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Wednesday, 21 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Another office

Filed under
Reviews
OOo

At the outset, this article was written in OpenOffice Writer a word processor comparable to Microsoft Word. The Writer is just one part of the suite called OpenOffice.org touted as "open source" competition to Microsoft Office.

The original version was slow and clunky. However, with the latest version (2.0), OpenOffice.org has made it worthwhile to be written about.

Small Security Risk Still Big Selling Point for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Even companies hawking Linux antivirus products acknowledge that the operating system doesn't suffer from many security woes at this point. "Our product is more used to filtering Windows viruses than actual Linux viruses," said Ron O'Brien, an analyst at Sophos, a security firm in Abingdon, England.

Microsoft: OpenDocument is too slow

Filed under
OSS

The Office maker has taken a swing at the open source format, but the ODF Alliance says Open XML is not yet supported by any application so its performance can't even be measured.

Runit makes a speedy replacement for init

Filed under
HowTos

runit, a Unix init scheme with service supervision written by Gerrit Pape, is a complete replacement for SysVinit. Its key benefits include improved boot speed and ease of use. In the time that it takes you to read this article, you could move from init to runit.

Windows Vs. Linux

Filed under
Linux

So, what if you don’t like the way Windows is headed? You could abandon the PC altogether and go get yourself an Apple computer (which isn’t as much of a pocketbook hit as it used to be). What about Linux? Is there room in your heart for Linux?

How To Automate Spamcop Submissions

Filed under
HowTos

Spamcop is a service which provides RBLs for mailservers in order to reject incoming mail from spammers. Their philosophy is to process possible spam complaints from users. When they receive a certain amount of complaints during a time-period then they will blacklist the offender. This system is dependant on spam reporting from users. However, their submission process is not very user-friendly.

One of the worst operating system experiences ever encountered

Filed under
Microsoft
Reviews

VIRTUAL MICROSOFT employee, columnist Gary Krakow, says installing Vista Beta 2, "was one of the worst operating system experiences that I’ve ever encountered."

Also: Vista Needs More Fine-Tuning

Novell sells Celerant, focuses on Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Novell announced on May 24th that it has sold its shares in Celerant Consulting, its management consulting branch, to Caledonia Investments, a UK-quoted investment trust, for $77 million.

New Linux Inclinations?

Filed under
Linux

I'm writing this entry from a three-iPod row on a flight back from Las Vegas, where I just spent a couple of days with system builders and home integrators at XChange Tech Connect.

Linux Driver Development Kit

Filed under
Linux

Have you ever felt teased when driver developers of other operating systems teased you about a lack of a "proper" driver development kit for Linux? Have you felt left out of the crowd when looking at the 36 cdrom package of documentation and example source code that other operating systems provide for their developers? Well feel ashamed no longer!

Why doesn't govt embrace open source?

Filed under
OSS

Though use of open source is an integral part of any e-governance project report, it fails to move beyond. In the end, proprietary software and environment win thumbs-up in bagging the projects.

Google Summer of Code 2006: The Contestents Are At The Starting Line!

Filed under
KDE
Google

KDE is happy to announce the selection of 24 student applications for the Google Summer of Code 2006. This year, Google received a total of 6400 applications worldwide spread across 102 different Open Source organisations.

Linux, SQL Server drive database market: report

Filed under
Linux

The worldwide database market grew 8 percent last year to US$13.8 billion, with Linux and Microsoft SQL Server seeing the strongest momentum, according to new Gartner research.

First pictures of the $100 laptop

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

Available in fetching orange and yellow, or shades of blue and green, here's the $100 laptop, which was unveiled at the Seven Countries Task Force Meeting yesterday. Almost immediately, pictures of the machine hit the net.

Streamlining Iptables for FTP and SMB/CIFS Traffic

Filed under
HowTos

There is an article at nixCraft on Connecting a Linux or UNIX system to Network attached storage device. The article itself is a good one, except for the part about iptables firewall rules to permit FTP and SMB/CIFS traffic between the Linux client and NAS. The errors are common misconceptions, so I thought I'd mention them, and show the standard iptables usage.

Load Balancing and Round Robin DNS

Filed under
HowTos

Round robin DNS is a leading technique for providing a high level of availability of some service (typically http/web site) and for providing load balancing.

Book Review: Understanding Linux Networking Internals

Filed under
Reviews

OK. I admit it! I did not read every page of Understanding Linux Networking Internals. But I have read many of the thousand pages and looked at every one of its 36 chapters. It's a lot of stuff. And the overwhelming portion of Benvenuti's work is very good.

Hardening Linux Web Servers

Filed under
HowTos

Security is a process, not a result. It is a process which is difficult to adopt under normal conditions; the problem is compounded when it spans several job descriptions. All the system level security in the world is rendered useless by insecure web-applications. This article will cover installing, configuring and hardening free software web servers and associated software.

n/a

Guess We'll Go For It?

Filed under
Site News

Well, despite my hesitation, it looks like moving to a new host from my home based server might be a good idea. I received less than a 100 votes, but most said it was somewhat to quite a bit faster with a few stating about the same. No one reports slower response time.

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More in Tux Machines

Open Source platforms to now help students

The technical institutes in the State are now asked to use free and open-source software developed by a team, headed by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). The MHRD has also promoted their FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education) projects which uses tools so that students can easily use them. Recently, the MHRD made a decision that FOSSEE should be promoted amongst the student community so they can aim at reducing dependency on proprietary software in educational institutions. The MHRD Minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank too took to twitter urging students to use FLOSS tools in various languages to meet academic and research requirements. Read more

today's howtos

  • A guided tour of Linux file system types

    While it may not be obvious to the casual user, Linux file systems have evolved significantly over the last decade or so to make them more resistant to corruption and performance problems. Most Linux systems today use a file system type called ext4. The “ext” part stands for “extended” and the 4 indicates that this is the 4th generation of this file system type. Features added over time include the ability to provide increasingly larger file systems (currently as large as 1,000,000 TiB) and much larger files (up to 16 TiB), more resistance to system crashes and less fragmentation (scattering single files as chunks in multiple locations) which improves performance.

  • Testing the Linux Malware Detect.
  • Kushal Das: Remember to mark drive as removable for tails vm install

    If you are installing Tails into a VM for testing or anything else, always remember to mark the drive as a removable USB drive. Otherwise, the installation step will finish properly, but, you will get errors like the following screenshot while booting from the drive.

  • How to Set DNS Nameservers on Ubuntu 18.04

Security Leftovers

  • NSA Researchers Talk Development, Release of Ghidra SRE Tool

    The National Security Agency released its classified Ghidra software reverse-engineering (SRE) tool as open source to the cybersecurity community on April 4. NSA researchers Brian Knighton and Chris Delikat shared how Ghidra was built and the process of releasing it at Black Hat 2019. Ghidra is a framework developed by the NSA’s Research Directorate for the agency’s cybersecurity mission. It’s designed to analyze malicious code to give security pros a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems.

  • Linux Is Being Hit with Zero-Day Exploits/ Zero-Day Attacks [Ed: This is not news. If you have a system that is unpatched for months, despite many warnings, it is a risk, no matter the OS/kernel.]

    It was once the popular opinion that Linux was immune to zero-day exploits. However, even before the Equifax exploit, vulnerabilities were found in Linux distributions like Fedora and Ubuntu. In particular, back in 2016, a security researcher discovered that you could exploit a Linux system by playing a specific music file. Then, in 2017, a group of attackers used Struckshock vulnerability to carry on the attack on Equifax. These zero-day attacks are Advanced Persistent Attacks that exploit recently discovered vulnerabilities. Read on to learn more about what are zero-day exploits and how they can affect a Linux system.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and Others Launch Confidential Computing Consortium for Data Security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and others launch Confidential Computing Consortium for data security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use. Established by the Linux Foundation, the organization plans to bring together hardware vendors, developers, open source experts, and others to promote the use of confidential computing, advance common open source standards, and better protect data. “Confidential computing focuses on securing data in use. Current approaches to securing data often address data at rest (storage) and in transit (network), but encrypting data in use is possibly the most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data,” the Linux Foundation said today in a joint statement. “Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.”

Linux-driven modules to showcase new MediaTek AIoT SoCs

Innocomm is prepping an “SB30 SoM” with the new quad -A35 MediaTek i300 followed by an “SB50 SoM” with an AI-equipped, octa-core -A73 and -A53 MediaTek i500. Both modules ship with Linux/Android evaluation kits. Innocomm, which has produced NXP-based compute modules such as the i.MX8M Mini driven WB15 and i.MX8M powered WB10, will soon try on some MediaTek SoCs for size. First up is an SB30 SoM due to launch in October that will run Linux or Android on MediaTek’s 1.5GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC. In November, the company plans to introduce an SB50 SoM based on the MediaTek i500 (MT8385). Read more