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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CRYENGINE to Arrive on Steam for Linux Soon Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:35pm
Story MongoDB 2.6: Our Biggest Release Ever Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:29pm
Story Hamachi Graphical Frontend Haguichi 1.0.24 Now Has Systemd and Upstart Support Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:25pm
Story NVIDIA Releases 337 Linux Driver With Overclocking, Better EGL Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:20pm
Story Ubuntu Touch Gets More Fixes with the Latest Images Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:13pm
Story HP quietly introduces $349 Slate 8 Pro Business tablet Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:09pm
Story Replace the Retiring Windows XP with Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 5:03pm
Story Clonezilla Live 2.2.2-35 Distro for Backup Is Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 4:57pm
Story AMD Releases The Radeon R9 295X Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 4:47pm
Story Raspberry Pi to Deliver a Modular Device for Businesses Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 4:42pm

Tax collects Linux for open source analytics

Filed under
Linux

Despite its strong ties to proprietary software vendors, the Australian Taxation Office has finally dipped its toes into open source by establishing a Linux-based system for information analytics.

45 Minutes to a Linux Terminal Server

Filed under
Software
HowTos

With a Linux Terminal Server and thin-clients, a business can remove many of the costs associated with maintenance, support, and licensing of countless desktop PCs. Thanks to the exceptional efforts of the Linux Terminal Server Project members, such a switch is neither dramatic, nor painful.

Xfce 4 - your next window manager

Filed under
Software
Reviews

This Just might be good enough to be your next window manager!

I have found that one of the many I have investigated is good enough to be my primary window manager, Xfce. It has the ability to be both fast and powerful.

Microsoft talks to the enemy

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft's main eye on the open source community says the software giant wants to shake off its image of "stomping" on new ideas and be more open to talking with Linux developers.

Opening the potential of OpenOffice.org

Filed under
Software

One of the most critical Open Source desktop applications is OpenOffice.org. Back in the day when I started taking a keen interest in Linux on the desktop, an office suite was always the problem. Back then there simply was no Open Source office suite that was mature enough to use, but that was about to change.

Next up for cell phones: porn

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The cell phone, which already plays music, sends and receives e-mail and takes pictures, is adding a steamier offering: pornography.

An odd week in the world of open source software

Filed under
OSS

The open source world shied away from neither controversy nor absurdity last week as we all staggered forward under the weight of some seriously heavy weirdness.

n/a

ISP-Server Setup - Ubuntu 5.0.4 "The Hoary Hedgehog"

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.0.4 - The Hoary Hedgehog) that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/POP3s/IMAP/IMAPs, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

Sending Windows back to Hell

Filed under
Mac

Last week I became so fed up with Microsoft, Windows and the ridiculous cost of SQL server that I went out and bought a 12-inch Powerbook. This leaves me using no Windows machines, not even my dual-boot Thinkpad.

Intel stalls $50m deal with McLaren

Filed under
Hardware

It is believed that Intel is furious that the FIA - the body that governs F1 - recently signed a strategic partnership agreement with its arch-rival AMD.

Gates to free-software makers: Keep the day job

Filed under
Misc

Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates met this week with CNET News.com for a conversation that covered topics ranging from Windows Vista to Google APIs, Gates also touched on the hot-button issue of free versus commercial software.

New Quake4 Movies

Filed under
Gaming

Some new video of the upcoming Quake4 surfaced a few days ago at 3dgamers. These are a few frames from a multiplayer game and of some of the new vehicles.

SCO and Novell dispute takes new twist

Filed under
Legal

SCO's latest filing in its legal battle against Novell appears to lend credence to Novell's claim that the transfer of Unix to SCO was not comprehensive.

Greece Demands Reparations For Ancient Intellectual Property Violations

Filed under
Humor

Calling it the "greatest copyright violation in the history of civilization," the government of Greece issued a statement today demanding that Italy provide reparations for all of the countless ideas that were stolen by the ancient Romans.

Nations Present Open Source Argument to World Bank

Filed under
OSS

The group's report -- described as a blueprint for creating national policies for open-technology standards -- poses a threat to proprietary software makers who are already facing stiff competition from the OSM in the public sector of many developing countries.

Searching the World Live Web

Filed under
Web

Live Web search got a lot bigger yesterday, when Google launched its new blogsearch engine. It legitimizes the Live Web--and blogging in particular--in a big way. What impact will Google's new blogsearch engine have for the Live Web?

The Bigger They Are...

Filed under
Linux

Something else was King of the IT Hill before Windows. Therefore, simple logic dictates that something else will be King of the IT Hill after Windows.

I maintain that something else will be Linux.

Dell Is Top x86 Linux Shipper

Filed under
Linux

Dell was the top shipper of x86-based Linux servers during the second quarter of 2005, the PC maker said Friday, suggesting that entrenched vendors of the popular server are standing their ground against increased competition.

Novell Investor Wants Company to Fire Employees, Sell Division

Filed under
Misc

Blum Partners revealed this week that, disappointed by recent Novell results, it wants big changes at the NetWare and Linux vendor.

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More in Tux Machines

NomadBSD 1.2 released!

We are pleased to announce the release of NomadBSD 1.2! We would like to thank all the testers who sent us feedback and bug reports. Read more

Review: Alpine Linux 3.9.2

Alpine Linux is different in some important ways compared to most other distributions. It uses different libraries, it uses a different service manager (than most), it has different command line tools and a custom installer. All of this can, at first, make Alpine feel a bit unfamiliar, a bit alien. But what I found was that, after a little work had been done to get the system up and running (and after a few missteps on my part) I began to greatly appreciate the distribution. Alpine is unusually small and requires few resources. Even the larger Extended edition I was running required less than 100MB of RAM and less than a gigabyte of disk space after all my services were enabled. I also appreciated that Alpine ships with some security features, like PIE, and does not enable any services it does not need to run. I believe it is fair to say this distribution requires more work to set up. Installing Alpine is not a point-n-click experience, it's more manual and requires a bit of typing. Not as much as setting up Arch Linux, but still more work than average. Setting up services requires a little more work and, in some cases, reading too since Alpine works a little differently than mainstream Linux projects. I repeatedly found it was a good idea to refer to the project's wiki to learn which steps were different on Alpine. What I came away thinking at the end of my trial, and I probably sound old (or at least old fashioned), is Alpine Linux reminds me of what got me into running Linux in the first place, about 20 years ago. Alpine is fast, light, and transparent. It offered very few surprises and does almost nothing automatically. This results in a little more effort on our parts, but it means that Alpine does not do things unless we ask it to perform an action. It is lean, efficient and does not go around changing things or trying to guess what we want to do. These are characteristics I sometimes miss these days in the Linux ecosystem. Read more

today's howtos

Linux v5.1-rc6

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch because nobody eats that stuff in the US. Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0. So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking). Read more Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message