- which will be awarded quarterly -- will see the winner receive $25k in cash and $25k in Cloud Credits in order to support their efforts dedicated to education and skill building for women, minorities, and/or under-served communities. The inaugural grant is going to Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization working to increase the number of women working in computer science. [...] Other finalists in this quarter's grant competition were Outreachy (Organized by the Software Freedom Conservancy), which sets up three-month paid internships on open source projects for people who ordinarily might not have those opportunities. And PyLadies, an international mentorship group of the Python Software Foundation, helping women become active in the Python open-source community.

  • Ex-IBM Director Joins Open-Source Blockchain Platform

    ennifer Trelewicz, the former Director of the Systems & Technology Laboratory at IBM, has just joined the open-source and fully decentralised blockchain software, Credits. According to AMB Crypto, Trelewicz has taken the post of Chief Business Officer, under which she is responsible for the external business sector of the firm.

  • IBM Group Sales Down Again But Cloud And Open Source Business Is Positive

    Third quarter results at IBM showed group sales were down 3.9% to $18bn, although revenue from the acquired Red Hat was up a handy 20%. That group drop though masked progress being seen in the cloud, with Cloud & Cognitive Software up 7.8% to $5.3bn. This part of the business includes cloud and data platforms that include Red Hat offerings, cognitive applications and transaction processing platforms. The Global Technology Services segment – that includes infrastructure and cloud services and technology support services – was down 4.1% to $6.7bn. And Global Business Services, which includes consulting, application management and global process services was up 2.2% to $4.1bn – with consulting actually up 5% when broken down.

  • IBM Poised for Another Sales Slide Despite Red Hat Deal: What to Watch

    International Business Machines Corp. is expected to report third-quarter earnings after the market closes Wednesday. The results, which follow a string of quarterly revenue declines, will be the company’s first since it closed its $34 billion purchase of open-source software giant Red Hat. Here’s what to look for:

Free Software and Proprietary Software

  • Firefox to get page translation feature, like Chrome

    Firefox's page translation feature will work offline, with a local library, rather than cloud-based translation services.

  • OBS Studio 24.0.3

    OBS Studio is software designed for capturing, compositing, encoding, recording, and streaming video content, efficiently. It is the re-write of the widely used Open Broadcaster Software, to allow even more features and multi-platform support. OBS Studio supports multiple sources, including media files, games, web pages, application windows, webcams, your desktop, microphone and more.

  • FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues

    The Federal Aviation Administration is demanding answers from Boeing after receiving a 2016 electronic message exchange in which a test pilot talks of unknowingly having lied to regulators and discloses "egregious" problems with the flight control system that figured in two 737 Max crashes.

    FAA Administrator Steve Dickson sent a terse letter Friday to Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg requesting to know why the messages had only been delivered the day before, not months ago when Boeing had uncovered them. "I expect your explanation immediately," he writes.

  • Why Kids’ Programming Will Be a Major Battleground in the Streaming Wars

    It’s not that children are suddenly allergic to SpongeBob. (According to Parrot Analytics, Mr. SquarePants and his underwater antics remain the most in-demand children’s content in America.) But as Juenger puts it: The traditional American TV industry is “entering a period of prolonged structural decline,” as viewers migrate to platforms that feature fewer or no ads.

    Saturday mornings, years ago relinquished by broadcasters, are now threatening to evaporate from the grip of cablers as well. This will prove to be a fertile area for existing streamers, as well as the soon-to-launch over-the-top offerings from Apple, Disney and WarnerMedia, among others. All of them are hungry for subscribers and eager to keep them shelling out monthly dollars.

Programming and Devices/Enthusiasts

OSS Leftovers

  • npm is moving back to its developer roots, founder says

    Everyone has an opinion on what NPM should do next, both as a company (npm, Inc.) and as the package manager (npm) made essential by Node.js. That's not surprising: More than 11 million JavaScript developers use npm (and associated npm registry) to build their applications, whether they use Node.js or not. It's also not a particularly easy question to resolve, given the turmoil npm Inc. has experienced over the past year, what with the introduction (and eventual departure) of CEO Bryan Bogensberger and employee unrest in his wake. Talking to npm founder and Chief Open Technologies officer Isaac Schlueter, however, the right strategy for "building a sustainable engine behind an open source labor of love" might well be a return to npm's roots.

  • Open source community should help fight fake news

    That’s the view of Aroma Rodrigues, a full-time Python developer at a major bank in India and a part-time software activist. She told delegates at last week’s PyConZA 2019, part of SA’s Open Source Week, that they can and should be doing more to use their skills for social good. [...] For example, the US-based Knight Foundation, which was established to promote excellence in journalism, examined more than 10 million tweets from 700 000 Twitter accounts before, during and after the 2016 US presidential election. The study found that identified clusters of Twitter accounts linked back to more than 600 fake and conspiracy news sites repeatedly, often in ways that seemed to be co-ordinated, or even automated, in order to sway public opinion one way or another.

  • Open source community should embrace the spirit of ubuntu

    In an interview with ITWeb at the conference, Nkosi pointed out that although open source was about community, “we are not using it as community”. [...] The word 'ubuntu' loosely translates to “I am because we are”. This, Nkosi asserted, was essentially the premise of open source software, which was about harnessing the collective power of the community.

  • How the top open source AI software drives innovation

    Open source software and tools have long been a mainstay of the computing ecosystem, especially over the past two decades. From the popularity of Linux in the enterprise server environment to the Firefox browser, open source has found a successful place in the computing hierarchy. It should come as little surprise that open source AI software is finding significant popularity and use within the machine learning and deep learning ecosystem, as well. In fact, much of the technology that powers AI is open source. This comes as a contrast to other enterprise technology, such as operating systems and databases that had their initial roots in closed, licensed software.

  • Catalan separatists have tooled up with a decentralized app for civil disobedience

    One of the first protest actions programmed by a new online activist group, calling itself Tsunami Democràtic, saw thousands of protestors coalescing on Barcelona airport Monday, in an attempt to shut it down. The protest didn’t quite do that but it did lead to major disruption, with roads blocked by human traffic as protestors walked down the highway and the cancelation of more than 100 flights, plus hours of delays for travellers arriving into El Prat. For months leading up to a major Supreme Court verdict on the fate of imprisoned Catalan political leaders a ‘technical elite‘ — as one local political science academic described them this week — has been preparing to reboot Catalonia’s independence movement by developing bespoke, decentralized high-tech protest tools. A source with knowledge of Tsunami Democràtic, speaking to TechCrunch on condition of anonymity, told us that “high level developers” located all around the world are involved in the effort, divvying up coding tasks as per any large scale IT project and leveraging open source resources (such as the RetroShare node-based networking platform) to channel grassroots support for independence into a resilient campaign network that can’t be stopped by the arrest of a few leaders.

  • To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source

    The European Union aims to reduce carbon emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050. Former California Governor Jerry Brown signed an executive order last year calling for the state, the fifth-largest economy in the world, to go carbon neutral by 2045. Meeting these goals, or even the less ambitious goals set by other governments, will require utilities to buy more energy from sustainable sources like wind and solar power. That shift is already creating logistical challenges for utilities. Unlike more predictable sources of energy, the energy produced by a wind farm can vary from day to day, forcing utilities to offload excess supplies and make up for shortages. The solar panels on residential rooftops that feed into the grid pose their own challenges because the grid wasn't designed to facilitate a two-way flow of energy. To meet those technological challenges, the energy sector is turning to open source software. Open source, which anyone can modify or share, helped power the rise of internet giants like Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Ostensible competitors worked together to develop software like the data-crunching platform Hadoop because it enabled them to solve difficult computing problems. Now all sorts of companies, ranging from Microsoft to Walmart to JP Morgan Chase use and make open source software. But the energy industry has lagged behind others in using and creating open source software, says Loek Bakker, head of information management at Dutch energy distribution company TenneT. "The energy industry isn't known for being innovative," he says. "I think we're quite a traditional industry."

  • Open FinTech Forum Brings Together Technologists and Business Executives to Accelerate Development in Finance Sector

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the speakers and program for Open FinTech Forum taking place December 9, 2019 at the Convene Conference Center in New York.

  • LF Energy Brings Power System Leaders Together with Open Source Experts at Paris Summit to Implement the Grid of the Future

    LF Energy, a nonprofit, vendor-neutral initiative from The Linux Foundation, whose mission is to accelerate the energy and electricity sectors’ worldwide decarbonization goals through open-source technology, announced the full agenda for its first global summit, NOW TO NEXT - The Power of Together, as well as the addition of Alliander, EDP, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts and Unicorn as new LF Energy members. NOW TO NEXT, which will be hosted in La Défense, Paris, on Nov. 4-5, will bring together leaders and innovators in the power and technology industries to discuss the global transition to clean energy. Industry leaders have realized that no one can meet decarbonization goals alone. Instead, we must work together to transition the 150-year-old power grid infrastructure to smarter and more efficient digital technologies that enable decentralized energy resources.

  • Percona Open Source Software Database Survey Reveals Shift Toward Diversity

    Percona, a leader in open source database software and services, today announced the results of its Open Source Software Database Survey. More than 830 members of the Percona community and customer base, representing small, medium and large companies from around the world, responded to questions regarding open source database usage and growth. The survey revealed that diverse tools and environments, including multiple databases and multi-cloud and hybrid environments, are transforming today’s datacenters.

  • Public Health England - open source and containerisation key to tech agenda
  • Moodle Announces the Integration of H5P
  • SDSC Launches Open-Source ‘SeedMeLab’

    Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego have launched an open-source software called SeedMeLab, which provides a host of features for researchers across all disciplines to manage and disseminate their data products internally and externally from a personalized and branded data cloud with full ownership and control. Under development and rigorous testing for past five years, SeedMeLab is a result of $1.3 million National Science Foundation (NSF) award to create a set of web-based building blocks that lets scientists seamlessly share and access preliminary results and transient data from research on a variety of platforms, including mobile devices. SeedMe is short for ‘Swiftly Encode, Explore and Disseminate My Experiments.’ “Offered as an open-source software or a managed service from SDSC, SeedMeLab eliminates content fragmentation—that is data, its context, and its discussion—and enables quick reference of data/research context that’s critical during research phase and very useful for long tail use of data products” said SDSC Visualization Group leader Amit Chourasia, principal investigator for the project. “SeedMeLab also boosts team productivity by facilitating knowledge transfer between lab members in a sustained way, and it is now available for researchers to overcome data management gaps that have been an issue in the past. SeedMeLab is an important stepping stone for researchers to realize FAIR data management in practice.”

  • Senate Bill Would Open Some Weather Agency Models to the Public

    A bipartisan bill introduced in the Senate Tuesday would require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which collects and models scientific data for weather forecasting purposes, to make certain operational weather models publicly available. Under the Learning Excellence and Good Examples from New Developers, or LEGEND Act, NOAA would also “periodically review innovations and improvements” to operational models made by third parties and the public. The bill would give NOAA’s administrator authority to utilize certain outside innovations.

  • Former Catalyst CEO Launches New Open Source Push for Legal Tech

    John Tredennick, founder and former CEO of e-discovery company Catalyst Repository Systems, has accepted the challenge of bringing free, open source legal tech to an industry notoriously known as a slow tech adopter.