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Monday, 19 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Breeds Boeing's New Jets

Filed under
Linux

Hawker de Havilland, the local arm of aircraft engineering giant Boeing, will retire its 30-year-old VAX system in favour of its new Linux-based environment in the manufacture of parts for the company's next-generation 787 jets.

OSDL taps director for Linux User Advisory Council

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Development Labs appointed Colin Hope-Murray as its Linux User Advisory Council director for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Linux looms large on world’s software horizon

Filed under
Linux

Linux vs. Microsoft — is this a legitimate contest? Will Microsoft remain a mighty empire forever? It’s not easy to predict the future of software development, but I am certain that the Linux phenomenon is a bright spot on the radar screen.

New book helps users master Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

A new book aimed at both new and experienced users of Ubuntu Linux is due out in August. The Official Ubuntu Book, from Prentice Hall ($34.99), covers all the important facets of the popular new Linux distribution, and features a foreword by Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth.

Updating and installing software in Ubuntu (Linux.com training videos)

Filed under
Ubuntu

The first video in this pair shows you how to update all the software in your Ubuntu GNU/Linux installation in a single, big gulp. The second video shows you how easy it is to install and remove software with the Synaptic Package Manager.

Google joins OpenDocument group

Filed under
Google

Google has joined a group that is promoting an OpenDocument Format standard that allows people to open documents regardless of the application they were created in.

Create mosaic movies with Perl, ImageMagick, and MPlayer

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HowTos

Use Perl, ImageMagick, and MPlayer to create mosaic movies composed of frames from other movies. Zoom out from the center of a large text-overlay image made up of sequential frames of existing movies. Disassemble, composite, and encode your own mosaic-type movies for special promotional or home video events.

Overhauled CUPS: Improved Unix Printing

Filed under
Software

CUPS (Common Unix Printing System) version 1.2 was released last month, bursting with over 90 fabulous new features and improvements. Today we'll take a look at them and decide how fabulous they really are.

Net Neutrality: A Threat to Operating Systems

Filed under
Misc

Is net neutrality a threat to the birth of viable online operating systems? Some believe so, while others feel that the neutrality of the Internet is not even in any sort of danger.

Development Release: SUSE Linux 10.2 Alpha 2

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger has announced the release of the second alpha build of SUSE Linux 10.2, together with the decision to rename SUSE Linux to openSUSE.

SLES 10: Not Your Father's Suse

Filed under
SUSE

Aside from the obvious changes wrought from the switch from KDE to Gnome, the default desktop layout has changed completely in SLES 10. Gone is the throat-lozenge-with-a-red-N applications menu, along with nearly all of SLES 9's taskbar clutter.

Book review: Understanding Open Source and Free Software Licensing

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Reviews

When you develop an open source work or use an open source work, it is important that you understand the license. A well written license protects both you and the user. According to the information found on the O’Reilly website, “Andrew M. St. Laurent is an experienced lawyer with a long-time interest in intellectual property, particularly software licensing”. Rest assured, after reading this book you will have a new appreciation for those who work daily with licensing issues.

Linux pinfo

Filed under
HowTos

I have never liked Linux "info". The reason is simple enough: I don't like Emacs, and "info" uses an emacs style interface. Pinfo displays the same "info" files, but is more lynx like; up and down arrows move you from clickable link to clickable link, right arrow invokes a link, left arrow returns you to the previous page.

Red Hat evolves with a techie camp

Filed under
Linux

Ethan Boyette has known for some time that he wanted be a computer engineer. But when it came to a possible employer, Red Hat was never on the list. That is, until this week.

Also: Red Hat Looks To Symposium To Spread The Gospel

Accessing network resources in a mixed environment

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HowTos

The first thing that comes to most sysadmins' minds when they hear about file and print services in mixed Windows and Linux environments is probably Samba, but you can also make a rock-solid system for sharing resources via NFS on the *nix platform and DiskShare on Windows.

Kubuntu Clash: Should I stay or should I go?

Over the past month or so I have been dipping my big toe into the Linux pool, just testing the waters. The reason for a move to Linux isn't one based on the love of open source, free choice or free software, the reason is far more capital, the devil drives when the bills need paying, work. Anyway, over the past weeks of swimming with Linux I've had less sleep than I have in a long long while, I've been more frustrated, argumentative, pounding the keyboard and flicking the finger(s) at the screen. Is this the norm?

n/a

Firefox 2.0 Beta 1 Is No Slam-Dunk

Filed under
Moz/FF
Reviews

Review: eWEEK Labs' tests show that Version 2.0 of the browser will be a worthy upgrade, but competitors—including Internet Explorer 7—are inching ahead.

Debian server hacked

Filed under
Security

"Early this morning we discovered that someone had managed to compromise gluck.debian.org," Debian developer James Troup wrote in an e-mail to the Debian community shortly before 4am AEST.

Windows power user tries Xandros

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I recently performed an experiment at the request of my husband, GeekTimeLinux Dave. He was preparing to review the new Xandros distribution, which has been described as the perfect distribution for a Windows user trying to make the switch to Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora and Red Hat: New F30 Builds, Flock Report, Servers and Package Management Domain Model

  • Ben Williams: F30-20190818 updated isos released.

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated F30-20190816 Live ISOs, carrying the 5.2.8-200 kernel. This set of updated isos will save considerable amounts of updates after install. ((for new installs.)(New installs of Workstation have 1.2GB of updates)). A huge thank you goes out to irc nicks dowdle, satellite,Southern-Gentlem for testing these iso.

  • Flock to Fedora 2019 Conference report

    Last week I attended “Flock to Fedora” conference in Budapest, Hungary. It was a Fedora contributors conference where I met some developers, project leaders, GSoC interns. Below is a brief report of my attendance.

  • What salary can a sysadmin expect to earn?

    The path to reliable salary data sometimes is sometimes paved with frustration. That’s because the honest answer to a reasonable question—what should I be paid for this job?—is usually: "It depends." Location, experience, skill set, industry, and other factors all impact someone’s actual compensation. For example, there’s rarely a single, agreed-upon salary for a particular job title or role. All of the above applies to system administrators. It’s a common, long-established IT job that spans many industries, company sizes, and other variables. While sysadmins may share some common fundamentals, it’s certainly not a one-size-fits-all position, and it’s all the truer as some sysadmin roles evolve to take on cloud, DevOps, and other responsibilities. What salary can you expect to earn as a sysadmin? Yeah, it depends. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t get a clear picture of what sysadmin compensation looks like, including specific numbers. This is information worth having handy if you’re a sysadmin on the job market or seeking a promotion. Let’s start with some good news from a compensation standpoint. Sysadmins—like other IT pros these days—are in demand. "In today’s business environment, companies are innovating and moving faster than ever before, and they need systems that can keep up with the pace of their projects and communications, as well as help everything run smoothly," says Robert Sutton, district president for the recruiting firm Robert Half Technology. "That’s why systems administrators are among the IT professionals who can expect to see a growing salary over the next year or so."

  • Run Mixed IT Efficiently, The Adient – SUSE Way.

    When you have multiple distributions, such as Red Hat and SUSE, you can reduce administration complexity and save administration time and resources with a common management tool. Adient had applications running on both SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Adient deployed SUSE Manager to manage their Mixed IT environment involving both distributions.

  • Package Management Domain Model

    When I wrote this model, we were trying to unify a few different sorts of packages. Coming from SpaceWalk, part of the team was used to wokring on RPMS with the RPM Database for storage, and Yum as the mechanism for fetching them. The other part of the team was coming from the JBoss side, working with JAR, WAR, EAR and associated files, and the Ivy or Maven building and fetching the files. We were working within the context of the Red Hat Network (as it was then called) for delivering content to subscribers. Thus, we had the concept of Errata, Channels, and Entitlements which are somewhat different from what other organizations call these things, but the concepts should be general enough to cover a range of systems. There are many gaps in this diagram. It does not discuss the building of packages, nor the relationship between source and binary packages. It also does not provide a way to distinguish between the package storage system and the package fetch mechanism. But the bones are solid. I’ve used this diagram for a few years, and it is useful.

Review: AcademiX GNU/Linux 2.2

What sets AcademiX apart from other distributions is the EDU software manager. This package manager provides curated lists of educational software, which are grouped by subject and by age range. This package manager makes finding educational software really easy. There is software for astronomy, biology, geography, foreign languages, and many other subjects. While there are gaps in the availability of applications covering various subjects, that is a gap in the broader open source application ecosystem, not something specific to AcademiX. While some of the rough edges I noted with the installation process and the desktop customization make me a hesitant to recommend AcademiX to new Linux users, Educational Technology professionals should perhaps try out AcademiX just to use the EDU package manager to explore various open source applications. While installing and updating software was easy and basically the same experience as any other modern, Debian-based distribution, the fact that some of the packages come from servers in Romania means that some package downloads can be much slower than downloading from the world-wide network of Debian mirrors. For individual packages and small collections of packages this is not too noticeable, but it is still an issue. The frustrating part is the fact that the speeds are not consistent. Sometimes I was downloading at only 40kbps, but other times it was much faster. I experienced the same issue when trying to download the ISO. One download took about 20 minutes for the 1.7GB image but some other attempts took 4 hours. Final thoughts AcademiX GNU/Linux is an interesting distribution, but it has some rough edges that need to be cleaned up. Honestly, I really, really wanted to like this distribution (good distributions aimed at the educational market are always needed), but found it to be merely okay. AcademiX has a lot of potential, but it is just not there yet. DebianEdu/Skolelinux is far more polished while serving almost the exact same niche. However, if the AcademiX team cleans up some of the issues I noted above, especially the installer issues, I think future versions of AcademiX might turn out to be worthwhile. The EDU software installer is well organized and aids in discovering educational software, so that is one solid advantage AcademiX offers, but overall the distribution needs more work and polish before I could move it from "this distribution is okay" to "you should give this distribution a try". Read more

Security: ECB, Bluetooth and AppArmor Crash Course

  • ECB server hacked – Data disclosure of the European Central Bank – Bank hacks from Mexico to Bangladesh

    The Europeans probably do not even know about „what is going on“ and according to ex finance minister of Greece – finance ministers do not have a lot to say in the ECB – the IMF has – there are no recordings of the meetings of „The Eurogroup“ – so transparency over decision making processes is rather bad. After all just like the (more or less ideal) „big brother“ the FED it is not under direct democratic influence – does what it wants – every word the FED CEO says is analyzed and influences financial market decisions. „One of the sites of the European Central Bank (ECB) has been hacked. The attackers gained access to sensitive users ‚ information, however, the internal system of the Bank has not been compromised.

  • Specification vulnerability in devices that speak Bluetooth is addressed

    The discovery of a flaw in Bluetooth specification that could enable an attack to spy on your information made news this week; the attacker could be able to weaken the encryption of Bluetooth devices and snoop on communications or send falsified ones to take over a device, said The Verge.

  • FrOSCon 2019 - openSUSE booth & AppArmor Crash Course

    Last weekend, I was at FrOSCon - a great Open Source conference in Sankt Augustin, Germany. We (Sarah, Marcel and I) ran the openSUSE booth, answered lots of questions about openSUSE and gave the visitors some goodies - serious and funny (hi OBS team!) stickers, openSUSE hats, backpacks and magazines featuring openSUSE Leap. We also had a big plush geeko, but instead of doing a boring raffle, we played openSUSE Jeopardy where the candidates had to ask the right questions about Linux and openSUSE for the answers I provided.

Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria Xfce review - Nice but somewhat crude

Overall, Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria Xfce is a decent distro. It has lots of good and unique points. Network, media and phone support is good. You get a colorful repertoire of high-quality programs, the performance and battery life are excellent, and the desktop is fairly pretty. The system was also quite robust and stable. But then, there were issues - including inconsistent behavior compared to the Plasma crop. The installation can be a bit friendlier (as Plasma one does). The package management remains the Achilles' Heel of this distro. Having too many frontends is confusing, and none of them do a great job. The messages on dependencies, the need for AUR (if you want fancy stuff), and such all create unnecessary confusing. There were also tons of visual papercuts, and I struggled getting things in order. All in all, Manjaro is getting better all the time, but it is still too geeky for the common person, as it breaks the fourth wall of nerdiness too often. 7/10, and I hope it can sort itself out and continue to deliver the unique, fun stuff that gets sidelined by the rough edges. Read more