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Monday, 20 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Court Overturns Eolas Browser Judgment Against Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

"The U.S District Court of Appeals on Wednesday called for a new trial on a key aspect of the $520 million jury verdict that found that Microsoft had infringed on Web browser technology patents held by Eolas Technologies."

AMD's Latest Stunt

Filed under
Hardware

"CHIP FIRM AMD often attempts to pull off a stunt at the time of the Intel Developer Forum. And this time it took to the sky in a bid to remind Intel that it has a dual core Turion 64 notebook processor on the way."

KDE's FOSDEM report

Filed under
Software
OSS

Jonathan Riddell has posted news and pictures of Europe's biggest meeting of Free Software developers last weekend. He briefs us on the discussions and drops some big names. It sounds like it was great. Wish I could have been there. Big Grin

HP's ex-CEO Fiorina may end up at World Bank

Filed under
Misc

"Ousted Hewlett-Packard chief executive Carly Fiorina is under consideration to be World Bank president, a Bush administration official said, adding that no decision has been made."

Illicit drug sales booming online

Filed under
Web

"The worldwide trade in illegal drugs sold over the internet has surged, according to the UN's drug watchdog. Dangerous drugs are being sold without prescription in a virtual marketplace that is difficult to control, says the International Narcotics Control Board."

Half-Life 2 sweeps Bafta awards

Filed under
Gaming

"PC first person shooter Half-Life 2 has won six Bafta Awards, including best game and best online game."

"The title, developed by Valve, was released last year to universal acclaim - receiving special praise for its immersive plot and physics engine."

Invisibility Shields Planned

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"In popular science fiction, the power of invisibility is readily apparent. Star Trek fans, for example, know that the devious Romulans could make their spaceships suddenly disappear. But is the idea really so implausible? Not according to new findings by scientists who say they have come up with a way to create cloaking device."

Showing the Newbie's Side in Linux

Filed under
Linux

When I first started reading the article "Current Problems with Linux" I expected something of a Linux bashing. However as I read thru it, I kinda remembering feeling the way he describes five years ago when I first started using Linux. It took me about 3 or 4 tries to finally get away from windows due to some of the issues Aditya Nag discusses. I don't entirely agree with all his assessments, but some merit further thought.

Media Player Flaw Speaks Volumes on M$ Security

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

I'm sure everyone's read of M$ latest security blunder relating to it's media player, but I particularly like David Coursey's stance. He says, "By focusing not on the largest number of potential victims but on patching its most current software, Microsoft reveals its tendency to "encourage" customers to buy new software by letting them sway in the breeze for a while."

Displays on Your Car's Windshield?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"Ever wish you could be Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future II and travel to a future where city windows display pastoral scenes and the newspaper is a disposable piece of constantly updating, foldable plastic? Well, that movie magic may soon come to life, thanks to a new class of materials recently developed by researchers at Oregon State University and Hewlett Packard."

Hollywood Studios File New Round of Web Lawsuits

Filed under
Movies
Legal

"Hollywood's major movie studios filed a new round of lawsuits across the United States on Thursday against people who trade illegally copied films and TV shows on the Internet."

Concerns About Open Source "Zealots"

Filed under
OSS

"Speaking live on SYS-CON.TV, Linux Business Week editor-in-chief Maureen O'Gara talked with SYS-CON Media West Coast bureau chief Roger Strukhoff about a variety of issues, including zealotry and what she interprets as the "anti-capitalist" overtones of the open source movement."

O'Reilly Releases "Linux in a Windows World"

Filed under
Linux

"Before the Linux operating system can achieve world domination, there are a few lesser challenges it will need to face, the chief among which is the huge installed base of Microsoft Windows users. Practically speaking, the overall success of Linux will not be in its eradication of Windows, but in its ability to coexist with it and other systems. "Indeed, the challenge of coexisting with Windows can be viewed as an opportunity," says Roderick W. Smith, author of "Linux in a Windows World" (O'Reilly, US $44.95). "Linux can be integrated into a Windows network, providing a reliable and low-cost platform on which to run vital services for Windows systems, or even serving as a workstation on an otherwise Windows-dominated network.""

Cannabis 'doubles mental health risk'

Filed under
Misc

"Smoking cannabis virtually doubles the risk of developing mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, researchers say. The New Zealand scientists said their study suggested this was probably due to chemical changes in the brain which resulted from smoking the drug."

AMD in the Movies

Filed under
Hardware
Movies

"On May 19, the latest and final Star Wars prequel Revenge of the Sith will be heading to a theater near you. What you may not realize is that an Austin company played a role in getting it there. Austin's Advanced Micro Devices helped provide the force behind the film."

EU software patent law may halt Linux development

Filed under
Legal

"The European Commission (EC) on Monday rejected requests to rewrite the CIID which could seriously damage open source software development in Europe, according to a legal expert, Jeremy Mark Malcolm."

AMD and Dell Leaders to Be Keynote Speakers at WCIT 2006

Filed under
Hardware

"The World Congress on Information Technology (WCIT 2006) today announced the addition of Michael Dell, Chairman of the Board, Dell Inc.; and Hector Ruiz, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, AMD; as keynote speakers. The two leaders will draw on their longstanding involvement in a variety of global causes to share their insight on the positive role technology can play in addressing societal needs."

Yahoo! goes Hollywood

Filed under
Movies
Web

"Watch out, Hollywood. There's a new player in town. Yahoo!, the Internet portal created a decade ago by a pair of Stanford University computer geeks, is getting serious about muscling in on the entertainment business."

The Business Case for Linux

Filed under
Linux

ComputerWorld is running this really interesting article written by Carol Sliwa focusing on high volume businesses and their contemplation of running Linux servers. "Now that Linux is more commonly viewed as a mainstream option for mission-critical functions, IT managers are increasingly evaluating the open-source operating system with the same due diligence with which they compare commercial offerings."

Review: SimplyMEPIS 3.3 Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Randi submits, "XtremeResources is pleased to announce the publication of a review of the SimplyMepis 3.3 Linux Distribution by our very own Steve "sjohnson" Johnson."

This is a really nice review of Mepis starting out with a little background on Warren Woodford. The review includes some

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Why Are Cryptographers Being Denied Entry into the US?

    Is there some cryptographer blacklist? Is something else going on? A lot of us would like to know.

  • Security Engineering: Third Edition

    Today I put online a chapter on Who is the Opponent, which draws together what we learned from Snowden and others about the capabilities of state actors, together with what we’ve learned about cybercrime actors as a result of running the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre. Isn’t it odd that almost six years after Snowden, nobody’s tried to pull together what we learned into a coherent summary?

    There’s also a chapter on Surveillance or Privacy which looks at policy. What’s the privacy landscape now, and what might we expect from the tussles over data retention, government backdoors and censorship more generally?

  • Google halts some business with China's Huawei: report

    Huawei will reportedly no longer be able to access Android updates, the Gmail app, the Google Play store and new versions of Google phones outside of China.

  • Google restricts Huawei's use of Android

    Existing Huawei smartphone users will be able to update apps and push through security fixes, as well as update Google Play services.

    But when Google launches the next version of Android later this year, it may not be available on Huawei devices.

    Future Huawei devices may no longer have apps such as YouTube and Maps.

  • Forget Huawei, The Internet Of Things Is The Real Security Threat
    We've noted for a while how a lot of the US protectionist security hysteria surrounding Huawei isn't supported by much in the way of hard data. And while it's certainly possible that Huawei helps the Chinese government spy, the reality is that Chinese (or any other) intelligence services don't really need to rely on Huawei to spy on the American public. Why? Because people around the world keep connecting millions of internet of broken things devices to their home and business networks that lack even the most rudimentary of security and privacy protections. Week after week we've documented how these devices are being built with both privacy and security as a distant afterthought, resulting in everything from your television to your refrigerator creating both new attack vectors and wonderful new surveillance opportunities for hackers and state actors.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

A Look At The MDS Cost On Xeon, EPYC & Xeon Total Impact Of Affected CPU Vulnerabilities

This weekend I posted a number of benchmarks looking at the performance impact of the new MDS/Zombieload vulnerabilities that also included a look at the overall cost of Spectre/Meltdown/L1TF/MDS on Intel desktop CPUs and AMD CPUs (Spectre). In this article are similar benchmarks but turning the attention now to Intel Xeon hardware and also comparing those total mitigation costs against AMD EPYC with its Spectre mitigations. This article offers a look at the MDS/Zombieload mitigations on a 1st Gen Skylake Xeon Scalable server as well as a Kabylake Xeon E3 server for reference. Following that is a look at the total CPU vulnerability mitigation costs for 1st Gen Xeon Scalable, 2nd Gen Xeon Scalable (Cascade Lake), and an AMD EPYC 2P server as well for its Spectre mitigations. As expected given Intel's guidance last week of their latest Xeon processors being mitigated for MDS, indeed, the dual Xeon Platinum 8280 Cascade Lake server reported it was not affected by the MDS mitigations and thus not enabled. So for the MDS tests up first it's just some reference results using a dual Xeon Gold 6138 Skylake server running Ubuntu 19.04 with the Linux 5.0 patched kernel and reference results side-by-side for a separate Xeon E3-1275 v6 server. Read more