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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 21 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KitKat now powering almost a quarter of all Android devices Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:48pm
Story The most exciting Android tablet this year is coming from Dell Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:44pm
Story A global shift to open source at the university Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:40pm
Story 30 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 2:09pm
Story digiKam Recipes 4.0.9 Released Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 2:04pm
Story Stephen Hawking Talks About the Linux-Based Intel Connected Wheelchair Project Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 2:02pm
Story Listaller: Back to the future! Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 2:01pm
Story Ubuntu for Smartwatches? Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 1:39pm
Story City of Turin decides to ditch Windows XP for Ubuntu and €6m saving Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 12:14pm
Story Docker and the battle for open source cloud surpremacy Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 11:59am

First pictures of the $100 laptop

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

Available in fetching orange and yellow, or shades of blue and green, here's the $100 laptop, which was unveiled at the Seven Countries Task Force Meeting yesterday. Almost immediately, pictures of the machine hit the net.

Streamlining Iptables for FTP and SMB/CIFS Traffic

Filed under
HowTos

There is an article at nixCraft on Connecting a Linux or UNIX system to Network attached storage device. The article itself is a good one, except for the part about iptables firewall rules to permit FTP and SMB/CIFS traffic between the Linux client and NAS. The errors are common misconceptions, so I thought I'd mention them, and show the standard iptables usage.

Load Balancing and Round Robin DNS

Filed under
HowTos

Round robin DNS is a leading technique for providing a high level of availability of some service (typically http/web site) and for providing load balancing.

Book Review: Understanding Linux Networking Internals

Filed under
Reviews

OK. I admit it! I did not read every page of Understanding Linux Networking Internals. But I have read many of the thousand pages and looked at every one of its 36 chapters. It's a lot of stuff. And the overwhelming portion of Benvenuti's work is very good.

Hardening Linux Web Servers

Filed under
HowTos

Security is a process, not a result. It is a process which is difficult to adopt under normal conditions; the problem is compounded when it spans several job descriptions. All the system level security in the world is rendered useless by insecure web-applications. This article will cover installing, configuring and hardening free software web servers and associated software.

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Guess We'll Go For It?

Filed under
Site News

Well, despite my hesitation, it looks like moving to a new host from my home based server might be a good idea. I received less than a 100 votes, but most said it was somewhat to quite a bit faster with a few stating about the same. No one reports slower response time.

ATI 8.25.18 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

It was only last month that ATI had unveiled its Radeon X1000 series support under Linux. On that April 12 launch, Phoronix was there with coverage, and a handful of articles that had looked at its performance and various features. As was hinted at in those articles where the TV-out support had seized to exist, we mentioned that ATI would be bringing this support back in an upcoming release, as well as other features. Well, today is the day. ATI's fglrx 8.25.18 display drivers bring yet another handful of new Linux features to the table, and we at Phoronix have you covered.

Review: SUSE 10.1

Filed under
SUSE

Novell released SUSE 10.1 -- the distro once known as OpenSUSE -- this month after an extensive public beta that went through five public and two closed release candidates before being deemed worthy. Here's my take on the final version of SUSE 10.1.

Mozilla CEO: 'Why we're still shunned in the enterprise'

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla, maker of the open source Firefox web browser and Thunderbird email client, says a reliance on proprietary technologies is still an obstacle for IT directors looking to deploy open source in the enterprise.

Running Fedora Core 5 Under Windows XP

For many IT professionals it makes sense to work with both Windows XP and Linux.

On the other hand, Linux is stable and the Linux community provides you with free high-quality Open Source software.

Rough Start For Google's Summer of Code '06

Filed under
Google

They waited in IRC. They waited by their inboxes. They waited for Google to accept them.

And nearly 1,800 applicants of Google's Summer of Code 2006 finally got word their projects were accepted. Then came the rude awakening.

Smaller businesses take another look at open source apps

Filed under
OSS

A surge in IT spending among small and medium-sized businesses is raising hopes among freeware advocates that a flurry of new open source products will spur the corporate use of Linux.

Test the New Site?

I'm running a test of the new host/site and would appreciate some feedback. I find I'm getting cold feet about moving. Big Grin But if time permits, I'd appreciate some visits and a click on the poll about the site speed. Thanks.

In New Window
In Same Window

A GNU Denial Of Service Vulnerability

Filed under
Security

SecurityFocus has a vulnerability advisory about an issue with the GNU strings command and a potential Denial of Service attack. If a file contains certain character strings, the string command will crash due to a failure to properly handle unexpected user-supplied input.

Vim tips: Folding fun

Filed under
HowTos

The problem with writing and editing on a computer, versus having words on paper, is that it's usually hard to compare text from different sections of a document when they don't fit on the screen together. One way to do it is to use Vim's viewports feature. Another is to "fold" the text. Using Vim's folding features, you can tuck away portions of a file's text so that they're out of sight until you want to work with them again. Here's how.

Opera 9.0 Beta 2 is out

Filed under
Software

Some fixes:

Cache is not shared between widgets and pages opened from widgets.
Fixed Bittorrent downloads on Unix.
Fixed crash that could occur when exiting pages with Flash 8.
Fixed IPv6 on FreeBSD.
Fixed session handling for widgets.

Download.

The geek who took on Microsoft

Filed under
OSS

In the early morning hours of May 3, a dramatic piece of news out of Geneva began caroming through the online world: At long last, Microsoft's lock on the $9 billion office-application business was facing a challenge.

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More in Tux Machines

Endeavour OS | Review from an openSUSE User

Endeavour OS is the unofficial successor to Antegros, I’ve never used Antegros so I cannot make any comparisons between the two. It should also be noted that I think Arch Linux, in general is more work than it is worth so this won’t exactly be a shining review. Feel free to bail here if you don’t like the direction of my initial prejudice. I am reviewing Endeavour OS as a rather biased openSUSE Linux user that is firmly entrenched in all things openSUSE. I am going at this from the perspective that my computer is my companion, my coworker or assistant in getting my digital work done and some entertainment sprinkled in there as well. Bottom Line Up Front: If you want to run main-line Arch, Endeavour OS is absolutely the way to get going with it. They take the “Easy Plus One” approach to Arch by allowing you to install what I would consider a minimal but very usable base and learn to use “genuine Arch” with all the triumphs and pitfalls. If you want to go Arch, I can most certainly endorse this as the route to do so. However, even after playing here for two weeks, I find Arch to be more trouble than it is worth but a great educational experience. Read more

Eclipse is Now a Module on Fedora 30

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Updates from the Document Liberation Project

We mostly focus on LibreOffice on this blog, but The Document Foundation also oversees the Document Liberation Project (DLP), which develops software libraries to import and export many different file formats. If you have some old documents or spreadsheets from legacy office software, for instance, the DLP can help you to access that data – giving control back to you. Many well-known free and open source programs use DLP libraries, such as Inkscape, Scribus, Calligra and of course LibreOffice. A few days ago, there were some DLP updates, so here’s a quick summary: Read more Also: UI Logger

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