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Friday, 20 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry SOL srlinuxx 3 14/08/2013 - 8:06am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 14/08/2013 - 3:03pm
Blog entry blogstop javascript srlinuxx 14/08/2013 - 8:52pm
Blog entry sorry so slow srlinuxx 14/08/2013 - 8:55pm
Story Patterns and practices for open source software success srlinuxx 14/08/2013 - 9:02pm
Story Ubuntu 13.10 Release Date, Features: Overshadowed by Ubuntu Edge? srlinuxx 14/08/2013 - 9:04pm
Story Netrunner Sprints Ahead of the Linux Distro Pack srlinuxx 14/08/2013 - 9:08pm
Story Linux Mint 15 Olivia KDE - The eyes smile doth not srlinuxx 15/08/2013 - 3:14am
Story Red hatters plot a new future for Fedora srlinuxx 15/08/2013 - 3:17am
Story Run Windows apps on both OS X & Linux with CrossOver 12.5 srlinuxx 15/08/2013 - 3:18am

Enable password aging on Linux systems

Filed under
HowTos

Password aging is a mechanism that allows the system to enforce a certain lifetime for passwords. While this may be moderately inconvenient for users, it ensures that passwords are changed occasionally, which is a good security practice. Most Linux distributions do not enable password aging by default, but it's very easy to enable.

Jeff Waugh on Ubuntu: Community Building for Human Beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

At the 2006 Open Source Convention, Jeff Waugh, who works on Ubuntu business and community development as an employee of Canonical, describes the process by which Ubuntu's team went about creating a community with shared values and vision.

New computer OS runs on your Web browser

Filed under
Misc

When it comes to personal computer operating systems or an ''OS,'' you can count them on one hand. There's the Windows OS that you find on more personal computers than any other. Then there's Apple Computer's Macintosh OS called OS X. The third big name in operating systems is Linux. I recently found a new remote OS. This is not an OS that resides on your computer. No, the OS resides on a remote server. The entire OS runs within an ordinary Web browser.

Making wireless work in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest new features for laptop users in Ubuntu is network-manager. With this shiny new application it is finally easy to connect your Ubuntu system to any wireless network. Where previously you had to jump through hoops to do WPA or 802.1x authentication, network manager makes this completely transparent.

GNU/Linux vs. Mac: Why Apple will not dominate?

Filed under
OS

At this point there are really only three major contenders on the desktop market; Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X. It is a known fact that Windows still holds the vast majority of the market and Mac OS X is tied to computers made only by one manufacturer.

Desktop memory usage

Filed under
Software

This was actually supposed to be a follow-up to my tests of startup performance of various desktop environments, primarily KDE of course. I decided I should publish at least a shorter variant with all the numbers and some conclusions. You can do your own analyses of the numbers if you will.

How to set up a VoIP service with Xorcom Rapid, Asterisk PBX and *starShop-OSS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this howto I will show you step-by-step how to successfully set up a long distance calls service in your Cybercafé, using open source software. The main element is *starShop-OSS, an open source application designed to monitor and bill, in real time, calls made via Asterisk PBX. This service is commonly called callshop or taxiphone.

XenEnterprise 3.0 Works Well Within Limits

Filed under
Reviews

XenSource offers its first product, which is the best Xen virtualization solution eWEEK Labs has tested, although it's not yet ready to take on VMware.

The ever growing Monster

Filed under
Just talk

A simple oversight may cause some wondering WTF? I’ve been spending most of my time getting my Debian installation up and running with what I need. After a week or so I am really happy with it. Then the other day, I was trying to install something and I had run out of disk space! 23 gigs used already? for Linux?

What you should (and shouldn't) expect from 64-bit Linux

Filed under
Linux

So you just bought and assembled a brand-new AMD64 workstation. The only decision that remains is whether to install a 64-bit Linux distribution, or stick with comfortable, tried-and-true IA-32. If you are seeking an easy answer to that question, I can't help you. Running 64-bit Linux has its pros and cons. Unfortunately, a lot of the cons are out of your hands -- but they're not really Linux's fault, either.

Open source stacks move into critical operations

Filed under
Interviews

The open source stack is moving to the core of data centers -- to a place where it's responsible for handling critical parts of business operations. Support for these applications is paramount for IT departments and absolutely essential to the enterprises that use them, according to a report from The 451 Group, based in New York.

Something Out of Nothing - Ubuntu Dapper Drake (6.06 LTS) on a Packard Bell iMedia 1307

Filed under
Ubuntu

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a set of desktop computers in a more wretched state than those I saw this morning. It was going to be something of a miracle if they started up; however they did. Still, the result was not particularly pleasing. I decided to install and see if Linux could bring something as wretched as this back to life.

Which way, open-sourcers?

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this year, I wrote that the General Public License version 3 (GPLv3) would bring the open-source and free-software communities to a critical juncture. While some scoffed, the decision of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) to discount the concerns of commercial open-sourcers with the latest draft of GPLv3 threatens to split the community and slow the growth of free/libre/open-source software (FLOSS).

Educational Institutions Adopt Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat announced the growing adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Network solutions by several higher education institutions, including Wake Forest University, the University of Washington and Vanderbilt University.

Secure your Wi-Fi traffic using FOSS utilities

Filed under
HowTos

A recent Slashdot item on Wi-Fi security was a timely reminder of the weaknesses of default Wi-Fi encryption protocols, and the dangers of using unencrypted, public Wi-Fi connections. Fortunately, you can use FOSS utilities to securely tunnel your Wi-Fi connection sessions and protect your Web and email traffic.

EU warns Microsoft against tying security upgrades in Vista system

Filed under
Microsoft

European Commission on Tuesday warned US- computer giant Microsoft against bundling security upgrades into its new Windows Vista operating system.

Why is Gnome So Ugly?

Filed under
Software

Ok, so Gnome 2.16 came out a while ago. There are lots of new features. Yay for the foot. Now default Gnome is ass-ugly. Thank God the Ubuntu folks made their own theme, otherwise no one would be using Gnome at all. I'll swear by that.

Holoracer 3 Announced

Filed under
Gaming

Holoracer 3 has just been announced over at Happy Penguin. It aims to be an incredibly fast "twitch" racer with 3D psychodelic graphics and networked play. They've already got a finished release for you to sample on SourceForge. (HoloRacer@Sourceforge)

Why Desktop Linux Will Not Take off, and Why You Don't Want It to

Filed under
Linux

You must remember the period where various electronic devices, from phones to radios, were available in transparent cases. You may have found them utterly cool. Yet the simple fact that you can't find these things on the shelves anymore (except for do-it-yourself PC cases) means the crowd doesn't find them nearly that cool. While you may not see the link yet, this is exactly why the Linux desktop will never be popular.

Tip of the Trade: Bastille Linux

Filed under
Software

Every wise old system and network administrator knows that security is a multilayer process. You have your firewalls and other border security, perhaps some internal network segmentation, and application and operating system security. However, locking down the operating system is probably the most crucial link in this chain. An excellent utility to help you probe, assess, and harden your Linux system is Bastille Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Headlines

  • LHS Episode #302: The End of Kenwood

    Welcome to Episode 302 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short topic episode, the hosts discuss the potential end of Kenwood in the amateur radio market, emcom in Montucky, Storm Area 51, HF on satellites, a huge update for PulseAudio, the Linux 5.3 kernel and much more. Thank you for listening and have a fantastic week.

  • 09/19/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Fresh init system controversy at the Debian project, a more scalable Samba, and a big release for LLVM. Plus GitHub's latest security steps and a new version of OBS Studio.

Android Leftovers

When Diverse Network ASICs Meet A Unifying Operating System

And it has also been a decade since switch upstart Arista Networks launched its Extensible Operating System, or EOS, which is derived from Linux. [...] The cross-platform nature of ArcOS, coupled with its ability to run in any function on the network, could turn out to be the key differentiator. A lot of these other NOSes were point solutions that could only be deployed in certain parts of the network, and that just creates animosity with the incumbent vendors that dominate the rest of the networking stack. Given the mission-critical nature of networking in the modern datacenter, it costs a great deal to qualify a new network operating system, and it can take a lot of time. If ArcOS can run across more platforms, qualify faster, and do more jobs in the network, then, says Garg, it has a good chance of shaking up switching and routing. “That totally changes the business conversation and the TCO advantages that we can bring to a customer across the entirety of their network.” Read more

Server: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenStack, and Red Hat's Ansible

  • 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes/OpenShift presented by Burr Sutter

    Burr Sutter gave a terrific talk in India in July, where he laid out the terms, systems and processes needed to setup Kubernetes for developers. This is an introductory presentation, which may be useful for your larger community of Kubernetes users once you’ve already setup User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI) in Red Hat OpenShift for them, though it does go into the deeper details of actually running the a cluster. To follow along, Burr created an accompanying GitHub repository, so you too can learn how to setup an awesome Kubernetes cluster in just 9 steps.

  • Weaveworks Named a Top Kubernetes Contributor

    But anyone who knows the history of Weaveworks might not be too surprised by this. Weaveworks has been a major champion of Kubernetes since the very beginning. It might not be too much of a coincidence that Weaveworks was incorporated only a few weeks after Kubernetes was open sourced, five years ago. In addition to this, the very first elected chair of the CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee, responsible for technical leadership to the Cloud Native Foundation was also headed up by our CEO, Alexis Richardson(@monadic) (soon to be replaced by the awesome Liz Rice (@lizrice) of Aqua Security).

  • Improving trust in the cloud with OpenStack and AMD SEV

    This post contains an exciting announcement, but first I need to provide some context! Ever heard that joke “the cloud is just someone else’s computer”? Of course it’s a gross over-simplification, but there’s more than a grain of truth in it. And that raises the question: if your applications are running in someone else’s data-centre, how can you trust that they’re not being snooped upon, or worse, invasively tampered with?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Enhances Infrastructure Security and Cloud-Native Integration Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack community’s "Stein" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 adds performance and cloud security enhancements and expands the platform’s ecosystem of supported hardware, helping IT organizations to more quickly and more securely support demanding production workloads. Given the role of Linux as the foundation for hybrid cloud, customers can also benefit from a more secure, flexible and intelligent Linux operating system underpinning their private cloud deployments with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

  • Red Hat Ansible Automation Accelerates Past Major Adoption Milestone, Now Manages More Than Four Million Customer Systems Worldwide

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that more than four million customer systems worldwide are now automated by Red Hat Ansible Automation. Customers, including Energy Market Company, Microsoft, Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Surescripts all use Red Hat Ansible Automation to automate and orchestrate their IT operations, helping to expand automation across IT stacks. According to a blog post by Chris Gardner with Forrester Research, who was the author of The Forrester Wave™: Infrastructure Automation Platforms, Q3 2019, "Infrastructure automation isn’t just on-premises or the cloud. It’s at the edge and everywhere in between."1 Since its launch in 2013, Red Hat Ansible Automation has provided a single tool to help organizations automate across IT operations and development, including infrastructure, networks, cloud, security and beyond.